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Puppy named official mascot of Parris Island in Beaufort Co, SC

Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot is preparing to welcome its new (and cutest) rookie mascot, a tradition that dates back to 1914.

“Military working dogs have a long history in our organization,” said Parris Island sworn chief officer Bobby Yarbrough. “Everything from battlefield work…to morale and welfare. It is a symbol not only of today’s Marines, but also of past generations.

The pup, a bulldog nicknamed Opha Mae II, is named after the Navy’s first female recruit, Opha Mae Johnson, who enlisted in 1918. Johnson worked in the quartermaster’s office, according to division headquarters. of Marine Corps History and Museums. By the end of World War I, she had achieved the rank of sergeant.

Opha Mae II is the second bulldog mascot named after Johnson, according to reports from Island Packet and Beaufort Gazette.

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Opha Mae II, the new mascot for Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, is set to graduate alongside her handler Friday, May 6, 2022. Lance Cpl. michelle brudnicki

Opha May I began her tenure as the recruit depot mascot in 2017. She was the first female to hold the position after taking over from Cpl. Legend, the depot’s oldest mascot, Parris Island officials previously told the Island Packet and the Beaufort Gazette. Opha May will retire to Chicago with her master after five years of service, Yarbrough said.

Bulldogs and Marines

The bulldogs, Yarbrough said, acted as a symbol for the Marines, who were called “devil’s dogs” during the Battle of Belleau Wood in France during World War I.

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Opha Mae II, a bulldog pup, enjoys traversing the same obstacles as her fellow recruits and will be outfitted in a uniform to begin her mascot duties for Parris Island. launches the corporal. michelle brudnicki

“The bulldog, I believe, was most representative of that image,” Yarbrough said. “It’s more tradition than real history.”

Today, it’s an annual tradition for Marines to visit the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery, the final resting place of Marines killed in action, and “walk down the hill” to drink water at the devil’s dog fountain, he said.

Opha Mae II Mascot Post

Opha Mae II will begin her role as mascot when she graduates on May 6 alongside her master, Pfc. Shannon Morales Canales. She will live in the barracks with her handler, begin her Navy “training” with Oscar Company and be outfitted for a uniform, Yarbrough said. Her duties include boosting morale and attending graduations and community events.

“She likes to go through some of the obstacles and things that other rookies go through,” Yarbrough said. “Just like our mantra, ‘you gotta win the United States Marine title,’ and that’s no different for Opha Mae.”

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Meet Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island’s new mascot, Opha Mae II. launches the corporal. michelle brudnicki

Sofia Sanchez is a breaking news reporter at The Island Packet and Beaufort Gazette. She reports on crime and develops stories in and around Beaufort. Sofia is a Cuban-American journalist from Florida and a graduate of Florida International University in 2020.

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Non profit living

Medford launches effort to remove lead from homes – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News

Medford City Council and Habitat for Humanity will work together to reduce lead contamination

Children exposed to lead-contaminated homes will benefit from a $2.2 million Medford effort to eliminate the poison.

Medford City Council on Thursday evening approved the program, which will be managed by Habitat for Humanity.

“We’re going to be able to help a lot of people,” said Denise James, the nonprofit’s executive director.

According to the Centers for Disease Control.

While children can be contaminated with lead directly from paint chips, it is more common for lead chips to contaminate surrounding soil or the ground where children play.

The program aims to remove lead from 78 homes in Medford.

Most of the funding for the program comes from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development.

To provide the required matching funds, the council donated $200,000 to the program, with an additional $40,000 from Jackson Care Connect.

The agreement with HUD expires on April 30, 2025.

The cleanup effort is part of the city’s 2020-2024 plan to expand and improve affordable housing.

Habitat is still preparing for the three-year program and recently hired Joe Berggren as project manager.

To qualify for the program, a home must have been built before 1978 and must have children under the age of 6 living in it.

Grandparents or other caregivers can also benefit from the program.

Priority will be given to homes where children under 6 have high blood lead levels.

Any homeowner or homeowner interested in participating in the program can call Berggren at 541-779-1983, ext. 102, or [email protected]

To qualify, a homeowner must commit to living in the home for at least three years after repairs to avoid reimbursing the costs, James said.

The household must be considered low-income according to the standards established by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development.

James said Berggren, which begins next week, will conduct an analysis of the properties to determine the extent of the lead contamination and what steps need to be taken to clean up the property.

In addition to lead removal, the program provides an additional $5,000 to a particular home to address other health and safety issues, such as asbestos removal or heating and cooling systems. air conditioner.

James said Habitat will work with licensed contractors for lead removal.

Habitat for Humanity helped restore other homes in the valley and built homes for residents affected by the Almeda fire.

The organization anticipates that many residents will apply to be part of the program, but if it does not receive enough applicants, it will contact owners of older homes, which are common throughout the city.

“If we don’t hear from anyone, we’ll dig deeper into the data,” James said.

Contact freelance writer Damian Mann at [email protected]

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International headquarters

EXPLANATOR: Who is a war criminal and who decides?

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden on Wednesday categorically called Russian Vladimir Putin a “war criminal” for the onslaught unfolding in Ukraine, where hospitals and maternity wards have been bombed. But declaring someone a war criminal is not as simple as saying the words. There are established definitions and processes for determining who is a war criminal and how they should be punished.

The White House had avoided applying the designation to Putin, saying it required investigation and international resolve. After Biden used the term, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said the president “speaks from his heart” and reiterated his statements that there is a process to make a formal decision.

In popular usage, however, the phrase has taken on a colloquial meaning as an umbrella term for someone who is awful.

“It’s clear that Putin is a war criminal, but the president is talking politically about it,” said David Crane, who has worked on war crimes for decades and served as chief prosecutor at the UN Special Court. for Sierra Leone, which tried former Liberian President Charles Taylor.

Investigations into Putin’s actions have already begun. The United States and 44 other countries are working together to investigate possible violations and abuses, after the adoption of a resolution by the United Nations Human Rights Council to create a commission of inquiry. There is another investigation by the International Criminal Court, an independent body based in the Netherlands.

“We’re at the beginning of the beginning,” said Crane, who now heads the Global Accountability Network, which works with the international court and the United Nations, among others. On the day of the invasion, his group set up a task force compiling criminal information on war crimes. He also drafts a sample indictment against Putin. He predicted that an indictment of Putin could take place within a year. But there is no limitation period.

Here’s an overview of how it all works:

WHO IS A WAR CRIMINAL?

The term applies to anyone who violates a set of rules adopted by world leaders known as the law of armed conflict. Rules govern the behavior of countries during times of war.

These rules have been modified and expanded over the past century, drawn from the Geneva Conventions in the aftermath of World War II and protocols added later.

The rules aim to protect those not taking part in combat and those who can no longer fight, including civilians like doctors and nurses, wounded soldiers and prisoners of war. Treaties and protocols specify who can be targeted and with what weapons. Certain weapons are prohibited, including chemical or biological agents.

WHAT SPECIFIC CRIMES MAKE SOMEONE A WAR CRIMINAL?

So-called “grave breaches” of the conventions that constitute war crimes include intentional homicide and the mass destruction and appropriation of property not justified by military necessity. Other war crimes include the deliberate targeting of civilians, the use of disproportionate force, the use of human shields and the taking of hostages.

The International Criminal Court also prosecutes crimes against humanity committed as part of “a widespread or systematic attack directed against any civilian population”. These include murder, extermination, forcible transfer, torture, rape and sexual slavery.

The most likely way for Putin to enter the picture as a war criminal is through the widely accepted legal doctrine of command responsibility. If commanders order or even know or are in a position to know of crimes and have done nothing to prevent them, they can be held legally responsible.

WHAT ARE THE PATHWAYS TO JUSTICE?

Generally, there are four avenues for investigating and determining war crimes, although each has limitations. One is through the International Criminal Court.

A second option would be for the United Nations to hand over its work on the commission of inquiry to a hybrid international war crimes tribunal to prosecute Putin.

A third would be to create a tribunal or court to try Putin by a group of interested or concerned states, such as NATO, the European Union and the United States. One example is the Nuremberg military tribunals after World War II against Nazi leaders.

Finally, some countries have their own laws for prosecuting war crimes. Germany, for example, is already investigating Putin. The United States does not have such a law, but the Department of Justice has a special section that focuses on acts such as international genocide, torture, recruitment of child soldiers, and female genital mutilation.

WHERE COULD PUTIN BE TESTED?

It’s not clear. Russia does not recognize the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court and would not send any suspects to the seat of the Court in The Hague, Netherlands. The United States also does not recognize the authority of the court. Putin could be tried in a country chosen by the United Nations or by the consortium of nations concerned. But getting him there would be difficult.

HAVE NATIONAL LEADERS BEEN PROSECUTED IN THE PAST?

Yes. From the Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals after World War II to more recent ad hoc tribunals, top leaders have been prosecuted for their actions in countries like Bosnia, Cambodia and Rwanda.

Former Yugoslav leader Slobodan Milosevic was tried by a UN court in The Hague for fomenting bloody conflict during the collapse of Yugoslavia in the early 1990s. He died in his cell before the court cannot render a verdict. His Bosnian Serb ally Radovan Karadzic and Bosnian Serb military leader General Ratko Mladic have been successfully prosecuted and are both serving life sentences.

Taylor, from Liberia, was sentenced to 50 years in prison after being found guilty of sponsoring atrocities in neighboring Sierra Leone. Former Chadian dictator Hissène Habré, who died last year, was the first former head of state to be convicted of crimes against humanity by an African court. He was sentenced to life.

___

Corder reported from the Netherlands. News researcher Rhonda Shafner in New York contributed to this report.

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History organization

NMU organization raises awareness of missing and murdered Indigenous women

MARQUETTE, Mich. (WLUC) – A group at Northern Michigan University is raising awareness for missing and murdered Native women.

Red dresses have been installed throughout Whitman Woods to commemorate each woman who has been wrongfully taken from her family.

“Those murdered, sisters, mothers and parents, will be able to see this color and see that we are still here looking for them,” Center for Native American Studies director Amber Morseau said.

The red dress installation is part of the “Sing Our Sisters Home” series presented by the Center for Native American Studies.

Morseau said Indigenous people are the most likely in the United States and Canada to be victims of human trafficking.

“These cases go unreported and those that do are largely ignored or there is no evidence due to the nature of the crime,” Morseau said.

She said she thought law enforcement could work better with Indian Country agencies to get the girls home safely.

“I don’t want to have to walk the streets at night and fear for my life or constantly have my partner with me or a group of people to feel safe as an Indigenous woman,” she said.

Morseau encourages more people to come talk to the indigenous people in the community to learn more about their history.

“Show up for our lighter moments too. To be able to come out and celebrate with us so that you can build community with each other rather than focusing on the traumas that have happened to our people.

She says her goal of bringing awareness to missing and murdered Indigenous people is to never have to hang another red dress in the woods.

“I really hope that one day I don’t have to come here and do this anymore because these cases will be resolved,” Morseau said.

The dress installation will continue to hang in Whitman Woods until March 28.

Clothing donations are still accepted at NMU’s Center for American Studies at Whitman Commons.

Copyright 2022 WLUC. All rights reserved.

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Non profit living

NC woman seeks to help Ukrainians

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina — Terrifying images of war in Ukraine continue to resonate with residents of the former Soviet republic living in North Carolina.


What do you want to know

  • Tatyana Thulien’s nonprofit United Communities helps create a humanitarian project called Road of Life
  • She collects basic necessities like clothes, medicine and money
  • To learn more about donating to his humanitarian project, visit the United Communities Association website

Music has always been part of Tatyana Thulien’s life. She grew up in Kiev under the Soviet Union.

Thulien says she finds playing the piano and singing in her Charlotte home an outlet for hope.

“I’m thinking about love and peace,” Thulien said. “And I think about how every country deserves to live in peace, just like my beloved Ukraine.”

As his hometown is attacked by the Russians, Thulien thinks of his parents, originally from Russia and Ukraine. Her mother survived the siege of Leningrad during World War II as a teenager.

“That’s why the sirens ringing all over Ukraine today ring in my heart,” Thulien said. “Because my mother spent an entire year in besieged Leningrad listening to those sirens.”

In her early twenties, Thulien, then a mother of two, watched the Soviet Union crumble in the 1990s. She lost her job in an engineering department and fell into the savage post-socialist environment of private enterprise.

She eventually received a scholarship to study in the United States at the University of Georgia and the University of Missouri.

She met her husband in Missouri. The two were married in Ukraine before getting her visa and moving to Minnesota in 1997. She has been involved in the Slavic community for many years as a public figure, journalist and Russian teacher.

“Our dear lord wanted me here,” Thulien said. “He wanted me to create the family here and be able to bring my legacy here as well.”

Thulien remains in constant contact with his friends still living in Ukraine. They continue to send him heartbreaking messages and videos of empty store shelves.

“I tell them to stay strong, don’t give up, don’t lose hope and stay alive,” Thulien said.

Thulien seeks to do more for Ukrainians. His nonprofit United Communities helps create a humanitarian project called Road of Life.

She collects basic necessities like clothes, medicine and money.

” People are scared. People are suffering. They are absolutely unsure of their future and we have to help them,” Thulien said.

Thulien says she’s praying for a better future, though she still doesn’t know how the war will end.

“I really don’t know today,” Thulien said. “I hope the whole world will stop and just focus on peace.”

Thulien is a candidate for the Mecklenburg County Commission seat. She also sits on the community relations committee to help raise awareness of county programs, services and initiatives.

To learn more about donating to her humanitarian project, visit the United Communities Association website.

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International headquarters

Prime Minister Modi’s global reach has boosted the BJP electorally

The poll results are also an endorsement of Prime Minister Modi’s comments he made at one of his rallies when he attributed the success of Operation Ganga to India’s rise to power over the World Scene.

New Delhi: The four out of five election result for the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) can be attributed to some extent to the steadfast, determined and extraordinary global reach of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, which led to “India’s substantial rise ” on the global platform. The surge of saffron in most states that have recently gone to the polls suggests that Prime Minister Modi’s “masterstrokes” on the foreign policy front have struck a chord with voters.
As he addressed party workers after the election victory at the BJP headquarters in New Delhi on Thursday, what Prime Minister Modi said was, in fact, a confirmation of how voters endorsed diplomatic positions that his government has taken from time to time. Referring to the ongoing war between Russia and Ukraine, Prime Minister Modi said on Thursday, “India’s many needs are related to the countries concerned, but she is on the side of peace and hopes that all problems will be solved through dialogue”. He added, “In this uncertain environment of upheaval, the people of India, especially states like Uttar Pradesh, have shown their foresight.” “The way voters gave their mandate for stable governments in these polls means that democracy runs through the veins of Indians,” he added.
Prime Minister Modi’s message was loud and clear to the global community as well as Indian politicians who questioned his government’s stance on the conflict in Ukraine. The BJP’s massive mandate in the UP and other states is the people’s response to those who question India’s Ukrainian position. The poll results are also an endorsement of Prime Minister Modi’s comments he made at one of his rallies when he attributed the success of Operation Ganga – an evacuation mission in Ukraine – to the rise in power of India on the world stage. What created a positive impact of Prime Minister Modi’s diplomacy among the people of the contending states was that the President of Ukraine and other world leaders asked him to persuade Russian President Vladimir Putin to stop the war . The fact that Putin continued to brief Prime Minister Modi on the conflict situation “reinforced the belief in the strength of his leadership on the world stage”. Even diplomats from the Department of External Affairs (MEA) analyze how the government’s diplomatic positions have been well received by voters. “Prime Minister Modi not bowing to pressure from Quad members over India’s stance on Ukraine was appreciated even by his political opponents,” a diplomat told the Sunday Guardian.
While expressing satisfaction with law and order, development and other issues in UP, voters in the more remote parts of the state have publicly appreciated Prime Minister Modi’s bold foreign policy moves. What is interesting for diplomats is how the current dispensation’s foreign policy has impacted domestic electoral politics. “That major powers such as the US, UK, Germany, France and Italy are coming to India was the perception of the voters. These countries are unable to bully us today with Modi as prime minister,” a foreign service official says. Prime Minister Modi’s surgical strike on Pakistan continues to thrill voters. “People attributed to the aggressive diplomacy of the Modi government that Pakistan continues to be on the FATF gray list,” the sources said.
China being under enormous pressure due to Prime Minister Modi’s diplomatic offensive was another reason cited by some for supporting the BJP. “Some voters were of the view that India’s pressure and the foreign minister’s tough rhetoric forced China to come to the dialogue table,” a source said.
What has also dominated public discourse is that Prime Minister Modi has been named the most popular leader in the world with an approval rating of 71% of India’s adult population. A US-based global leader endorsement tracker, Morning Consult had released this result. Among the 13 leaders surveyed by the research firm, PM Modi tops the list with 71%. US President Joe Biden and Canadian Justin Trudeau were far behind him. “It was another certificate of Prime Minister Modi’s international image,” a diplomat said.
“Needless to say, India’s international standing has improved tremendously over the past seven years,” a diplomat said. “Although the members of the Quad, including the almighty United States, criticize Russia, India has continued to take a different stance due to the determination of Prime Minister Modi,” he adds. He insisted that India wants peace which can only be achieved through dialogue.
Voters also recalled how the global community praised Prime Minister Modi’s vaccination policy in what was another great global achievement of his government.
Moreover, Prime Minister Modi’s outspoken comments during his Independence Day speech at Red Fort were remembered by UP voters when he said, “India is fighting with great courage against the double challenge of terrorism and expansionism, and does not hesitate to make difficult decisions. “He said that by carrying out surgical and airstrikes, the country was sending the message of a ‘New India’.
“This was welcomed by voters in Uttar Pradesh as the ‘New India’ refrain cemented Prime Minister Modi’s image of being a strong leader,” sources said. It is undeniable that the huge public reaction to Prime Minister Modi’s foreign policy initiatives aimed at containing China’s “enemies” from Pakistan to the Taliban has also boosted the energy levels of BJP workers and leaders. BJP MP Hema Malini was so quick to take advantage when she declared to thunderous applause at a rally that everyone in the world wanted PM Modi to stop the Russian-Ukrainian war .

