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RI Community Service and Educational Organizations Celebrate Black History Month

As Black History Month draws to a close, community service and education organizations in Providence and Rhode Island have held several events to celebrate and continue advocacy efforts for the Black community.

The Herald spoke to five organizations about how they commemorated the month.

Providence Children’s Museum

The Providence Children’s Museum presents an annual play “MLK: Amazing Grace,” which took place this year on February 19. The piece tells the story of Martin Luther King, Jr. and highlights the civil rights movement in a way that focuses on children, said Caroline Payson, the museum’s executive director.

“It starts from the perspective of a little boy trying to make sense of justice and injustice as he sees it,” Payson said. “Our hope for this piece is that they see themselves, regardless of background, as children who can ask questions about things in the world that might trouble them.”

The museum is also offering recorded books each week with its partnership with the Rhode Island Black Storytellers Association this month, Payson said.

“I want the kids’ experience at the museum to be what they need,” Payson said, whether it’s running up the ramp, exploring the laser cutters and 3D printers in the studio. innovation or to discover the story of a Dominican. immigrant through the reconstruction of the Fefa market.

The museum’s programming and exhibitions have been impacted by the pandemic. According to Payson, the museum had about 180,000 to 190,000 patrons a year before COVID, but currently sees 70 to 75 percent fewer visitors.

The day of the “Amazing Grace” play saw 725 visitors, the most on a single day since 2019, Payson said, but the museum would see double that before the pandemic hit. As a nonprofit that doesn’t have a large endowment, the museum is slowly starting to return to more physical exhibits and hopes visitor numbers will recover.

Redwood Library and the Athenaeum

Redwood Library and the Athenaeum in Newport, RI hosted a series of virtual Black History lectures in honor of the month, said Executive Director Benedict Leca, PhD’04. These included lectures by Rhode Island Civic Chorale & Orchestra Conductor Edward Markward, Wellesley College History Professor Brenna Wynn Greer, RISD Assistant Professor Christopher Roberts, and Stages of Freedom co-founders Ray Rickman and Robb Dimmick. .

The Redwood also opened an art installation Feb. 16 that features a sculpture by contemporary artist Nari Ward, Leca said. Ward redesigns large case clocks with West African wood carvings, and the piece is on permanent display in the library.

For both libraries, the pandemic has brought both downsides and upsides. Although unable to host in-person presentations, libraries quickly pivoted in August 2020 to using Crowdcast for online programming. They also created a YouTube channel and revamped their website. The Redwood also hosts an annual gospel choir concert with singers from two black churches in Newport, which was canceled last year for the safety of performers and audiences.

The Redwood and Athenaeum are both partially reopened, with reduced hours from the pre-pandemic schedule, but accommodations can be made for researchers who need access to equipment.

When it comes to Black History Month and the work of the library, “you celebrate accomplishments and you retain a certain element of criticality because the struggle isn’t over,” Leca said.

Leca added that she hopes visitors will make an effort to understand “the richness and intricacies” of the library’s collections.

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“You want to consider your sources…and weigh the material you critically absorb,” she said.

Providence Community Library

On February 24, Rochambeau Library Clerk Khamry Varfley led a Women in Business panel to educate attendees on the importance of supporting Black-owned businesses and giving entrepreneurs a platform to share advice and stories. COVID-19 has disproportionately affected Black-owned businesses. Supporting these businesses encourages other entrepreneurs, which helps diversify the economy, Varfley.

“I really want people to have a better idea of ​​how small businesses and black businesses work,” she said.

Systems Coordinator Dhana Whiteing runs the monthly Conversations Book Club, which features books written by people of color and marginalized groups. On March 16, the Mount Pleasant Library will host a Black Photographers Showcase featuring four local black photographers, one of whom volunteered at the library as a child, according to Whiteing.

“There just aren’t enough days (in Black History Month), but we’re doing our best,” she added.

Other events at the library include an annual jazz concert in April or May, a market scheduled for April 30, recurring author talks, and the Seed Program, which “highlights the leadership of farmers and educators of BIPOC,” according to the library’s website. The outdoor-focused market is designed to showcase small businesses and serve as a networking opportunity, said Varfley, who is also a small business owner.

It is also hoped that the increased number of events this year will attract more visitors and support for events in the future, and Patrons of Varfley and Whiteing hope to take advantage of the programming and resources available.

“Come to your local library,” Whiteing said. “It’s one of the few free places.”

Newport Historical Society

The Newport Historical Society strives to highlight archival research, such as with the “Know Your History” webpage. The webpage is a compilation of resources and blog posts that includes a collection of BIPOC history and heritage in Rhode Island. There was also a “Creative Survival” walking tour on February 20, which highlighted the history of POC in Newport.

“There’s no history without black history, so if we’re not telling it year-round, we’re deliberately excluding a central piece of our local history,” chief executive Ruth Taylor said. The band is also interested in trying “to highlight and uncover authentic POC voices from the past,” according to Taylor.

A group of scholars are currently working remotely to sift through archival documents and incorporate references to people of color from history into a database. According to Taylor, the goal is to construct biographies by cross-referencing in order to “speak more fully of the authentic experience of people in early Newport”.

“It’s an effort, but it pays off,” she said.

The pandemic has displaced some of the work being done by the NHS as more resources have been uploaded to the website. Online events and programs have also helped reach a wider audience, Taylor said, as it hosts around 200,000 people a year.

“I really hope the world starts to recognize that history isn’t a purely academic pursuit… understanding history, how we got here, can be hugely helpful in understanding where we’re going from here. ‘here, how we fix things,’ she said. . “History is like this gigantic database of human behavior, and why would we ignore that?”

Freedom Steps

Ray Rickman and Robb Dimmick, co-founders of Stages of Freedom, a heritage museum in Providence, hosted a virtual event with Redwood Library and the Athenaeum on “Disappearing Ink,” a newly released bibliography of writings by and about African Americans Who Reviews the Black Press. “We want to bring this story to white and black people here in Providence and inspire young people who are interested in journalism to consider starting their own newspaper,” Dimmick said.

Rickman and Dimmick also bonded with Amiri Nash ’24, who founded The Black Star Journal, The Herald previously reported. The first issue of the new publication is expected to be released on Friday.

Rickman and Dimmick spoke in five one-minute segments for public radio Martha’s Vineyard, with each episode spotlighting a prominent African American in Rhode Island. Rickman has also given two talks — one at Middlebridge School in Narragansett and the other at Barrington Congregational Church — on the Stages of Freedom’s Swim Empowerment program for black youth.

“Our theme is to really bring to the fore significant African Americans in Rhode Island and their contributions to shaping culture and discourse,” Dimmick said. The two email 12,000 people daily, highlighting events, resources and information about the pandemic. They are also providing 1,000 COVID test kits per week to the local community. Stages of Freedom is also continuing to work on a new museum, which is expected to open later this year.

Stages of Freedom has compiled the “On the Road to Freedom” database, a virtual guide to sites associated with black history in Rhode Island. The organization’s website features further information and updates on programs and events.

“What we really hope is that people see the breadth, richness and depth of African American history in Rhode Island, not limited to 28 or 29 days a year, but throughout the year,” Dimmick said. “The bottom line is recognizing that black history is a shared history.”

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History organization

California State Parks will vote to rename part of Lake Folsom in an effort to inclusively acknowledge Black Gold Rush history

California State Parks is considering a new name for part of the Folsom Lake State Recreation Area called Negro Bar, after some residents said it had harmed them for decades. The potential change has sparked debate about how black history is preserved in California, even acknowledging that history isn’t always easy.

Many people have argued that while the word is a racial slur today, it didn’t always have that meaning. Michael Harris, a local black historian, said he strongly believes the discussion around the name change distracts from the larger conversation about how to remember and honor the contributions of black miners to the region.

“If we’re going to say the n-word and put a 21st-century context to it, it’s disrespectful, nobody’s going to call us Negro today, but historically that’s what we were,” said Harris, who was a strong supporter of keeping the name.

“Given the contextual nature of the period in question, 1840-1875, that’s what it is,” Harris said.

He is wary of changing the name to make some people more comfortable with the story.

“The idea of ​​focusing on the name is intentionally disrespectful, it presupposes derogatory treatment, and it certainly denies one of the contributions of people of African descent in the era of the gold rush.”

This part of Lake Folsom lies along a bend in the American River. It’s a popular launch site for paddleboarders and kayakers, and visitors can see the site where African-American miners first found gold as they made their way to the river’s edge. According to State Parks, the term Negro Bar was first documented in an 1850 newspaper article which noted that black miners had discovered gold at this site.

But in recent years, the name has become controversial. In 2018, a black woman, Phaedra Jones, was driving to deliver food to The Cliff House of Folsom when she passed the sign for Negro Bar. She was immediately disturbed and eventually created a petition to demand that state parks be renamed.

Since then, the scrutiny around the name of the entry has increased. In 2020, a coalition of Folsom residents came together to lobby for the name change.

Jenn Johnson is black and lives in town. She grew up in Folsom and is part of the C3 coalition which is pushing for change. She said that while living in the predominantly white town, she always felt uncomfortable with the name Negro Bar and therefore avoids going there.

“I’m not going to show up and go to a place called Negro Bar where all the other people are white-skinned using that term,” Johnson said. “That’s not an acceptable term to use, so why are we using it as a state park name?”

Some, like Sacramento NAACP President Betty Williams, have noted that the word “nigger” had a different meaning when it was originally given to mark this historic spot to remember the contributions of black miners.

“During that time, the word Negro was seen as a professional and a word that described professional and hard-working African Americans, Black African Americans,” Williams said.

But Williams also acknowledged that the words change meaning over time. She added that her organization had debated for years whether to push State Parks to change its name and was divided in its opinions. In the end, she says, they decided to leave it to the community.

“Now here we are in 2022, and you have a different generation, so you go from black to black to African American, and some people have gone back to black,” Williams said. “So the debate is whether we are basing it on what they felt at the time, or are we conforming to today’s times where the use of the word nigger to identify a historical area n not seen as something positive?

Now State Parks has said it will consider a name change. The California State Park Commission will address the issue in a vote in June.

Alexandra Stehl, assistant director of strategic planning and recreation services for state parks, said the discussion to rename the area is part of a larger effort to reconsider the history of state parks. .

“We build on efforts to support equity and inclusion, and this area has been requested in the past to be renamed,” Stehl said. “State Parks has agreed that renaming this area is a priority.”

Stehl said some options for a new name include Black Miners Bar, Black Freedom Bar, African American Bar and Historic Negro Bar, among others.

She adds that apart from a name change, the department will also embark on an educational campaign to help visitors fully understand the history of the park and its importance to the California Gold Rush.

“We try to keep this historic value very high, but at the same time we want to make sure we’re looking for a name that’s inclusive and doesn’t create barriers for people who want to enjoy the park,” Stehl said.

Folsom resident Jenn Johnson said she hoped a new name would be considered.

“If we try to move forward and educate ourselves and be better, we want to love our future generations, and if people like me, young people in their twenties, say and shout from the top of their hills, ‘That word has been used in this community to hurt me,’ the least we can do is bow to that and make them feel more welcome,” Johnson said. “And hopefully I can going to the park in the future without feeling completely sick because of that name.”

State Parks said renaming a park — the name of which might be considered offensive in modern times — is nothing new. They mentioned Su-meg State Park as a recent example. The park was renamed to honor the indigenous people who lived there, replacing one that honored a man who colonized the area.

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Non profit living

Hometown Alaska: Teens talk coping with COVID


Young people trying to stay connected during the Covid pandemic. Wikimedia Commons image by SGerbic,

In this week’s Hometown Alaska, teenagers in Anchorage describe how they suffered, endured and even grew while living under the Covid pandemic. We’ll hear from teens from Alaska Teen Media Institute (ATMI), Covenant House, and MHATS, which stands for Mental Health Advocacy Through Storytelling, a nonprofit organization founded and run by students in Anchorage.

ATMI students have started creating a series called “Podcast in Place, Youth Stories from Quarantine” recorded at home due to COVID constraints. Topics include individual student reactions to school closures and uncertainty, interviews with Alaska’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Anne Zink, and a multi-generational family interview (grandparents, their daughter and their grandchildren) on immunization information and engagement management.

Two Covenant House students talk about the emotional impact of isolation and job loss due to restaurant closures during the pandemic.

The MHATS teens describe their commitment to better mental health education for young people in school, and their own ups and downs throughout the pandemic.

Either way, these students were changed by the experience of living through Covid. They also represent an age group, according to the CDC, that has the lowest rate of vaccination and booster compliance.

This program has been pre-recorded for scheduling purposes, so hosts will not take your calls during the program. However, we still want to hear from you. Please call our 24/7 registered line (550-8480) and tell us about your own experience. Have you hesitated to get vaccinated or to be vaccinated? What helped you overcome this hesitation?

This program is part of Alaska Public Media’s “Talk to Your Neighbor” project, providing trusted voices and accurate information to listeners about Covid vaccination. APM has partnered with 20 community groups to help overcome vaccine hesitancy.

HOSTS: Kathleen McCoy and ATMI’s Daisy Carter

GUESTS:

  • Caelan Vossa.k.a PeanutAlliance House
  • Grace MargesonAlliance House
  • Abby LauferMHATS
  • Marshall ivyMHATS
  • Tara SkidmoreMHATS
  • daisy carterATMI and Alaska Public Media, co-host and guest

CONNECTIONS:

TO PARTICIPATE:

  • Today’s program has been pre-recorded so hosts cannot take live calls. However, we still want to hear from you. Dial 550-8480 and leave a recorded message, 24/7.
  • Send E-mail to [email protected] before, during or after the live broadcast.
  • post your comment or question below (comments can be read on-air).
  • The pre-recorded show air: Monday February 21, 2022 at 10 a.m.
  • RE-AIR: Monday February 21, 2022 at 8 p.m.
  • PODCAST: Available on this page after the program.
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International headquarters

Switzerland approves tobacco ad ban

ZURICH — Glamorous cigarette ads will soon be a thing of the past in Switzerland, after voters overwhelmingly approved legislation on Sunday banning tobacco companies from displaying them in public spaces.

Health advocates said the legislation, which was approved in a referendum, was an important step towards tightening the country’s regulations on loose tobacco.

“Many organizations have mobilized and advocated for a solution that prioritizes the protection of young people,” said Flavia Wasserfallen, member of the Swiss National Council and supporter of the initiative.

In much of the West, tobacco adverts have long fallen out of favor, but they have survived in this Alpine nation, with displays of cigarettes and e-cigarettes appearing on billboards, in cinemas and at events like music festivals.

But voters made it clear on Sunday that they were no longer interested in seeing them, and despite strong opposition from the tobacco industry and government, the tougher regulations were approved by 56.6% of voters and won received strong support from the French and Italians in the country. -languages, despite having the highest smoking rates in the country.

Steps have been taken in recent years to try to introduce stricter regulations on tobacco-related products in Switzerland. In 2015, the Federal Council, the country’s executive branch, proposed a Tobacco Products Act that would ban the sale of tobacco and related products to minors and restrict advertising.

Parliament eventually approved a watered down version of the bill, which banned the sale of tobacco to those under 18 but allowed advertising to continue almost unhindered.

The most recent initiative was launched by a group of more than 40 health organizations that formed in response to weakening tobacco laws. The new Tobacco Products Act, which includes the advertising provisions that voters approved on Sunday, is expected to come into force in 2023.

“The majority of our country has decided to correct Parliament’s decision on the Tobacco Products Act,” said Hans Stöckli, chairman of the committee behind the initiative, on Sunday. Mr Stöckli described the result as “a historic step” and a “necessary step” towards better tobacco regulation.

Opponents of the measure called the tighter restrictions extreme. And while they agreed tobacco should be age-restricted, they said the new rules amounted to a de facto ban on a legal product because children could potentially be exposed to n anywhere.

Switzerland has a long-standing close relationship with the tobacco industry. Philip Morris and Japan Tobacco International have their international headquarters in the country, and British American Tobacco also has a strong presence.

The industry employs approximately 4,500 people in Switzerland, according to the government, including in the production of high-tar cigarettes which are illegal to produce or sell in the European Union. Cigarettes rank with chocolate and cheese among the main exports.

Even after the new rules come into effect, Switzerland will continue to have more liberal tobacco regulations than many other countries. Moreover, it will still not meet all the conditions required to ratify the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, an international response to the fight against tobacco. tobacco epidemicdespite signing in 2004. The United States has not ratified the convention either.

Alain Berset, Swiss vice-president, who is also the country’s health minister, had opposed the initiative before the vote. But at a press conference on Sunday, he acknowledged that Swiss voters had spoken and said the government would move forward with the new regulations.

“The Federal Council will now tackle the implementation of the initiative,” Berset said.

The Tobacco Products Act was not the only issue of the ballot on Sunday. In a move people feared had cut Switzerland off from global medical progress, voters rejected a proposal to ban all human and animal experiments in the country.

Voters also decided against giving Swiss media more financial support, rejecting a government proposal to extend subsidies to online media as well as regional radio and TV stations.

A government-approved amendment to the federal stamp duty law that would have made it cheaper for businesses to raise new capital was also rejected, with opponents saying it would have mainly benefited big business.

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History organization

Opinion: Florida’s ‘don’t say gay’ bill is cruel and dangerous

As leaders of two LGBTQ organizations, we have been amazed at the progress we have made over the past decade. But it’s also clear that the increased visibility of our community has caused a backlash. According to the American Civil Liberties Union, more than 100 anti-LGBTQ bills, the majority of which target transgender and non-binary youth, are currently pending in state legislatures across the country.
One of the most extreme examples is a bill in Florida known as the “Don’t Say Gay” bill. It states that school districts “may not encourage discussion of sexual orientation or gender identity in the elementary grades or in a manner that is not appropriate for the age or development of students.” The language, which is vague and could apply to K-12 classrooms across Florida, could be used to prohibit open discussions about LGBTQ people and issues.
If passed, it would effectively erase entire chapters of history, literature and critical health information from schools – and silence LGBTQ students and those with LGBTQ parents or family members. . It’s just one of many divisive and dehumanizing bills in Florida that use LGBTQ youth as political pawns to limit conversations about gender and sexual identity.
Let’s be clear: the Don’t Say Gay Bill will do real and lasting harm. All students should learn about the significant contributions of the LGBTQ community to United States history and culture. Landmark events, ranging from the Stonewall riots to Supreme Court rulings in cases such as Obergefell v. Hodges and Bostock v. Clayton County, should be included in any comprehensive lesson plan on modern history and the civil rights movements.

LGBTQ students deserve to see their own history and experiences reflected in their education, just like their peers. Learning about LGBTQ civil rights heroes like Marsha P. Johnson, Harvey Milk, and Bayard Rustin can inspire LGBTQ students, make them proud of who they are, and help them envision a better future.

Research from the Trevor Project found that LGBTQ students who learned about LGBTQ issues or people in the classroom at school were 23% less likely to attempt suicide in the past year. Conversely, when LGBTQ topics are taboo, this stigma is often internalized and can negatively impact a student’s mental health and self-esteem.
Learning about the LGBTQ community can also foster peer acceptance and contribute to a positive school climate, which is still much needed. Tragically, a majority of LGBTQ youth in middle school and high school said they had been bullied in person or electronically in the past year — and those who did were three times more likely to attempt to commit suicide.
And given that only 1 in 3 young LGBTQ people find their home to be LGBTQ, it is all the more important to ensure that schools – the place where young people spend a significant part of their waking hours – are as welcoming as possible.
At a time when 42% of LGBTQ youth, including more than half of transgender and non-binary youth, have seriously considered attempting suicide in the past year, according to a national survey conducted by The Trevor Project, fostering an environment Affirmative schooling is more critical than ever. That’s why lawmakers should expand support systems for LGBTQ students and encourage teachers to create safe and inclusive learning environments, without fueling stigma and shame.