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Non profit living

Morehead State Music Ambassadors Prepare for Carter Fold | Living

HILTONS — The Music Ambassadors of Morehead State are ready to bring bluegrass and early music to The Carter Family Fold.

The group includes faculty members and students from Morehead State University’s Traditional Music Program, as well as Raymond McLain, who has his own Carter Fold story.

McLain is the director of the Kentucky Center for Traditional Music at Morehead State University, located in Rowan County, Kentucky. He also sits on the board of the Carter Music Center and is the artistic director of The Carter Family Fold.

He performed at the fold and many Carter family shows over the years, starting with his family, the McLain Family Band. According to a press release from the venue, he first began performing at Carter family shows when Janette Carter began performing concerts at the former AP Carter Grocery in 1974. Saturday night he will also be joined by his sister, Ruth McLain Smith. .

Throughout his 50+ year musical career, Raymond McLain has performed across the United States, in 62 foreign countries and has also toured as the Music Ambassador for the US State Department.

The Carter Family Memorial Music Center is a non-profit organization that offers old-school country and folk music weekly at Hiltons. The venue also pays homage to the legendary Carter family (AP Carter, Sara Carter and Maybelle Carter), whose first recordings in 1927 are credited with giving birth to the commercial country music industry.

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Carter Family Fold shows are on Saturday nights. Doors open at 6 p.m. and music begins at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults; $2 for children 6-11 and children 6 and under are free.

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Non profit living

Onward and Upward, the acclaimed military veteran nonprofit, has huge goals for 2022

Classes in session on January 8, 2018. Cabin workspaces

Group of new customers – the photo was taken with their permission

Suicides of active duty personnel and veterans are reaching new heights. This is an alarmingly growing statistic that Onward and Upward want to prevent this from increasing further.

– forward and upward

LOS ANGELES, CA, USA, March 9, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — What has a relatively unknown Wisconsin-based nonprofit been up to for the past 90 days? Onward and Upward, an acclaimed military veterans society, sought to understand why the rate of military suicides has risen from 22 to now more than 30 a day in the United States. According to a Washington Post article written by Peter Marks, dated January 1, 2022, suicides of active duty personnel and veterans are reaching new heights. This is an alarmingly growing statistic that Onward and Upward want to keep from increasing further.

Who is this non-profit organization? It is a veteran-owned and operated community-based online job center (“the Center”) designed to facilitate the employment of home-insecure and unemployed individuals seeking employment. an online or on-site job. Inside this facility is a laptop classroom on one side of the building and on the other side of the building is an area of ​​cubicle computer workstations. For people at the Center who want to work online as remote employees, this arrangement is fine. They have a workplace for their part-time or full-time online employer with mentorship, healthy food and drink, and a six-month program after which they graduate and take their computer home with them and continue to work for their online employer.

For people who are employed to work on-site, the Center mentors them and, if necessary, coordinates transportation to get them to their place of work safely and on time. In either online or on-site employment, the Center offers a six-month program that includes housing and soft skills training designed to provide what is needed to obtain, retain and progress in their employment. During the six months, the client works for their employer, saves up to three months in rent, utilities, and groceries, and attends all professional development training sessions covering topics such as interpersonal communication company, reliability/reliability, conflicts and negotiation, time management. , stress management, money/budget management and networking.

What’s really great about having the Center is to see all the people who once lived in tents, on sidewalks, benches and alleys now employed and safely housed, straighten up and staying up. It is also nice to witness the reunion of mothers with their daughters, brothers with brothers and couples who were once separated and can now be together thanks to a job and a safe place to live.

Onward and Upward helped 17 people in the first year of operation in 2017 (7 of whom were military veterans) to be employed and housed to never be homeless again. In 2018 there were 12 people (7 of which were military veterans) and the third year, 2019, there were 38 people (12 of which were military veterans) who once lived in tents and are now housed and employed and currently all living in their homes. them, working for their employers (online and/or onsite) to never be homeless again. “Our organization within the Center also teaches our clients and community members how to get, keep and grow in any job,” says Onward and Upward. “We enjoy witnessing the personal and professional growth of everyone we have the privilege of meeting and assisting with employment and advancement in employment. Our organization truly enjoys being the conduit and catalyst for new beginnings. for people who are homeless and unemployed, especially military veterans.”

That’s why, over the past 90 days, Onward and Upward is so thrilled to have been introduced to five other veteran service organizations who are equally passionate about ensuring people have the services they need to get back on their feet. foot and stay on their feet. sustainably. After meeting, they formed a coalition of veterans.

Onward and Upward continues, “Collectively and individually, we aim to make a difference in people’s lives, especially for our military brothers and sisters. The other five organizations are Project Diehard, Veterans Warriors One-Stop-Shop (VWOSS), Faith Hope Love for Veterans, Hope Advanced, and Veterans Ranch. Transitional Housing for Veterans and to provide a place for other nonprofit veterans to provide their services is with Project Diehard, more than 5,000 resources and sources for managing military transition issues and advocacy for veterans. VWOSS veterans, women’s issues are resolved and small home villages are established with Faith Hope Love for Veterans, credit issues, background issues and tax liens are resolved with Hope Advanced, and Veterans’ Ranch Veterans works with veterans and their families through horses (horse therapy) with a mission to get these great Americans to put down their heavy coats of burden and walk away as new and improved versions of themselves.

Collectively, the Five Veterans Service Organizations and Onward and Upward is a coalition of veterans whose mission is to prevent 22 military suicides from occurring a day. Onward and Upward have hosted a special day on 02/22/2022 titled “2-22 to Save 22” to bring attention to this crisis and announce that by working together, we can stop military suicide.

The event took place onsite at the Kalahari Resort, Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin, and via online conferencing platform, Whova. The introduction of a “home front forward operating base” was made on 02/22/2022. With the promise of introducing a possible solution to the military suicide crisis, over 200 LinkedIn sign-ups for the 2-22 to Save 22 hybrid event took place, and over 300 connections were made after the event for continue the conversation and start planning this event. concept to become a reality.

Working interdependently with each of the five Veteran Coalition organizations, Onward and Upward is confident that more and more military veterans will avoid going to a dark place and instead have a life worth living.

“We believe that if our brothers and sisters in arms have a life worth living, they will want to live it! We invite individuals and organizations who want to support us in the mission to stop military suicide to visit our website. in our collective and individual missions, we seek people to help us as volunteers, sponsors and/or donors of time, talent and/or treasure. We know that stopping military suicide ‘takes a village’ and we appreciate anyone who would support us in this fight to stop military suicide,” Onward and Upward conclude.

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Canadian army

NATO chief advises Russia against attacking supply lines supporting Ukraine

The NATO Secretary General has warned that a Russian attack on the supply lines of allied countries supporting Ukraine with arms and ammunition would be a dangerous escalation of the war raging in Eastern Europe.

Jens Stoltenberg made the remarks Tuesday during an interview with CBC News as he, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the leaders of Spain and Latvia toured the NATO base and training range at Adazi , outside Riga, the Latvian capital.

“Allies are helping Ukraine uphold its right to self-defense, which is enshrined in the UN charter,” Stoltenberg said after meeting with Trudeau, Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez and Latvian Prime Minister Arturs. Krišjānis Kariņš at Adazi base.

“Russia is the aggressor and Ukraine is defending itself. If there is an attack on a NATO country, a NATO territory, it will trigger Article 5.”

Article 5 is the self-defense clause of NATO’s founding treaty which states that an attack on one member is an attack on all 30 member countries.

“I am absolutely convinced that President Putin knows this and we remove any possibility of miscalculation, of misunderstanding about our commitment to defending every square inch of NATO territory,” Stoltenberg said.

The United States and its allies, including Canada, have been in a race against time to send arms and ammunition to Ukraine, which has been under relentless assault by Russian forces for more than two weeks.

Some members of the US intelligence community fear that Moscow is trying to cut off the flow of weapons into Ukraine, either with airstrikes or long-range artillery. Weapons coming from the West are unloaded in neighboring countries, such as Poland, and then transported by land.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, left, and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg walk during their visit to the Adazi military base in Kadaga, Latvia on Tuesday March. 8, 2022. (Roman Koksarov/AP)

Stoltenberg said there is a clear distinction between supply lines within Ukraine and those operating outside its borders.

“There is a war in Ukraine and, of course, supply lines inside Ukraine can be attacked,” he said.

“An attack on NATO territory, on NATO forces, on NATO capabilities, that would be an attack on NATO.”

Stoltenberg said NATO’s message to Russia is that “they must end the war, that we will continue to support Ukraine, and that we will continue to impose unprecedented sanctions.”

Poland offers fighter jets to Ukraine

The stakes appeared to rise dramatically on Tuesday night when Poland announced it was ready to transfer all of its MiG-29 planes to the United States so they could be handed over to the Ukrainians.

The Polish Foreign Ministry has urged other NATO members with the same type of Russian-made warplanes to do the same.

WATCH | Ukrainian Chargé d’Affaires Andrii Bukvych says fighter jets are needed immediately

Ukraine needs fighter jets and a no-fly zone (diplomat)

“We need these fighters [jets] and sheltered skies as soon as possible,” said Ukrainian Chargé d’Affaires Andrii Bukvych. “Otherwise the cost will be calculated in thousands of civilians.” 6:59

The United States suggested that it would support Poland by providing replacement fighters. But in a tweet on Tuesday evening, the Pentagon said the proposal was not “sustainable” because it would involve fighter jets in the hands of Americans flying in “airspace that is disputed with Russia. .

“[That] raises serious concerns for the entire NATO alliance.”

The West has sent Ukraine thousands of anti-tank and anti-aircraft missiles since the war broke out.

Ukrainian civilians receive weapons training, on the outskirts of Lviv, western Ukraine, Monday, March 7, 2022. (Bernat Armangue/AP)

A Canadian shipment of small arms – including machine guns, carbines and 15 million rounds – arrived in Ukraine just before the Russian invasion. The Liberal government has pledged to send anti-tanks and grenade launchers, but it is not known if the shipment has arrived.

Some of the lethal aid is taken from the Canadian Armed Forces’ own stocks. This highlighted some of the shortcomings facing the Canadian military; the Canadian army does not have its own dedicated anti-aircraft system, for example.

Trudeau was asked on Tuesday if his government was ready to place an urgent supply order to equip the Canadian army in response to the war and Ottawa’s plans to increase the contingent of Canadian troops in Latvia.

“All of these weapons are far more useful right now and in the weeks to come in the hands of Ukrainian soldiers fighting for their lives than they would be in the hands of Canadians,” Trudeau said.

“But of course we have to make sure that we replace those weapons quickly and that we continue to invest in the equipment that allows our armed forces to be able to continue contributing.”

A Russian MiG-29 aircraft in flight outside Moscow on August 11, 2012. (Misha Japaridze/Associated Press)

Trudeau, Stoltenberg and the other leaders visited a training range on Tuesday where troops from a 10-nation contingent were conducting a live-fire training exercise. They walked among armored personnel carriers, tanks and mobile guns and chatted with the troops.

Colonel Sandris Gaugers is the commander of the Latvian mechanized brigade working with the NATO battle group. He said integrating equipment and procedures from different armies has been a challenge but the mission is succeeding.

“Certainly we can go fight”

“Honestly, if I had to say, can we go fight? Sure, we can go fight,” he told Trudeau, Stoltenberg and Sanchez as they overlooked the training area from a position at the top of a hill.

Canada has pledged to add an artillery battery of 120 soldiers to its current commitment of 540 soldiers and staff in Latvia.

General Wayne Eyre, Canada’s top military commander, told CBC News in an exclusive interview on Tuesday that he is currently focused on organizing those reinforcements.

“We have the same challenge we had in World War I, World War II,” the Chief of the Defense Staff said. “We have to cross this great lake known as the Atlantic and we only have limited strategic lift capability. So we are going to have an effect on the ground here very soon.”

Canada activates NATO reinforcements

The federal government has ordered the activation of 3,400 reinforcements who could join the NATO Response Force (NFR) if called by the Supreme Allied Commander.

Eyre said the military is still investigating if and how they will be needed.

“The NATO Response Force is a shopping list of capabilities, which can be requested depending on the nature of what NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander is requesting,” he said. “So the likelihood of all 3,400 being called is relatively low.”

Trudeau also announced on Tuesday the anticipated renewal of Canada’s military contribution to the NATO deterrence mission, known as Operation Reassurance.

WATCH: Canada renews Operation Reassurance

Canada renews NATO’s Operation Reassurance

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the renewal of Operation Reassurance a year before its scheduled end during his visit to Latvia. 1:11

“As Russia continues its unwarranted and unjustifiable attacks on Ukraine, Canada stands united with our European allies in supporting Ukraine and the Ukrainian people, and democracy and human rights everywhere,” said Trudeau on Tuesday.

The mandate to deploy hundreds of Canadian troops to Latvia was set to expire in 2023. The federal cabinet extended it indefinitely in response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Prior to the invasion, the Liberal government signaled in Defense Minister Anita Anand’s mandate letter that it intended to renew the mandate of the NATO mission. Stoltenberg welcomed the move when he and the three prime ministers met the media after their meetings.

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Non profit living

H&M ANNOUNCES SECOND YEAR OF PARTNERSHIP WITH BUY FROM A BLACK WOMAN IN HONOR OF INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY 2022

Buy From a Black Woman is a non-profit organization founded in 2016 by Nikki Porcher that connects more than 600 black women-owned businesses across United States and provides a supportive community with the goal of helping their businesses thrive. Throughout 2021, H&M sponsored events such as the Buy From A Black Woman Inspire Tour and the BFABW Holiday Market which ran from November to December 2021 at the Times Square location of H&M. These events, which saw products from more than 50 black women-owned businesses sold in H&M stores across the country, exposed new customers to these Buy From a Black Woman member businesses.

“Over the past year, working with H&M, we have been able to shine a light on what it means when you believe in and support the communities that support you. The Black Woman Inspire Tour, The Business Accelerator, The Black Woman Holiday Market, these events have helped open the doors wider and we were able to show the world that black women are here,” said Nikki Porcher, Founder of Buy From a Black Woman. “I am thrilled to continue this partnership through 2022 and show why we believe black women are living examples of what is possible, not only when you believe in yourself, but also when you have the support of others. “a community that believes in you. When you support a black woman business owner, you support an entire community. H&M believes in supporting black women.”

Throughout 2022, H&M United States will continue to support Buy From a Black Woman through a variety of activities and support aimed at continued growth and success for business owners, beginning with a donation of $250,000. Starting this summer, H&M United States will once again sponsor the organization’s Buy From a Black Woman Inspire tour, building on H&M the United States brick-and-mortar channels and locations to highlight black women-owned businesses across the country. On the way to fall, H&M United States will continue to focus on sustainability in business by sponsoring the nonprofit’s Black Woman Business Accelerator program. This 10-week business training course includes a structured, expert-led online program to assist Black women business owners in the different ways they can grow, while providing an opportunity to access finance. Internally, H&M United States will sponsor both eligible colleagues who wish to join the Buy From a Black Woman directory and online network and will spotlight the nonprofit’s various ventures throughout the year.

“We are thrilled to enter the second year of our partnership with Buy From a Black Woman. Our relationship with Nikki Porcher and Buy From a Black Woman vendors have allowed us to witness the growth of these businesses in ways we could not have imagined. This partnership exemplifies the impact we want to have in empowering and building capacity in the communities where we live and work,” said Donna DozierGordonInclusion and Diversity Manager at H&M United States.

“After the success and impact we saw in our first year of partnership, we knew we had to continue and expand our support for Nikki Porcher and Buy from a Black Woman for 2022. Through our continued work together, we can further amplify their mission to uplift Black women, their businesses, and their communities,” said carlos duartePresident, H&M Americas.

To watch the trailer for “The Living Example” and see images from the announcement, click here.

For more information on Buying From A Black Woman, please contact:

Nikki PorcherFounder
E-mail: [email protected]
Customers can also donate here.
Support and learn about businesses owned and operated by black women here.

For more information about H&M, please contact:
H&M press relations
E-mail: [email protected]
*We hope you enjoyed reading the latest from H&M, but if not, just email [email protected] and request to be removed from our media list.

H & M Hennes & Mauritz AB (publ) was founded in Sweden in 1947 and is listed on Nasdaq Stockholm. The business idea of ​​H&M is to offer fashion and quality at the best price in a sustainable way. Besides H&M, the group includes the brands COS, Monki, Weekday, & Other Stories, H&M HOME and ARKET as well as Afound. H&M Group has 54 online marketplaces and approximately 4,800 stores in 75 markets, including franchise markets. In 2021, net sales were 199 billion Swedish crowns. The number of employees amounts to approximately 155,000. For more information, visit hmgroup.com.