Scaring LGBTQ students from discussing their identity, community or family at school is as cruel as it is dangerous.

If you or someone you know needs help or support, The Trevor Project’s trained crisis counselors are available 24/7 at 1-866-488-7386, via chat at TheTrevorProject.org/Get-Helpor by texting START to 678678.
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Non profit living

Recognizing Local Charities for Nonprofit Appreciation Week | bloginfo(‘name’); ?>

February 10, 2022 0 comments

By Paula Brown, Local Journalism Initiative reporter

A small group of Dufferin County organizations will recognize the work of local nonprofits next week as part of a campaign for the first-ever Nonprofit Appreciation Week (February 14-February 20) .

In December 2021, the province passed Bill 9 to create Nonprofit Appreciation Week, a motion that received unanimous support from all parties. Beginning February 14 and continuing through February 20, the week is focused on recognizing those in the nonprofit sector whose work changes the lives of individuals, families, and communities.

Michele Fisher, executive director of the Dufferin Community Foundation, said the week of appreciation had been “a long time coming.”

“Most of the other helping professions are recognized for their impact. During the pandemic, for example, healthcare workers have been rightly praised for their efforts. But frontline workers in the nonprofit sector — many of whom were also deemed essential — have flown under the radar. That’s why we like to call them ‘invisible champions’,” Fisher said. “Nonprofit Appreciation Week is an opportunity for us as a community to say ‘Thank You.’ It makes visible all they do to help some of our most vulnerable and to strengthen our communities. I hope this will allow our nonprofit professionals to feel truly recognized for all that they do. »

In Dufferin County alone, there are over 150 non-profit organizations working within the community, ranging from social services, environmental/conservation organizations, arts and culture, recreation, health, mental health, community development, housing and homelessness, food security and much more. .

The Citizen spoke with some of the local nonprofits in Dufferin County ahead of Nonprofit Appreciation Week.

Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County

For people with dementia, a consistent routine can help them thrive. As a non-profit organization focused on support, programming and education, the Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County has taken on the challenge of maintaining this routine for more than two years.

“Over the past two years we have seen a significant drop in the availability of things like day programs, community support, personal support worker support. Basically anything that would allow a person with dementia and their family to maintain a consistent routine,” said Lindsay Gregory, Outreach and Education Coordinator. “Without this structure, we are seeing an increase in complex cases, an increase in behaviors and the burnout of caregivers.

To help address the lack of structure for clients brought about by the pandemic, the Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County has begun offering online training and education sessions as well as social programs, activities and social sessions. exercises.

One program, which Gregory points to as a proud moment in the face of the pandemic, is their Bring Back Box program.

The Bring Back Box program is a Montessori approach to dementia care where clients receive personalized activity kits based on their hobbies, interests, and memories that provide meaningful stimulation and engagement.

“We see a lot of people with dementia who are bored,” Gregory said. “It’s a really nice way to connect with people in an otherwise virtual world.”

The Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County has approximately 400 people on their active caseload and while their caseload has not increased since the pandemic, they have seen more admissions seeking access to education and support .

“We talk more often with people who are now at home with loved ones and who may be noticing this cognitive decline that they wouldn’t otherwise notice,” Gregory said.

Coming out of the pandemic, Gregory said after seeing how people have connected with them, the Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County will likely continue to use their virtual opportunities in a “hybrid model.”

Community Living Dufferin for over 60 years has been providing support to adults in Dufferin County who have developmental disabilities and when COVID-19 hit, rather than accepting a hiatus from all programs, Community Living Dufferin staff shows creativity.

“It could have been very easy for us to say ‘sorry, the building is closed and the programs are over, we’re just going to get by,’ but our staff didn’t,” Karen Murphy-Fitz explained, executive assistant. . “We changed our programs from those we operated in the main building to programs we offered in each of our homes.”

One of the ways they transformed, Murphy-Fitz added, was by distributing craft boxes in their homes, which contained games, science projects and art supplies.

“Residents had something different to fill their days,” Murphy-Fitz said.

Operating 14 homes that provide housing for more than 60 adults supported by the nonprofit, Community Living Dufferin was challenged early on by isolation as family visits were cut short.

Community Living Dufferin applied for and became the recipient of a number of grants allowing them to purchase smart TVs, iPads and Google Home units so they can continue to connect with families.

“It was huge for helping the people we support stay connected with their families, giving them the opportunity to see each other face to face,” Murphy-Fitz said.

Although Community Living Dufferin has learned, like many organizations, to balance the setbacks caused by the pandemic, it is the emotional impacts that continue to be felt.

While speaking with the Citizen, Murphy-Fitz held back tears as she spoke about their adaptation as hallways and rooms remain empty.

“It’s been hard not seeing people, and it’s going to be nice to have everyone together again.”

As the saying goes, the show must go on.

As a relatively young organization that began with seasonal programming, Streams Community Hub faced the challenge of bringing the arts, a naturally collaborative and in-person discipline, into the virtual space.

“We really spent several months, like anyone working in a space that deals with a lot of in-person programming, trying to figure out what to do,” explained Juli-Anne James, co-founder of Streams Hub. “It’s hard to put on a play without a stage.”

Although not fully equipped with the technology and staff to deliver virtual programs, Juli-Anne and Andrew James have found a way to bring the arts into children’s homes – through a stand-up competition.

The Word of Mouth Monologue competition launched in March 2021 and saw local young people aged 8-17 submit online performances of various monologues and compete in a live final.

“The monologue competition was a really great opportunity that we did after it turned out to be really awesome,” Andrew said. “It made us realize it’s a good outlet and now we need to keep doing it even when things get back to ‘normal’. We recognized the importance of helping young people have another way to express themselves .

Although restricted for a year to offering arts programs to young people, the James duo note that internal work was underway to deepen their roots in the community.

“We were able to see some of the needs in our community and see how we could better meet those needs,” Andrew said.

Streams Community Hub is preparing to open its first permanent location, tentatively scheduled for early March.

“We know the importance of connection, of being together in a space and that we can never escape that need or that want,” Andrew said. “Our show must go on, to move forward creating a bigger space not only for young people, but for the artist who also needs a place to express themselves in their art, while earning a living and teaching the next generation.”

Organizations that have worked to develop local activities in recognition of Nonprofit Appreciation Week include the Dufferin Community Foundation, United Way Guelph Wellington Dufferin, Headwaters Communities in Action, DC MOVES, the Chamber of commerce of Dufferin and Dufferin County.

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International headquarters

Chicago Fire plans new training facility at former CHA site

The Chicago Fire football team plans to build a practice facility on land that was once one of the Chicago Housing Authority’s largest public housing developments.

The Major League Soccer team, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot and Housing Authority CEO announced Thursday that they have begun discussions about developing 30 acres of vacant land on Chicago’s Near West Side. The site would house a headquarters and training center for firefighters, they said.

Under a long-term lease, the Fire would develop the multimillion-dollar facility and provide community benefits and investment, officials said. This would include investments in nearby public housing sites, job creation for community members and recreational opportunities for young people.

The property was once the site of ABLA homes, which once housed nearly 17,000 people in 3,600 units, WTTW Chicago reported.

The proposal will be discussed at community meetings over the coming weeks.

“In neighborhoods across the city, football brings people together, fostering a strong sense of history and community while showing immense passion for the game,” said Chicago Fire FC President Ishwara Glassman Chrein. “We look forward to introducing the project to the local community, hearing their feedback and creating new opportunities for Near West Side residents to enjoy the game.”

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Non profit living

Leadership Development for Racial Equity

After working 26 years in the for-profit capital sector of our economy and nine years working with the poor, forgotten and demonized people in our society, I see life much differently. I feel like I’ve awakened to a new understanding of the rules of how we interact for the good of society. The Homeboy Way is the “how” of mutuality, compassion and relatedness for a better society.

Homeboy Industries is the largest and most successful gang reintegration program in the world. It was founded and is run by Father Greg Boyle, a Jesuit priest, who dedicates his life to helping men and women get out of the gang lifestyle. By transforming their lives, these men and women show us why people shouldn’t be defined by the worst thing they’ve done. Homeboy has helped thousands of people heal from complex traumas and become contributing members of our society, even when it seems everyone in society has let them down. In many ways, this effort can be seen as a fight against racial and economic inequality – because the population we serve is made up of poor people of color who have never had a fair chance in our society.

As a human services nonprofit, Homeboy has always struggled to secure the financial resources to stay afloat. I came to Homeboy exactly when they needed someone like me with the skills to lead successful organizations. I also came at a time when I needed to know more about myself and my spiritual journey. Working with Homeboy Industries has given me knowledge and insight into my own spirituality and the plight of the people Homeboy Industries serves.

I have made friendships and relationships that are remarkable. I have experienced more heartbreak and more joy in recent years than in my entire life before that. Along the way, almost by providence, I have been able to see how business can be run with a different set of priorities so that everyone benefits: owners, management and those who have never been able to maintain a job but are doing so now. I learned how to help the “unemployable” to become employable. I participated in the development of business models that provide not only economic impact but social impact. Doing business the Homeboy Way is the direction in which we must lead our collective efforts and a roadmap to revamp capital markets.

In today’s environment, we have massive tidal currents around the issues and causes of social injustice and racial inequality. What I didn’t know then, but what I know now, is that I was lucky enough to be on the front line with those involved. I became not only a non-profit CEO of a social service agency, but more importantly, a participant in the fight to bring resources and help to those on the margins of our society.

I learned a lot about leadership development for racial equity. Every organization, be it a non-profit or government agency and especially a for-profit business, must address this issue and strive to improve the lives of everyone around us.

The struggle for any organization is to develop the next generation of leaders from within, and at Homeboy, that’s not just vitally important to the mission, but an order of magnitude more difficult. Our ex-gang population needs to see people like them in leadership roles so that the actions we take are genuine and have the best interest of the client in mind.

Outside organizations have the luxury of hiring mid- to high-level executives into their organization and can groom them to be the best leaders. For Homeboy, to have leaders who share the lived experiences and stories of those we serve – gang life, incarceration and trauma – we must prepare our people from the bottom up. They start as customers to transform their lives and, when ready, become frontline workers, followed by a series of supervisory jobs before moving into middle management. Once in middle management, they acquired a combination of positive leadership and some functional skills. However, going beyond middle management at Homeboy or any organization is about knowing how many other functional skills one can pick up along the way. When one becomes a senior leader, they function like a general manager. This is where the task becomes the greatest challenge, as it is partly about the motivation of the individual and the ability of the organization to provide such learning experiences.

Motivating our clients can be complicated. One of the ideas of our founders is that young people, who are stuck in the gang lifestyle, don’t see themselves living past 30. (That’s one of the reasons tougher sentencing laws don’t deter crime, because they don’t feel like their lives are going to last long anyway.) When they come to Homeboy to change their life, this is the first time they start dreaming and planning a long life. Once they complete our 18-month program, they rightly feel like they’ve accomplished something magical: “What’s next and how can I move up the corporate ladder?” is no longer so far from their thoughts. However, many just want to revel in the life they now have, “the good life”. I’ve had many conversations with interns taking that first step into management and they’re ecstatic and don’t even want to think about the next step. They are now a success for their children, their families, their friends and themselves.

Another aspect of developing a career is that you need to be aware of your “work flaws”. When our homies reach “the good life”, it’s after so much deep introspection to transform their lives, they avoid considering another level of introspection concerning life at work. This period of calm can last a few years. Then, for some, they start wanting more and developing more. When that time comes, we can start discussions about further developing business and managerial skills.

We have to keep in mind that the only organizational structure our peeps have known is the gang hierarchy, which is a very different structure from the grassroots-based nonprofit world and the corporate world of matrix organizations. In the world of gangs, the leader must make a call and everyone must follow and listen. When our insiders first become managers at Homeboy, they expect absolute authority, which rarely happens, and so a clash occurs. This can cause them to question their own worth or even stir up a desire to fire everyone. For them, realizing this issue and changing their own mindset usually takes time to overcome.

The final area of ​​challenge is organizational mundane things like emails, phone calls, and report writing. This is where Homeboy’s insiders struggle the most: they don’t see it as a priority, and some see it as “women’s work” and think it’s a waste of their talent. If they refuse to do so, it often becomes their biggest obstacle to career advancement. However, after a lot of “straight talk” type coaching, they come back and eventually come to a point of reconciling these issues.

Even with these challenges, we have wonderful managers who have overcome their obstacles and reached high leadership positions. The effort to develop the leadership team that is partly made up of leaders with family backgrounds requires time, money and, most importantly, a mindset that the entire organization must adopt.

From a broader societal perspective, I believe one of the key drivers will be how to lift more people out of poverty and into quality jobs that ensure growth on the economic ladder. It’s not enough to provide entry-level positions (usually at minimum wage), but work that leads to something more substantial. This would mean an over-investment in terms of developing people’s job skills while they work. A proactive approach for people of color with the same type of lived experience is to provide counseling, mentoring and coaching. I suspect that the same factors that present challenges for Homeboy will be the same factors that other organizations face when trying to really push people up the economic ladder. Our hard-won lessons should be a model for other organizations wishing to follow a similar path and work towards racial equity.


Written by Thomas Vozzo.

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Canadian army

BTS Fans Celebrate V’s Birthday By Donating To Charities, Adopting

The end of December doesn’t just bring the holidays, it also brings V‘the birthday of!

December 30, BTS member — whose real name is Kim taehyung– turns 26e birthday and ARMY all over the world celebrate alongside him. From adopting tigers to building elementary schools, BTS fans are going out of their way to ‘Snow Flower’ the big day of the act.

Check out how ARMY is celebrating V’s birthday below.


Ahead of V’s birthday, the Malaysian military adopted a white tiger from Ampang Zoo Negara to celebrate the singer. They also collect donations to take care of the tiger, which they named “Kim Taehyung”. This is one of the many anniversary projects that fanclub Taehyung Malaysia has organized this year.

Billboards are a must for any K-pop birthday party, and ARMY certainly didn’t disappoint for V.’s birthday. From a special doll exhibit called TaeTae Land in Seoul to the large murals in Uruguay to city ​​bus, fans spread birthday joy everywhere!

In line with BTS vision to empower young people, Chinese BTS fans, in partnership with Chinese Foundation for Youth Development, organized fundraisers to build the Taehyung Hope Primary School to provide education to young children in rural China.

The project started in July 2020 for the singer’s 25th birthdaye birthday. Following the success of the project, the Chinese fanclub Baidu V bar are about to build another school in the name of V.

What is a birthday without gifts? But, instead of gifts to V himself, ARMY gives gifts to those in need.

From helping underprivileged and homeless children and supporting people with disabilities, to raising funds for animal shelters, fans have organized a series of charity projects to celebrate the BTS member.

The Canadian ARMY has a project up to ‘Winter bear’ alley of the act. Title The Taehyung Grove, this fan project raises funds to plant trees in northern British Columbia to help provide shelter for animals.


BTS are currently on “official extended rest period” following the success of their sold-out sale Permission to dance on stage in LA concerts earlier this month.

Check out V’s latest track “Christmas Tree” here:




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Non profit living

Pastor Monroe’s work to help underserved creates believers

Pastor Heather Boone once dubbed a campaign to buy a larger church for her growing community mission the “Miracle on Second Street,” and some say the title still applies to the neighborhood she remodeled. to help the under-served.

Oaks Village, a Monroe nonprofit that serves thousands of struggling residents each year, and its dynamic leader have drawn attention to their attention even on the little things that can change lives, from products to clothing to ‘interview. Boone recently won USA Today’s Best of Humankind Awards, and that award made her even more determined to serve.

If his mission was not simple, the way forward is now.

“We just want the world to know what we’re doing in this little corner,” Boone said. “And we hope others will replicate what we do.”

His victory caught the national attention of Boone and his team. She said this would only amplify their mission and broad reach in Oaks Village, with its grocery store, daycare, tutoring, addiction recovery, health clinic and more.

“She’s a great woman,” said Robert Tucker, a former resident of the Oaks shelter who now works there. “… This is not a job for her. It’s his life. “

The program had humble beginnings, with twists and turns and miracles reflecting the scriptures she often shares for inspiration.

Boone grew up in Detroit, where the 45-year-old said she was “a very bad teenager.”

Through a religious awakening and conversion at the age of 20, Boone joined the African Methodist Episcopal Church, met her husband, Britton, and became a youth pastor.

“Once I found God, I wanted to help other young people not to go through all the trials I went through,” she said.

Over a decade ago, Boone was assigned to lead a small congregation in Monroe. The denomination leaders wanted to relocate her after three years, “but I really felt that God had called us here,” she said. “My husband and I made the decision to start our own ministry. “

Inspired by a Bible passage referring to God’s people, the couple launched Oaks of Righteousness in 2012, meeting for the first time at a community center and school. The following year, they bought a building that once housed a Salvation Army church, which also housed shelter for the homeless during the colder months, Boone said.

The first winter drew over 90 people and convinced the Boones to establish a year-round facility. Guided by prayer, they moved into space while working to raise enough money to do so.

Then came what they called a divine turn of events which brought forth an abundance of blessings.

Learning that the Archdiocese of Detroit was selling the nearby St. Joseph’s Church, which had several buildings, Boone embarked on a “Miracle on 2nd Street” fundraising campaign. Supporters raised over $ 320,000 purchase the property in 2016, which paved the way for upgrading the shelter as well as expanding or creating initiatives under the umbrella of Oaks Village.

Today the shelter has 75 beds, with separate floors for men, women and families. Clients are offered help finding housing, recovering from drug addiction and more.

Among them is Eric Uselton, who recently moved there after meeting Britton Boone on the job. He said he lived in a motel in Detroit and spent hundreds of dollars a day on drug addiction.

This month, Uselton marked 35 days of abstinence. Before heading back to a bunk bed one recent night after volunteering to install spotlights outside, he praised the Boones and their work which he calls transformative.

“If I had stayed where I was, I would have ended up in jail or dead,” Uselton said. “They have their hearts in the right place and they do it for the right reasons. They don’t do it to get credit or anything like that. They do it because they are Christians and want to help.

News of this aid regularly draws hundreds of visitors to the mostly volunteer-run “campus” as well as numerous partnerships.

Boone has seen a growing need since the COVID-19 pandemic.

The US Census Bureau estimates that 9.7% of Monroe County residents live in poverty. According to the website of the national network of food banks Feeding America, the county has a food insecurity rate of about 11.9%.

Boone estimates that Oaks Village, which has an emergency pantry, summer lunch cafe and soup kitchen, serves up to 10,000 meals each year.

The donated items come from supporters such as David Voggenreiter, 16, who arrived with his father on Monday to unload canned goods, bread and other items.

The Monroe County Middle College student discovered the site while preparing for a civic engagement project and immediately decided to contribute. “It feels good to be able to help people,” Voggenreiter said.

This is the objective of the association, which also has a “clothes closet” full of accessories, toiletries and free household items as well as a free health clinic which has opened its doors. doors in 2019.

The clinic is run by medical staff from the ProMedica health system and dedicated volunteers such as Sandy Libstorff, a retired registered nurse who first met Boone after helping deliver a patient living at the homeless shelter. -shelter.

Much of their work is now focused on COVID-19 testing, Libstorff said, as well as on patients who “have had bad experiences with mainstream medical care and are suspicious”.

Noting that some patients have reported diabetes or high blood pressure and cholesterol without any transportation to reach fresh food, Boone and his team worked to acquire an old party store shortly before Christmas 2020 and turn it into one. neighborhood market with fresh produce.

Village Market opened this year through a partnership with Meijer, which supplies the products.

“Pastor Boone’s unique approach to bringing fresh food to an underserved community was compelling to us, and something we were delighted to support,” said Frank Guglielmi, senior director of corporate communications at Meijer.