SOURCEH&M

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Canadian army

DVIDS – News – Task Force 46 leads Exercise Cyber ​​Impact 2022

U.S. Army Task Force 46, commanded by Maj. Gen. Pablo Estrada, is a national response force supporting civilian responders to manage catastrophic chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear incidents, conducts an exercise on the effects of Cyber ​​Attack in Buffalo March 8-10, 2022 Exercise Cyber ​​​​​​Impact 22 features leaders from 12 Army National Guard and other military units from across the country working in subordination to the 46th Military Police Command (MPC) to build relationships and develop mutually supportive plans and processes with local, state, federal and private sectors, academics and Canadian partners.

“We are in the digital age…as we watch the attacks that occur, we are one click away from affecting a power grid or a banking institution, and this is only going to become more prevalent,” said the US Army colonel. David Hayes, deputy chief of staff, communications, 46th MPC, Michigan National Guard.

The three-day exercise is intended to build unity of effort and familiarity with the effects of a cyber attack among all Homeland Defense (HD) partners, all-hazards, defense support civil authorities (DSCA)/Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) to prepare for disaster response and consequence management. Participants from Michigan’s National All-Domain Warfighting Center (NADWC) and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police will also join in person and virtually from Canada.

NADWC maximizes joint combat readiness by providing an adaptable, cost-effective, and integrated training environment across all domains, supported by an ever-expanding Joint Joint Command and Control (JADC2) architecture. All of this is designed to allow the application of combined arms effects in a contested threat environment close to peers.

A high-profile example is last May’s ransomware attack on Colonial Pipeline which disrupted plant operations for days and led to a nationwide fuel crisis, which also dramatically increased prices. . Scenarios like this will be used to help guide discussions, brainstorming sessions and expert roundtables.

“This is an exercise that will test the nation’s resilience, strengthen preparedness and cooperation among partners, and improve the effectiveness of a joint response to protect national security,” Hayes said. .

Cyber ​​Impact 2022 attendees will include government and industry leaders from the local, state and federal levels, including those representing police and emergency response units, environmental conservation authorities and electric utilities, Canada-US border security and more.

Mercyhurst University cybersecurity professor Christopher Mansour will be among the panel of distinguished speakers from institutions including MIT, FBI, FEMA, Army Cyber ​​Institute, Niagara University, Ontario Police Cybercrime Investigation Team and U.S. Coast Guard District 9, which oversees operations. across the five Great Lakes.

“Considering how devastating cyberattacks on critical infrastructure can be, it is important to test our vulnerabilities so that we can work to prevent them in the future,” said Mansour, whose presentation will focus on security system threats. industrial control (ICS).

The three-day exercise will include the following:
• Day 1 – Academic Presentations, M&T Bank, Buffalo, New York,
• Day 2 – Tabletop Training Exercise, Red Team Maneuvers, KeyBank Center, 1 Seymour H Knox III Plaza, Buffalo
• Day 3 – Communications exercise at Highmark Stadium, Orchard Park, New York and a tour of key infrastructure in the region (New York Power Authority, US Coast Guard Station)

“Multi-domain operational exercises like this help prevent and prepare not only Task Force 46, but also key metropolitan partners for what unfortunately could be America’s Worst Day. We owe it to all Americans to ensure that the military and emergency responders are prepared for all risks,” said U.S. Army Col. Chris McKinney, Chief of Staff for Task Force 46.

For more information or to arrange interviews and other media coverage, please RSVP by 5 p.m. on March 2, 2022 by contacting:
Staff Sgt. Cambrin Bassett, Public Affairs NCO for Task Force 46, Michigan National Guard: (616) 990-9112 or [email protected]; [email protected]

About Task Force 46.
U.S. Army Task Force 46 is a national response force that assists civilian responders in managing catastrophic chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear incidents. The 46th MPC provides command and control of 12 Army National Guard units and other military units nationwide to build relationships and develop plans and processes for mutual support with local, state, federal, private sector, academic and Canadian partners. For more information, please visit: https://www.facebook.com/46MPCMD







Date taken: 03.07.2022
Date posted: 03.07.2022 07:25
Story ID: 415902
Location: LANSING, MI, United States





Web views: 45
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Canadian army

What if the Winter War came to Canada?

There is a nice sound in the expression “war in the mountains”. He has a Ring of Audacity; it feels cleaner than trench warfare and lighter than tank warfare. The only thing that can match it is war in the air, and it’s gotten too deadly to be nice. It has also become too familiar; while the War in the Mountains is still weird enough to seem romantic. Except, of course, to the men who have to fight it.

– McKay Jenkins The last ridge

Like many of you, last week I was in shock watching Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Just when we think we have seen enough defining world events for our generation to last into the next century, Putin decides to flex his imperialist muscle and plunges two nations, including a military superpower, into an unprovoked and unnecessary war. Let’s be clear: there is no splitting the freedom convoy, let’s try to listen to both sides here. On one side are the Kremlin belligerents and on the other are thousands of soldiers and civilians defending their homeland. Millions of people are now displaced. The world stands in solidarity with Ukraine. I am with Ukraine.

I am not a soldier and I am lucky not to have known the war. I enjoy studying military history as a hobby, which leads me to listen to Dan Carlin’s podcasts for many hours. I never believed that war was the answer, but if it comes to your doorstep and threatens your family and your country (as it does for Ukrainians), I believe defending your homeland is justified.

Such an event of this magnitude taking place in the 21st century got me thinking: what if we were the ones being invaded at the behest of a narcissistic autocrat? It’s a highly unlikely scenario given Canada’s fortuitous geopolitical position, but dystopian fiction writers have explored the plausibility of US annexation. So imagine, for a second, that in the middle of a cold winter, Canada is invaded on many fronts by armed forces far superior to ours, and the leader of Canada is calling on everyone of fighting age to take up arms against the ‘aggressor.

If this scenario were to come true, I would volunteer for a Mountain Division. Not because of an illusion that ski warfare would somehow be more fun than urban warfare, but because I know I have the skills to travel through snow and through mountainous terrain quite quickly.

Military skiing has a rich history in the Scandinavian nations. In 1716, during the Great Northern War, a Norwegian general was alerted to an impending Swedish attack by a messenger on skis. After surprising the Swedes and repelling the attack, Norway realized the advantage of rapid mobilization on the snow and drafted all the skiers they could find into their military ranks. In the 1800s, Nordic military ski patrols began to organize competitions which led to the foundation of modern Nordic ski racing. The ability to move quickly over rugged mountainous terrain was essential for armies in the European Alps in the 20th century.

In the context of soldiers on skis defending themselves against a superpower, the best example is the Winter War, which began with the Soviet invasion of Finland on November 30, 1939, three months after the outbreak of World War II. The Finns were vastly outnumbered and under-resourced, with many recently enlisted soldiers not even having a uniform and making do with their own winter clothes. But they knew their terrain and climate, and almost all Finnish soldiers were skilled in cross-country skiing. They used the cold, the snow, the forest and the long hours of darkness to their advantage. The Finns dressed in layers with skiers wearing light white snow capes, the camouflage rendering them nearly invisible and capable of executing many successful guerrilla attacks against the Soviet columns.

The United States has the 10th Mountain Division, which was active in World War II and until recently served as a dedicated mountain warfare unit in places like Iraq and Syria. Although there are special operations training programs in Canada for mountain travel, the armed forces still do not have a dedicated mountain unit, at least not the one they want us to know. In a 2017 service article titled “Mountain Warfare In The Canadian Army,” Maj Aafaq Hyder, a student at the Canadian Forces College, wrote:

“The [Canadian Army]recent involvement in the Alpine operations in Korea, the Balkans and Afghanistan has highlighted the importance of preparing its leaders and troops to [Mountain Warfare] and fight at high altitude. Currently, the [Canadian Army] little focus on preparing permanent units specially trained or equipped to deploy to a mountainous theater. To remain operationally viable and meet its military commitments to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the [Canadian Army] must develop their skills in mountain operations. It must carve out a place for itself as an expeditionary force capable of rapid intervention in [Mountain Warfare].”

Of all the things I associate with skiing, war has never been one. And I sincerely hope that war never comes to Canada’s doorstep. But if the last week has shown us all one thing, it’s that the tyrants of this world might just choose to do it anyway.

Vince Shuley encourages you to donate to the Ukrainian Red Cross Humanitarian Crisis Appeal. For questions, comments or suggestions for The Outsider, email [email protected] or Instagram @whis_vince.

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Non profit living

San Antonio Ukrainians ask for help during meeting with Rep. Joaquin Castro

SAN ANTONIO — Ukrainians living in San Antonio hope to make their voices heard in Washington, DC A total of six women who represent local Ukrainian nonprofit San Antonio met directly with Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-San Antonio) on Friday.

They wanted to share their worries and frustrations about the war in their native country. They are looking for answers to help their loved ones back home.

“I keep in touch with my friends who are in hiding. They are scared and live in constant fear,” said Viktoriya Lundblade.

Lundblade said his hometown of Kharkiv was leveled by Russian shelling. It is one of many areas under constant Russian assault.

“You see a beautiful city, people dancing. Right now this city is bombed, destroyed,” Lundblade said.

Castro moderated the roundtable and wanted to reassure these women that their calls are being heard.

“I wanted to let them know that I’m listening and Congress is listening,” Castro said. “I know they speak in a very desperate voice because many of them still have family members there.”

A d

These women are calling for tougher sanctions against Russia.

“The United States is stepping up its military support, also imposing very tough sanctions on (President) Putin and Russia,” Castro said.

Castro said he was also working with Missouri Representative Ann Wagner (R-MO) to impose social and cultural sanctions in Russia, as well as a way to help refugees.

“I’m going to take this conversation and talk to other lawmakers in Washington. There has been talk of a humanitarian corridor so people fleeing the country have a safe route, so they don’t risk being hit by Russian fire,” Castro said.

These women just hope that they can one day return to the Ukraine they once called home.

“Please stop this war. I want to go back to my hometown, which is already bombed, and I want to see my people,” Lundblade said.

Copyright 2022 by KSAT – All rights reserved.

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Canadian army

Ukraine-Russia War: Live Updates – The New York Times

A fire broke out early Friday at a complex in southern Ukraine housing Europe’s largest nuclear power plant after Russian troops fired on the area, and the Russian military later took control of the site, Ukrainian officials said.

Security camera footage verified by The New York Times showed a burning building inside the Zaporizhzhia nuclear complex near a line of military vehicles. The videos appeared to show people in the vehicles shooting at power plant buildings. Ukraine’s state emergency service later said the fire was extinguished after 6 a.m.

The fire did not affect essential plant equipment, the International Atomic Energy Agency said on Twitterciting his communication with the Ukrainian government.

About an hour after dawn, the inspection of Ukrainian nuclear regulations said in a press release that Russian military forces now occupied the complex. He said all power units at the site remained intact and no changes in radiation levels were observed.

The fire started after a Russian attack on a training building outside the factory perimeter, according to a statement from Ukraine’s state emergency service. A spokesman for the nuclear power plant, Andriy Tuz, was quoted by The Associated Press as saying on Ukrainian television that shells set fire to one of the plant’s six reactors which was being renovated and did not work.

Ukraine’s nuclear inspectorate later said in its statement that one unit of the six units was working, another was “out of order”, two were being cooled down and two others had been disconnected from the grid.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky had accused the Russian military of deliberately attacking the complex and said an explosion there would have been “the end for everyone, the end of Europe”.

“Only immediate actions from Europe could stop the Russian military,” he added.

President Biden spoke with Mr. Zelensky about the fire and joined him in urging Russia to “cease its military activities in the region and allow firefighters and emergency responders access to the site,” the White House said. Local reports later said emergency teams had gained access.

Mr. Biden’s energy secretary, Jennifer M. Granholm, said on Twitter that the United States had not detected high levels of radiation in the region, echoing an earlier assessment by the International Atomic Energy Agency. “The plant’s reactors are protected by robust containment structures and the reactors are shut down safely,” she said.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said he will request an emergency meeting of the United Nations Security Council over the fire at the complex, according to his office.

Before the fire was reported by Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba, Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency said in a press release that “a large number of Russian tanks and infantry” had entered Enerhodar, a town next to the factory. Chief Executive Rafael Mariano Grossi said troops were “heading straight” to the reactor site.

the Zaporizhia nuclear complex, on the Dnieper about 160 km north of Crimea, is the largest in Europe. According to the International Atomic Energy Agencyits six reactors produce a total of 6,000 megawatts of electricity.

By comparison, the Chernobyl plant in northern Ukraine produced 3,800 megawatts, about a third less. (One megawatt, one million watts, is enough to light 10,000 hundred-watt bulbs.) All four reactors at the Chernobyl complex were shut down after one suffered a catastrophic fire and meltdown in 1986 .

Reactor cores are filled with highly radioactive fuel. But an added hazard at the Zaporizhzhia site is the many acres of open water ponds behind the complex where spent fuel rods have been cooled for years. Experts fear that errant shells or missiles striking such sites could trigger radiological disasters.

For days, social media reports detailed how the residents of Enerhodar erected a giant barrier of tires, vehicles, and metal barricades in an attempt to block a Russian advance into the city and the reactor site. Christoph Koettl, Visual Investigator for The New York Times, noted on twitter that the barricades were so big that they could be seen from outer space by orbiting satellites.

Since last Sunday, three days after the start of the invasion, the Ukrainian nuclear regulator started reporting an unusual rate of disconnections: Six of the country’s 15 reactors were offline. Tuesday, the Installation of Zaporizhzhia was the site with the most offline reactors.

John Youn, Marc Santora and Nathan Willis contributed report.

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International headquarters

Why the Ukrainian Invasion Was Predictable: ‘It’s time the world finally learned a lesson about Russia’ | FIU News

Through a series of opinion pieces, FIU News shares the expertise and diverse perspectives of members of the university community. In this article, Besiki Luka Kutateladze, an associate professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice and a native of the Republic of Georgia, examines how many experts saw the attack on Ukraine coming — and even warned the world about its probability.

By Besiki Luka Kutateladze

The Russian invasion of Ukraine is finally getting some deserved attention. From financial penalties to direct military aid, the West unites to confront Putin’s imperialism. Along with this development comes the realization that the benefits of resisting Russian aggression outweigh the economic and security risks posed by such actions. While it’s certainly refreshing to see the West finally throwing a punch, much of this could have been done sooner.

I remember 2008, standing in front of the United Nations headquarters in New York as an international student from Georgia, shouting at the top of his lungs: If the West ignores the Russian invasion of Georgia, this would encourage further Russian military expansion both south and west. As in 2008, the opportunities still seem endless, from Kazakhstan to the Baltic countries, even if the latter are members of NATO.

Russia occupies 20% of Georgiaand continues the process of creeping annexation land surrounding the occupied territories. Russia has also orchestrated frozen conflicts in Nagorno-Karabakh and Transnistria.

Still, the move to Ukraine seemed to fetch the biggest prizes for the post-Soviet era. The invasion was intended to deter the Euro-Atlantic integration of Ukraine, as well as Georgia and Moldova. Putin has always considered Ukraine to be part of the historical territory of greater Russia. The illegality of 2014 annexation of Crimea and eastern Ukraine tamed the unbridled appetite of the imperialist monster for nearly eight years, but those who thought Putin would stop there were wrong.

The ground for an invasion of Ukraine could not have been more fertile.

The rise of the European Union energy dependence on Russia has made many Europeans, and in particular Germans, prefer today’s egg to tomorrow’s chicken. While Russian natural gas, crude oil and solid fuels kept European cars running and buildings warm, many European politicians blamed Ukrainians (and also Georgians) for not being ready to join the EU or NATO.

At the Bucharest summit in 2008, NATO created a path for Ukraine and Georgia to join NATO, but no major steps have been taken, leaving these fragile democracies in danger of slipping back into the Russian orbit.

The abandonment of Ukraine and Georgia has stalled pro-democracy reforms throughout the post-Soviet sphere whose leaders are watching Georgia and Ukraine pay a heavy price for looking west.

Russia has been undeterred for far too long. The ongoing war in Ukraine is being waged on behalf of the entire region. The Ukrainian people are being punished for their commitment to building a free democratic society, a society that their eastern neighbor still hates. Offering NATO and EU memberships is the least we can do to thank these fighters for their commitment to a free world.

Professor Kutateladze experienced first-hand Russian aggression in the 1990s when Russia took control of the Georgian regions of Abkhazia and South Ossetia. During the 2008 Russo-Georgian War, he joined his fellow Georgians in New York and Washington DC to protest the occupation and warn against possible future aggression from the Putin regime. From 2008 to 2013, he played a crucial role in the development of the United Nations Rule of Law Indicators. In 2002, he was a US State Department Fellow in the Republic of Georgia. He holds a law degree from Georgia and a doctorate in criminal justice from the United States.

Besiki Luka Kutateladze

Map of Russian conflicts

Map of Post-Soviet Era Conflicts (Source: Warsaw Institute)

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History organization

The history of Bottega Veneta – WWD

It’s hard to imagine Bottega Veneta, which last year surpassed the 1.5 billion euro mark and achieved global brand status, as a struggling, understated and on the verge of bankruptcy in 2001 – and many may have forgotten that the acquisition of the brand was led by Tom Ford and Domenico De Sole, who then ran the Gucci Group.

Gucci Group takes the reins

De Sole then revealed that Bottega Veneta was at the top of his list of acquisition targets and, together with Ford, realized that the brand’s strong heritage of high-quality leather accessories and footwear and craftsmanship Italian had enormous potential. He thought the brand could exponentially increase its revenue, which in 2000 was around $50 million.

Ford did not become involved in the design of the collection, as it took over the design of the Yves Saint Laurent Rive Gauche rtw line, which Gucci Group acquired in November 1999. Instead, Tomas Maier was appointed to the position of creator. director of Bottega Veneta.

Initially, Gucci Group purchased a 66.67% stake in Bottega Veneta through a capital investment of $96.2 million and the purchase of shares from its shareholders for $60.6 million, for a total of $156.8 million. The remaining 33.33% was in the hands of its shareholders – the Moltedo family.

The beginnings of Bottega Veneta

The company was founded in 1966 in Vicenza, Veneto, by Michele Taddei and Renzo Zengiaro. Shortly after Zengiaro left Bottega Veneta in the late 70s, Taddei handed the business over to his ex-wife Laura Braggion, who ran the business with her second husband Vittorio Moltedo and was the brand’s creative director. . She would contribute to the brand’s early success in the United States by becoming Andy Warhol’s assistant, whose studios made the short film “Bottega Veneta Industrial Videotape” in 1985, and opened the first store there in New York in 1972.

The brand had enjoyed success in the 60s and 70s as an expression of high quality, understated elegance and craftsmanship. At the time of the acquisition, Bottega Veneta had 12 directly operated stores in the United States, five in Europe and four in Asia, and the Italian luxury group has developed its strategy of controlling distribution in Japan, a historically strong market for the brand. , including the operation of 19 stores.

The Moltedos left Bottega Veneta shortly after the acquisition of Gucci Group and Patrizio di Marco was recruited from Céline, where he was president of US operations, to join Bottega Veneta as general manager in May 2001. The following month, he was promoted to CEO, while at the same time Tomas Maier was hired as the brand’s creative director, preparing Bottega Veneta for its reinvention.

Thomas Maier codifies the Bottega plan

Germany’s Maier, who had spent nine years at Hermès and previously worked at Guy Laroche and Sonia Rykiel, was an unlikely savior for a company steeped in Italian tradition. But the principles he established – no logos and no compromises – redefined Bottega Veneta in an era of luxury brand gone mad.

Tomas Maier
Billy Farrell/BFA/REX/Shuttersto

The women’s rtw line debuted in October 1997 and was briefly discontinued by Gucci. Maier reinstated it and in 2004 the company introduced menswear and quickly established its signature look: refined, realistic and ever-changing, never out of style.

Starting from the brand’s signature Intrecciato woven leather bags and leveraging the strength of its artisans, the history and cultural context of the region itself, Maier set out to create a style brand of life. As the ’90s logo craze raged, he was drawn to the brand’s slogan that resonated with the designer, who favored sophisticated designs that advocated individualism: “When your own initials are enough.”

Di Marco was tasked with repositioning Bottega Veneta in the luxury range, which was a difficult task as the brand had moved away from its roots and diluted its brand DNA by adopting a flashier and less luxurious identity and he did not much remained of the old archives.

Clarity of vision and disciplined execution paid off, and after structuring its global organization and distribution, increasing its revenue more than tenfold in six years, in 2009 di Marco left the company on a high. and was called upon to lead the Gucci brand. , succeeding Mark Lee as CEO.

Bottega in the years

In January 2009, Marco Bizzarri, previously at Stella McCartney, was named President and CEO of Bottega Veneta, and although his arrival coincided with the global recession, he was also able to lead the brand through another phase of growth.

Bottega Veneta Knot pouch in Intrecciato satin

Bottega Veneta Knot clutch in Intrecciato satin.
Courtesy picture

He continued to build the brand on understated luxury and craftsmanship, establishing a new 108,000 square foot headquarters in Milan and investing in the company’s human resources by offering its employees a new headquarters in 2013 – the majestic 18th century Villa Schroeder-Da Porto. , nestled in a park about 25 km from Vicenza, in the Veneto region of northern Italy. The site has obtained LEED certification at Platinum level developed by the Green Building Council, helping Bottega Veneta to become the first Italian company to achieve this level in the fashion and luxury sector.

The building included the workshop, management and administration offices, storage of precious skins, archives including 5,000 bags, a museum, a restaurant and its own artisan school, which was internalized. Bottega Veneta has conservatively restored the 54,000 square foot villa, which is protected by the Italian government’s Department of Historic Buildings and Monuments, retaining its local stone facade, portals, columns, statues and fountains . He drove growth in Asia and further expanded the brand’s commercial footprint by opening a flagship store in Milan.

Bottega Veneta

Villa Schroeder-Da Porto in Montebello Vicentino
Courtesy of Bottega Veneta

Adapt to the landscape

In 2014, Bizzarri became CEO of Kering’s new Couture and Leather Goods division, directly overseeing most of Kering’s luxury brands. Former Valentino and Ermenegildo Zegna Group executive Carlo Alberto Beretta was appointed CEO of Bottega Veneta in January 2015 and left a year later, replaced by former Hugo Boss CEO Claus-Dietrich Lahrs, at a when the brand was hit by the luxury downturn, as analysts lamented a lack of product innovation, lopsided pricing architecture and overreliance on Chinese and tourist clientele and limited brand awareness. brand in developed markets.

In 2018, after 17 years, Maier left Bottega VenetaUnder his tenure, revenues grew from 48 million euros to almost 1.2 billion euros in 2017, but the brand had struggled to keep up with rapid changes in the consumer landscape, as demand dwindled on its key market, Asia, and which it was unable to exploit in a millennial audience.

He was replaced by Daniel Lee, previously director of ready-to-wear at Céline, who followed earlier stints at Maison Margiela, Balenciaga and Donna Karan.

In September 2019, Bartolomeo Rongone, who goes by the name Leo, previously COO at Saint Laurent, took over from Lahrs.

Lee helped revive the brand, turning it into a hot-selling ticket and an influential, fashion-forward brand, infusing a new, youthful spirit into the collections. Her designs, especially the accessories – from the signature Pouch bag, which was introduced in her debut collection in 2019, to the Cassette bag and the Lido sandals – all flew off the shelves. He built momentum for the brand with disruptive strategies such as deleting his Instagram account and hosting traveling fashion shows in places including London, Berlin and Detroit.

The best Bottega Veneta creations by Daniel Lee

Bottega Veneta’s Jodie bag
Marcus Tondo/WWD

In a surprising split, Lee left the company last November, which was seen by multiple sources as a layoff, given the designer’s complex personality. Sources say Bottega Veneta was losing key figures within the company, ranging from prized and highly skilled veteran craftsmen at the company’s headquarters in Vicenza to pivot managers who clashed with Lee, often described as uncommunicative. .

A new era

Matthieu Blazy, until then design director, was promoted internally a few days later and held his first show as creative director on February 26. The event marked the brand’s return to Milan Fashion Week and did not disappoint retailers and the press, as the was hailed for respect while evolving house codes and its precise, chic cuts. and its strong accessories.

Rongone helped Bottega Veneta in 2021 record a 24.2% increase in revenue compared to 2020, surpassing the 1.5 billion euro mark. Compared to 2019, revenues increased by 32%. The CEO and Blazy plan to move the company’s new headquarters to Palazzo San Fedele in Milan, where the show was held, before the end of 2023. The executive has further strengthened the exclusivity of the brand by eliminating all markdowns and streamlining brand wholesale. accounts — by increasing the number of dealerships and also taking on online partners.

Matthew Blazy

Matthew Blazy
Willy Vanderperre/Courtesy of Bottega Veneta

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Smol: Canada ignores Russia’s militarized Arctic at its peril

Like Ukraine, the region is perceived by Vladimir Putin as an integral part of his country. Several modern Arctic warfare bases house, operate and test some of Russia’s most advanced weapons.

Content of the article

As the war in Ukraine escalates, it might be prudent for Canada to finally make a serious strategic assessment of Russia’s other major military buildup. It is a militarized front which, like Ukraine, involves contested territorial and maritime claims, pitting Vladimir Putin’s Russia against democratic countries within and outside NATO. Like Ukraine, it is also seen by Putin as an integral part of Russia. It is of increasing strategic importance in trade, defense and resource extraction, and it is a front where Russia has amassed unprecedented levels of military equipment and personnel.

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This is the Arctic in 2022. And we ignore at our peril this militarized and contested region around, above and in front of our northern territory and our maritime claim.

On the Russian shores of this disputed sea and land border with Canada, Scandinavia and the United States are new or expanded and modernized Russian Arctic coastal military bases at Rogachevo, Pechenga, Severomorsk, Tiksi, Zvyozdny, Sredny Ostrov, Nagurskoye and Temp, to name a few. These modern Arctic warfare bases house, operate and test some of Russia’s most advanced weapons, such as the MIG 31BM fighter jet and the Poseidon 2M39 stealth nuclear torpedo, as well as TOR-M2DT missiles.

This reality has not been lost on NATO members Denmark and Norway, or allied countries like Sweden and Finland which, like the United States, have improved and expanded their military presence in the region. with professionally trained combat personnel and newly acquired equipment.

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Canada, with its ill-equipped and emasculated military, remains largely absent from the region.

Let us momentarily abandon the common (and I dare say naive) assumption underlying Canadian defense policy: that the United States is at Canada’s disposal, to expend whatever is necessary in American military resources and American military lives to defend every square mile of Canada, at no cost or corresponding effort to Canadians.

Where would we be if our defense depended above all on us?

The answer is: as prepared and combat ready as an administrative headquarters in Yellowknife can be alongside a company-sized detachment of part-time Army Reservists nearby. As martially worthy of Putin’s fear as 440 Squadron, Canada’s only permanent air force squadron in the Arctic with a “fleet” of four non-combat CC-138 twin-otter aircraft. As firm in our will to stand firm as the 55-person (non-military) Signal Station (CFS Alert) on Ellesmere Island. A match as worthy of Russian warships and nuclear submarines, with their increasingly sophisticated weaponry, as our heavy police arctic patrol vessels (only one in service so far), each designed to boast a single machine gun mounted on her deck.

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This is the extent of Canada’s professional “boots in the snow” military capability in the Arctic.

Yes, we have about 5,000 local Canadian Rangers in the North – ready to do just about anything, but actually go to war for Canada. On a professional level, this is a good thing since these non-combatant reserve auxiliaries from northern communities sponsored by the Department of National Defense receive almost no military training. They have rendered invaluable service on occasion when community assistance was needed in operations such as search and rescue. And, especially during this pandemic, these temporary reinforcements have stepped up to provide needed aid to beleaguered communities. The Canadian Rangers are worthy civil defense volunteers, but they are by no means soldiers.

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So let’s not portray them as somehow being at the forefront of Canada’s supposed determination to assert its sovereignty over the Arctic.

Of course, since we are members of NATO, any attack on Canada is considered an attack on all members of NATO. Certainly, in a possible maritime stalemate in the region, Canada can expect some protection and assurance from the United States as well as better armed and equipped armies from Denmark and Norway, not to mention our former colonial masters, France and the United Kingdom.

But should that happen in our current deplorable state of military readiness, let us have the honesty and integrity to refrain from clinging to the absurd illusion of an international “middle power” that many Canadians still harbor.

Robert Smol is a retired military intelligence officer who served in the Canadian Armed Forces for over 20 years. He is currently working as a paralegal and security professional while completing a doctorate in military [email protected]

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News, weather, sports on all platforms

With family in Ukraine, the last 3 days have been hell for the UIC PhD. RaisedIt’s hard to imagine what it feels like to watch your country in absolute turmoil from thousands of miles away, but Hanna Deiqkun is experiencing exactly that. She spoke with CBS 2’s Sabrina Franza.

The scene on the ground in war-torn UkraineKiev is besieged, but the Russian ground assault has met with fierce resistance from Ukrainian forces – and not just around the capital, but also in other parts of the country. Reporting by CBS News’ Charlie D’Agata.

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First weather alert in Chicago: finally a little warmerCBS 2 meteorologist Robb Ellis has your first-alert weather forecast at 10 p.m. for Saturday, February 26, 2022.

An organization raises awareness of the disappearance of black and brown womenThis past weekend of Black History Month, a local group has drawn attention to the growing number of missing and murdered women in black and brown communities.

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Unmarked police SUV crashes into car in LawndaleSome Chicago police officers were recovering late Saturday after an accident in Lawndale.

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UIC PhD Student fears for her family living on the frontline in UkraineAs the war in Ukraine unfolds in what may seem like a world apart to some, it hits close for a PhD student in Chicago. Reporting by CBS 2’s Sabrina Franza.

US and European allies impose sanctions as Russian troops advance towards KievUS and European allies targeted Russia on Saturday, striking with unprecedented new sanctions to punish the Kremlin for invading Ukraine. Meanwhile, Russian troops bombard Ukrainian cities with heavy artillery and close in on the capital Kiev.

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Russia heads for Kyiv as Ukrainian troops hold backAir raid sirens sounded in Kiev as Russian troops continued, and Ukraine’s president vowed to keep fighting. Reporting by Michael George of CBS News.

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Ukraine has the will, but Russia has the power: how their military forces fit together

By all accounts, the battle for Ukraine was never going to be a fair fight.

The invading Russian Federation commands the second most powerful military in the world, behind only the United States, having spent an estimated US$61.7 billion on defense in 2020, according to figures compiled by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute.

Ukraine spent a tenth of that amount, or just US$5.9 billion.

And this disparity appears in almost every possible comparison.

  • Russia has nearly 900,000 active military personnel to rely on in its war of aggression, compared to about 200,000 permanent Ukrainian military personnel.
  • Ukraine has far fewer attack planes – 146 compared to Russia’s 1,328 – and helicopters; only 42 against 478.
  • The Russian tanks rumbling towards the capital, Kiev, are part of an overall armored corps of 31,000 vehicles, compared to Ukraine’s 5,000.
  • The Russian Navy has 605 ships, including 70 submarines, which can be deployed in the Black Sea off the coast of Ukraine. While the Ukrainian fleet has only 38 ships and no submarines.

The unbalanced list goes on and on.

“The Russian army is powerful, there is no doubt about it, much more powerful than Ukraine’s,” the retired lieutenant general said. Andrew Leslie, former Chief of the Land Staff of the Canadian Armed Forces.

“The Russians have a vast technological advantage, in terms of quality, in terms of training time – which gives you experience on the different war machines – and in terms of numbers.”

A Ukrainian soldier is injured after coming across gunfire inside the city of Kiev on February 25, 2022. (Emilio Morenatti/Associated Press)

Russian advantages that will be virtually insurmountable for Ukrainian defenders – at least early in the war, Leslie said. But pacifying the country’s 44 million people could prove a much tougher task for Russian President Vladimir Putin.

  • What questions do you have about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine? Email [email protected]

“Mr. Putin is going to have to go to the cities and he is going to have to occupy Ukraine for years against a bitter and vengeful population that has tasted freedom,” predicts Leslie. “And they’re not going to forget, and they’re not going to allow the Russians to have an easy job, or to stay very long.”

Do not underestimate the will of the Ukrainian people

The Ukrainian leadership seems to have already moved on to the next fight. Russia’s official military reserve force is estimated at 2 million soldiers. But the Ukrainians are now busy trying to increase their core of 900,000 appeals, having now ordered all men between the ages of 18 and 60 to stay in the country, and arming anyone willing to pick up a gun.

On Friday, former President Petro Poroshenko was on the streets of Kyiv, brandishing an AK-47 and touting the country’s numerical strength.

“It’s the long line of people who want to join the battalion, but we don’t have enough guns… they’re normal, ordinary people [who] sometimes [have] was never in the army, now I’m lining up to join us,” Poroshenko told CNN.

“Putin will never catch Ukraine despite how many soldiers he has, how many missiles he has, how many nuclear weapons he has. We Ukrainians are a free people with a great European future.”

WATCH | NATO will supply more weapons to Ukraine:

NATO announces more weapons and air defense systems for Ukraine

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg announced that the alliance would provide Ukraine with more aid and weapons, including air defense systems, while warning Russia that it would pay a heavy tribute for years to come. 28:19

Hanna Maliar, Ukrainian Deputy Defense Minister, Facebook Friday to urge citizens to resist Russian forces in any way possible, even with homemade weapons. Advocacy apparently had an impact, as online searches for Molotov cocktail recipes reportedly increased in the capital.

The Ukrainian people’s will to resist should not be underestimated, said Ihor Kozak, a former Canadian Forces officer who has been training and advising the military in his native Ukraine since 2014.

“Ukrainians are now fighting for their freedom, for their families, for their homeland,” Kozak said. “The morale is very, very high. And I think that’s going to be a deciding factor in this war.”

Nor should anyone doubt the professionalism of its heavily armed but well-trained military, Kozak added.

Eight years ago, when Russia first invaded Ukraine, annexing Crimea and backing a separatist uprising in the Donbass region, the country’s military was almost non-existent.