The store participates in a state program that allows EBT / Bridge card users to ‘double’ their fruit and vegetable purchases and is a partner in the special federally funded supplemental nutrition program for women, infants and children. children. He also owns a cosmetics business, tutoring space, and products from a local independent dairy.

All of this “means access to the community,” Boone said as he stood in an aisle wearing a black shirt emblazoned with the words “Be kind.”

“We understand that we don’t have everything because we are still a very small store. But when you don’t have transportation, you can get the things you need.

Recognizing a need for some residents of the shelter and others in the neighborhood looking for work sparked another business. Acorn Children’s Village, which opened last year in a donated building renovated through an Art Van charity challenge that raised over $ 50,000, offers free, low-cost child care for children. children up to 5 years old.

It’s licensed for over 30 kids who “love to learn and grow with us,” said Becky McCollum-McCrea, who helped start the installation and working on it.

The longtime educator argues that the long waitlist for his classrooms is a testament to the community’s need and Boone’s vision.

“She has a genuine love for people, and I’ve seen miracles happen because of her,” McCollum-McCrea said. “In my entire life of involvement in the church, I have never seen anything like this happen. I just feel like God is giving him ideas on what is needed or what to do and before long it will come true.

This prompted Libstorff to nominate Boone to the USA Today competition, which recognizes “everyday people who have demonstrated the highest level of kindness, compassion and persistence,” her website said.

His nomination joined more than 600 others before an advisory committee selected the finalists and 72,000 votes were cast to determine the 11 winners.

In a ceremony broadcast live this month to announce the winners, NBC personality Jenna Bush Hager, daughter of former President George W. Bush, described Boone as “living a life of service.”

The accolade underscores the commitment of a pastor who is known to donate bedding if someone else needs it, Libstorff said. “She has dedicated her whole life to helping people. She is an incredible woman.

Tucker acknowledged his support for helping him quit drugs, embrace spirituality, and become a homeowner. “My fall has become a rise,” he said.

Kellie Vining, a member of Monroe City Council whose precinct includes the non-profit organization, said that “her generous spirit has rubbed off on a lot of people. She has a true pastor’s heart.”

Boone is now focused on the future. Amid her daily watch and long hours meeting with residents, she hopes to find support for a program to build affordable housing on plots near the market.

With her businesses making headlines, she gets calls from across the country to repeat the success.

“There is a role model we can give them,” Boone said. “It has been amazing because we want to be successful and multiply. “

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Canadian army

Unfazed by pandemic and supply chain issues, Santa prepares for his annual flight

DENVER, Dec.24 (Reuters) – Undeterred by pandemics, supply chain problems and labor shortages plaguing overland commerce, Santa Claus was due to launch his reindeer sleigh on Friday for giving Christmas gifts to good girls and boys around the world, according to military officials who track his flights.

“Santa has been doing this for centuries, he’s a professional,” said Canadian Army Captain Alexandra Hejduk, spokesperson for the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD).

NORAD, a joint US-Canadian military command based at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is responsible for monitoring air defenses and issuing aerospace and maritime warnings across North America.

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NORAD’s Santa Claus tracking practice originated in 1955, when a Colorado Springs newspaper misprinted the phone number of a local department store so young people could call and talk to Santa, mistakenly listing the number of what was then called the Continental Air Defense Command. A duty officer took the calls and assured the children that Santa Claus, also known as Kris Kringle or Saint Nicholas, was aware of their wish lists and was on his way.

The annual tradition has continued for 66 years and is now part of NORAD’s mission.

Followers of the Merry Old Elf can get real-time updates on his whereabouts by logging into noradsanta.org or through various social media platforms, or they can call a NORAD-sponsored Santa Hotline to talk with a live operator.

Other US government agencies were also preparing for Santa’s visit.

The US secret service, which is responsible for protecting the president, also ensures the safety of Santa Claus, the agency said in a statement posted on Twitter, accompanied by a video showing its agents preparing for the duties of protecting Santa Claus. .

“The Big Red Protective Detail is selected, assembled and ready to fulfill its seasonal mission,” the statement said. “The American public can be assured that MS Claus here from the North Pole will travel safely throughout his tour of the United States.”

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Reporting by Keith Coffman in Denver; Editing by Steve Gorman and Leslie Adler

Our standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Canadian army

Local cadets participate in wreaths across Canada

Provided by the 325th Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron Kiwanis Cornwall

Since 2015, local Air, Army and Sea Cadets have participated in wreaths across Canada. This year was no different for 13 cadets from the 325th Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron Kiwanis Cornwall and Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps Stormont. On Sunday, December 5, 2021, sixty-five wreaths were laid on the headstones of men and women who served in the Canadian Armed Forces in Cornwall and South Stormont.

It was the 7th year for the cadets in what has become an annual event. The goal of Crowns across Canada is to continue the commitment to always remember those who have served for our country. The phrase We Will Remember is always associated with Remembrance Day, however, most do not continue to be remembered beyond the period of November 11. This is an event where young people can pursue the commitment to always remember.

“Wreaths across Canada are more than just laying a wreath. It is important to remember our fallen troops even outside of Remembrance Day, ”said Sgt Treyson Garner, a cadet from 325 ARCCA. “Every time I laid a wreath, I thought about the life of this fallen soldier and what they were doing so that we could live ours in peace. It was a way of showing our great gratitude to those who could not return home. That’s what Crowns Across Canada means to me.

Being able to participate in wreaths across Canada takes on special meaning for PO1 Maylee Larking, a sea cadet in the Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps Stormont. “It is a privilege to be able to recognize soldiers who sacrificed their lives to grant me the freedoms and the rights that I have today. To be able to lay a wreath on my great-grandfather’s grave is a huge honor as I can recognize the service and sacrifices he made for his friends, family and the country as a whole, ”said Larkin .

Wreaths Across Canada was created by WO (retired) Craig McPhee after being inspired by a similar event in Arlington, Virginia. The event takes place on the first Sunday in December with the aim of honoring the thousands of men and women of the Canadian Armed Forces who lay eggs in plots across the country. The main activities of Wreaths Across Canada are focused on the National Military Cemetery, located at Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa.

This year the wreaths were handcrafted by students from Cornwall Collegiate and Vocational School. Elementary and secondary school students were part of the team that made 120 wreaths under the supervision of Mr. Nigel Carlisle. The wreaths were made of evergreen branches, with a red bow attached.

Part of Wreaths Across Canada’s mission is to honor those who have served Canada as members of our military and to teach young Canadians the value of freedom. It says a lot about the role local cadets and students play in ensuring those buried locally are remembered.

The wreaths made by CCVS were for cadets in Cornwall and Glengarry, covering 21 cemeteries in Cornwall, South Stormont, South Glengarry and North Glengarry in partnership with cadets from 253 Claude Nunney VC Squadron of Royal Canadian Air Cadets , located in Lancaster.

Each year, the list of burial sites covered by local cadet units continues to grow. The list has
went from 27 in the original year to 120 this year. Each year, cadets continue to find other
graves in the spotlight, and this year was no different. While laying wreaths this year, Cornwall Cadets have found 38 additional gravestones which will be added to the list for next year.

The cost of the wreaths is currently covered by the Cornwall Air Cadet Squadron. Donations and
sponsorships are certainly appreciated to help cover the costs of remembering and honoring those who have served for Canada.


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Non profit living

Live With This Herbal Recipe From Youth Health Advocate Haile Thomas – Food Tank

At each age, Haile Thomas’ life has revolved around nutritious food. Her Jamaican immigrant mother taught her how to cook when she was five, and three years later, when her father was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, her family turned their diet and lifestyle into a nurturing center and restorative food. When Thomas was 12, she founded The organization HAPPY, a non-profit organization that promotes the mental and physical well-being of young people by developing knowledge about diet and self-advocacy. At 17, she was the youngest certified integrative health coach in the United States. With her messages of healthy eating and youth empowerment, she has appeared in the White House, at Food tank tops, and in the national media.

And last year she published a cookbook-slash-empowerment-manifesto, Live alive, which was nominated for an NAACP Image Award. In addition to the more than 80 herbal recipes, his book opens with a series of essays on his upbringing, how we are shaped by what we consume and Thomas’s seven “Power Points”. From wellness and relationships, to education, creativity and community, and conversations with young women who embody these principles, Thomas breaks down the components of a lively life. And as one of the essays notes, the book is meant to be interactive – “a place where food stains and deep thoughts can coexist!” She writes – so there are journal pages and writing prompts to encourage thought and action.

“We really want [youth] see food and cooking as something that can really permeate their daily life and be something super fun and accessible ”, Thomas told Food Tank President Danielle Nierenberg at the Food Tank Summit 2018.

For our third monthly cookbook series, Food Tank is excited to share Thomas’ recipe for Red Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Chimichurri Sauce. If you missed the first few installments of our cookbook series, we’ve featured two recipes from Jubilee, Toni Tipton-Martin’s award-winning exploration of hundreds of years of black cuisine, and a selection of fall recipes from Beth Dooley’s local and seasonal cookbook The lively cuisine. Make sure to grab these recipes, but first, join us as we cook and live a busy life with Haile Thomas!

And one more thing: when you cook this recipe at home, let us know! Tag us on social media @FoodTank or #FoodTank so we can admire your meals and share your photos.

* * * * *

Red roasted cauliflower steaks with chimichurri sauce

Makes 4 servings

Knowing how to season and roast a good cauliflower steak is essential at home, so I pass this favorite recipe on to you! Due to the neutral flavor of cauliflower, it’s a great canvas for spices and sauces that really pop. Serve with your favorite vegetables and grains!

—Haile Thomas, Living Lively: 80 Herbal Recipes To Activate Your Power And Nurture Your Potential

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER

  • 1 tablespoon of garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon of paprika
  • 1 tablespoon of dried thyme
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 medium cauliflower, cut through the core into four slices about ½ inch thick
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil

CHIMICHURRI SAUCE

  • ½ cup of fresh cilantro, leaves and stems
  • ½ cup of fresh parsley, leaves and stems
  • ¼ cup fresh basil leaves
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • Kosher salt

1. To roast the cauliflower: Preheat the oven to 425 ° F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. In a medium bowl, combine garlic powder, paprika, thyme, cayenne pepper and salt to taste.

3. Arrange the cauliflower “steaks” on the prepared baking sheet and drizzle with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Sprinkle the herb and spice mixture evenly on both sides of each cauliflower steak. Drizzle the cauliflower steaks with the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil.

4. Roast for 20 to 25 minutes, until the cauliflower is golden and crisp on top.

5. Meanwhile, to make the chimichurri sauce: In a food processor, combine the cilantro, parsley, basil, garlic, olive oil, vinegar and salt to taste and mix until smooth consistency. Put aside.

6. Drizzle the steaks with the chimichurri sauce and serve.

From LIVING LIVELY by Haile Thomas Copyright © 2020 by Haile Thomas. Reprinted with permission from William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

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Non profit living

An aging country shows others how to manage

ESINCE 1,495 residents of Gojome, a town in northern Japan, gathered for a morning market. One recent weekday, along a street with closed and almost empty shops, elderly vendors display their autumn wares: mushrooms and chestnuts, okra, eggplants and pears. It wasn’t always so empty, sighs Ogawa Kosei, who runs a bookstore on the street. He shows pictures taken by his father which show the scene filled with customers.

Gojome’s population has halved since 1990. More than half of its residents are over the age of 65, making it one of the oldest towns in Akita, the oldest prefecture in Japan, which is in its own right. tour the oldest country in the world. Still, Gojome is less of an outlier than an omen. According to UN, each country is experiencing growth in the size and proportion of its elderly population; by 2050, one in six people in the world will be over 65, up from one in eleven in 2019. UN also predicts that 55 countries, including China, will see their populations decline by 2050.

Demographic change has two drivers that are often grouped together: increasing longevity and a falling birth rate. Their convergence requires “a new map of life,” explains Akiyama Hiroko, founder of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Tokyo. The infrastructure created when the population was younger and the population pyramid more solid must be rethought, from health to housing to transport. The new reality demands a “completely different way of thinking,” says Kashiwa Kazuyori, head of Gojome’s planning department. When he started working in the 1970s, the focus was on growth. Now it is a matter of managing the decline.

Part of the challenge is that demographic change affects everyone differently. Two cities or regions may look alike from afar, but have distinct historical, cultural and environmental conditions; two people can be the same age, earn the same money, and live on the same street, but have different mental and physical health. “Context is often lacking,” says Kudo Shogo of Akita International University. He is one of dozens of young foreigners who have been welcomed to Gojome, which was a trade hub at the crossroads of agricultural districts. Comparable agriculture-focused neighbors have been less open to newcomers.

This makes it difficult to design a national policy. “There is no single model,” says Iio Jun, political scientist at HANDLES. While the national government is responsible for finances, including pensions, the new life map is best drawn from scratch. A lot of ideas come from listening to citizens, says Ms. Akiyama. “They know what the problems are and often they know how to solve them. “

One question is how aging is discussed: as a problem or a burden. “Older people feel that society doesn’t need them,” says Hatakeyama Junko, 70, head of Akita Partnership, a non-profit organization that runs a community center. Longevity in itself is not a problem, it should be celebrated. Problems arise when people lead long but unhealthy, lonely or dependent lives. The goal in Japan has shifted from increasing life expectancy to improving “healthy and independent life expectancy,” says Akiyama.

It means finding ways for older people to continue working. Almost half of the 65-69 age group and a third of the 70-74 age group are employed. The Japanese Gerontological Society has called for reclassifying people aged 65 to 74 as “pre-old.” Ms. Akiyama talks about creating “second life workplaces”. But the work of the second life will be different from that of the first; its contribution may not be easily captured in growth statistics. “We need to strive for well-being, not just economic productivity,” says Akiyama. Experiences abound, from municipalities that train retirees to become farmers, to businesses that encourage older employees to launch startups. The elderly “want dignity and respect,” says Matsuyama Daiko of Taizo-in temple in Kyoto, which has a “second life program” that offers courses for retirees to become priests.

The other key is to stay healthy, physically and mentally. Wiser municipalities focus on preventive care. At the stylish Kadokawa Care Center, a former school in Toyama, northwest Tokyo, 70s, 80s and 90s splash about in a pool and soar on exercise machines. “Without this place, I would be in a retirement home,” exclaims Kyoda Taketoshi, 82. Socialization is no less important. “It was expensive to build this place, but it was worth it,” says Saito Yoneaki, 80, before jumping to join friends in the sauna. Although healthy life expectancy in Japan is eight to 12 years less than overall life expectancy, the gap narrowed slightly between 2010 and 2016.

The birth rate is more difficult to change. It fell to 1.34 in 2020, well below the 2.1 needed to maintain a stable population. Even if Japan could increase it, rural areas would still struggle. One study estimates that more than half of Japan’s 1,700 municipalities could disappear by 2040, as young people, especially women, leave. Yet while a return to growth is unlikely in most regions, there is an alternative to outright disappearance: a critical core of newcomers. Even a handful of transplants can revitalize an aging city without fully replacing the population, notes Iio.

Gojome is a good example. Although the population is decreasing, “a new wind is blowing in the city”, explains Watanabe Hikobe, its mayor. Over the past decade, a small group of young foreigners have arrived, drawn by visions of a slow, bucolic life, and the chance to try out new models of loose work and community living. Yanagisawa Ryu, 34, a computer science graduate from Japan’s leading university, quit his job in Tokyo and became a “social entrepreneur”. He oversees Babame Base, a business center in an empty school in Gojome that is home to a graphic design studio, an ecotourism business, a local doctor, and a business that trains farmers in the use of drones, among others.

Such “urban migrants” are still a relative rarity. Mr. Yanagisawa admits his college friends find his lifestyle choices “weird.” But in many ways, they are the vanguard. “Rather than trying to recreate the past, we need to think about: what kind of community, what kind of city do we want now? Mr. Kudo said. They are not the only foreigners to settle.

This article appeared in the Special Feature section of the print edition under the title “Le vieux pays”


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Canadian army

Otonabee Ward: The Salvation Army collects toys for the children of Peterborough

Turning into its 62nd year, the annual Pure Country 105 / Move 105 / Move 99.7 Christmas Toy Drive for The Salvation Army is underway and people are invited to drop off new, unwrapped toys for children up to 14 years old. years old at two locations: The Salvation Army, 219 Simcoe St. with the striped doors, and ring the doorbell, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or at the toy bin in the center court of Lansdowne Place, during shopping center opening hours.

“The Salvation Army toy store is open now and customers are coming every day until December 17,” said Donna Barkley, toy store coordinator. “We have an ongoing need for toys and if anyone needs help over Christmas they can call our office at 705-742-4391 ext. 231 because they have to make an appointment.

Toy drive looks a little different this year, with health and safety concerns related to COVID-19 and increased need anticipated this year. The Salvation Army is making appointments to ensure adequate social distancing and, as required by Peterborough Public Health, all toys are quarantined for three days before being handled by volunteers or customers.

“Pure Country 105 / MOVE 99.7 kicked off the toy drive on November 12,” said Vince Bierworth, Promotions Coordinator / Announcer, Bell Media Radio. “A constant supply of toys is needed and volunteers collect donations at both sites every three to four days. In the past, there have been over 100 donation locations throughout the City and County of Peterborough. But due to the constant need to pick up and distribute toys, there is no physical way for volunteers to visit each location to collect donations. ”

They are asking every business and organization that has been a drop-off location in the past, to support the campaign with an internal fundraising or to make a financial donation so that The Salvation Army can fill in the gaps by age by going to www.SalvationArmyPTBO.org

The Salvation Army toy store is set up differently this year. Instead of sorting toys by age group, they are sorted by “gender” which means it will be like a toy store with a Lego section, electronics section, games, dolls, etc. to better serve customers.

Since 1960, the toy drive has been helping people in need in our community. There is a special need for gifts for children under 3, tweens 10-12 and teens. Types of toys needed include baby items such as plush toys, bath toys, teething rings and learning tools (all safety compliant) etc.

Items accepted for boys and girls ages 10-12 include books, video games, electronics, hairdryers, irons, nail polish kits, body lotion, movie certificates, Lego, basketballs, soccer balls, hoodies, clothing, music, gift cards for EB Games, Old Navy, Claire’s, Canadian Tire, Tim Hortons, Subway and more.

The Salvation Army also helps young people aged 15 to 17 by offering parents a Walmart gift card. They need food donations that can be brought to 219 Simcoe Street. Food is also quarantined for three days before being sorted and distributed.

For more information, please contact Vince Bierworth at 705-742-8844 ext. 4457 or [email protected] To contact The Salvation Army, please dial 705-742-4391 ext. 231, or visit www.SalvationArmyPTBO.org.

Panda Feeds Canada

Panda Feeds Canada will be at the Real Canadian Superstore Peterborough on December 4 and 5 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. to collect food and donations for Kawartha Food Share. Andrew Parnell started Panda Feeds Canada, which is a food drive to raise food and raise money for food banks across Canada. To date, he has raised 12,000 pounds of food, as well as financial donations. You can follow PandaFeedsCanada on Instagram.


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History organization

Meet the members of the ninety-nine

In 1929, a group of 99 female pilots (out of the 285 licensed female pilots in the United States) decided to form an organization for social, recruiting, and business purposes. Living in a society that limited the social and economic independence of women, these groups formed to provide women with mutual support in the aviation profession.

Thus were born the ninety-nine. The organization continues to exist today. This is the story of three of the many members.

Amelia Earhart

In addition to her record, Amelia Earhart helped form the Ninety-Nines (National Air and Space Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, SI 79-6354).

Earhart helped form the Ninety-Nine and was the organization’s first president. By 1929 Earhart was already making a name for himself. The year before, she had been the first woman to be a passenger on a transatlantic flight, a flight that caught her international attention. However, Earhart was only getting started.

In May 1932, she was the first woman to cross the Atlantic solo, the second person after Charles Lindbergh to cross it and the first person to cross the ocean by plane twice. In August, she became the first woman to fly solo across the United States.

Earhart continued to set records and gain attention. She has tirelessly lectured across the country on topics such as aviation and women’s issues and has written for Cosmopolitan and various other magazines. She wrote about her flights and her career in books 20 hours and 40 minutes (1928) and The pleasure of it (1933).

In 1937, Earhart’s life was tragically cut short when her plane went missing as she attempted to circumnavigate the world. Earhart’s disappearance remains one of the great unsolved mysteries of the 20th century, and it often overshadows her legacy as a courageous and dedicated aviator and enduring inspiration.

Louise Thaden

Louise Thaden was a founding member of the Ninety-Nine. (National Air and Space Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution)

Record-breaking pilot Louise Thaden caught the attention of the United States in the late 1920s and 1930s.

A student in 1925 at the University of Arkansas, she had been interested in aviation long before learning to fly. In 1926, Thaden was working for the JHJ Turner Coal Co., but she spent so much time touring the Travel Air Factory that Turner introduced her to his friend Walter Beech, owner of Travel Air. Beech offered her a job with her distributor on the Pacific Coast, which she accepted. As part of her salary, Louise received flying lessons.

In 1929, she gained recognition as a competitive pilot when she became the first pilot to simultaneously hold the female altitude, endurance and speed records in light aircraft. In 1929, she won first place in the first annual Women’s Air Derby, from Santa Monica, Calif. To Cleveland, Ohio. Employed in 1930 as the director of public relations for Pittsburgh Aviation Industries and director of the women’s division of the Penn School of Aeronautics, she was instrumental in popularizing aviation while continuing to set new flight records. In 1935, fellow aviator Phoebe Omlie asked Thaden to join the National Air Marking Program as a field representative. Flying a Beech Staggerwing, Thaden won the Bendix Trophy in the 1936 Bendix Transcontinental Race, the first year women were allowed to compete against men. Later that year, she received the Women’s Harmon Trophy, an international award for Outstanding Aviator of the Year.

Thaden was a founding member of the Ninety-Nine, and in 1937 she became the National Secretary of the National Aeronautics Association. Thaden eventually returned to Beech Aircraft Corporation as a factory representative and demonstration pilot. His autobiography Wide and scared top was published in 1938, and she is also the author of numerous newspaper and magazine articles on the promotion of aviation.

Ida Van Smith

In 1967 Ida Van Smith founded a series of flight training clubs for children to encourage their involvement in aviation and aerospace science.

Born in North Carolina, Smith graduated from Shaw University and received an MA from Queens College. She became a teacher in New York City public schools in the areas of history and special education.

In 1967, at the age of 50, she finally realized a personal dream of learning to fly. After obtaining her private pilot license and instructor rating, Smith founded the Ida Van Smith Flight Club in Long Island, New York. Student training was conducted in an FAA-funded aircraft simulator and an operational Cessna 172. Soon there were more than 20 clubs across the country, with members ranging in age from 13 to 19. As a result, thousands of children have been exposed to aviation and many have pursued careers in aviation. Smith also produced and hosted an aviation cable television show and taught an introductory aviation course at York College, City University of New York.

After retiring from teaching in 1977, Smith remained active in its namesake clubs. She was a member of the Black Wings of the Tuskegee Airman, the Negro Airman International and the Ninety-Nines. She has published or featured in numerous educational, aeronautical and historical journals. Smith has received numerous awards for his contribution to aviation and the education of young people. Smith died in 2003.


This content was migrated from a previous online exhibit, Women in Aviation and Space History, which shared the stories of women featured at the Museum in the early 2000s.


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International headquarters

Secretary Antony J. Blinken at an Ocean Plastics event

MRS ANDERSEN: Thank you. I am very honored to welcome you, Secretary Blinken, to the United Nations in Nairobi. For almost 50 years – next year it will be 50 – we at the United Nations Environment Program have been proud to host in Kenya the only UN Headquarters located in the Global South, the nerve center of multilateral governance here for the environment.

Secretary Blinken, your presence here today is extremely important. Your presence here demonstrates that the United States wants to be part of the multilateral solutions that will keep environmental action moving. At UNEP, we have long enjoyed a strong partnership with the United States on environmental law, pollution reduction, promotion of the green economy, scientific leadership for the environment and , most recently, of course, in Glasgow on methane emissions.

Mr Secretary, we have just concluded the Climate COP in Glasgow, and if there is one clear conclusion, of course, for us and for the world, it is that we can keep 1.5 alive, we can make it happen. , but it’s gonna take us all to make it happen. And as we now rush to the United Nations Environment Assembly in February 2022 to be held here in this beautiful location, we must recognize that the work Member States are doing on plastic pollution has the potential to be a turning point. Meaningful action against pollution will force us out of our comfort zones, by engaging in numerous environmental agreements with business and finance, with cities, with civil society, with entrepreneurs and with people around the world. .

I am therefore very happy to welcome here the presence of the remarkable Kenyan entrepreneurs who are proof that the action is already underway, and our host country, Kenya, continues to focus on the transition to clean energy by 2030. , geothermal energy, wind power, solar home power, the successful ban on single-use plastic bags, green bonds, climate-resilient agriculture, and much more.

So, Mr. Secretary, UNEP will mark its 50th anniversary next year, and as we seek to work together to address a triple planetary crisis – the climate change crisis, the biodiversity crisis and the loss of nature, and the pollution and waste crisis – we have a real opportunity to rush towards environmental multilateralism that has an impact, a positive impact, on people’s lives. Because as the UN Secretary General has noted, success or failure is not an act of nature; it’s in our hands. Thank you, Mr. Secretary.

SECRETARY BLINKEN: Well, hello everyone, and Executive Director Andersen, thank you very much for your outstanding leadership on this issue, for the work of the entire United Nations Environment Program team within the only United Nations Headquarters in the United Nations. southern country, and what seat it is.

Inger and I were just in Glasgow for COP26, and UNEP was a key partner in rallying countries to take the bold and urgent action needed to keep warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius and avert climate catastrophe. To give just one example, the independent and rigorous data tracked by the UNEP International Methane Emissions Observatory will bring greater transparency to the efforts of more than 100 countries now, led by the European Union and the United States. who signed the Global Methane Pledge. This commitment commits to reducing global methane emissions by at least 30% by 2030. This is just one important example of action taken by the international community in Glasgow.

Many countries, including in Africa, have established more ambitious national action plans to reduce emissions, and many have made significant commitments to invest more in adaptation, especially in vulnerable countries through initiatives such as the Africa Adaptation Initiative and President Biden’s Emergency Plan for Adaptation and Resilience, or PREPARE, as the acronym says.

Now back to methane, if the world’s major emitters of methane join us, including China, that would be like taking every ship out of the seas and every plane out of the skies in terms of emissions. At the same time, we still have a lot of work to do. As Inger pointed out at COP26, we must now stick to the commitments we made, and we must continue to push for greater commitments and more action on adaptation and mitigation, because no one is under the illusion that we have done enough yet, especially as the damage inflicted by the climate crisis continues to worsen, as the brutal drought here in Kenya very clearly shows.

So today we are stepping up and intensifying our efforts to tackle another pollutant that threatens our planet, plastic, by announcing US support for multilateral negotiations on a global deal to tackle plastic pollution in the oceans. By launching these negotiations at the United Nations Environmental Assembly in February 2022, our goal is to create a tool we can use to protect our oceans and all the life they support from the growing global harms of plastic pollution.

It is crucial that the agreement calls on countries to develop and implement strong national action plans to tackle this problem at its source. Many countries, climate and ocean advocates, private companies have supported this effort for some time. We are grateful for the serious work they have already put into this effort and look forward to working with them. The private sector in particular will need to do more to reduce plastic pollution and invest in innovation. We recognize that different actors will have different capacities to act, but every nation, every community, and indeed every individual has a role to play, and let me say a little about why.

It is estimated that we add between eight and fourteen million tonnes of plastic pollution to the ocean each year. That’s about one truckload dumped into the sea every minute of every day, and the rate is increasing rather than decreasing. Plastic can take decades to millions of years to break down. Meanwhile, the waste is transported everywhere from Antarctica to the Mariana Trench. Some of it is caught in massive swirling ocean currents. The largest, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, covers an area three times the size of France.

The negative effects of plastic pollution on marine life and humans are serious. Much of the plastic at sea is broken down into tiny pieces that marine animals eat. These microplastics can tear animals’ organs, clog their intestines, and make them look full, causing them to starve to death. And because plastics absorb toxins, when we eat seafood, we are not only consuming microplastics, but toxins as well. In addition, plastic pollution can harm artisanal fishing and discourage tourism in coastal areas.

As we know, our health, our survival is linked to the health of our oceans. We must do more to protect them. Supporting the development of this new deal is just one of the ways we are working to make it happen, but it comes above many others. At the 2019 Our Ocean conference, the United States announced more than 20 new commitments valued at over $ 1.2 billion to promote sustainable fishing, tackle marine debris and invest in marine science. In February, the United States will co-host the next Our Ocean conference with Palau, where we will focus on the link between oceans and climate change and the importance of healthy oceans for the survival of small island developing states. .

This connection is at the heart of the SALPIE initiative that President Biden launched in March to increase U.S. economic cooperation with island countries and territories. This overall goal has strong bipartisan support from the United States Congress, which passed the landmark 2020 Save Our Seas 2.0 legislation. As this legislation recognizes, innovation is crucial, and on this point the United States leads by force of our example, like the Plastics Innovation Challenge of the United States Department of Energy, which invests millions of dollars. dollars of research in national laboratories, universities, and industry to take giant leaps in areas such as the development of new recyclable plastics by design.

Many of the most promising innovations do not come from government or industry, but from individuals, including as we have just seen here in Kenya. Indeed, before speaking to you, I had the chance to meet a duo of very inspiring entrepreneurs. One of them was Nzambi Matee, an engineer who, as some of you may have heard, started a business that turns plastic waste into sustainable, affordable bricks that can be used to pave roads. Her company produces between 500 and a thousand bricks every day, recycling 500 kilos of plastic waste using machines she designed here in Nairobi. The company has created more than a hundred jobs.

The other day the (inaudible) co-founder of a social enterprise that employs women and young people in Mombasa to model a new form of waste management, organized informal workers, trained them to sort recyclable waste of other waste, and put that waste to productive and profitable use.

So we face the monumental challenge of protecting our oceans, but if we are ambitious in our global and local efforts, if we can combine the efforts of government and industry with those of communities and individuals, if we empower approaches innovations which we have seen with partners like Nzambi and (inaudible), I am convinced that we can overcome this challenge, we can meet it – we can meet it and we can meet it together.

So it’s wonderful to be here to see the amazing work that UNEP is doing here in Kenya, but also around the world. We have a lot of work to do, but we have very strong partners to do it. Thank you. (Applause.)


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5 takeaways from Friday at COP26

Protesters demonstrated in Glasgow, Scotland at a youth-led climate rally on Friday. Photo by AFP / Getty Images

It has been a long week at the COP26 climate conference in Glasgow and after a flurry of big announcements in recent days, the theme for Friday was the impact of climate change on future generations.

Here’s what happened if you missed it.

“Green wash festival”

Attention has shifted from the suits and briefcases of the conference venue to the city center, where thousands of children made sure their voices were heard while walking through the city.

Young activists from all over the world have flocked to Glasgow, demand action from leaders during a Fridays for Future event.

Event headliner Greta Thunberg called the COP event a “global northern greenwashing festival” and said “it should be obvious that we cannot solve a crisis the same way. that got us there in the first place. “

A word on the “good news” from the IEA

Several analysts have poured cold water on the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) assessment that global warming could be limited to 1.8 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels by 2100, if all the COP26 commitments made on Wednesday evening are respected on time. COP26 President Alok Sharma asked the IEA to keep an eye on the commitments.

Mark Maslin, professor of earth sciences at University College London, was not convinced. “This is irresponsible, because it is only true if all of the country’s commitments are kept and their policies are 100% effective – which they never are,” Maslin told CNN. “It’s almost as if the IEA wants to tell everyone that the job is done and that we have solved climate change, when we climate scientists know that we are still a long way from 2 degrees let alone 1.5 degrees. “

Al Gore says the tools are in our hands

Former US Vice President Al Gore praised the young people who marched in Glasgow on Friday. Speaking at the official conference, he said world leaders must “legitimize their expectations for a future that is worthy of them”.

“We can do it, but we have to put the period of delay, distraction and opportunity in the past, recognize that we have entered a period of consequences and make it a period of solutions,” he said. .

Gore, a strong advocate for climate change, said humanity has the power to save the world, if the political will can be mustered. “It’s like we can flip a switch and save the future of our civilization,” Gore said. He also highlighted a common theme this week: that promises are big, but must be kept to have an impact.

“We have the tools we need to resolve the crisis. We have heard promises that will move us in the right direction towards those solutions. We need to make sure those promises are kept,” Gore said.

The US plan to make carbon capture cheaper

US Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm announced Friday that the Department of Energy has a new goal: to dramatically reduce the cost of removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Granholm told COP26 on Friday that the DOE’s goal is to reduce the cost to $ 100 per tonne of carbon by 2030. At present, the department estimates that it costs around $ 2,000 per tonne.

Scientists say removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere is crucial to achieving net zero emissions by 2050 and keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius. But the technology is still relatively young and incredibly expensive. It also needs to be dramatically increased in order to reduce what humans have already emitted.

Negotiators at work

The first week of the COP26 summit will end on Saturday and negotiations on some of the key aspects of the Paris Agreement are well advanced. National delegates are still trying to figure out how to implement article six of the treaty, which defines the need for carbon emissions trading.

They are also trying to reach agreement on transparency rules for emission reductions, which include questions such as how often countries must report on their progress and how to avoid double counting.


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It’s the decade to cut emissions

As the sun rose in Glasgow, more than 20,000 people – delegates from individual nations, representatives of non-governmental organizations and activists – gathered in Scotland for the start of the United Nations climate conference. two weeks. Known as the Conference of the Parties or COP 26, it takes place from Monday November 1 to Friday November 12, 2021.

COP 26 will mainly focus on two things: (1) commitments on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; and (2) financing and technology transfers from developed countries to developing countries, to help them cope with and adapt to climate change.

This year’s climate negotiations are important because, under the 2015 Paris Agreement, countries must submit information to the UN detailing their plans to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Although discussions on GHGs tend to focus on carbon dioxide (CO2), GHG emissions also include methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N20). The UN aggregates the commitments, called Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and assesses the cumulative impact.

The Paris Agreement, which was adopted at COP 21 in Paris in 2015 and entered into force in 2016, stipulated that NDCs were to be reported every five years, with the intention of increasing commitments over time. time. The submission deadline was 2020, and 194 of 197 parties submitted their first NDCs.

The Paris Agreement also established a target to take action to limit the increase in average global temperature to well below 2.0 degrees Celsius and preferably to 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 Fahrenheit), considered by many countries, especially countries in sub-Saharan Africa and low-lying islands. , be the limit. “1.5 to stay alive,” as the island nations say.

Unfortunately, the nations at the top have made little progress on these issues leading up to COP 26. According to the UN, the commitments made so far will not reduce emissions but will actually allow them to increase by 16%. The current commitments would result in a temperature increase of 2.7 degrees Celsius (4.9 degrees Fahrenheit).

Historically, developed countries (in the UN parlance), such as EU countries and the United States, are the biggest emitters. The EU initially pledged to reduce its GHG emissions by 40% by 2030 based on 1990 levels. In December 2020, it updated its pledges for a more ambitious 55% reduction. by 2030, based on 1990 levels. EU supply is in line with reduction targets recommended by most scientific bodies.

Overall, current commitments would reduce CO emissions2 emissions by only 7% by 2030. But the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, established in 1988 by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environment Program, for example, argues that GHGs must be reduced by 45% by 2030 based on 2010 levels, then reduced to net zero by 2050, in order to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) and d ” avoid irreversible climate change.

The United States has said it will reduce its GHG emissions by 50 to 52% by 2030—based on 2005 levels. While most countries use 1990 as a benchmark, the United States uses 2005, which means their commitments are actually lower. The current 50 to 52 percent of the United States appears to be close to the 55 percent of the EU, but is actually 13 to 14 percent under the 2005 baseline scenario. Accounting tricks will not solve the climate crisis. (Many states in the United States, such as California, Massachusetts, and Washington, use 1990 as a benchmark for emissions.)

Germany, on the other hand, has increased its cuts from 55% to 65% by 2030 based on 1990 levels. Yet although the amount appears large, to achieve this, Germany would have to phase out coal. by 2030, as will the major producing countries of China, India, the United States, Indonesia, Australia and Russia. UN Secretary General António Guterres has called for “no new coal by 2021”. And the president of the COP 26, Alok Sharma, demanded that the meeting of the UNO “entrust the coal to history”. The Powering Past Coal Alliance, a group of 137 countries, regions, cities and organizations working to accelerate the phase-out of coal-fired power plants, will do everything possible to ensure that COP 26 throws coal in the dustbin of history.

Developing countries, like China and India, have proposed cuts based on their economic growth. (Developing countries like China and India still remember historic inequalities in emissions production.) In 2020, China said it will aim to be net zero by 2060 and that its emissions would peak by 2035. Chinese President Xi Jinping will not attend COP 26. In his stead, Chinese Climate Envoy Xie Zhenhua and Vice Minister Zhao Yingmin will lead the delegation and provide China’s commitment to the NDC.

In 2016, India proposed a reduction of 33 to 35 percent by 2030 based on 2005 levels and has yet to submit its 2020 NDC target. Indian Prime Minister Modi will attend COP 26.

Limiting methane emissions will also be discussed. Methane is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the atmosphere. In September, the US and the EU unveiled the Global Methane Pledge, which aims to reduce methane emissions by at least 30% by 2030 based on 2020 levels. Already more than 35 countries have signed the Global Methane Pledge.

Ambitions have been lowered somewhat in recent weeks by the US President’s special climate envoy John Kerry. Chinese President Xi Jinping, Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador and South African President Cyril Ramaphosa will not be in attendance. That said, Biden and many other heads of state will be in attendance. COP 26 will be vital in putting pressure on world leaders to take action and reduce emissions.

AIn addition to emission reductions, finance is a key topic in the UN climate negotiations.

Developed countries have agreed to provide funding to developing countries to help them adapt to the impacts of the climate crisis, such as sea level rise and drought. One hundred billion dollars a year has been pledged to developing countries, a commitment that dates back to the 2009 climate conference in Copenhagen.

This amount is, however, much lower than the amounts claimed by negotiators from various groups of nations, such as the African Group, the Alliance of Small Island States, and the least developed countries and small island developing States, which have the least. contributed to and have already suffered the worst impacts of global warming. And since 2019, the most recent year for which data is available, developed countries have contributed less than $ 90 billion, according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). In 2018, the OECD, together with the UN and the World Bank released a report indicating that $ 6.9 trillion would be needed annually until 2020 to ensure the resilience of developing countries.

As key climate negotiators and NGOs discuss these issues in the negotiating rooms, activists will take to the streets throughout the week to advocate for climate justice. A wave of protests will take place during COP 26, possibly the largest in Scotland since those against the Iraq war in 2003. Yesterday, Extinction Rebellion’s Deep Water Rising actions highlighted how the burning of fossil fuels results in a sea ​​level rise. Friday, a march organized by young people, Fridays for Future, will take place. On Saturday, a Global Day of Action for Climate Justice will follow, with marches planned in Glasgow, London and around the world. And on Sunday, the People’s Summit for Climate Justice will launch a series of in-person and online workshops and events. This week, 350.org is also organizing a Global Week of Action. These actions in Glasgow and around the world will inspire COP 26 negotiators to set high ambitions and take action. Time is running out, because it is the decade to reduce emissions.