“There was really no money spent, no training, no modern weapons, no ammunition. So the people who went to fight were the young volunteers, and the not so young volunteers of the revolution Maidan, often in running shoes, with obsolete weapons,” recalls Kozak.

What Ukraine needs are weapons

All that changed with the establishment of a modern fighting force, trained to NATO standards by Western advisers, including members of the Canadian military. Now, what Ukraine desperately needs is not so much manpower as weapons.

“They need more [anti-tank] javelins, more [anti-aircraft] darts, more ammunition, more weapons so they can defend themselves and they can defend us. So I strongly encourage the Government of Canada and Western leaders to do this now before it’s too late,” Kozak said.

Big demand as Russia makes rapid inroads, with its troops already on the streets of Kiev.

Especially since the Ukrainian army ranks 22nd most powerful in the world — a place ahead of Canada in 23rd place.

PICTURES | ATTENTION: This photo gallery contains graphic images:

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The Rebel to Rabble Review: The Aftermath of “Insurrection”

The convoy of trucks protesting the mandatory COVID vaccination that turned into a nearly month-long occupation of downtown Ottawa may have left, but the search team from Tap Progress still refers to its ties to other right-wing movements on the far right – including “a nationwide network of right-wing evangelical Christian pastors”, according to a dispatch filed by “Prairie reporter” Emily Leedham.

“Pastors, many of whom have previously been fined for holding church services in violation of public health orders, are part of a group called Liberty Coalition Canada (LCC),” notes Leedham, which “was founded in January 2021 to oppose COVID-19 restrictions on churches, but has since launched campaigns to oppose vaccination mandates and capacity limits in workplaces, schools and universities.

More recently, the LCC “wrote an open letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau condemning his use of the Emergency Powers Act in response to the three-week occupation of Ottawa by the far-right convoy, saying to Trudeau that they are “concerned” that he does not appreciate “the significance of God’s wrath on a rebellious and lawless nation. ”

The letter, which was sent two days after the emergency order was issued, went on to “implore” Trudeau to “step back, restore the constitutional freedoms of the people, respect the God-given rights to our citizens and, above all, to humble yourself and kneel before Christ the King, lest you perish on the way.

Leedham also cites a Global News report which “indicates the blockade has ties to libertarian groups in the United States and notes the presence of American supporters in Coutts, AB.”

In a separate room, Mitchell Thompson, PP Ontario reporter strong points a recently unearthed photo of Ontario MPP and vocal convoy supporter Randy Hillier’ posing with the flag of a far-right secessionist group linked to charges of conspiracy to murder and firearms seized en route to the Coutts border blockade”.

According to PP, the photo “was originally posted on a far-right TikTok account” and “shows Hillier wearing a ‘No More Lockdowns’ t-shirt while holding an open beer can next to a flag. of the ‘Diagolon’,” which, Thompson notes, “is the symbol of a neo-fascist group called the ‘Plaid Army’, which has been spotted at the center of chaos in downtown Ottawa.

Meanwhile, Mob Contributors Ish Theilheimer and Marc Zwelling have suggestions for “how not to talk about the insurgency”, starting with the assertion that “illegal squatters in Ottawa are well-funded far-right extremists, which is good to call them, because it’s undeniably true” .

According to them, “the great victory of the insurgents in the media is to appropriate the word ‘freedom’ for their cause”.

Their recommendation, then, “for those who want to cancel the rioters (is) not to inadvertently give them free publicity using the rioters’ own words,” the duo wrote.

“This advice is at the heart of the concept of framing. Like a frame around a painting, a verbal frame outlines a debate. If you say winning Ottawa “has nothing to do with freedom,” you’re repeating the frame. By doing so, you conjure up images of freedom in your audience, when you really want them to think about oppression, a war against peaceful citizens, and an attack on democratically elected governments.

Elsewhere on the site, National political journalist Rabble Stephen Wentzell turn his attention on Canada’s response to rising tensions on the Ukrainian border, and the announcement earlier this week that Trudeau had approved “millions more to export lethal weapons to Ukraine” even as “all major parties except (the) Conservatives” – in this case, New Democrats and Greens – called for “a non-violent response”.

It is worth noting that The scoundrel essayist Marusya Bociurkiw offers a distinctly different grip on the tensions in his “lament for Ukraine” on February 22.

“The newspaper, online journals, even the alternative media space of the left, are full of crude anachronisms and xenophobic assumptions,” she writes.

“A left-wing broadcaster features a Russian ‘expert’ chastising those who are ‘too’ anti-Russian, as if this autocratic theocracy could still be redeemed by the long-disavowed progressive ideals of early communism. My leftist community is largely disinterested in Ukraine, asserting its ignorance with elaborate shrugs.

In response, she writes, “I find myself throwing out facts and statistics like so many baseball cards to anyone who will listen: that Ukraine was the first post-Soviet country to legalize homosexuality; the only country in the world to renounce its nuclear arsenal without violence; (a) leader in artistic, culinary and technical innovation; and that her feminist and queer organization is a model for the tottering state of North American feminist and queer politics.

More than Canadian Dimension, Oliver Boyd-Barrett warns that “Western media continue to press the ‘imminent Russian invasion of Ukraine’ narrative, claiming it has happened before and citing the alleged pressure Moscow is supposed to apply on Ukraine. »

In fact, he suggests, “even if Russia withdraws its forces from its own border with Ukraine – and even if all parties agree that full membership (in) NATO will not be extended to Ukraine at any time in the immediate future – NATO will maintain its dangerous passive-aggressive “victim” posture. This is because “Washington only wants one kind of development in Ukraine: a neoliberal paradise that will give Western capital total freedom to do whatever it wants with Ukrainian land and resources”.

Ultimately, Ricochet writer Christopher Curtis explore Quebec City’s “Hostility Merchants”, otherwise known as “Trash Radio”, the “talk radio hosts (who) set the agenda, determine elections and traffic in fear and mistrust », in particular Dominic Mrais from Radio X.

“Radio X is part of what its detractors call junk radio, or junk radio – a collection of conservative talk radio stations for which controversy is a business model,” he wrote. But it’s also “a glimpse into what looks like a unique moment of anger in Canadian politics.”

Centre-Right Trends in the Canadian Political Media Universe:

  • Ezra Levan, commander of Rebel Newsyou take a closer look to “whom Trudeau entrusts with his emergency crackdown,” beginning with “Bill Blair, the disgraced ex-cop who ran Toronto police during the G-20.”
  • Roberto Wakerell-Cruz of Post Millennial chronic Tory MP Colin Carrie’s attempt to ask ‘which ministers agreed’ with the agenda of the World Economic Forum, which Wakerell-Cruz describes as a ‘globalist think tank’, only to be ‘interrupted by the chairman of the Chamber due to very clear audio “being really bad”. ”
  • Rebel News reporter Alexandra Lavoie landed an exclusive interview with Candice Sero, “an Indigenous Mohawk residing in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory in Hastings County who was in Ottawa protesting vaccination mandates, when she was trampled by the Toronto Police Mounted Unit and punched kicked by other police officers while she was on the ground”.
  • True North News Contributor Harley Sims was at launch of the “4,395 kilometer march from Vancouver to Ottawa…in solidarity with Canadian truckers and workers to end authoritarian government mandates” by Canadian Armed Forces veteran James Topp.

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Creative goaltender Emile Francis introduced the trapper glove to the NHL

New York Rangers coach Emile Francis shouts after the Rangers score against the Philadelphia Flyers in the second period of an NHL hockey game in Philadelphia in April 1974.Brian Horton/Associated Press

Championships are wonderful but they are not everything.

Emile Francis never won the Stanley Cup in his professional hockey life as a player, coach and manager, but the short man who introduced the goaltender’s trapper glove remains a giant for his accomplishments and his personality. Mr Francis died on Saturday at the age of 95.

The high point of his five-decade hockey career came as the National Hockey League grew from a modest group of six teams to a business enterprise three times the size of the mid-1960s through the mid-1960s. 1970. Taking over the New York Rangers operation that had languished in the depths of the standings for two decades, Mr. Francis built a formidable team that couldn’t quite overcome more powerful teams in Montreal, Boston and Chicago.

Nicknamed “The Cat” for his speed at playing junior hockey, Mr. Francis was a goaltender who, at 5-foot-7 and no more than 155 pounds, was undersized even by the standards of the time. Even as a boy growing up in North Battleford, Saskatchewan, he made up for that with a sharp, creative mind.

“I was always a little guy, so I had to rely on my wits – and no one was going to cheat me on anything,” Mr. Francis recalled in an interview with this reporter in 2003. “Sister Mary Berchmans taught me that at École du Couvent de l’Enfant-Jésus primary school in North Battleford, I was in front of goal in an hour-long game against Connaught School for the Championship of elementary schools. Whenever I had the chance, I would throw the puck over the boards in the snow, which was okay by the rules at the time.

“We won 1-0 but Connaught didn’t want to give us the trophy because of my tactics. When we told Sister Mary about it, she took me to Connaught School in a taxi, stormed into the principal, who was also their hockey coach, and demanded the trophy. We took it back and Sister Mary declared school holidays.

Emile Francis was born September 13, 1926 in North Battleford. His teenage years were heavily affected by World War II, but the quirks of his age, the war’s effect on the NHL, and his eligibility to serve kept him away from the battlefields.

“American hockey teams needed players so badly during World War II that they recruited teenagers,” Francis said. “I was barely past my 17th birthday and I was playing one goal for the Philadelphia Falcons, then the Washington Lions, of the Amateur Hockey League East.”

Nicknamed “The Cat” for his speed at playing junior hockey, Mr. Francis was a goaltender who, at 5-foot-7 and no more than 155 pounds, was undersized even by the standards of the time.Harry Harris/Associated Press

He joined the Canadian army when he was old enough, but the war ended before he could go overseas and he was discharged in 1945. year of junior hockey eligibility, so I joined the Moose Jaw Canucks.

Moose Jaw went undefeated in the 1945-46 Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League campaign before being eliminated in the Memorial Cup playoffs. Mr. Francis was so impressive that he split the following season between the senior Regina Capitals and the NHL’s Chicago Black Hawks, where he resisted authority to make a goaltending innovation that was as important than the introduction of facial protection by Jacques Plante a decade later.

“I created the first trapper,” he said. “Until then, the two goalkeeper gloves were basically identical, blockers with just a little strap between the thumb and fingers. If you actually tried to catch the puck in your palm, it would knock hell out of your hand. So I took a George McQuinn style baseball mitt – he was a first baseman for the St. Louis Browns – and sewed it onto a regular hockey glove. No one said anything about it until my first NHL game with the Chicago Black Hawks. We are about to begin when King Clancy, who referees the game, is called to the bench by Jack Adams, the Detroit coach. Adams says something, points at me and Clancy skates towards my net.

“’Let me see this glove,’ Clancy said. He looks at my trapper and says, “It’s illegal. You cannot use it.

“’Well,’ I said, ‘you don’t have a game because it’s the only glove I have!’ I had it there. The teams have only dressed one goalkeeper and it would be foolish to bring the emergency goalkeeper down from the stands while the starter is fully healthy. Clancy lets me use the glove, but orders me to bring it to league president Clarence Campbell this weekend when we’re in Montreal so he can rule on it. Campbell endorsed it, and trappers soon became standard equipment.

In the end, Mr. Francis was unable to measure up to NHL standards over the long term. With only six teams in the league with a goaltender each, there wasn’t much of a major league future for someone who was only a Top 10. After a few seasons with the Black Hawks, he was distributed to the New York Rangers, for whom he appeared only sparingly.

“You look at my NHL career line and it’s not much: 95 games, 31-52-11 and a 3.75 goals-against-average,” Francis said. “But every year I’ve played 50 to 70 games, plus playoffs, for American Hockey League teams in New Haven, Cincinnati and Cleveland, and around the old Western Pro Hockey League. for Vancouver, Saskatoon, Seattle, Victoria and Spokane.”

Mr. Francis, however, accumulated a wealth of knowledge about coaching and team management, augmenting his hockey experience with summers as player-manager of the North Battleford semi-pro baseball team. The sport was immensely popular in his home province in the 1950s.

“Every summer I played baseball in Saskatchewan,” Francis said. “For a time the Bentley family got me to join them at Delisle, but the people of North Battleford thought my military background made me a good leader and organizer, so I became player-manager of the North Battleford Beavers . It was good baseball! Some of the best ballplayers around were NHL players like Max and Doug Bentley, Bert Olmstead at Scepter and Gordie Howe at Saskatoon.

“Our rosters were full of great black baseball players because the black leagues had disbanded and organized baseball was slow to integrate. Championship matches were great, but the really serious competition was in tournaments because finishing in the money was what kept your team from going bust.

After retiring from hockey in 1960, Mr. Francis was hired by the Rangers to coach their junior team in Guelph, Ontario. Two years later he was appointed assistant general manager in New York and in 1964 he was promoted to general manager. Early in his tenure on Nov. 22, 1964, he was the center of attention in one of the most bizarre incidents in the NHL. During a home game at the old Madison Square Garden against Detroit, Mr. Francis accosted the goal judge who signaled a Red Wings count and found himself surrounded by hostile fans.

“We end up in a fight,” Mr. Francis recalled. “I’m outnumbered three-to-one and these guys are hammering me good, tearing my face open, when Vic Hadfield sees what’s going on from the ice. He jumps onto the boards, steps over the Plexiglas, and half the team follows him. They save me and give these guys a lick. The league fined us all, but what really freaked me out was that the three guys sued me for a million dollars, and after the case dragged through the courts, they got $80,000.

Mr Francis took over the coaching reins at Rangers in 1966, resigning twice but returning behind the bench after Bernie Geoffrion and Larry Popein were unable to last more than half a season. As Rangers coach, Mr. Francis posted an impressive record of 342-209-103.

“Rangers were also lost players when I joined them, but we produced good young players like Rod Gilbert, Jean Ratelle and Brad Park, acquired goalkeeper Ed Giacomin from the minors, made good trades and became strong contenders. . We never won the Stanley Cup but we came close, especially in 1972 when everything was in place until Ratelle broke his ankle. We led the Bruins to six games in the final; I know we would have beaten them with Ratelle in there.

“Managing and coaching Rangers was aggravating because the Madison Square Garden corporation owned the team and treated it like an afterthought,” he once said, recalling they had to play playoff games on the road because the circus had priority for the April dates. The ice cream in the garden was also terrible.

“I blew my peak in 1975 when one of our best defensemen, Dale Rolfe, skated on a spot where the ice had worn out and suffered a terrible broken leg, ended his his career immediately. “I’ve seen better ice on the highways in Saskatchewan,” I told reporters, and I meant it. Bill Jennings, the Rangers chairman, didn’t like it when I said what I thought, which might have something to do with my dismissal in 1976.”

Mr. Francis was soon hired to be general manager of the St. Louis Blues, where his seven-year tenure included a struggle to keep the team financially solvent. He moved on to a six-year run as chairman and general manager of the Hartford Whalers before retiring in 1989. Neither the Blues nor the Whalers could match the winning consistency of the Rangers, and Mr Francis is denied the glory of a Stanley Cup title. .

“Of course I had my disappointments,” Mr. Francis said, “like playing all those years in the minors and never winning the Stanley Cup, but all the while I had the best time of my life. life.”

He was enshrined as a builder in the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1982. For his contributions to hockey in the United States, he was awarded the Lester Patrick Trophy and the International Wayne Gretzky Award. He was a longtime member of the Hockey Hall of Fame Veterans Committee and became an exceptional storyteller and ambassador for the game.

He and his wife, Emma, ​​who died in 2020 after 68 years of marriage, had two sons: Bob, who had a brief playing and coaching career in the NHL, and Rick. He leaves his two sons.

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Chinese Cryptocurrency Exchange Huobi Plans US Back-to-School

Chinese cryptocurrency exchange Huobi plans to re-enter the U.S. market more than two years after ceasing operations to comply with regulations, one of the company’s co-founders told CNBC.

But the company may not launch an exchange and may instead focus on other areas such as asset management, after missteps last time around, according to Du Jun.

“In 2018 we tried to enter the US market but quickly pulled out because we didn’t have a strong market commitment at that time and we didn’t have a good management team in the States. States,” Du said according to a CNBC translation of his Mandarin comments.

“I expect asset management to be a bigger business than trading, which also echoes the traditional financial market,” he told CNBC, adding, “I don’t think that the exchange is a necessary element of entering the United States”.

Du did not confirm which Huobi company will launch first when it returns to the United States. A return to the US market could put Huobi in competition with companies like Coinbase. Huobi is one of the top 10 cryptocurrency exchanges by trading volume in the world, according to CoinGecko.

Huobi first launched a cryptocurrency exchange business in the United States in 2018. The following year, the company announced that it would freeze US user accounts and added that it would return to the market in a “more integrated and impactful fashion”.

Huobi Group owns an exchange business and an asset management business called Huobi Tech, which is listed in Hong Kong.

The US push is part of a larger international expansion plan after several years of tighter crypto regulations in China, the market where Huobi was founded. Last year, Beijing sought to completely eliminate cryptocurrency mining in China and crack down on loopholes that allowed Chinese citizens to trade.

At the end of 2021, Huobi retired existing mainland Chinese user accounts and chose Singapore as its headquarters in Asia.