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Emirates News Agency – World Council of Muslim Communities Announces International Conference “Islamic Unity: Concept, Opportunities, Challenges”

ABU DHABI, October 31, 2021 (WAM) – The World Council of Muslim Communities held a press conference at the Council’s headquarters in Abu Dhabi, with the participation of Dr Ali Rashid Al Nuaimi, Chairman of the Council, and Dr Mohamed Bechari , the Secretary General, to announce the schedule of the International Conference, entitled “Islamic Unity: Concept, Opportunities, Challenges”, to be held from December 12 to 14 in Abu Dhabi.

Dr. Al Nuaimi announced the holding of the conference, under the patronage of Sheikh Nahyan bin Mubarak Al Nahyan, Minister of Tolerance and Coexistence.

The importance of the conference stems from the need to present an intellectual and legal discourse that fills the void that exists among Muslim communities around the world, to meet the challenge of belonging to contemporary Muslim society, which confirms the role pioneer of academics and thinkers in leading the nation, and presenting an intellectual and legitimate proposal up to the demands of the time.

Al Nuaimi said that one of the conference’s goals is to lead a discourse that stems from the values ​​of coexistence pursued by the UAE, in terms of partnering with others. “We truly believe in this positive partnership of working together to build nations and face the challenges facing humanity everywhere, such as climate change, pandemics, poverty or unemployment, and create opportunities for young people, ”he added.

The President of the Council underlined the importance of the pioneering role of the scholars and thinkers of the nation by presenting a discourse based on legitimate foundations, taking into account the peculiarities of that time, respecting its regulations and laws, and establishing a better future for Muslims and non-Muslims, especially with the existence of certain discourses that divide humanity and serve agendas that harm Muslims wherever they are. He noted that the Council will wish to welcome as many Muslim scholars, thinkers and academic leaders as possible, so that a vision of Abu Dhabi is presented to the world in the service of Muslims and non-Muslims, as regards concerns the concept of Islamic unity. and opens horizons for opportunities that must be invested in the present and the future, to develop strategies to deal with the challenges that Muslims face wherever they are.

The World Council of Muslim Communities is an international non-governmental organization headquartered in Abu Dhabi. It includes more than 900 Islamic organizations and institutions from 142 countries, aiming to achieve one goal: the integration of Muslim communities in their countries, and for its members to obtain full citizenship and full affiliation with the Islamic religion.


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Non profit living

Guys with Ties offers life classes in Massillon in CM2

MASSILLON – Jason Hamilton Jr. doesn’t want to take off his crisp white shirt and black clip-on tie.

He looks and feels great.

This is exactly what a Guys with Ties participant is.

Following: Guys with Ties Expands to Gibbs Elementary in Canton

“We’re dressed for success,” Massillon alumnus and Tiger football star Devin Jordan told more than a dozen students from Franklin Elementary School who have joined the volunteer leadership program.

On Monday, Jordan, president of his nonprofit Beyond the Game foundation, welcomed 87 elementary students in Franklin, Whittier and Gorrell to the brotherhood.

The leadership program for third graders aims to develop good leaders, good manners and good citizens.

Dressed in matching ties and shirts, the boys meet regularly to learn about different skills, including social etiquette, community service, job skills and respect.

Guest speakers will travel in person and virtually to discuss their personal experiences.

Following: Girls with Pearls Prepares Fairless Third Grade Students for the Future

Following: TE Harrison Bryant of Cleveland Browns shares frozen treats with area students

Boys are expected to live up to the program’s motto “Be good. Look good. Do good.”

“Wear this shirt and tie with pride,” he told the third graders.

The first lesson was about making a good first impression, which happens within two to three seconds of meeting someone.

They learned the five ways to make a good first impression – the 5 S’s: stand up when you meet someone for the first time, smile, say your name loud and clear, shake firmly, and say something nice to you. about the person.

Jordan challenged the boys to practice the techniques, promising them that those who follow the rules, do their “homework” and emulate the leaders will be awarded prizes and participate in special events.

As a former Tiger, Jordan wanted to bring the Guys with Ties program to Massillon. They were close last year but COVID has hampered efforts.

“There is a lot of enthusiasm around this program,” he said. “Superintendent (Paul) Salvino really insisted on that.”

The Massillon Guys with Ties program reaches Middlebranch and Avondale schools in Plain Local, Fairless Elementary School and Alliance City schools.

New programs are expected to start in Carrollton and Tusky Valley in the coming weeks, he said.

Girls with Pearls comes to Massillon

The girls also have a chic new group.

The Girls with Pearls is similar to Guys with Ties. The program promotes healthy relationships and values ​​to equip young people with the skills to prepare for femininity.

It was introduced to about 80 grade three girls in the city’s school district last week.

Throwing on organza scarves and satin gloves in a rainbow of matching colors, a beaded bracelet and necklace, the girls regularly meet volunteer coaches.

After just one meeting, Jordan said. there were several girls who asked to join after hearing about the effort from their classmates.

“This is what we want,” he said. “We want to build the program to include all the girls.”

Local Fairless schools hosted the program last year and more are expected to launch a program this year, Jordan said.

The Guys with Ties and Girls With Pearls programs both require volunteers to run the program with help from Jordan.

A positive program

Anytime the district can put a positive male figure in front of the kids to teach good manners, respect and being a good citizen is positive, said Franklin principal Mike Medure.

Hamilton’s mother Ashley Smith is hoping her son’s participation will give him the boost he needs.

“My son has a lot of self-confidence issues and what (this program) does is build confidence. I hope this can help him be more of a leader than a follower,” she said. declared.

As she picked up her son from school on Monday, the youngster couldn’t contain his excitement.

“Look at my shirt,” he told those waiting in the car.

“He likes to look good,” Smith said of his son. “I haven’t seen his face light up like this in a while.”

Contact Amy at 330-775-1135 or [email protected]

On Twitter: @aknappINDE


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Shoals organization seeks to overcome stigma between law enforcement and black community through outreach to youth

SHEFFIELD, Alabama – From Dark to Light is the name of a community youth outreach event that will take place at Sterling Boulevard Church of Christ on Halloween.

Event organizer Chris Garner said the purpose of the event is for people with different perspectives to come together and learn from each other.

“I think everyone has a nifty comment about people because people want to use their own comments, but it gives everyone a chance to have a voice,” Garner said. “If everyone sees a lot of different points of view, everyone gets a different point of view for themselves. “

A partner organization of the event is the Kaiden Garner Project, founded in honor of Florence’s toddler whose life was tragically taken in 2020.

The organization’s vice chairman Eartis Bridges said the founders, one of whom worked with the late Sergeant Nick Risner at the Sheffield Police Department, want to use the Sunday event and the service and the example of Sergeant Risner to reach out to minority youth in the region to help overcome the stigma between law enforcement and the black community.

“I felt it was necessary that we take the opportunity, the Darkness to Light event that we are preparing to host, that it be allowed to wear a uniform because in the black community it is is a big stigma. Our kids don’t want to be law enforcement officers, ”said Bridges. “In order to bridge the gap, we need to stop waiting for other people to do something we could do for ourselves.”

Bridges said that when you invest in young people, you can help correct community mistakes and prevent history from repeating itself.

The event starts Sunday afternoon at 3 p.m. Organizers said they expected an exciting day with food, games, live music and a trunk or treat.


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Non profit living

Spokane teenager helps found refugee outreach program Youth Brining Immigrants Together

When immigrants and refugees arrive in Spokane, they often struggle to make connections in their new community. This can be especially true for young people, who find themselves in a school system that they do not understand, speaking a language that is foreign to them.

Neharika Sharma, junior at Gonzaga Prep, and a group of teens around the world hope to ease this struggle by connecting recent immigrants with local residents through a new nonprofit they have founded called Youth Bringing Immigrants Together (YBIT).

Students from the United States and Ukraine have been invited to participate in a training camp organized by Global Youth Entrepreneurs. There, Sharma teamed up with Larry Huang, a Taiwanese immigrant living in Vancouver, Washington, Daria Malevka from France and Barbara Potochevska from Ukraine.

Soon they realized that they all had something in common: a family experience with immigration. This inspired them to create a non-profit organization dedicated to connecting local residents with immigrants and refugees to ease their transition.

YBIT has been selected as the winner of the non-profit Global Youth Entrepreneur competition. This competition attracts hundreds of applicants from all over the world.

Students in the United States and Ukraine were matched in groups of four to compete for a $ 1,000 grant and the opportunity to receive financial advice from Nike CFO Mehran Nikko and former Microsoft vice president Dan’l Lewin.

This is how Sharma, Huang, Malevka and Potochevska connected. Using their shared family experience with immigration, they introduced a non-profit organization that matches locals with immigrants and refugees to ease their transition.

“We had to create business presentations, financial and business plans within a week, and it was overwhelming with the jet lag,” because two of the founders lived in Ukraine, Sharma said.

“Some of us didn’t have enough time to sleep because the competition was going on,” Potochevska added.

Sharma said the group didn’t know the financial side of doing business, so when they got $ 1,000 they didn’t know how to use it. As a result, Nike’s CFO and Microsoft’s vice president told YBIT how to set up a non-profit organization, register it with the government, and distribute the funds properly.

Shortly after YBIT won the grant, COVID-19 took the world by storm. However, this roadblock benefited the building of their non-profit organization. This saved the group a lot of money as they have built a positive reputation through social media.

Sharma’s parents immigrated from India to Spokane. She is a junior at Gonzaga Prep and enjoys participating in musical theater and Indian classical dance. She said the process took her family about 13 years to immigrate to the United States. Understanding how difficult and trying this process is for so many people, Sharma sought to make this transition easier, especially for families.

When she first started working with YBIT, Sharma was surprised to find that unlike her, most immigrants quickly abandon their culture to assimilate into American life.

“If I had left my culture behind,” she said, “half of my life would have been gone.

She said she tries to prevent this assimilation by posting topics on Instagram that mentees can discuss with their mentors. One week, she asked mentees to share a recipe from their culture with their mentors. With this program, Sharma hopes to encourage teens to embrace their uniqueness.

Huang immigrated to Vancouver from Taiwan at the age of 3. Huang said that because his family spoke Mandarin Chinese, he struggled to overcome the language barrier. His school enrolled him in ESL, which made it difficult for him to adapt to an unfamiliar environment.

“Coping with the language barrier was difficult for me. So I signed up for this innovation boot camp (Global Youth Enterprises) and met the YBIT team and from there I discovered this common story in this field, ”said Huang.

The team decided that the nonprofit would target teens desperate to find a home in the community.

“With the stress and responsibilities that adults have to take on, it’s easy for teens to feel lost in the equation,” Huang said.

Afghan families who fled their homes continue to arrive in Spokane as the Taliban gain traction following the US withdrawal. Sharma said YBIT is “absolutely” looking for opportunities to help Afghan refugees.

When an immigrant family files their documents, they learn about resources designed to facilitate their transition. YBIT presents documents from immigration agencies as a resource for young people. This advertisement is the reason YBIT hosts operations in over 55 countries.

“The language barrier is the most difficult barrier facing immigrants and refugees,” said Jackson Lino, director of youth programs at World Relief.

The four co-founders echoed Lino’s statement, saying easing the language barrier is YBIT’s top priority. Meeting a mentor each week allows mentees to learn the language of their new home and provides teens with a unique opportunity to experience phrases, slang and nuances of the language they are learning.

Ahmed Hassan participated in the YBIT Refugee Mentor / Mentor Program. Hassan recently moved from Saudi Arabia to Ukraine to study at university and is no stranger to moving countries. He was born in Germany and has also lived in Canada and the United Arab Emirates.

He said the YBIT team had it set up with a friend and they instantly hooked up.

“We shared a lot of cultural knowledge and acquired a good amount of new things,” Hassan said. “We both knew different languages ​​as well, so we also practiced this together. “

In this mentorship, Hassan said he found a place to share his experience and realized that the YBIT participants “were one family with the same goals.”

After completing his mentorship, Hassan was invited to remain a volunteer.

“We do our best to give young people all the support they need and to help them get involved in any new environment they find themselves in,” he said.

In order to facilitate communication, mentors must be at least bilingual. Huang is the leader of the Chinese language, Sharma the Hindi leader, Malevka the French and Potochevska the Ukrainian.

In addition to language proficiency, YBIT is looking for likeable, kind and enthusiastic teens about learning about another culture.

Potochevska lives in central Ukraine and plans to study at Taras Shevchenko National University in Kyiv in the fall. She understands the challenges of immigration because she saw her brother immigrate to Australia. She said the process was “really stressful” for everyone involved.

“For migrants, it’s a big cultural difference,” she said. “For me alone, communicating with Americans is sometimes difficult for me, and sometimes I just don’t understand (their) mentality.

YBIT is delighted to welcome a new group of mentees and mentors for the 2021-22 school year. Their mentee application form is open to refugee and immigrant youth. Applications to become a mentor are closed, but teens are encouraged to contact YBIT to find out how they can be of assistance. Visit YBIT online at ybitinternational.wixsite.com/ybit.


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Women’s Sports Foundation Celebrates Inspirational Athletes, Girls and Sport Leaders at Annual Women in Sport Tribute

Allyson Felix, Jordan Larson, Kim Ng, Naomi Osaka and Larry Scott honored with Foundation Signature Awards

Posted: October 13, 2021 at 8:00 p.m. CDT|Update: 4 hours ago

NEW YORK, October 13, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Tonight, the Women’s Sports Foundation celebrated the extraordinary accomplishments of athletes and leaders in women’s sport at their annual salute. Recognized as the biggest evening in women’s sport, the event paid tribute to athletes and executives who made history. Allyson Felix, Jordan larson, Kim Ng, Naomi Osaka and Larry scott – in a national broadcast on Yahoo Sports, preceded by an exclusive reception for donors and supporters of the New-York Historical Society. The salute was presented by WSF Athleta partners, espnW, Gatorade, NBC Sports Group and Yahoo Sports.

The biggest evening in women’s sport! WFTU annual tribute to women in sport.

In a year in which the first female coaches won Super Bowl rings, a former WNBA player became part-owner of the franchise and Team United States women in Tokyo By winning 58% and 60% of the team’s Olympic and Paralympic medals, respectively, there is much to celebrate. The power, impact and popularity of women’s sports and athletes continue to grow – with athletes serving as inspiration and role models, motivating the next generation of young girls to #KeepPlaying. WSF research has shown that participation in sport offers many lifelong benefits, including health and wellness, goal setting and mastery, discipline, self-confidence and leadership skills. While the Salute invites everyone to revel in the celebration, it also serves to remind people of the continued need for equitable access, inclusion and opportunities in sport for girls and women, and he mobilizes everyone to take measures to support the Foundation in its mission.

“The Women’s Sports Foundation is an ally, an advocate and a catalyst for girls and women to reach their highest potential in sport and life,” said Billie Jean King, founder of the WSF. “I am inspired by this incredible group of award winners and proud to recognize their record breaking and earth-shattering accomplishments, and encouraged by girls around the world who are boldly breaking new ground.”

The Foundation’s coveted prizes and this year’s winners included:

Sportswoman of the Year Award – presented to an athlete (in individual sport and team sport) who has shown outstanding athletic performance in the past 12 months.

  • Individual sport, Allyson Felix (Athletics) – World record holder, 18-time World Championship medalist, 11-time Olympic medalist and America’s most decorated track and field athlete in history.
  • Team sport, Jordan larson (Volleyball) – Triple Olympic medalist and captain of history United States Women’s volleyball team.

Wilma Rudolph Courage Price – presented to a female athlete or a team that shows extraordinary courage in its sports performance, demonstrates its ability to overcome adversity, makes a significant contribution to sport and serves as a role model.

  • Naomi Osaka – Four-time Grand Slam champion, social justice activist and mental health advocate

Billie Jean King Leadership Award featured with the Billie Jean King Leadership Initiative – recognizes an individual or group who demonstrates exceptional leadership and contributes significantly to the advancement of women through achievement in sport and the workplace.

  • Kim Ng – General Manager (GM) of the Miami Marlins, the highest ranked woman in Major League Baseball and the first female general manager of all professional male sports teams in the North American major leagues.

Equality Champion Award – recognizes an individual or organization that demonstrates an unwavering commitment to gender equality and the advancement of women and girls in sport.

  • Larry scott – Former Commissioner of the Pac 12 conference, former CEO of the WTA Tour

More information on the winners and their awards can be found here.

The evening’s festivities were a hybrid of virtual and in-person celebration. In addition to the award winners, the Salute show featured programs such as the recently launched Power of She Fund: Child Care Grant, with Athleta, which supports mom-athletes; and the community-based girls’ group The Cycle Effect, which empowers girls through mountain biking and mentoring. The WSF also announced its next president-elect, three-time Olympian and director of player development for the New Jersey Devils, Meghan Duggan, who will take charge of January 2022 the current president, member of the World Rugby Hall of Famer and mixed martial arts athlete Phaidra Knight. Champion athletes participating in the New-York Historical Society event included: Grete Eliassen, Aja Evans, Rachel Garcia, Jessica long, Tatiana mcfadden, Maggie Steffens and more.

“I look forward to the Salute every year to applaud and shine the much-deserved spotlight on everyone’s commitment and accomplishments,” said Phaidra Knight, President of the WSF. “At all levels of sport, women continue to excel and make history. The courage, power and determination displayed throughout the year by women in sport is exactly what the next generation of girls need to see to inspire their own limitless possibilities.

A replay of the WSF Annual Salute, produced by Springtime Media, can be found here. More information about the event can be found here.

About the Women’s Sports Foundation
The Women’s Sports Foundation exists to empower girls and women to reach their potential in sport and in life. We are an ally, an advocate and a catalyst. Founded by Billie Jean King in 1974, we strengthen and expand opportunities for participation and leadership through research, advocacy, community programs and a wide variety of collaborative partnerships. The Women’s Sports Foundation has positively shaped the lives of millions of young people, student-athletes, elite athletes and coaches. We are building a future where every girl and woman can #KeepPlaying and enjoy the lifelong benefits of participating in sport. All the girls. All the women. All sportsÒ. To learn more about the Women’s Sports Foundation, please visit www.WomensSportsFoundation.org

CONTACT:
Patty bifulco
Women’s Sports Foundation
631.230.3322
[email protected]

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SOURCE Women’s Sports Foundation

The above press release has been provided courtesy of PRNewswire. The views, opinions and statements contained in the press release are not endorsed by Gray Media Group and do not necessarily state or reflect those of Gray Media Group, Inc.


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Jonathan Katz urges Elon community and nation to learn from history

Zemari Ahmadi was killed by a US drone strike in Afghanistan in August this year. Ahmadi, along with nine other members of his family, drove a vehicle that the United States mistakenly took for use by a branch of the Islamic State called ISIS-K.

According to author and journalist Johnathan Katz, this type of unapologetic brutality is not uncommon in countries around the world, including the United States. Liberal Arts Forum initiative, Katz spoke at Elon University on October 11 about the consequences of what he called the imperialist mentality and the danger of a desensitized nation.

Katz kicked off his lecture by highlighting the injustice against Ahmadi and his family. Not only were they civilians, but seven of the ten people killed in the strike were children. It was only after the United States received a backlash for the strike that the Pentagon admitted to any sort of wrongdoing. Ahmadi’s remaining family have still not received compensation or reparations, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Drawing on that concept, Katz gave a history lesson on the US occupation of Afghanistan and Haiti for nearly 20 years, as well as the Capitol Riot on January 6. Katz said these three instances can be used to examine and define America’s current economic, political and militaristic climate.

“These three places and their histories and their histories are actually very, very intertwined in a way that I think is instructive in understanding them individually, us as a country and people and understanding growth differently than we do, Americans, can take in the future, ”Katz said.

Katz was the only full-time US journalist in Haiti during the 2010 earthquake and Associated Press correspondent in Haiti from 2007 to 2011. He later revealed the story that United Nations soldiers likely caused cholera outbreak after earthquake that killed thousands. Katz has reported in more than a dozen countries and territories.

In 2011 he was awarded the Medill Medill for Courage in Journalism and in 2019 was National Fellow in New America. Katz also previously headed the Media & Journalism Initiative at the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University, and still contributes frequently to the New York Times and other publications.

Katz is currently writing a book, “Gangsters of Capitalism”, on General Smedley Butler and the legacy of the American Empire. Its release is scheduled for January 18, 2022.

At the event, Katz described in depth the reasoning reported by America behind the occupation of Haiti from 1915 to 1934 and Afghanistan from 2001 to 2021. He also explained the motivations that did not been reported.

“If the reason we went to Afghanistan was to root out Osama bin Laden and destroy the Taliban government that offered him refuge, then this mission should have ended in 2011,” Katz said. “But the mission of war … continued for another decade, and that’s because [the U.S. government had] these other ideals.

From Katz’s perspective, the world’s superpowers have wreaked havoc on Third World countries under the guise of providing aid, education and “civilization.” Katz said that after millions of deaths, entire regions stripped of their resources, and the will of stronger, foreign nations being applied to the colonized, world powers want to forget the past and pretend every country is starting from the same. starting line.

Professor Linda Dunn, who teaches in Peace and Conflict Studies at Elon University, has been a member of a peace organization located in Alamance County for over 40 years. The group, which started as Peacemakers of Alamance County, has now grown into a chapter of Peace Action. Peace action is a national organization that focuses on efforts such as war, the nuclear threat, poverty, climate change and terrorism.

Dunn attended the conference to get Katz’s advice on how best to educate the masses on how people can be conscious and active citizens.

According to Dunn, the Alamance chapter of Action pour la paix has largely focused on educating people about the current state of the country and how it has become, which includes anchoring institutional racism and funding for the American military might. With concepts and ideals brought to the forefront of American minds in light of events such as the withdrawal from Afghanistan and the riot on the Capitol, Dunn said she believed it was more practical than ever to ‘educate the public.

“I have a lot of hope right now,” Dunn said. “I really believe that you young people are more and more aware of all of these issues – of how institutional racism and all of that stuff relates to this military abuse, and our mindset of spending so much money. money for war. “

Considering that Haiti was the first country in the world to abolish slavery and gain independence in 1804Katz said the nation takes great pride in holding its own identity and its own success. About a century after gaining independence, US troops occupied Haiti under the pretext of restore stability in the Caribbean.

According to Katz, during the 20 years of American occupation of Haiti, American troops reestablished slavery, overthrew the Haitian Parliament and emptied the country of its resources for American profit. Now, as the leader of the modern world, the United States still refuses to provide reparations or acknowledge that Haiti’s current state of suffering is its fault, Katz said.

Not only did Katz draw the same correlation from the US occupation of Afghanistan, but he also pointed to the Capitol insurgency earlier this year as a byproduct of the Americans’ response to US military might. Katz pointed out that not only is the United States responsible for the horrors of colonization, political instability and poverty, but the imposition of its strength and will always occurs – regardless of the consequences on human lives.

“I think the first thing we need to do is stop and look at ourselves in the mirror and look at our history,” Katz said. “This kind of awareness has come home in a major way, and Americans are not sure what to do with it – and so some Americans are looking to America first.”

Although this is not a new concept, Katz explained the effect of “brutalizing” a country like the United States, where people are becoming increasingly numb to destruction, to violence. death and poverty left in other countries by their own nation.

“It’s the fault line that exists in America right now, and there certainly is the fault line in a lot of individual Americans with ‘which way are we going to go,’” Katz said. “Are we going to be brutalized or are we going to stop at realizing ourselves?” “

In the wake of more people learning and sympathizing with the damage inflicted on less developed countries by global superpowers, Katz warned that without proper remedies, these war-torn countries would fall into more corrupt and hostile systems. In the case of reparations, Katz said there must be an acknowledgment of what has been stripped and stolen that has put developing countries at a disadvantage from the start.

“It’s the kind of thing that can allow you to take those experiences, hold onto that story and turn it into something more productive instead of just doubling and tripling the brutality,” Katz said.



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Looking back October 7 | Local history

October 7, 2011: It’s been two years since the local Friendly’s franchisee proposed to demolish the Arsenal Street restaurant and build a new one in its place. Now the chain’s parent company has announced it is seeking Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Kevin M. Fear, owner of Mattress Express, still wants the city to sell him two-thirds of an acre. adjacent to 120 Haney St. to park for his business next door at 1241 Arsenal St. instead of Franchisee Friendly, Kessler Family LLC, Rochester.

October 7, 1996: At least one chain of pharmacies in the north of the country – Kinney Drugs – has started offering home HIV test kits, and television commercials have appeared offering the products by mail. Those working with AIDS patients in the north of the country and their families have mixed feelings about the home test kits, pointing out that the test and personalized counseling is always available locally at little or no cost.

October 7, 1971: City police today reported that a two-by-four foot section of concrete fell from under the Court Street Bridge on Tuesday morning and in the middle of Newell Street. It is not believed that the incident was caused by a structural deficiency in the bridge itself, but rather by the effect of frost and water on the trim added to the bridge after its original construction.

October 7, 1946: The Supervisory Board unanimously passed a resolution to discontinue the operation of the Bide-a-wee contagious hospital and send all cases of contagious diseases to the new contagious section of the county sanatorium from Jefferson starting November 1.

October 7, 1921: The toddle top craze that hit Gouverneur in mild form some time ago peaked on the West Side yesterday afternoon when teachers at that school confiscated between two and three dozen tops. The teachers had only paid close attention to the summits after a few days, when it began to appear that the young people were distracted from their studies.

October 7, 1896: A few days ago an article was published explaining how the waitresses at the Harris House had escaped the owner’s edict prohibiting girls from having visitors to their rooms and how Cupid circumvented the difficulties in using the fire escape. . The waitresses of this hotel are esteemed young ladies and the boss wants us to understand that they have not played such a trick.

October 7, 1871: Real estate activity seems to be flourishing at the present time. Mr. OG Staples informs us that he has sold three houses and lots in the past two weeks. Mr. Staples builds very tasty and neat homes and we wish him success in selling them. He has built 14 in the past eight months.

1765: Delegates from nine of the American colonies meet in New York to discuss the Stamp Act crisis and the colonial response to it.

1849: Edgar Allan Poe, 40, tragically dies in Baltimore. Never able to overcome his drinking habits, he was found in a delusional state outside a saloon that served as a polling station.

1944: uprising of prisoners at the Birkenau concentration camp.

1949: Iva Toguri D’Aquino, better known as Tokyo Rose, is sentenced to 10 years in prison for treason.

1985: Four Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) hijackers seize the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro and demand the release of 50 Palestinians held by Israel.

1993: End of the great flood of 1993 on the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, the worst American flood since 1927.

1996: Fox News Channel begins broadcasting.

2001: start of the US invasion of Afghanistan in reaction to the terrorist attacks of September 11; it will become the longest war in US history.

2003: California voters remove Democratic Governor Gray Davis from office in the state’s first successful recall of a sitting governor (only the second successful governor recall in US history); a Republican candidate, bodybuilder / actor Arnold Schwarzenegger wins the election to replace Davis 17 days later.

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Emanuel Martínez brought muralism to Denver. Now gentrification threatens its art

Fresco in the recreation center painted by Emanuel Martínez in 1970. Photo courtesy of the Chicano Murals of Colorado project

Culture

The artist’s iconic murals celebrating Chicano history and culture have made Mile High City a mecca for public art.


Public art has become a contested space visual battlefield in the epic story of Denver’s growth; the one to which the artist Emanuel Martínez has been a part since he painted his first mural on the walls of La Alma Lincoln Park in 1970. In a new art exhibition, Smoking mirrors: visual stories of identity, resistance and resilience, which opens on October 14 at the Museo de las Americas, Martínez will do what he does best: tell the story of the resistance and resilience of indigenous peoples, using mythology and history as a lexicon.

The exhibit opens just weeks after Denver City Council voted unanimously to make La Alma Lincoln Park a historic cultural district. Much of the conversation behind that decision centered on Martínez and the preservation of the hundreds of murals he created to celebrate Chicano history and culture, which many longtime residents consider to be the soul of a neighborhood threatened by gentrification.

“Her contributions aren’t just aesthetic,” said Denver City Councilor Jamie Torres, “they speak for the history of our community, our battles for visibility and justice, and our cultural contributions.” Torres District 3, which includes neighborhoods in the western part of town like Sun Valley and Westwood, is an open-air museum dedicated to Martínez’s murals.

Alma Lincoln Park has been a focal point for the community since its days as a hub of civil rights activism for the Chicano community of Denver. It was home to the Brown Berets, a Communist Party group, and the Crusade for Justice; the local organization led by activist Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzales protested against police brutality, discrimination in employment and inequity in public education suffered by Latinx communities in the city. It was also the site where Martínez painted his first of many murals, not under the auspices of municipal cultural management, but as a form of resistance.

“The first mural I did was outside the housing projects,” says Martínez. “When the director of the Denver Housing Authority heard about it, he came up with an eviction notice.” Martínez says it was his collaboration with the community to paint the artwork that kept him from being dislodged. “The residents who were helping me paint said, ‘If you kick him out, you’re going to have to kick us all out. “

This commitment to community is what continues to distinguish Martínez’s work – which has also appeared in the Smithsonian and in California – from contemporary muralists of some notoriety. (His first commissioned piece, completed in 1967, was for the Bishop of Los Angeles; a Catholic mass altar emblazoned with a crucifix bearing a brown-skinned Jesus and a native woman holding wheat and grapes, believed to signify bread and communion wine.) It’s a commitment that spans decades.

Emmanuel Martinez
“Eyes on the park” by Emanuel Martínez. Photo by Philip Clapham

In 1971, Martínez wanted to create a space for young people to learn and express themselves through art. That year he was hired by Denver Parks and Recreation, first as a lifeguard at La Alma, then, after receiving a grant to implement an arts and crafts training program for neighborhood youth, in as a recreation coordinator. The only problem was the lack of space. Martínez and other members of the community therefore converted an old on-site storage building into a year-round center.

“I never really intended to be a recreation leader,” says Martínez. “I wanted to paint murals.

The unexpected concert, which Martínez remembers, paid around $ 3.60 an hour, had perfect timing. “The town was spending a lot more money removing graffiti than hiring me to do murals,” which Marintez said led him to become the city’s first and only full-time muralist. Denver. There was a catch, however. He had to buy his own paint and supplies. Despite the costs, the artist painted hundreds of murals on building facades and bridges, inside schools and other buildings.

He even turned public swimming pools into gallery space, like in Curtis-Mestizo Park’s “Eyes On the Park,” a fascinating multicultural mural of three subjects with tanned skin, square jaws and sunglasses painted in 1971. which represents the historically black and brown residents neighborhood. “La Alma”, painted in 1978, adorns a wall of the eponymous park’s recreation center with vibrant images full of symbolism linking contemporary Chicano peoples to their indigenous past. His 2000 mural titled “Confluent People” has become an iconic splash of paint along the Speer Boulevard hallway and one of Denverite favorites.

Martínez has since expanded his repertoire, working as a relief artist and sculptor; something that, according to Michael Chavez, program director for Denver Arts & Venues, is often overlooked. “His bust for Cesar Chavez Park is amazing,” he says. Its most recent, an imposing monolith titled “La Raza Unida”, was unveiled in June 2021 during a renaming ceremony for La Raza Park. The piece should be presented to the city as a gift to its permanent collection of public art, according to Chavez. And, at the Museo’s next exhibition, Martínez will unveil new works, including a 6-meter-long sculpture of Quetzalcóatl, the feathered serpent deity of Mexico, alongside more than 30 local artists.

Emmanuel Martinez
Emmanuel Martínez. Photo courtesy of Chicano Murals of Colorado Project

Martínez’s cultural and political awareness began when he was a child, growing up at Five Points. He was part of a group of young people passionate about the Chicano movement. These early political voices were heard through art and continue to influence generations of Chicano and Latinx artists in Denver.

But some, like Lucha Martínez de Luna, archaeologist, founder and director of the Chicano / a Murals of Colorado project, and daughter of Martínez, see Five Points as a warning.

“I am worried because Five Points, which is also a historic cultural district, has almost 100% gentrified,” says Martínez de Luna. She suggests the designation could spur an influx of artists and their co-ops, leaving a trail for developers and yuppies to follow, displacing longtime residents in a process called “art washing.” “The cooperatives are starting to create artist studios, to discuss how they are going to work with the community, but they are also starting to work with developers,” explains Martínez de Luna. “That’s exactly what they did in Five Points, they even changed the name of the neighborhood to RiNo.”

Alma Lincoln Park is the second historic cultural district in Mile High City. Five points is the first. In a 2020 Westword essay by co-founder Patricia Calhoun, she pontificates on how the historically black neighborhood, once known as Harlem of the West, might be more aptly named “Gentrification Station”. The neighborhood in which blacks were demarcated stretched as far as the Platte River, and for many longtime former residents, its consolidation and renaming is a racial form or prejudice intended to erase its black past in order to make it an enjoyable arts hub.

The move came as the neighborhood, one of Denver’s oldest, continues to gentrify; this double-edged social phenomenon promises economic revival in the form of restaurants, cafes and art galleries, but also the displacement of long-time residents. This, just after a 2020 study by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition which named Denver the “second most gentrified city in America.” A 2015 study from the city of Denver had previously classified Lincoln Park and other historically black and Latin neighborhoods as “vulnerable” to gentrification.

This change potentially threatens Martínez’s murals. Since the designation only protects physical buildings, not what is painted on them, art exists at the option of building owners, especially works of art on private property. Thus, the organization of Martínez de Luna, whose mission is to promote, protect and preserve the heritage of the Chicano muralists of Colorado, is working against the clock.

She knows there is no way to get the art back once it’s gone. When asked how many murals had been made or still exist, she could not answer. “Every time I drive through a neighborhood, I remember a place where there was a mural and it’s just not there,” she says. “It’s heartbreaking.”


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Charter committee chairman Darrick Dansby wants the party to be a force again

I wrote about the Greater Cincinnati Charter Committee for about 40 of its 97 years of existence; and, after all these years, the Chartists get cranky when I call them in the print media a “political party”.

Charter is, of course, the organization founded in 1924 to bring down decades of incompetent and corrupt government by political bosses and into the era of the board-manager form of government. The council-manager form of government, beaten and besieged as it is, exists to this day.

The Chartists prefer this rather long title to be called a political party: An independent political organization dedicated to good government.

In my mind, a political organization that has supported and promoted lists of candidates for Cincinnati City Council – and sometimes for other offices – is a political party, but they are, of course, free to call themselves what they are. wish.

Over the years, the fortune of the Charter Committee has increased and decreased on several occasions. But, in 2021, his leadership sees an opportunity to reestablish itself as a major presence at city hall – mainly due to scandals and indictments that have given city council a reputation as a breeding ground for corruption.

This year, under the leadership of a new president, Darrick Dansby, Charter is diversifying.

So far in this municipal election season, Charter has:

  • backed a candidate in a three-person race for an unexpired term in Hamilton County Municipal Court;
  • speak out against number 3, the gigantic eight-part, all-or-nothing Charter amendment that would bring about serious changes in the way city council works;
  • endorsed a very diverse slate of eight council candidates, in a difficult situation where Democratic candidates were told they could not agree to a Charter cross-endorsement.

With only one current board member vying this year who has been elected before – Democrat Greg Landsman – there are plenty of breakthrough opportunities for the massive field of 35 candidates.

Charter, it seems, is in a good position to win a few seats on the new nine-member city council.

The Charter list includes:

  • Two former charter board members to Jim Tarbell and Kevin Flynn, both recognized throughout town.
  • Two Republicans – Steve Goodin and Liz Keating – who were appointed to council seats when the indicted council members stepped down.
  • And four first-time contenders – Jackie Frondorf, whose family is well known in Westwood, the city’s largest neighborhood; Bill Frost, originally from England and an engineer who served as chairman of the Pleasant Ridge Community Council; Galen G. Gordon, an activist from the West End who is the sales manager at the Hilton Netherland Plaza Downtown; and John J. Williams, a lawyer who spent the first 12 years of his career in the city’s notary’s office.

“It’s a good, diverse slate,” Dansby said.

Election of board members is the top priority, but Dansby said the charter committee is very concerned about question 3 and is calling for a “no” vote on all of the charter changes proposed by the rep. state Tom Brinkman, who is also a Republican candidate for council. .

Number 3 would make drastic changes in the way the board does business. This would do:

  • ensure that the salaries of council members are equal to the median household income in the city. This would mean a drop in salary from $ 65,000 per year to about $ 46,000;
  • require council approval of all lawsuits brought by the city;
  • the designated replacement, which has been used to fill vacant board positions since the 1920s, whereby board members choose one or more other board members to choose their replacement, is said to have disappeared;
  • if a board member resigns or otherwise leaves the board, their place will go to 10e place finisher in the last council campaign;
  • eliminate the “pocket veto” of the mayor, where the mayor can choose never to put an item on the council’s agenda or even assign it to a committee;
  • require a one-year residency in the city to serve as mayor or council member;
  • allow individual liability of city employees for certain violations of public meetings and violations of the law on public documents;
  • allow the mayor’s dismissal.

When I spoke to Dansby about it, he did not specifically say whether there were any sections of the Charter amendment with which he and the Charter Committee disagreed.

“It’s not about the problems, it’s about the process,” Dansby said. “It was developed without any input from the community, without any public discussion of the issues.

“It’s a very dangerous thing to have so many amendments in one ballot,” Dansby said. “This is not the way it should be done. Voters should not be forced to vote all or nothing. I cannot support eight major charter changes in one fell swoop.”

Dansby said he believed it all had to do with Brinkman, who gathered more than 4,600 signatures from Cincinnati voters to put number 3 on the ballot.

“It’s just a move by Mr. Brinkman to advance his own candidacy,” Dansby said. “And I don’t like to hear him call him ‘the Brinkman Amendment.’ I don’t want to advertise him. Just call him what he is – Number 3.”

The Hamilton County Republican Party Executive Committee approved Question 3. The Hamilton County Democratic Party has taken no formal action, but party leaders are clearly opposed, as a number of Prominent local Democrats have gone to the Ohio Supreme Court in an unsuccessful attempt to prevent the number 3 from being put on the ballot.

Dansby said he was not sure how his approved board candidates were presenting themselves at No. 3.

“We allow our candidates to have their own perspective on the issues,” Dansby said.

This is certainly not the first time that the Charter Committee has taken a stand for or against a ballot issue, but if you combine that with their rather impressive roster of council candidates and the fact that they are involved in a Race to the municipal court, we are definitely seeing a version of the Charter much more aggressive than it has been in recent years.

Last week, Charter lent her support to Elizabeth A. Tye, a North Avondale attorney who worked as both a prosecutor and defense attorney, for the remaining term in District 2 of the City Court of Hamilton County.

Tye has two opponents in the race – incumbent Republican Bertha Garcia Helmick, who was appointed to the vacant municipal court post in April, and attorney Donte Johnson, the Democratic Party-backed candidate for Hamilton County. Tye is also a Democrat, but Johnson has won party support.