Du said Huobi lost around 30% of its revenue due to the shutdown of users in China. But it gave the company new impetus for international expansion. It plans to set up a headquarters in Europe, in addition to its US push.

Learn more about cryptocurrencies from CNBC Pro

“Regarding the number of resources or personnel that we will deploy for the international market, we have no choice but to use all our strength to move forward in our global strategy,” said From. “In the past, we explored a new market and we could always walk out if it didn’t work out. Now Huobi has no choice but to go global.”

Chinese regulations

Du praised China’s strict cryptocurrency regulations as they tackled gambling and money laundering cases. The Huobi co-founder said the regulations protect small investors. He said, however, that other countries should not follow China’s approach as investors may be more mature in other markets.

“In China, when people lose in their investment, sometimes extreme people jump from the regulator building and investors are less mature. The government took a similar approach to Covid restriction. It sensed danger and took measures. measures to protect people’s safety,” Du said.

“In other regions, we can say that investors are more mature. They have more experience and they take responsibility for their investment decisions and therefore the governments of these markets do not need to take strict measures.”

Global regulators are considering rules for cryptocurrency, from trading to how it should be taxed. This month, India has proposed a 30% tax on any income from the transfer of digital assets. Meanwhile, the United States is still considering how to regulate cryptocurrencies.

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Russia extends military exercises in Belarus, raising fears of Ukraine invasion

Tanks move during the Union Courage-2022 Russia-Belarus military exercises at the Obuz-Lesnovsky training ground in Belarus on February 19.Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr/Associated Press

Russian troops in Belarus did not return to their home bases as planned on Sunday, instead continuing military exercises near the Ukrainian border and raising fears that Russia could soon launch a three-pronged attack on Ukraine.

The 10-day drills involving some 30,000 Russian troops, along with Belarusian forces, began Feb. 10, and their expected conclusion was one of the most watched signals of whether Russian President Vladimir Putin would choose to step up or to ease the months- old crisis around Ukraine. No end date was given for the extended exercises.

The continued presence of Russian troops in Belarus leaves open the worst case scenario of Russia attacking Ukraine from three directions, with troops in Belarus capable of pushing towards the capital of Kiev from the north. US officials have estimated that Russia now has between 170,000 and 190,000 troops in position around Ukraine. Most are massed along Ukraine’s eastern border, while large numbers are also concentrated in the south on the Russian-occupied Crimean peninsula.

Freeland deviates from G20 economic scenario to warn Russia over Ukraine, sources say

If Ukraine is invaded, the US and UK will block Russia’s access to dollars and pounds, UK PM warns

Belarusian Defense Minister Viktor Khrenin said Mr Putin and Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko had decided to continue the joint exercises due to “increasing military activity on the external borders” of Russia and Belarus, as well as “the aggravation of the situation in Donbass”, a region in the south-east of Ukraine.

“There is a conclusion – that it smells strongly of gunpowder in Europe,” Khrenin said.

On Saturday, the Russian and Belarusian leaders jointly oversaw the start of exercises to test the readiness of Russia’s nuclear arsenal, which is the largest in the world.

Russia says it has no intention of attacking Ukraine. But the Kremlin demanded guarantees that its neighbor will never be allowed to join the North Atlantic Treaty Organization – guarantees that the United States and the alliance of 30 NATO countries have said they would not give.

French President Emmanuel Macron called Mr Putin on Sunday in what the Elysee Palace described as “a last-ditch effort to avoid a Russian invasion of Ukraine”. Afterwards, the Kremlin said Mr Putin had told the French leader that the United States and NATO must respond to Russia’s demands “in a concrete and substantial way”. Moscow says NATO’s eastward expansion in the three decades since the end of the Cold War is a threat to its security.

Mr Putin believes Ukraine has been under de facto Western control since a 2014 revolution that toppled a pro-Moscow president. Mr Putin said last week he believed Ukraine’s military was committing “genocide” in the predominantly Russian-speaking region of Donbass, which is part of Ukraine but is under the control of a militia backed by Moscow for eight years. .

Fighting between the Ukrainian army and pro-Russian militants in Donbass has killed more than 14,000 people since 2014. The United Nations monitoring mission for Ukraine says that while both sides have committed human rights abuses Man, there is no evidence to support Mr. Putin’s claim. of genocide.

Since Mr Putin’s remarks, however, there have been a series of explosions and other alleged attacks in separatist-held areas, raising fears the Kremlin is manufacturing a provocation to use as justification for an invasion. pre-planned from Ukraine. US President Joe Biden said on Friday he believed Mr Putin had already made up his mind to attack.

After a visit to the Donbass frontline on Saturday, Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister Iryna Vereshchuk said the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe mission that monitors ceasefire violations had been weakened after Canada, the United States and Britain ordered their nationals to leave early. this month as concerns mounted over a possible Russian invasion.

Ms Vereshchuk said impartial reporting on what was happening in eastern Ukraine was now more important than ever and called on Ottawa, Washington and London to “review” their decision to withdraw from the mission. OSCE.

“We need to have a clear record of these situations. We have to make sure every incident is properly documented,” she told The Globe and Mail after visiting a kindergarten in the frontline town of Stanytsia Luhanska which was hit by a shell last week. injuring three staff members.

Canada and several other Western governments have also temporarily closed their embassies in Kyiv and moved staff to the city of Lviv, near the Ukraine-Poland border. Canada also withdrew the 260-soldier Operation Unifier that had been training the Ukrainian military for seven years, and Ottawa advised all Canadian citizens to leave Ukraine “now”.

Russia and Belarus, which are close military allies, say the tension in Eastern Europe has been caused by NATO, which has deployed additional troops to alliance member countries Poland, Romania and the Baltic States in response to Russian military build-up.

Andrei Sannikov, a Belarusian dissident who in 2010 ran for president against Mr Lukashenko in an election widely seen as rigged, said joint military exercises in Belarus posed a threat not only to Ukraine, but also for the sovereignty of his country.

Their extension almost certainly means that Russian troops will be in Belarus during the February 27 referendum on constitutional changes that would allow Mr Lukashenko, who came to power in 1994, to remain president until 2035.

“The referendum will be held under the presence of foreign troops, under the threat that foreign troops will be used against the civilian population,” Sannikov said.

“Russia now completely controls Belarus. You can see how Belarus is being used as a springboard… which not only threatens Ukraine, but also Europe.

Ukraine says Russian-backed separatists are to blame after a kindergarten in Stanytsia Luhanska was bombed and videos of fleeing civilians made in separatist-controlled areas of Donetsk are fabricated.

The Globe and Mail

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International headquarters

Russian and Belarusian troops will continue readiness checks, says Belarusian defense minister

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. (Matt Dunham/Pool/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia is planning ‘the biggest war in Europe since 1945’, says British Prime Minister Boris Johnson told the BBC during an interview broadcast on Sunday.

“I’m afraid to say the plan we see is for something that could really be the biggest war in Europe since 1945,” he said.

He added that “people need to understand the cost in human lives that this could entail not only for Ukrainians, but also for Russians and young Russians.”

On the issue of sanctions, Johnson said the goal was to impact not just “Vladimir Putin’s associates but also all companies, organizations of strategic importance to Russia.”

“We are going to prevent Russian companies from raising funds in the UK markets and we are going, even with our American friends, to prevent them from trading in pounds and dollars, which will be very difficult,” he said.

Speaking at the Munich Security Conference in Germany on Saturday, Johnson said that in preparing to invade Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin “made a serious miscalculation”, adding that Moscow would not have “absolutely nothing to gain from this catastrophic enterprise and everything to lose”.

Johnson urged Moscow to defuse tensions before it was too late.

I fear that a blitzkrieg will be followed by a long and hideous period of retaliation, revenge and insurrection, and that Russian parents will mourn the loss of young Russian soldiers, who in their own way are just as innocent as the Ukrainians who are now preparing to attack,” he said.

Johnson said: “We don’t know exactly what President Putin has in mind,” adding that “the omens are bleak and that’s why we need to stay strong together.”

Johnson’s remarks come a day after US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin said Russia was “putting itself in the right positions to carry out an attack”.

“They’re unfolding and now ready to strike,” Austin said, speaking Saturday from Vilnius, Lithuania.

“If you look at the position he’s in today, it’s obvious [Putin] made a decision and they are moving into the right positions to carry out an attack.

Echoing US President Joe Biden’s assertion that Putin had decided to invade, Austin added that the United States would pursue a diplomatic solution “until the very last minute, until it’s not possible”.

However, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has denied increased claims by Western leaders that a Russian invasion is imminent.

Asked about the aggressive use of US intelligence to dissuade Putin from invading Ukraine, Zelensky said he was “grateful for the work that our two intelligence services have done. But the intelligence I trust is my information.

“I trust the Ukrainian intelligence services who … understand what is happening along our borders, who have different sources of intelligence and understand different risks depending on the data intercepted … this information must be used,” Zelensky told Christiane Amanpour, CNN’s chief international anchor. personal interview at the security conference on Saturday.

He continued: “We’re not really living in illusion. We understand what can happen tomorrow…just putting ourselves in coffins and waiting for foreign soldiers to come in is not something we’re prepared to do.”

Zelensky then called on international partners to support Ukraine by investing in the country. “Strengthen our arms… our economy. Invest in our country. Bring your business.

“We are not panicking, we want to live our lives,” he added.

CNN’s Ross Levitt, Karen Smith, Maegan Vazquez, Kevin Liptak, Betsy Klein, Sam Fossum, Emmet Lyons and Lauren Said-Moorhouse contributed to this post.

This post has been updated.

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History organization

Historic Sites Commemorating Black History in Every State | News

America is making further progress in celebrating black history and triumphs. In 2021, Tishaura Jones became the first black woman elected mayor of St. Louis, just as Kamala Harris was declared the first female vice president of the United States — and the first of black and Asian descent to hold that rank. That same year, Juneteenth (June 17), which signifies the end of slavery in the United States, became a federal holiday through legislation signed by President Joe Biden.

The legacy of influential black Americans has not always been recognized, so it is not uncommon for modern residents to overlook the historic sites of their own cities. While some historical black figures are more renowned than others, there are entire generations of historical black figures – dating back to the days of Jim Crow slavery through the civil rights era – who have left traces of their vision across the country. Whether it be personalities such as Robert Abbott, who founded The Chicago Defender, one of the largest African-American newspapers in the country, or more discreet initiators such as Obrey Wendell Hamlet, who, thanks to its entrepreneurial touch, has cultivated a unique vacation. experiences in the Rocky Mountains – one thing is certain: there are still many more unexplored histories of black people than we know.

In the United States, 232 sites are considered nationally significant to Black history. Using the National Register of Historic Places, Stacker identified historic sites commemorating black history in 47 states. North Dakota, Vermont, Hawaii and Wyoming had no black historic sites on the register. While some states, particularly in the South, are home to many central sites of the civil rights movement, Stacker listed the total number of sites in each state and the names of three historical sites, if any. You can visit the comprehensive Register of Historic Places and explore the Civil Rights Trail to learn about other historic sites across the United States.

Read on to explore and learn about historic sites celebrating Black history nationwide.

You might also like: 50 Black Writers Whose Impact Went Beyond the Page

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“I am not here today to start a war, but to prevent one”

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and US Ambassador to the UN Linda Thomas-Greenfield at the UN in New York on February 17. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said he was speaking to the United Nations about Russia and Ukraine “not to start a war, but to prevent it”.

“I am not here today to start a war, but to prevent it. The information I have presented here is validated by what we have seen unfold before our eyes for months. Alarms like melodrama and nonsense, they have regularly amassed over 150,000 troops on Ukraine’s borders as well as the capabilities to carry out a massive military assault. We are not the only ones to see this. Allies and partners see the same Blinken mentioned.

He urged Russia to use diplomacy as a solution to the crisis.

“And Russia doesn’t just hear about us. The international chorus has grown stronger and stronger,” the US official said. “If Russia does not invade Ukraine, then we will be relieved that Russia has changed course and proven our predictions wrong. It would be a much better outcome than the course we are currently on, and we will gladly accept any criticism than anyone who comes to us.”

Blinken said he sent a letter to Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov proposing they meet next week in Europe. It also offers meetings of the NATO-Russia Council and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe.

“These meetings can pave the way for a summit of key leaders in the context of de-escalation to reach agreement on our mutual security concerns. As top diplomats for our nations, we have a responsibility to do everything we can to make diplomacy succeed, not to turn the diplomatic stone unturned,” he said.

He said Russia will likely respond with layoffs that the United States is “fueling hysteria.”

“The Russian government can announce today without reservation, equivocation or misdirection that Russia will not invade Ukraine, make it clear, make it clear to the world – and then demonstrate it by returning your troops, your tanks, your planes, to hangars and sending diplomats to the negotiating table. In the days to come, the world will remember that commitment. Or the refusal to do so,” he concluded.

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Doubting Russia’s exit, NATO seeks to strengthen its defenses

BRUSSELS (AP) – NATO member nations on Wednesday discussed new ways to bolster the defenses of nations on the organization’s eastern flank as Russia’s military buildup around Ukraine fuels one of the biggest security crises in Europe for decades.

For two days at NATO headquarters in Brussels, defense ministers were due to discuss how and when to quickly send troops and equipment to the countries closest to Russia and the sea region. Black if Moscow ordered an invasion of Ukraine.

US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin and his counterparts also plan to assess the possibility of stationing longer-term troops in southeastern Europe, possibly starting later this year. The troops would reflect the presence of some 5,000 military personnel who have been stationed in allied nations Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland on a rotational basis in recent years.

The United States has begun deploying 5,000 troops to Poland and Romania. Britain sends hundreds of soldiers to Poland and offers more warships and planes. Germany, the Netherlands and Norway send additional troops to Lithuania. Denmark and Spain provide jets for air policing.

“The fact that we have deployed more NATO troops on the ground, more naval assets, more aircraft, all of this sends a very clear message,” NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said. “I think there is no room for miscalculation in Moscow about our commitment to defending our allies.”

This deployment responds to a formidable challenge.

Over the past four months, Russia is estimated to have amassed around 60% of its entire ground forces and a significant part of its air forces in northern and eastern Ukraine, as well as in Belarus. neighbor. Moscow looks set to repeat its 2014 invasion of Ukraine, but on a larger scale.

Russian President Vladimir Putin wants NATO, the world’s largest security organization, to stop expanding. It demands that the US-led alliance withdraw its troops and equipment from countries that joined after 1997 – almost half of NATO’s 30 ranks.

NATO cannot agree to his terms. Its founding treaty commits to an ‘open door’ policy for European countries wishing to join, and a mutual defense clause ensures that all members will come to the defense of a threatened ally.

Ukraine, however, is not a member and NATO as an organization is unwilling to defend it.

“We have to understand that Ukraine is a partner. We support Ukraine. But for all NATO allies, we provide 100% security guarantees,” Stoltenberg told reporters ahead of Wednesday’s meeting.

That said, some member countries help Ukraine more directly, such as the United States, Britain and Canada.

“We will provide lethal and non-lethal aid to Ukraine. This is a very important issue for all of us,” said Canadian Defense Minister Anita Anand.

But the “massive costs” promised to Putin if he ordered an invasion would be economic and political, mainly in the form of sanctions, which are not part of NATO’s remit. The alliance offered Russia a series of talks on security, including arms control.

Over the past two days, Russia has said it was returning troops and weapons to bases, but Stoltenberg said the allies had seen no concrete signs of a withdrawal and fears that Russia would not invading Ukraine persists.

“They’ve always moved forces back and forth, so just that we’re seeing movement of forces, it doesn’t confirm a true pullback,” Stoltenberg said. “The trend in recent weeks and months has been a steady increase in Russian capabilities near Ukraine’s borders.”

Russia poses no direct threat to the security of any NATO country, but the alliance is concerned about the fallout from any conflict in Ukraine, such as a wave of people fleeing the fighting across European borders, or d possible cyberattacks and disinformation attacks.

___

Follow AP’s coverage of the Russia-Ukraine tension at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

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Canada’s Trudeau triggers Emergency Act to break lockdowns – AZERTAC

Baku, February 15, AZERTAC

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Monday invoked the Emergencies Act as part of a move to lift a blockade in the capital Ottawa and other areas in connection with protests by truckers against the government’s health rules. COVID-19, according to Anadolu Agency.

It also aims to prevent a repeat blockade of the Ambassador Bridge, the main commercial artery between Canada and the United States. The law is time-limited, although the duration of its effect is unclear. It is also targeted at specific areas like the blockade of Ottawa.

“This is about keeping Canadians safe,” Trudeau told a nationally broadcast press conference, adding “we cannot and will not allow dangerous activities to continue.”

The law has never been used before, but an earlier version — in 1988, it replaced the War Measures Act — was invoked in 1970 by the late Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau, Justin Trudeau’s father , who used it to repress a Quebec separatist. organization that kidnapped British Trade Commissioner and Quebec Cabinet Minister Pierre Laporte. He was later found dead.

On Monday, Trudeau declared the Emergencies Act to deal with blockades by truckers and others who demanded the repeal of all government COVID-19 health measures. Border points were disrupted in several provinces, including Ontario, Alberta and Manitoba.

But when his father called in the army to deal with the Quebec threat and there were soldiers everywhere and tanks roamed the streets, Justin did not call the Canadian Armed Forces, which he had said at the end of last week was a last resort.

“We don’t use the Emergencies Act to call in the military,” Trudeau said. “We are not suspending fundamental rights or nullifying the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

“We don’t limit people’s freedom of expression. We don’t limit freedom of peaceful assembly. We don’t prevent people from exercising their right to lawfully protest.”

While protesters on the Ambassador Bridge were evacuated and the bridge reopened on Sunday, the city of Ottawa, which has a population of one million, remains paralyzed by protesters and hundreds of large transport trucks. The “siege,” as Ontario Premier Doug Ford called it, is in its third week. Ford declared a provincial state of emergency, but this had no effect on the situation in Ottawa.

The law is defined as a tool to deal with an “urgent and critical situation” that “seriously endangers the life, health or safety of Canadians”.

It gives the government the right to enact “temporary special measures which might not be appropriate in normal times”.

For example, under the law, the federal government can order Ottawa tow trucks to remove parked trucks that have created havoc downtown. The towing companies had refused to do so, fearing reprisals. Trudeau made the decision after consulting with provincial premiers and his caucus (elected Liberal MPs).

Meanwhile, at the Coutts Dam in Alberta, between the United States and Canada, police said on Monday they arrested 11 militant protesters and seized a number of weapons, including long guns, handguns fist, ammunition and bulletproof vests.

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Nasdaq Announces Retirement of Executive Vice President of Market Technology Lars Ottersgård; appoints new leadership for financial crime technology and market infrastructure companies

Nasdaq, Inc.

Consolidates legal and regulatory functions and group risk management responsibilities

Nasdaq Announces Technology Market Leadership Updates

Nasdaq, Inc. announced the retirement of Lars Ottersgørd, executive vice president of Market Technology, after 16 years at the helm of the organization.  As a result, the company is appointing two senior executives – Jamie King and Roland Chai – to advance its Financial Crime Enforcement and Market Infrastructure Technology businesses, respectively.

Nasdaq, Inc. announced the retirement of Lars Ottersgård, executive vice president of Market Technology, after 16 years at the helm of the organization. As a result, the company is appointing two senior executives – Jamie King and Roland Chai – to advance its Financial Crime Enforcement and Market Infrastructure Technology businesses, respectively.

NEW YORK, Feb. 14 10, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Nasdaq, Inc. (Nasdaq: NDAQ), today announced the retirement of Lars Ottersgård, executive vice president of Market Technology, after 16 years leading the organization. Ottersgård will transition to an advisory role on April 30, 2022, until his official retirement on August 31. As a result, the company is appointing two top executives – Jamie King and Roland Chai – to drive its anti-financial and market crime infrastructure forward. The technology companies, respectively, and both will report directly to Nasdaq President and CEO Adena Friedman.

The announced changes are not expected to impact the Company’s public financial reporting structure for the Market Technology segment, comprised of the Anti-Financial Crime and Market Infrastructure Technology businesses. Additionally, the Nasdaq continues to maintain its financial and operational performance targets for the Market Technology segment.

During a 16-year career at Nasdaq, Ottersgård presided over a near tripling of the company’s market technology franchise and was instrumental in growing the company into one of the biggest global solution providers for exchanges, clearing houses, central securities depositories, regulators, banks, and brokers. After a 20-year career at IBM, Ottersgård joined OMX AB in 2006 to lead global sales for the Nordic-based exchange company’s trading technology business and was appointed to lead the market technology business. combined following Nasdaq’s landmark merger with OMX in 2008. His vision and leadership has resulted in the provision of Nasdaq’s technology capabilities to more than 130 market infrastructure operators in 50 countries, including one of largest market infrastructure agreements in the history of the industry. Following the launch of the Nasdaq Financial Framework, Ottersgård led the company into new areas beyond traditional capital markets, including building and scaling the company’s anti-financial crime solutions for banks and brokers around the world, and played a key role in advancing the Nasdaq cloud journey.

“Lars has been an exceptional leader and colleague, having led our Market Technology segment through some of the most significant milestones in industry history,” said Adena Friedman, President and CEO of Nasdaq. “After bringing OMX to Nasdaq in 2008, his keen eye for emerging technologies led Nasdaq to acquire SMARTS Surveillance and Cinnober, cementing our leadership position in providing essential technology to over a hundred exchanges and of market infrastructure operators around the world.His recent efforts to expand our solutions and marketplaces in the cloud, as well as to serve new markets, including cryptocurrencies, puts us in a privileged position for us partner with customers across the marketplace ecosystem as we move toward an interconnected future.”

The following management changes will take effect on April 4, 2022:

  • Jamie King will be elevated to Executive Vice President, Nasdaq, and assume leadership of Nasdaq Anti-financial crime (AFC). AFC’s business includes solutions used by thousands of banks, stock exchange operators and other financial institutions to detect and combat financial crime through trade and market monitoring, as well as fraud detection solutions and Verafin’s anti-money laundering program. King is currently president and CEO of Verafin, which he co-founded in 2003.

  • Roland Chai, currently Global Chief Risk Officer of Nasdaq, will be elevated to Executive Vice President and will lead the Nasdaq Market Infrastructure Technology company, which includes products specifically designed to meet the technology needs of market infrastructure customers. Prior to joining Nasdaq in 2020, Chai served as Head of Post-Trading and Head of Group Risk at the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. He previously held the position of Equity Manager at LCH Ltd after starting his career in software development.

  • Following these changes, John ZeccaNasdaq’s Chief Legal & Regulatory Officer, will assume leadership of Roland Chai’s Nasdaq Group Risk Management team and become Legal, Risk and Regulatory Director.

“The organizational and leadership changes announced today will accelerate Nasdaq’s ability to realize its potential as a global leader in anti-financial crime solutions and as a leading, innovative technology partner to exchanges and markets around the world,” said Friedman. “Jamie and Roland are both respected leaders in their fields with deep industry expertise, proven track records of success, and a shared focus on deepening client relationships. I look forward to continued success as we are driving the next phase of growth in our anti-financial and market crime solutions.”

CAUTION REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

The information in this communication contains forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. The Nasdaq cautions readers that any forward-looking information is not a guarantee of future performance and that actual results could differ materially from those contained in the forward-looking information. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, projections regarding our future financial results, products and services and achievement of objectives, and other statements that are not historical facts. Forward-looking statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties or other factors beyond Nasdaq’s control. These factors include, but are not limited to, Nasdaq’s ability to implement its strategic initiatives, economic, political and market conditions and fluctuations, government and industry regulation, interest rate risk, competitive U.S. and worldwide, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business operations, results of operations, financial condition, workforce, or the operations or decisions of our customers, suppliers, or business partners, and other factors detailed in Nasdaq’s filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, including its annual reports on Form 10-K and quarterly reports on Form 10-Q which are available on the Investor Relations website. Nasdaq Investors at http://ir.nasdaq.com and on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. The Nasdaq undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

About the Nasdaq

Nasdaq (Nasdaq: NDAQ) is a global technology company serving capital markets and other industries. Our diverse offering of data, analytics, software and services enables clients to optimize and execute their business vision with confidence. To learn more about the company, technology solutions and career opportunities, visit us on LinkedIn, Twitter @Nasdaq or www.nasdaq.com.

Contacts for Media Relations:

Will Briganti
+1 (646) 964-8169
[email protected]

Yan-yan Tong
+1 (240) 721-8066
ya[email protected]

Contact with Investor Relations:

Ed Ditmire, CFA
+1 (212) 401-8737
[email protected]

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/56fb1997-149e-4e2f-9aeb-4871b7a2fcf7

-NDAQF-

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Canadian army

US says more than 130,000 Russian troops are stationed outside Ukraine

Some airlines have canceled or diverted flights to Ukraine amid heightened fears that an invasion by Russia is imminent despite intensive weekend talks between the Kremlin and the West.

In an hour-long call Saturday with Russian President Vladimir Putin, President Joe Biden said invading Ukraine would cause widespread human suffering and that the West was committed to diplomacy to end the crisis but also prepared for other scenarios, the White House said. He offered no suggestion that the call diminished the threat of imminent war in Europe.

The two presidents spoke a day after Biden’s national security adviser Jake Sullivan warned that US intelligence shows a Russian invasion could begin within days.

Russia denies plans to invade, but has massed more than 100,000 troops near the Ukrainian border and sent troops to drills in neighboring Belarus. US officials say Russia’s firepower buildup has reached the point where it could invade on short notice.

Dutch airline KLM has canceled flights to Ukraine until further notice, the company announced on Saturday.

Dutch sensitivity to potential danger in Ukrainian airspace is high following the 2014 downing of a Malaysian airliner over an area of ​​eastern Ukraine held by rebel-backed by Russia. All 298 people on board died, including 198 Dutch citizens.

Ukrainian charter airline SkyUp said on Sunday its flight from Madeira, Portugal to Kiev had been diverted to the Moldovan capital Chisinau after the plane’s Irish lessor said it was banning flights in the country. Ukrainian airspace.

Ukrainian presidential spokesman Serhii Nykyforov told The Associated Press that Ukraine has not closed its airspace. A Ministry of Infrastructure statement said: Some carriers are experiencing difficulties related to fluctuations in insurance markets.

The Putin-Biden call, following a call between Putin and French President Emmanuel Macron earlier in the day, came at a critical time in what has become the biggest security crisis between Russia and the West since the cold War. US officials believe they have only days to prevent an invasion and massive bloodshed in Ukraine.

While the United States and its NATO allies have no plans to send troops to Ukraine to fight Russia, an invasion and the resulting punitive sanctions could reverberate far beyond the United States. former Soviet republic, affecting energy supplies, world markets and the balance of power in Europe.

President Biden has been clear with President Putin that while the United States remains ready to engage in diplomacy, in full coordination with our allies and partners, we are also ready for other scenarios, the President said. White House statement.

Yuri Ushakov, Putin’s top foreign policy aide, said while tensions had been escalating for months, in recent days the situation had simply reached the point of absurdity.

He said Biden had discussed possible sanctions that could be imposed on Russia, but that issue was not the focus of a long enough conversation with the Russian leader.

In a sign that US officials are preparing for the worst-case scenario, the United States announced its intention to evacuate most of its embassy staff in the Ukrainian capital and urged all US citizens in Ukraine to leave the country immediately . Britain has joined other European nations in telling its citizens to leave Ukraine.

Canada has closed its embassy in Kiev and moved its diplomatic staff to a temporary office in Lviv, located in the west of the country, Foreign Minister Melanie Joly said on Saturday. Lviv is home to a Ukrainian military base that served as the hub for Canada’s 200-soldier training mission in the former Soviet country.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy played down concerns about an invasion, urging the country to remain calm.

I believe that today in the information space there is a lot of information, he said on Saturday.

The timing of possible Russian military action remains a key question.

The United States has collected intelligence that Russia is considering on Wednesday as a target date, according to a U.S. official familiar with the findings. The official, who was not authorized to speak publicly and only did so on condition of anonymity, did not say how definitive the information was.

New US-Russian tensions surfaced on Saturday when the Defense Ministry summoned the US Embassy’s military attache after he said the Navy had detected a US submarine in Russian waters near the Kuril Islands in the Pacific. . The submarine refused the order to leave, but left after the navy used unspecified appropriate means, the ministry said.

Adding to the sense of crisis, the Pentagon ordered the dispatch of 3,000 additional American troops to Poland to reassure the allies.

In addition to the more than 100,000 ground troops that US officials say Russia has mustered along Ukraine’s eastern and southern borders, the Russians have deployed missile, air, naval and special operations forces, as well as supplies to support a war.

This week, Russia moved six amphibious assault ships into the Black Sea, increasing its ability to land marines on the coast.

Biden has bolstered the US military presence in Europe to reassure allies on NATO’s eastern flank. The 3,000 additional soldiers ordered in Poland come on top of the 1,700 who are on the way. The US military is also transferring 1,000 troops from Germany to Romania, which, like Poland, shares a border with Ukraine.

Russia demands that the West keep former Soviet countries out of NATO. He also wants NATO to refrain from deploying weapons near its border and roll back alliance forces from Eastern Europe, demands the West flatly rejects.

Russia and Ukraine have been locked in bitter conflict since 2014, when Ukraine’s pro-Kremlin leader was ousted from office by a popular uprising. Moscow responded by annexing the Crimean peninsula and then backing a separatist insurgency in eastern Ukraine, where fighting has killed more than 14,000 people.

A 2015 peace deal brokered by France and Germany stopped large-scale battles, but regular skirmishes have continued and efforts to reach a political settlement have stalled.

(ANI)

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International headquarters

Switzerland approves tobacco ad ban

ZURICH — Glamorous cigarette ads will soon be a thing of the past in Switzerland, after voters overwhelmingly approved legislation on Sunday banning tobacco companies from displaying them in public spaces.

Health advocates said the legislation, which was approved in a referendum, was an important step towards tightening the country’s regulations on loose tobacco.

“Many organizations have mobilized and advocated for a solution that prioritizes the protection of young people,” said Flavia Wasserfallen, member of the Swiss National Council and supporter of the initiative.

In much of the West, tobacco adverts have long fallen out of favor, but they have survived in this Alpine nation, with displays of cigarettes and e-cigarettes appearing on billboards, in cinemas and at events like music festivals.

But voters made it clear on Sunday that they were no longer interested in seeing them, and despite strong opposition from the tobacco industry and government, the tougher regulations were approved by 56.6% of voters and won received strong support from the French and Italians in the country. -languages, despite having the highest smoking rates in the country.

Steps have been taken in recent years to try to introduce stricter regulations on tobacco-related products in Switzerland. In 2015, the Federal Council, the country’s executive branch, proposed a Tobacco Products Act that would ban the sale of tobacco and related products to minors and restrict advertising.

Parliament eventually approved a watered down version of the bill, which banned the sale of tobacco to those under 18 but allowed advertising to continue almost unhindered.

The most recent initiative was launched by a group of more than 40 health organizations that formed in response to weakening tobacco laws. The new Tobacco Products Act, which includes the advertising provisions that voters approved on Sunday, is expected to come into force in 2023.

“The majority of our country has decided to correct Parliament’s decision on the Tobacco Products Act,” said Hans Stöckli, chairman of the committee behind the initiative, on Sunday. Mr Stöckli described the result as “a historic step” and a “necessary step” towards better tobacco regulation.

Opponents of the measure called the tighter restrictions extreme. And while they agreed tobacco should be age-restricted, they said the new rules amounted to a de facto ban on a legal product because children could potentially be exposed to n anywhere.

Switzerland has a long-standing close relationship with the tobacco industry. Philip Morris and Japan Tobacco International have their international headquarters in the country, and British American Tobacco also has a strong presence.

The industry employs approximately 4,500 people in Switzerland, according to the government, including in the production of high-tar cigarettes which are illegal to produce or sell in the European Union. Cigarettes rank with chocolate and cheese among the main exports.

Even after the new rules come into effect, Switzerland will continue to have more liberal tobacco regulations than many other countries. Moreover, it will still not meet all the conditions required to ratify the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, an international response to the fight against tobacco. tobacco epidemicdespite signing in 2004. The United States has not ratified the convention either.

Alain Berset, Swiss vice-president, who is also the country’s health minister, had opposed the initiative before the vote. But at a press conference on Sunday, he acknowledged that Swiss voters had spoken and said the government would move forward with the new regulations.

“The Federal Council will now tackle the implementation of the initiative,” Berset said.

The Tobacco Products Act was not the only issue of the ballot on Sunday. In a move people feared had cut Switzerland off from global medical progress, voters rejected a proposal to ban all human and animal experiments in the country.

Voters also decided against giving Swiss media more financial support, rejecting a government proposal to extend subsidies to online media as well as regional radio and TV stations.

A government-approved amendment to the federal stamp duty law that would have made it cheaper for businesses to raise new capital was also rejected, with opponents saying it would have mainly benefited big business.

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Non profit living

Covid updates: Supreme Court rejects teachers’ proposal to block New York City’s vaccination mandate

Credit…Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters

A new study on underreported coronavirus variants is a reminder that early detection and frequent genomic sequencing are among the most effective arrows in the quiver of public health officials.

But that is precisely what is not happening in many countries, putting their own populations – as well as the rest of the world – at risk.

Researchers in the United States and Nigeria examined a variant of interest, Eta, which circulated in Nigeria in early 2021, as well as a regionally rare Delta sublineage that was different from the Delta variant that circulated around the world.

Eta might have warranted the “variant of concern” designation if its growth potential had been recognized earlier, the researchers from the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University and the University of Ibadan in Nigeria wrote. Their research was published this month in Nature Communications.

“We were just lucky that this variant didn’t spread globally,” said Dr Oyewale Tomori, a virologist who heads a Nigerian government committee on Covid-19.

Judd Hultquist, co-author of the report and associate director of Northwestern’s Center for Pathogen Genomics and Microbial Evolution, said variant tracking was “incredibly uneven” across the world.

“Less than 1% of footage is from the African continent and less than 3% is from South America,” he said in an interview.

On Thursday, the World Health Organization’s Africa director, Dr Matshidiso Moeti, urged wider use of genomic sequencing technology in Africa to help speed up the detection of new variants. The technology is only available in a few middle-income countries in the region, such as South Africa and Botswana.

Researchers around the world use GISAID, the global online repository of coronavirus sequences, to share new genomes and search for mutations in its hundreds of thousands of viral genetic sequences.