Dansby said Tye “has an incredible amount of experience in the legal system and, for Charter, was clearly the best choice of the three. He’s a dynamic person.”

The new chairman of Charter, a real estate agent involved with Charter for seven years, said he “focuses on bringing young people to Charter; and people who don’t necessarily just vote for a party line. We need to diversify our base and reach the 52 neighborhoods. “

Dansby itself represents something new for Charter.

Throughout its history, Charter has consistently led and supported the Black Cincinnatians – from Ted Berry and Marian Spencer to Tyrone Yates and Yvette Simpson.

But, in 97 years of existence, Charter never had an African-American president until Dansby arrived earlier this year.

“The history of this organization has been great,” said Dansby. “And I’m very proud to be a part of it.”

Already, the new president of Charter is signaling his presence. The Charter is once again a force in city politics.

Don’t call it a political party.


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How parents can find their strength and resilience

Parents facing issues such as violence, drug addiction, and food or financial insecurity often feel blamed, humiliated and judged by society. Even well-intentioned initiatives designed to help them focus only on the issues and challenges they face, as if that was their entire story.

But a new group of community parenting programs recognize the multitude of strengths and wisdom inherent in these parents. These programs help parents recognize what they are doing well, trust their own expertise, honor their resilience, and bear witness to the importance of their love for their children.

Three organizations supported by GGSC’s Raising Caring, Courageous Kids initiative have worked to help parents recognize their individual parenting strengths, promote positive bonds with their children, and improve their ability to raise caring and resilient children. Participation in these programs often causes parents, as well as children, to begin to strengthen their sense of purpose in the world and to articulate their goals and dreams for the future.

Resilient parenting at the Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota

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Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota (LSS) works with families to create stability and success in the home. LSS helps parents involved, or at risk of involvement, in the child protection system.

After listening to the concerns and needs of parents, they created the online program “Resilient Parenting” —a blended learning experience with a combination of online units, face-to-face meetings and activities. interactive learning. The program promotes character strengths such as purpose, gratitude, forgiveness, and love. For example, mindfulness activities can involve breathing, yoga, or visualization breaks that parents can try.

Woven into the program were stories voiced by real parents going through similar experiences. Hearing from other parents offered hope and helped participants trust their own parenting decisions. It also helped create what Carol Dweck, professor of psychology at Stanford University, calls a “growth mindset,” in which parents in the program came to believe their basic abilities might be. further developed through hard work and dedication.

Heather Kamia, director of metro youth and family services at LSS, says they created a parenting program that has met parents in their community “where they are.” “We had to start from the assumption that all parents were the experts on their child. That they had ideas and experiences to share, ”she said. “To develop a productive partnership with parents, we also had to recognize [that] systems they may have experienced before have left many without confidence in this ability. “

According to Andrea Hussong, professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, this kind of strength-based partnership was essential. “It is important to work in partnership with parents around the knowledge that already exists and to help them remove the obstacles that prevent them from acting on this knowledge,” she explained.

Making the program virtual allowed parents to learn at their own pace and in a safe space. “Parents talked about feeling respected. They felt that the content could be really valuable to any parent, not just families involved in the system, ”Kamia said. LSS’s culturally relevant programming, which recognizes how systemic racism and lack of access to needs such as child care, wages and essential technology can affect a parent’s confidence in their child’s education , helped parents trust their own wisdom and positioned them to be able to guide their children to do the same.

Inspiring Grace and Resilience at UCAN

Chicago’s nonprofit UCAN strives to build strong youth and families through education and empowerment. They developed the “Inspiring Grace” program for young parents between the ages of 18 and 20 living in Chicago neighborhoods with high levels of violence, family and community trauma, and a lack of resources, including education and training. employment.

Once a week for six weeks, parents participated in dinner, discussions and activities focused on building resilience and improving parenting skills. Activities included planting seeds to represent forgiveness, marking the stones with aspects of their life they wanted to keep or let go, mindfulness through guided pictures, practicing benevolence by speaking into a mirror, and (most popular activity) creating vision boards. Parents wrote down their thoughts on their life purpose and who they wanted to become and wrote those thoughts on decorative vision boards that they presented to the group.

One vision was “to buy one of the abandoned buildings in the neighborhood for my son so that he always had a place to live”, another “to teach my children what love is”.

The creation of the vision boards made it possible for parents to see themselves in a better light and envision their possible inheritances, and even led to increased happiness. “These exercises led to aha times, in which parents could say, ‘Yes, I do. Yes, I have a sense of purpose. Yes, I help people. Yes, I show love! Said Karrie Mills, co-host of the program.

Velma McBride Murry, Professor of Human and Organizational Development at Vanderbilt University and Scientific Advisor at UCAN, says for these parents, “The consequences of negative childhood experiences are long-standing and the effects can be passed on from generation to generation, with which parents interact and raise their own children. She explained that the program was designed to disrupt the ripple effects of trauma on families through love, forgiveness and purpose.

Mills says it was essential to ensure that any trauma experienced by these parents did not obscure their ability to recognize their parental potential. They were encouraged to recognize the things they did regularly that helped others and showed their ability to love.

Murry says living in a home where parents are supportive and loving creates a sense of self-worth, self-acceptance and self-esteem in children. Having this internal trust can serve as a protective factor for children, reducing their dependence on their peers as a source of validation. She adds that these protection processes are essential when young people live in communities with an increased likelihood of exposure to violence.

Citywise: mentoring and more

Citywise specializes in individual, school and community mentoring programs for 8-12 year olds living in low income urban areas of the UK. Their goal is to develop character strengths in young people, including resilience, self-control, good judgment and fairness.

To be more successful with children, program officials also recognized the importance of involving parents. To help determine what services to offer parents, “they started out by listening, hearing what people are looking for, what they are trying to accomplish with their own parenthood,” according to Hussong.

The program has evolved over time to include parents who attend and participate in mentoring sessions, receive regular communications about the child’s mentoring experiences, and get tips and suggestions for activities that families could do. together.

Hana Bútorová, Director of Citywise Glasgow, says: “Most of the time the parents of the children we worked with were only contacted if something was wrong or something was going on that was difficult. So, we just started contacting them frequently with the right stuff, with quotes from mentors telling us how awesome the kid is today… inviting parents to celebrate their kid’s progress.

Perhaps more importantly, they created informal ways for families to interact, such as “Family Fun Days” and family game and craft clubs. These interactions allowed parents and guardians to reflect on key areas of the program such as self-control and identifying emotions, things they may not have learned when they were younger. “I think that was the biggest advantage of the program: just creating a space for them to start talking more explicitly [those] things, ”Bútorová adds.

Participation in family activities has allowed the character growth of children (and sometimes adults!) To occur naturally. For example, board games allowed parents and children to discuss concepts such as taking turns, the need for patience and honesty. Citywise research found that children who participated in family activities achieved the highest level of character building.

It was especially meaningful for some parents to hear from counselors that their children wanted to participate because they had loving and engaged parents (not just because of games or snacks). When a parent had “realized his value as a parent to his child … it made him feel like his love was doing something important here,” Bútorová said. For parents living difficult lives, this recognition offered a renewed sense of purpose.

Courses for parents

For all parents, these community programs offer many lessons. An important concept they encourage is to reject the idea of ​​having to be “the perfect parent” before trying to raise children in any meaningful way. What parent has not felt this pressure? But the perfect parent does not exist! Children learn resilience when they have the opportunity to watch their parents make mistakes and bounce back.

Realizing that there are no perfect parents means that we are all “work in progress”. As these organizations demonstrate, being an active “work in progress” benefits children. Modeling self-reflection, discovering and leveraging inner parenting strengths, and working alongside children to develop character strengths together can be a rewarding and fulfilling family experience.

Another important lesson is not to be afraid to ask for and accept help from those around you. It is an act of courage, not weakness. When parents have a supportive community and opportunities to discover their strengths, they can better develop a nurturing environment for their children.

Hussong says experts are learning there is no big secret to parenthood; parents may need a variety of tools and habits to establish an environment that is most supportive of their children’s unique needs. “It’s not just the modeling or the communication you use or just the types of activities and things you do with your child, or how you respond to them when they are having difficulty or when they are successful. to demonstrate a positive character and virtues, ”she said. “It’s all of those things.”


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Friendly Neighborhood ‘Dealer of Hope’ Fuels Federal Way

Louis Guiden is known as Federal Way’s “hope dealer”.

Since 2008, the Good Shepherd Youth Outreach of Federal Way has provided mentoring and character development skills to youth in the area. When the pandemic struck, the association pivoted its mission to tackle food insecurity among black and brown families in Federal Way.

“With their children at home, families are running out of food… it was the emergency for us,” said Guiden, 47, executive director of the association. “We have to respond to the need which right now is hunger. ”

Good Shepherd Youth Outreach of Federal Way is one of six finalists from the Western Region in the 2022 Chick-fil-A True Inspiration Awards competition.

The True Inspiration Awards began in 2015, in honor of Chick-fil-A founder S. Truett Cathy. The grant awards celebrate and support nonprofits dealing with education, hunger or homelessness that are run by black people or serve communities of color, according to the organization.

Voting began on September 4 and continues through September 25 through the Chick-fil-A app.

Good Shepherd Youth Outreach of Federal Way was founded by Guiden in 2008. The aim of the organization is to provide mentorship to youth of color through academic support, character development, life skills education and training. support for prevention and intervention.

Feeding Our Community was launched in April 2020. Since then, approximately 2.5 million pounds of food and over 28,000 meals have been served to local families from the Guiden drive-style weekly distribution program started at The Boys and Girls Club of Federal Way.

A team of about 15 people organize the drive-thru distributions each week, including young people from local middle and high schools who receive a stipend for their work, and additional volunteers from the community.

“It went from 15 to 20 cars a week to 120 cars a week,” Guiden said. The pandemic has allowed Guiden to refocus the mission of his program, moving to meet the most immediate needs of the community.

Black, Indigenous and Colored (BIPOC) families make up about 80% of those served by the association, Guiden said. Food is provided through partnerships with the Peacekeeper Society, Food Lifeline and Northwest Harvest.

Few food banks or distribution centers are run by Blacks or BIPOC, Guiden said, leaving a void in the provision of culturally relevant and culturally appropriate foods.

Guiden and his team understand the needs of the people to whom they provide food, and in return, there is a sense of understanding.

“As a black African American man living in Federal Way for 22 years, it really gave me a deep connection to my community, serving food,” he said. “It connects me to the community at large… The fight against food insecurity has given me so much hope, so much enthusiasm, so much love. ”

While Guiden and his team feed the community, people often drop off homemade meals, treats and other tokens of appreciation at distributors.

The True Inspiration Award nomination allowed Guiden to step back and realize the power of his work. If his nonprofit wins, the funds would be used to further develop the Community Empowerment Center, Feeding Our Community and Brothers Bout Business programs.

“It gave me the fuel I needed… I’m like, ‘What else can we fix in Federal Way? What can we do as an organization now to solve the problems of this community? ”

Moved from Louisiana to the Pacific Northwest in 1993, Guiden said he arrived with five dollars in his pocket. A work-related incident shortly after his move left him with a traumatic brain injury, an ankle fracture requiring 12 reconstructive surgeries and constant pain.

He found strength in his story through his faith and his wife. Guiden sees himself as a Sankofa bird, a symbol of his West African heritage that reminds people that “we must keep moving forward by remembering our past,” Guiden said.

By embarking on his own journey, he made sure to plant a seed to strengthen the capacities of future generations.

In its 22 years of mentoring and dedication to the youth of the community, Good Shepherd Youth Outreach has served over 180 youth and families.

“I’m the hope dealer,” he said. “I help people deal effectively with overwhelming pressures. ”

For more information or to get involved, visit www.gsyowa.org.

Local Federal Way youth are primarily responsible for the drive-thru food distribution each week.



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Local files | News, Sports, Jobs

Lt. Darryl Ng, Civil Air Patrol Commander of the Maui County Composite Squadron, will be the guest speaker at the Lahaina Sunset Rotary Club Virtual Reunion at 5:30 p.m. on September 21.

For more than 50 years, the 57th Maui County Composite Squadron has served the community, responding to Hurricane Iniki and famous Eddie Aikau research, according to a press release. Ng will share history and information about the squadron as well as its main mission and programs in Maui.

Club members and guests are welcome to attend the meeting via Zoom. To receive a meeting link, contact Joanne Laird at [email protected]

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Pizza Charity founder to speak to Rotarians

The Rotary Club of Kihei-Wailea will welcome Jonathan Yudis as a guest speaker at its virtual meeting on Wednesday at noon.

Yudis is the founder of the “Charity Pizza in Maui” community service project, which provides hot meals to homeless people in Maui.

The Zoom room will open at 11:30 am for communion. The Zoom meeting ID is 829 1334 8817; the access code is 081120.

For more information, contact Allan Weiland at [email protected]

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Shelter to host an adoption event

The Maui Humane Society will be hosting an adoption event from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on September 18.

No appointment is necessary and there is no adoption fee. Prospective pet parents can participate in the Maui Humane Society’s 10-day Paws to Adopt trial program.

In addition to the animals that await their homes forever, there will be food trucks and live entertainment at the event. Social distancing and masks are mandatory.

For more information, visit www.mauihumanesociety.org.

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Bezos donates to Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity Maui received a personal donation from Jeff Bezos, Founder and Executive Chairman of Amazon.

“We are incredibly grateful for the support of Mr. Bezos”, said Sherri Dodson, executive director of the association. “We are in the process of expanding our home security repair and modification program for low income kupunas and / or homeowners with disabilities, so this donation could not have come at a better time. Sadly, so many of our low income seniors live in unsanitary conditions and just need a helping hand. This donation will help us build our capacities and allow us to continue our mission. Everyone deserves a safe and decent place to live.

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Children’s advocacy group receives donation

The Friends of the Children’s Justice Center of Maui received a personal donation from Amazon Founder and Executive Chairman Jeff Bezos.

“This donation comes at a crucial time for us due to the overwhelming increase in service requests we have received during the COVID pandemic, as well as the broader needs we have seen in the community,” said Paul Tonnessen, executive director of the Friends of the Maui Children’s Justice Center.

The nonprofit organization provides assistance to abused and neglected children, promotes the prevention of child abuse and neglect, and supports the Maui Children’s Justice Center, which is part of the State Judiciary. Hawaii.

For more information about the Friends of the Maui Children’s Justice Center, contact Tonnessen at 986-8634 or visit mauicjc.org.

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Bezos donates to boys and girls clubs

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Maui is one of many local nonprofits that have received a personal donation from Jeff Bezos, founder and executive chairman of Amazon.

“We want to send a huge mahalo to Mr. Bezos and his team for his support and for recognizing the incredible value that Maui’s nonprofits provide,” said Kelly Maluo-Pearson, CEO of Boys & Girls Clubs of Maui.

The nonprofit said it would use the donation to continue providing its evidence-based programs that help young people learn, develop social skills, express themselves creatively and participate in events. sports.

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Saginaw Neighborhood Celebrates Planned Return of Children’s Community Center

SAGINAW, MI – Eight-year-old Asia Pratt was sitting breathlessly laughing next to her friends during a break as she jumped inside the inflatable house set up for an event reconnecting a neighborhood in Saginaw on the south side with an old community center ready to reopen in the coming month.

“I feel very happy,” she said of the celebration going on outside the facility at 3145 Russell. “It was so much fun. I can’t wait to be able to go here.

Organizers say the building – known as “The Nabe” – will likely not open to the community until 2022, but the excitement surrounding the news warranted some sort of block party on Saturday, August 28. The rally included The Nabe’s future target demographic. : Pratt and children his age.

Pratt plans to be the third generation in his family to run and play inside the facility when it reopens. Her father, Michael Pratt, 50, was part of a group of nine adults who formed a non-profit organization and bought the community center where they once played as children.

The Saturday celebration also catered to its demographic age. A DJ played Rick James; Earth, Wind and Fire; Kool and the Gang and other old hitmakers.

Still, the rally seemed to remain focused on the future: more specifically, The Nabe’s potential for the South Side neighborhood that has become largely desolate over the past two decades. Organizers say they hope when the community center reopens it will help revive the area and provide a place to grow up for children living nearby.

Leola Gochett, 80, moved to the South Side neighborhood in December 1970. Her three children spent their youth at The Nabe, known for decades as the Lutheran Charities Neighborhood House Community Center. After several changes of ownership, the building has remained largely unused in recent years, after decades of declining participation.

Gochett said she was delighted to hear that former attendees are planning to resuscitate the community center. She has known the nine members of the association since they played there when they were children.

“I believe in them,” said Gochett, who attended the celebration on Saturday. “This community needs this, to help us get back to the way things were in this neighborhood.”

After purchasing the old building, members of the nonprofit – which bears the same name as the community center – began tidying up the Nabe earlier this summer. It has fallen into disrepair in recent years, so the walls have been repainted, the floors have been repaired and the rooms have been cleaned.

The work remains, organizers say, but the progress of their efforts was visible to anyone who saw the interior of the 24,000-square-foot facility a month ago compared to today.

During the visits organized on Saturday, the participants got a glimpse of this renovated interior. However, much of the event activity at the start of the day took place on the community center lawn and parking lot, which organizers have turned into something that looks like a small fair.

Food vendors were camping on the outskirts of the rally. Children rushed between two inflatable houses and a mobile truck carrying playable video game consoles. Within sight of these children were their parents and other adults socializing to the music of the event.

“I’m so grateful that it brought this community together again,” said Anthony Dent, a 52-year-old man who once attended the community center as a child. “I can’t wait to see how this place will grow when it opens. “

James Carthan, a member of the nonprofit that owns the facility, said the support expressed by the community on Saturday was a sign that more success could be in store for the Nabe.

“It takes a village to raise a child,” said Carthan, 50. “I want this place to be a bright light for the young people of Saginaw.”

Organizers have organized tours of the interior of The Nabe, a Saginaw community center that the owners hope to open within the next year. Here, participants visit a basketball court where a mural was being completed.

RELATED:

Childhood friends reunite to revive Saginaw children’s community center


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A Q&A with The Wilderness Society’s New Mexico Deputy Director – High Country News – Know the West

Kay Bounkeua discusses Lao-Chinese childhood in the state, its connection to the landscape, and the future of the conservation movement.

In the mid-1980s, when Kay Bounkeua was a toddler, her family moved to Northeast Heights, a historically white-only neighborhood in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Her parents had moved to the city from a refugee camp in Thailand more than a decade earlier, after war flooded their landlocked home Laos. When neighbors learned that a Lao-Chinese family was moving in, they signed a petition warning that immigrants would bring the crime with them and devalue local real estate. It was one of the many incidents of racial harassment that plagued Bounkeua’s childhood.

Growing up the way she did, worried about discrimination, financial hardship, and feelings of not belonging, Bounkeua enjoyed biking and hiking in the Sandia Mountains with her family. There they could just be themselves. She fondly remembers speaking with her parents in Lao and Mandarin while contemplating the desert landscape. They all found solace outside, she said. They didn’t worry about “speaking bad languages” and “eating bad food”.

In 2010, Bounkeua joined the Asian Family Center in New Mexico, where he later served as Executive Director. She has led initiatives to provide language access to newcomers and has championed community concerns in local and national politics. But over a year ago, she changed careers: she became the New Mexico deputy director of the Wilderness Society, focusing on working with underrepresented communities in the outdoors and in conservation. .

Heidrich photography

Recently, High Country News spoke with Bounkeua about his transition from social work to conservation, and what it’s like to be one of the few Asians in conservation in the South West. Now that the Biden administration is committed to the “30×30” plan and an inclusive and sustainable future, she believes this is the perfect time to bring diverse community perspectives into the mainstream of conservation. This conversation has been edited for length and clarity.

High Country News: Can you tell me a bit about your past work with the Asian community in New Mexico?

Kay Bounkoua: In 2010, I came to the Asian Family Center as a program coordinator. At the time, it was primarily a direct service provider, providing intervention services to victims of domestic violence. Four years later, I became the managing director. As the organization grew and I dealt with what my family had been through, we created culturally appropriate programs. Just think of those who go from moving to relocating and trying to figure it all out as you build a new home.

I also thought about the future of the organization more from a social justice perspective. As young people who have felt, seen and experienced oppressive actions against our community became more politically engaged, the center has done more organizational and civic engagement work to help members of the Asian community. to exercise their right to vote. We have also started to discuss access to languages ​​in New Mexico. In this way, the Asian Family Center not only provided services to people in the community, but also implemented change at the system level.

HCN: Why did you join the Wilderness Society?

KB: Because I had my daughter, who is now 2 1/2 years old. This shift to parenthood got me thinking about the kind of life I want her to have and the kind of world we leave for our children. And I think this connection to land and place is critical.

As for my relationship with the land and what it means, I think a lot about Laos. When I visited Laos when I was little, before even going up a mountain road, we visited a shrine that people created at the bottom of the mountain, where you pray that the mountain spirits ask permission to cross the country. and guides you throughout your journey. This kind of spiritual connection reminded me that so many do have that spiritual connection with places here in New Mexico.

My dad always told me that the landscape of New Mexico is similar to that of Laos in that it is landlocked and warm. This vivid landscape made me feel connected to my parents’ homeland when I was young – but I’m afraid it will fade away and the ways I connected across the land of New Mexico are no longer. available so that I can share them with my daughter.

Kay Bounkeua and her young daughter hiked the Sandia Mountains near Albuquerque, New Mexico last winter.

Courtesy of Kay Bounkeua

HCN: How has your past community work inspired your conservation efforts at the Wilderness Society?

KB: To do conservation work, you cannot separate it from community work. We should consider the environment and its impacts on the health of communities as an ecosystem. For example, neighborhoods that have been marked in red have fewer trees and are more affected by heat waves. A higher urban heat index is also correlated with higher rates of violence. All of these contribute to the negative effects on the health of our communities.

HCN: What would you like to see changed in the Wilderness Society under your leadership to address the history of exclusion and discrimination in the mainstream conservation movement?

KB: I hope that we will continue to recognize the deep trauma suffered by communities while proposing solutions found within these communities. How can we examine environmental racism, environmental degradation and the root causes of these problems in our community? How do we invest money in Indigenous, Asian, Latin and other colored communities? For those who continue to be most impacted by climate and extinction crises, I think this is where the magic will happen. And a big part of that job is building trust and relationships, which takes a long time.

There is a lot of harm when we do not include people of color in the decision making process. So we began to conduct a series of 25 different hearing sessions with Black, Indigenous, Asian, Latinx and other people of color leaders and organizations to understand what “conservation” means to them and how to make conservation into the realm. New Mexico could be in a respectful relationship with them.

To do conservation work, you cannot separate it from community work. We should consider the environment and its impacts on the health of communities as an ecosystem.

HCN: To achieve a fair and sustainable future under “30×30”, what should policymakers and environmental organizations in the West do to involve more people of color in the movement?

KB: It is important to note that traditional knowledge and science can coexist. But so many times it feels like you can only do one or the other. If we create policies by looking only at Eurocentric science, it is a huge disservice to things that people have known for generations that could potentially support something that we are working on. And we need to welcome people who have been historically excluded from the environmental conservation movement so that they can give their opinion.

There are so many amazing indigenous led organizations across the state and across the country that we should just follow suit as they were the original and continuing stewards of this land. We can also learn from emerging groups, such as Outdoor Afro, Outdoor Asian and Latino Outdoor. They are so culturally based and understand these issues from a racial equity perspective and can provide many solutions to the issues that we are all trying to solve.

Wufei Yu is an editor at High Country News. Send him an e-mail To [email protected] or submit a letter to the editor.



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Salinas students stand up for ethnic studies – Voices of Monterey Bay

Zaira Hernandez testifies at school board meeting | Zoom screenshot

| YOUTH BEAT

By Karen Dorantes

On June 22, parents and grandparents arrived at a meeting of the Salinas Union High School District Governing Board to express their disapproval of the ethnic studies program currently taught in high schools in the district.

That night, no student was there to defend him.

Mike Lipe, one of the adults who came forward to oppose the curriculum, told the board that “there is absolutely no room for activists in our school boards and administrations. . These principles are deeply rooted in radicalism and racism. They promote division and hatred within society.

But the board members who voted for ethnic studies as a condition for a one-semester graduation in 2019 – to be implemented for the class of 2024 – held on.

The council’s support for ethnic studies contrasted with a 2012 decision in Tucson, Arizona, where one of the most popular and successful Mexican-American ethnic studies courses was banned by a law banning any course that ” advocates ethnic solidarity ”.

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Diego Puga Escobar speaks at school board meeting | Zoom screenshot

Carissa Purnell, who has taught ethnic studies in Salinas for the past six years, defined ethnic studies as “courses that use an interdisciplinary approach to analyze historical and contemporary issues and experiences associated with race, class and genre “.

She said ethnic studies were first introduced in the fall of 1968, when the Black Student Union led a student strike at San Francisco State University to demand more representation on campus.

School board president Phillip Tabera said it took five years of discussions to approve the district’s one-year ethnic studies course in 2018. It has become an option for all five high schools in Salinas this year. -the. The council approved a one-semester ethnic studies course in 2019 that will become a graduation requirement for the freshman class of 2024. District officials said the curriculum was developed with input from students. teachers, parents, students and the board.

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CarissaOffice provided-by-Alisal-Union-School-District

Carissa Purnell | Photo provided

Students defend ethnic studies

After the controversy at the June 22 meeting, about half a dozen young people came to the July 13 board meeting to express their support for the ethnic studies program. Many other students attended the meeting, hoping to speak, but public testimony was limited by the council. The most notable group of students was from La Cosecha, a youth organization that is part of the Building Healthy Communities initiative. (Disclosure: I am a member of La Cosecha.)

Seeing a group of students come together and stand up against adults telling them what they should and shouldn’t study in schools is something new to this generation.

Young people in La Cosecha, who are mostly Latino, said they supported ethnic studies because they wanted professionals to teach them about their own history. “My story should be taught, my story should be shown in these schools,” said Diego Puga Escobar, a member of La Cosecha and entering his last year at Alisal High School.

Escobar said after the meeting that he chose to speak to the board because he wanted to be the voice of those who might have been afraid to stand up for ethnic studies. Without ethnic studies, he said he believed there was a much bigger “gap” between people of different cultures, nationalities or ethnicities.

“If we are constantly taught a [side of history], then we’re going to be made to believe that there is only one truth, ”Escobar said. “All we’re trying to do is provide the resources to our people and be able to see that there are many truths on one side. “

Maraly Escalante introduced herself but was unable to speak at the July 13 meeting due to lack of time. She recently graduated from North Salinas High School and took an Ethnic Studies course at Hartnell College. She said the class allowed her to see Mexicans and Latinas in history, but she also learned about the history of other ethnicities and races.

Escalante said she believes ethnic studies gives students a better understanding of where members of their community come from, what their cultures are like, and what challenges they may have.

“I feel like ethnic studies unites us more because we have a new understanding,” she said. “A friend of mine used to tell me that throughout his school career he was ashamed of being African American and he didn’t know why he should be ashamed of it. In a way, ethnic studies help us understand why certain stereotypes exist in our communities and how to correct them.

To those who oppose ethnic studies, Escalante replied, “Yes, a lot of people can identify as Americans, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they see themselves everywhere. [the version of] American history they teach in high schools.

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Philip-Tabera-supplied-by-Carlos-Castro

Philippe Tabera | Photo by Carlos Castro

Meaningful conversation

Alma Cervantes, regional education equity manager for Building Healthy Communities, said her goal is to give young people a platform and “critically challenge a system that has prevented them from learning truth about this country, a system that has not provided a space for them to talk about their history, their history, their cultures.

Cervantes said ethnic studies creates a transformative space where students can engage in meaningful conversation not only with teachers, but with each other as well.

“Ethnic studies is beyond a curriculum,” she said. “It’s a transformative way for students to feel like they belong to the class. It supports their self-esteem, it supports their academics, good attendance and it allows us to see each other in the classrooms. “

Purnell cited three articles that support Cervantes’ point. She said research shows ethnic studies have been “proven to increase grade points, credits, attendance, graduation, and college education, as well as lead to better test scores,” she said. grades, math, reading, writing, science and social studies ”.

Zaira Hernandez, another La Cosecha member and recently graduated from Alisal High School, who spoke at the July 13 board meeting, said: “These young students are supposed to know who they are. , where they want to go and what they want. do for the rest of their lives, but how can you expect them to know who they are, who they are, without taking a course like this, which shares their history and culture? “

Beyond Salinas, on July 17, Gov. Gavin Newson signed a bill requiring freshmen at California State University to take an ethnic studies course to graduate.

Hernandez said pursuing ethnic studies has helped her discover people who may be more like her, not only in terms of race or ethnicity, but also gender. She disagrees with the claim that the program encourages hatred.

In fact, she says, it helps students respect others better. “It’s not trying to divide people.”

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Mother whose son was shot and killed offers help to families affected by gun violence

HAMPTON, Virginia – A mother who lost her son to gun violence has founded a non-profit organization to help other grieving parents after losing a child.

The support group is called MM2K, which stands for “Mommies Matter to Kyyri”.

Sevhn Doggette’s son Kyyri was 25 when he was shot and killed in August 2017. It happened in Charlotte, North Carolina, where Doggette now lives.

She tells News 3 that she is from Hampton Roads and comes here often, and when she heard about the recent violence involving young people, she felt compelled to publicize her organization.

Doggette says MM2K initially provides a listening ear to grieving moms and dads. She also said they have licensed therapists who volunteer their time.

“As for the different mechanics to help them go through, basically every day because it’s like a roller coaster ride for us,” Doggette explained.

As part of the support services, they sometimes even accompany parents to court in the face of the person (s) accused of having killed their child.

“Now you have to deal with this,” she added. “I’m also facing a life sentence and haven’t even committed a crime.”

Related: Norfolk Mother Who Lost Son To Gun Violence Hosts New Podcast to Help Grieving Families

Doggette says that while MM2K is active in Charlotte, she also hopes to host community events in Hampton Roads. She encourages families affected by gun violence to reach out.

More information about MM2K can be found here.

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A pine tree in London, Ontario. transmits healing lessons 30 years after the Oka crisis

Indigenous leaders invite the public to gather around a towering white pine in downtown London, Ontario. park on Sunday to reflect on why it was planted three decades ago.

The little-known tree, called the Tree of Peace, was planted in Ivey Park following the Oka crisis in Quebec which saw Mohawk protesters clash with police for more than two months.

Elders of the Oneida Nation of the Thames, and others who traveled to Quebec during the stalemate to act as negotiators in the summer and fall of 1990, want young people to understand the conflict.

“We planted it because it was a symbol of the great law of peace and how we are peaceful people still living by the precepts of peace, power and righteousness,” said Dan Smoke, who, along with his wife Mary Lou, will assist by leading a prayer circle and a sacred fire.

The colored bands on the tree represent the four Colors of Man (red, white, black and yellow), blue for Heavenly Father, green for Mother Earth and purple for the Creator. Some of the tapes were taken by vandals. (Angela McInnes)

The smoke was there, alongside hundreds of others in the London area, when the tree was planted on July 11, 1991. Although the conflict took place hundreds of miles away, it had an impact on the world. time and still today.

Also known as the Kanesatake Resistance, the armed standoff was sparked by the proposed golf course and townhouse expansion at a sacred Mohawk burial site known as the Pines. The land was not officially Kanesatake territory under the Indian Act, but it was considered sacred.

“The reason they stood up to protect the earth was because their ancestors were buried there,” Smoke said. “So there they were, protecting their ancestors.”

On July 11, the police and army were dispatched to dismantle the barricades with tear gas, resulting in gunfire from both sides and the death of an officer.

September 1, 1990: A Mohawk warrior sits in a golf cart and uses binoculars to view Canadian Army armored vehicles on Route 344 on the Kanesatake reserve in Oka, Quebec. (Tom Hanson / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Smoke said that following the shooting, the Oneida Nation sent their own skilled negotiators to advise the Mohawk people to work towards a peaceful disengagement.

“In our belief system as an indigenous people, the evil of one is the evil of all of us,” he said. “So if one of us is hurt and hurt, then we are all hurt and we are all hurt. So we have to stand up to protect him. It is our responsibility.”

For 78 days, the Mohawk people resisted law enforcement with encampments and blockades under Canadian watch. Before social media, the Oka Crisis shed light on the rights of Indigenous peoples.

“It was at this point that we and all kinds of people in Canada became much more aware of Aboriginal issues,” said John Turner.

Turner and his wife, Anita, were present when the white pine was planted in Ivey Park. “I firmly believe that if different cultures understand each other, it’s just a positive thing.”

From left to right: Mary Lou Smoke, Anita Turner and John Turner. All three were there when the Tree of Peace was first planted in Ivey Park on July 11, 1991. (Angela McInnes)

On the day the crisis ended, a soldier stabbed Waneek Horn-Miller, 14, in the chest with a bayonet as she and other protesters left the barriers, nearly killing her.

Smoke said the Tree of Peace was planted as a healing gesture after the Oka Crisis. Some of those who were at the plantation 30 years ago will return on Sunday to speak and honor the tree. There will also be veterans who were present in Kanesatake.

But Smoke said he was also eager to see new generations come to discover its history and meaning.

“I think it is time for us to pass on this knowledge and this wisdom to our young people so that they can benefit from it in a good way, so that they do not have to go through what we have experienced and what my ancestors lived, “he said.

The Tree of Peace is located beside the Fork of the Thames, off York Street, to the west of the London Labor Council sculpture, “The Praying Hands”. The ceremony begins Sunday at 6 p.m.

Mohawk director Tracey Deer’s debut film, Beans (2020), highlights the strength and resilience of Mohawk women. It finally gets its theatrical release on Friday. 5:25


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COVID demonstrated the immense value of higher education communities (opinion)

When I first started quarantining, well over a year ago, I felt like I had been bowled over in a modernized Danteen hellish landscape. Not one of the deepest circles, where you’re frozen in ice and someone gnaws at your head. Just one of the upper benevolent spheres, where you wander aimlessly between your desk and the refrigerator, endlessly refreshing the New York Times home page. As usual, but on top of that.

What I felt was the strange lived experience of reverse: this literary device – famous employee in Dante Hell – where the suffering of a sinner imitates the nature of his sin. Let the punishment match the crime.

Before COVID-19 hit, modern life had already left us atomized, uprooted, addicted to our smartphones. Over the past year, that life has ironically intensified: we have spent our days locked in our one-bedroom apartments, every human connection mediated by a screen, torn from our communities.

The college classroom was no exception. Just weeks after the start of the pandemic, higher education Jeremias were already prophesying a world in which a Brady Bunch of jerky, pixelated faces would become a permanent educational standard. But despite the tribulations of the past year, I came away reassured that liberal residential education never be completely supplanted by e-learning. Screens simply cannot offer what students are looking for: the chance to live and learn with their peers in tight-knit educational communities.

I have made a career of co-creating educational communities, first at Deep Springs College, then with my own nonprofit, Tidelines Institute (formerly the Arete Project), which runs similar shorter duration programs. By tearing apart such communities, COVID-19 has highlighted their immense value. The pandemic, it seems, will pass. As we begin to think about the fall semester, now It’s time to reinvent and reinvigorate educational communities when the doors of the academy finally reopen.

What is an educational community? Part of it is a social community, as it can happen in a dormitory or a sports team. But it is also an intellectual community, with a dynamic life outside the classroom. The educational community opens up from the classroom to personal relationships, extracurricular, work, meals: lived together and oriented towards learning.

The educational community is the best thing a residential college has to offer. The two together prove that education is not just about mastery of content, but the growth of the human being as a whole. Although I am happy to remember a few things about The Divine Comedy, the truth is, I forgot a lot of material from my undergraduate years. It’s not that the content wasn’t important. It is because he played the role of second violin in the vibrant world of inquiry, debate, experimentation and social relations that have gathered around him. In college, I shared this world with a small group of peers and professors. The academic content provided a substrate and sustenance, but it was within the community that my education took place. This is where I grew up.

This is what so many young people are looking for in their college experience. That’s why every college tour guide speaks convincingly about these ramblings all night long about the meaning of life they enjoy with their roommate. This is why a former student of an intensive humanities program advised incoming students to forgo the 1 p.m. class: so that the cohort discussions started in class can continue over lunch and early after. midday.

And that is precisely what online education will never supplant. Administrators charting a post-pandemic path for their institutions would do well to consider both the scientific evidence and the financial prognosis in favor of educational communities. Substantial research links tight-knit cohorts to a range of positive learning outcomes, including literacy and critical thinking gains, improved performance in STEM courses, and perseverance in college. Online education, on the other hand, can often be associated with higher attrition rate, larger success gaps and widespread student dissatisfaction. And for numbers lovers, while the price of online education can have immediate financial appeal, alumni donations are dismal among online education beneficiaries. Alumni donate to places where they have created memories, formed friendships, and made the transition to adulthood with their peers. (Deep Springs, for example, has an enviable alumni donation rate of almost 50 percent.)

It is true that Deep Springs and Tidelines Institute are outliers, striving to bring the educational community to its most vital embodiment. We did this by creating small islands where a small number of inhabitants – students, staff and faculty – participate equally in shared work and a shared world. While not completely abjuring hierarchy or division of labor, any member of the community can chair a hiring committee or swing a hammer, analyze Hegel, analyze data, or lead a camping trip.

These two institutions exist outside of the “normal” academy, but they offer courses that can be adapted for traditional colleges. Indeed, many institutions already offer educational communities of one kind or another. For those who don’t – or want to create more – here are some general precepts.

  • Cohorts are essential. Educational communities must be porous but made up of a dense network of relationships. It must be possible for individuals to really know each other. Six could be a minimum size, while 50 could be a maximum.
  • Students must share a lasting intellectual experience. The content itself can vary widely but should include at least one ongoing course, ideally for a minimum of a year. Directed studies at Yale University is one example.
  • Experiential opportunities work wonders. They strengthen relationships with students, forge community identity, and help students integrate theory and practice. Wild nature and civilization at the University of Montana effectively coupled substantive courses and outdoor exploration.
  • Diversity is a necessity. Educational communities are at serious risk: that students may self-select from groups of peers who look alike, think and act alike. But peer learning is crucial in such communities, which means students have to come with different backgrounds and beliefs.
  • … but not always. Some students thrive in communities where they share common stories with their peers. This is especially true for students from marginalized backgrounds, for whom a strong community can be a deciding factor in college perseverance. the ScHOLA²RS House at the University of Connecticut offers one of many excellent models.
  • The shared meals are excellent. The shared living space is even better.

Educational communities do not need to be totalizing; after all, it’s not The secret story. They can include French majors and physics majors, football stars, climate change activists and classical pianists. They can manifest in the form of formal programs like those mentioned above or, more simply, they can occur spontaneously.

I know how great it is to create a new program. Faculty members without this bandwidth can still cultivate educational communities. They can encourage seminars to adjourn directly to lunch or coffee where conversations can continue informally. They may advise students to set up directed readings with a handful of their peers. They can connect students with similar interests. And, where formal programs exist, they can point students in the right direction.

The pandemic has shown us how precious and necessary educational communities are. Nowhere else in modern life do we have the spaces and structures that can support such communities, and believe me, I watched. They are the product and the pride of residential colleges alone. When we finally get out of this mundane hell, let’s be ready to help them thrive.

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