Nigeria, with a population of 220 million, is the seventh most populous country in the world and the largest majority black country. It is also one of the least vaccinated: less than 3% of its population is fully inoculated, according to the Our World in Data project at the University of Oxford.

The World Health Organization has labeled Eta a variant of concern, which means it was worth studying but not as dangerous as a variant of concern. But after Eta moved the Alpha variant to Nigeria and the surrounding region early last year, researchers found it went largely unnoticed while Alpha remained at the center of much of the world. .

“Eta had all the hallmarks of a variant of concern and was able to outmatch the Alpha variant in the region before Delta arrived,” Dr Hultquist said.

And after the rise and fall of Eta, a rare Delta sub-lineage (AY.36) appeared in the region that was different from the Delta variant that circulated most of the world.

The study underscores the critical need for improved surveillance and tracking of coronavirus infections to ensure early detection of new variants in Nigeria and the West African region, said Dr Moses Adewumi of the ‘University of Ibadan, one of the collaborators.

Even now, the researchers said, there are just over 1,400 Nigerian coronavirus sequences available in public repositories. The United States, by comparison, sequences tens of thousands of specimens each week.

The variants that have been examined by researchers are no longer a threat. But at the time, the Alpha and Eta variants produced the highest spike in new infections; and the rare Delta lineage caused the second spike, according to Northwestern’s Dr. Ramon Lorenzo-Redondo, one of the study’s authors. The spikes resulted in the highest death rates of the pandemic, he said.

Africa is not fully utilizing available laboratory resources, Dr Tomori said. He said mainland labs had sequenced 70,000 viral genomes by the end of 2021.

“Sequencing is inadequate in Africa because many African governments have not appreciated the usefulness of such facilities to provide data for better epidemic control,” he said. “Furthermore, there is a lack of collaboration among African scholars, some of whom prefer to work with their former ‘colonial’ colleagues.”

One lesson is clear: it’s never too early to try to say what the impact of a variation might be. Researchers are already keeping a close eye on a new Omicron sub-variant, BA.2.

Alex Sigal, a virologist at the Africa Health Research Institute in Durban, South Africa, who helped identify Beta and Omicron variants, said: “The most important message here is that we don’t see everything, and that some of these places may not have Covid-19 control.

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History organization

Opinion: Florida’s ‘don’t say gay’ bill is cruel and dangerous

As leaders of two LGBTQ organizations, we have been amazed at the progress we have made over the past decade. But it’s also clear that the increased visibility of our community has caused a backlash. According to the American Civil Liberties Union, more than 100 anti-LGBTQ bills, the majority of which target transgender and non-binary youth, are currently pending in state legislatures across the country.
One of the most extreme examples is a bill in Florida known as the “Don’t Say Gay” bill. It states that school districts “may not encourage discussion of sexual orientation or gender identity in the elementary grades or in a manner that is not appropriate for the age or development of students.” The language, which is vague and could apply to K-12 classrooms across Florida, could be used to prohibit open discussions about LGBTQ people and issues.
If passed, it would effectively erase entire chapters of history, literature and critical health information from schools – and silence LGBTQ students and those with LGBTQ parents or family members. . It’s just one of many divisive and dehumanizing bills in Florida that use LGBTQ youth as political pawns to limit conversations about gender and sexual identity.
Let’s be clear: the Don’t Say Gay Bill will do real and lasting harm. All students should learn about the significant contributions of the LGBTQ community to United States history and culture. Landmark events, ranging from the Stonewall riots to Supreme Court rulings in cases such as Obergefell v. Hodges and Bostock v. Clayton County, should be included in any comprehensive lesson plan on modern history and the civil rights movements.

LGBTQ students deserve to see their own history and experiences reflected in their education, just like their peers. Learning about LGBTQ civil rights heroes like Marsha P. Johnson, Harvey Milk, and Bayard Rustin can inspire LGBTQ students, make them proud of who they are, and help them envision a better future.

Research from the Trevor Project found that LGBTQ students who learned about LGBTQ issues or people in the classroom at school were 23% less likely to attempt suicide in the past year. Conversely, when LGBTQ topics are taboo, this stigma is often internalized and can negatively impact a student’s mental health and self-esteem.
Learning about the LGBTQ community can also foster peer acceptance and contribute to a positive school climate, which is still much needed. Tragically, a majority of LGBTQ youth in middle school and high school said they had been bullied in person or electronically in the past year — and those who did were three times more likely to attempt to commit suicide.
And given that only 1 in 3 young LGBTQ people find their home to be LGBTQ, it is all the more important to ensure that schools – the place where young people spend a significant part of their waking hours – are as welcoming as possible.
At a time when 42% of LGBTQ youth, including more than half of transgender and non-binary youth, have seriously considered attempting suicide in the past year, according to a national survey conducted by The Trevor Project, fostering an environment Affirmative schooling is more critical than ever. That’s why lawmakers should expand support systems for LGBTQ students and encourage teachers to create safe and inclusive learning environments, without fueling stigma and shame.

Scaring LGBTQ students from discussing their identity, community or family at school is as cruel as it is dangerous.

If you or someone you know needs help or support, The Trevor Project’s trained crisis counselors are available 24/7 at 1-866-488-7386, via chat at TheTrevorProject.org/Get-Helpor by texting START to 678678.
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Canadian army

In a Ukrainian border town, children practice drills and stockpile supplies in case of a Russian attack

Residents of the Ukrainian town of Ovruch, just 15 kilometers from the border with Belarus, know that if the current crisis with Russia metastasized into a full military conflict, their community could be the first the invaders would come to.

“Teachers remind us that if there is [is] an offensive by the Russian Federation or Belarus, we shouldn’t panic,” Ivan Trostenyuk, a 14-year-old eighth grader at local school number three, said in a recent interview with CBC News as he was going home.

“Our [Ukrainian] the soldiers will help us.”

While Ovruch has a population of just 15,000, it is 200 km – or about two and a half hours’ drive – north of the capital, Kiev. The newly renovated highway south of Ovruch is one of the fastest routes to reach the political and economic center of Ukraine.

For weeks, Russia has sent troops and advanced weapons to Belarus, with some of the staging areas within 30 km of Ukraine. Military experts estimate there could now be more than 30,000 Russian troops in Belarus, and on Thursday they began moving in formation and conducting live-fire drills in exercises called Allied Resolve.

In this still image from a video released on February 11, military vehicles are seen conducting a joint military exercise between the armed forces of Russia and Belarus at the Brestsky training ground in the region of Brest, Belarus. (Russian Ministry of Defense document)

More than 130,000 Russians in total have gathered in places near Ukraine’s land border, in addition to a large naval deployment in the Black Sea.

Putin ‘just can’t back down’

Some Western analysts say the Russian deployment to Belarus represents the largest Russian troop movement there since well before the end of the Cold War. It also gives President Vladimir Putin and his generals additional options to attack Ukraine, should they choose to do so.

“When you have this amount of troops amassed at the borders, with the amount of naval power [Putin] moved into the Black Sea, with the amount of air power he has, he has to do something. He just can’t back down,” said Canadian Mychailo Wynnyckyj, associate professor of sociology and director of the doctoral program at Kyiv-Mohyla Business School.

Putin demanded that the United States and NATO rewrite existing security agreements in Europe, refuse to admit Ukraine to NATO and withdraw all foreign troops from former Soviet republics or former members of the Warsaw Pact. , such as Poland and Romania.

Canadian-Ukrainian Mychailo Wynnyckyj teaches in Kiev. He thinks Putin is unlikely to back down from a military buildup on the Ukrainian border. (Carly Thomas/CBC)

Wynnyckyj says Putin knows such demands cannot be met, and so he and many Ukrainians are preparing for the worst. “I think he’s going to move in.”

At the school in Ovruch, and others across Ukraine, teachers trained children in emergency drills in case the conflict escalated.

“The action plan for the children depends on the signal we receive,” said headmistress Ludmyla Zalizko of school number three in Ovruch.

“If bombings or other scenarios [happen]we could move to the basement, or outside.”

Several students told CBC News that psychologists came to their classes to try to reassure them but also to prepare them in case their city was attacked.

“We are not as worried as [the grown-ups] said Ivan Trostenyuk. “I think everything will be fine.

Heed the instructions

Other students said their parents trained them on home emergency plans.

“I live in a house and we have our own basement, where we already have a stock of food and other things, and we can go down there in 30 seconds,” 13-year-old Vania Zubiychuk said.

The Transfiguration Church is the dominant monument in Ovruch, Ukraine. (Chris Brown/CBC)

“If I’m in school [when an attack comes]I have to listen to the instructions of a teacher or adults around, and if at home … [I] listen and do whatever the parents ask you to do.”

Volodymyr Kublynsky, also 13, said his parents told him the less he told people about the political situation, the better. They say, “we shouldn’t be provocative, nobody should blow this up.”

The CBC News team spent several hours one day this week driving through Ukraine’s border areas north of Kiev and saw no evidence of the country’s military or mobilization efforts to protect the capital or the border region.

Nor, apparently, many people who live in Ovruch.

Petro Levkivsky, a municipal politician, says he understands his government wants to avoid panicking people, but a show of force would make people feel better.

“I’d rather see something happen,” he said. “I would rather there was a huge fence [at the border] and there were many troops to protect us.”

Petro Levkivsky, a municipal politician from Ovruch, said citizens might feel more reassured if they saw the Ukrainian army doing its own military exercises. (Carly Thomas/CBC)

Levkivsky said the Ukrainian military has improved significantly with the help of foreign countries, such as Canada, and this gives him hope that if hostilities break out, Ukraine will have a strong defense.

“It gives me confidence that we have an experienced army,” he said. “We are truly grateful that our foreign partners are providing military assistance, and we hope this will deter the aggressor and there will be virtually no war in central Europe.”

Ongoing conflict

Ukraine’s government has released a video of its own tanks and soldiers carrying out exercises east of the capital, near the cities of Kharkiv and Kherson, and says its preparations will reflect Russia’s schedule for its exercises until 20 February.

An old Soviet T-34 tank and an artillery piece serve as monuments to Ovruch’s military history in a park near the town’s entrance. (Adrian DiVirgilio/CBC)

In addition, there have recently been almost daily flights from the United States bringing new weapons to the Ukrainian military, including Javelin anti-tank missiles and other small arms ammunition.

Most Ukrainians see the current crisis with Russia as a continuation of a conflict that began in 2014, when Putin ordered his troops to seize the Crimean peninsula.

Shortly after, separatists in eastern Ukraine – which are supplied, financed and armed by Russia – launched an offensive against the Ukrainian army, in a conflict that has left more than 13,000 people dead. combatants and civilians.

Warnings from the US, Britain and others that a Russian attack could be ‘imminent’ come as no surprise to a war-weary nation that has spent years expecting an escalation from Russia at some point.

A kiosk near a bus stop in Ovruch. (Adrian DiVirgilio/CBC)

Wynnyckyj says like others in the country, he is preparing but also determined to carry on with his life as usual.

“We have 60 liters of water, just in case. We have lots of dried food and tinned food, just in case the electricity goes out for a few weeks, which might happen.”

But, he insisted, “it’s not panic. And we don’t have panic in the streets.”

In the border town of Ovruch, there is a sense of resignation that if an invasion did occur, it might not be possible to flee.

“If the incursion happens, it would happen suddenly, so we won’t have time to leave,” said Levkivsky, the local politician. “I have three children and no car. We won’t have time to escape.”

In this case, he says the plan would simply be for him and his family to stay put and do the best they can, as other Ukrainians did when their territory was invaded.

“Our compatriots in eastern Ukraine have experienced this, the Crimeans have experienced it too, we too, we will experience it too.”

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International headquarters

Job: Development and supply chain project manager – Castelli Cycling USA

Job title

Development & Supply Chain Project Manager

Company / Organization

Castelli Cycling United States

job description

Job Description
Date: February 2022
Job Title: Development and Supply Chain Project Manager
Reports to: Product Development Manager

Position Summary:
The Development and Supply Chain Project Manager will play a critical role in the development, production and shipment of premium cycling products within a global organization. The position will work with teams in the United States and Italy, as well as factories in Europe, Asia and Central America, to ensure products are delivered on time, on cost and on quality. The Development and Supply Chain Project Manager will create and implement new project management and communication tools, plan and manage development meetings.
Duties and Responsibilities:
• Responsibilities may include, but are not limited to; Creating a global schedule, implementing communication channels between global teams, responding to customer delivery needs.
• Gather information from all departments needed to move a project forward
• Map and define all assigned projects and milestones needed to complete and reach the end goal
• Create and maintain project tracking and implementation records
• Identify and resolve problems and conflicts within the project team
• Support ongoing online (retail) and custom product programs with existing global factories, as well as the development and launch of new factories
• Works closely with Product Development Manager, Senior Product Developer, Supply Chain Manager, Logistics Manager, Sales Manager and General Manager
• Organize and manage kick-off meetings with relevant stakeholders
• Historical and forecast analysis to determine product needs
• Actively participate in achieving the company’s business objectives
• Serve as a liaison between cross-functional teams to drive strategy deployment
• Develop best practices and tools for project execution and management
• Work in partnership with department heads to identify opportunities for improvement, develop business cases and drive the prioritization and delivery of eligible projects
• Ensure alignment of global internal processes to reduce complexity, increase transparency and establish clear accountability for achieving the most effective results.
• Keep all departments on track to meet the project schedule
• Identify and mitigate potential risks
• Other duties required by the position

Personal Qualifications:
• Demonstrated initiative with excellent written and verbal communication skills
• Ability to connect with internal and external team members at multiple levels, building confidence in your abilities to get the job done effectively
• Strong time management with accountability to ensure initiatives are completed and delivered on time and within budget
• Ability to work in a fast-paced environment with different international cultures
• Demonstrated success in managing multiple priorities in changing environments
• As a project manager, you will work in close coordination with operations and logistics
• Experience managing budgets and delivering initiatives
• A seasoned and strong ability to solve problems throughout the development process
• Embodies the temperament of a leader: adaptable, resilient, empathetic and assertive
• Proficiency in Microsoft Office applications including Word, Excel and PowerPoint
• Experience in Centric is a plus

Preferred Education and Work Experience Qualifications:
• Licence
• 2+ years of experience as a project manager
• Experience and/or training in the apparel industry with exposure to print production and/or custom product manufacturing as well as supply chain operations.

Please note that this job description is not designed to cover or contain a complete list of activities, duties or responsibilities that are required of the employee for this position. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable people with disabilities to perform the essential functions of the job.

About Castelli/Sportful:
VC Group is a family business operated for over 75 years with a commitment to our customers and our team members. We are a premium cycling apparel manufacturer with global headquarters in Italy and US headquarters in Portland, Oregon. We operate two clothing brands: Castelli and Sportful. Our company has a history of product innovation and performance. Our products have been used by Tour de France winners, world champions and Olympic gold medalists.

Our office and warehouse are in the Hollywood/Laurelhurst area of ​​NE Portland and close to MAX and bike paths.

Full-time positions offer competitive pay, health care, 401k, paid time off, and generous product compensation.

The Castelli/Sportful team strives to create an inclusive workplace that promotes and values ​​diversity. Companies that are diverse in terms of age, gender identity, race, sexual orientation, physical or mental ability, ethnicity, and outlook have proven to be better companies. More importantly, creating an environment where everyone, from any background, can do their best is the right thing to do. We welcome all applicants.

How to register

Please send a CV to [email protected]

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History organization

The end of the pandemic will not come from biology or medicine — it will come from us

Almost two years later, as the omicron variant surged over the winter holidays, it dashed optimism among many that the end of the pandemic was near. This all-news of the new variants produced widely varying responses, with some suggesting it heralds the endgame of the pandemic and others doubling down on containment measures.

So when will the pandemic really end?

According to Fauci’s logic, the answer is only when the number of cases, hospitalizations and deaths come down and stay low. But as seductive as this notion is in its sheer clarity, it clashes with history: Over the past century, the end of respiratory pandemics has never been clear cut.

Instead, in four cases – the flu pandemics of 1918, 1957, 1968 and 2009 – hospitalizations and deaths attributed to the pandemic pathogen continued for years after the sense of urgency subsided. This reality reveals that the “end” of a pandemic cannot be determined by some kind of epidemiological milestone or by the acquisition of a miracle treatment that eliminates all risk associated with the virus. On the contrary, historically, the resumption of normal life – if it was even interrupted in the first place – guides the end of a pandemic.

Most experts agree that the 1918 influenza pandemic, caused by an H1N1 virus, had three waves, ending in the winter of 1919. Some, however, include a fourth wave and date it to the end of 1920 This cloudiness comes because the deaths have continued over the years. after the declared end of the pandemic; as recently as the winter of 1928-29, for example, H1N1-related deaths in the United States topped 100,000.

Yet while the 1918 pandemic may have lasted for years on paper – killing three times as many people as covid-19 after adjusting for population – in real life countermeasures have rarely been maintained for more than six weeks. Cities varied widely in how they dealt with the virus. For example, while many major cities closed schools for an average of four weeks in 1918, New York and Chicago — then the nation’s two largest cities — kept schools open throughout the pandemic. And as historian John Barry notes, many places experienced “several months of relative normality between the waves.”

While the story of the 1918 pandemic has become more familiar since the start of the last pandemic, those of 1957 and 1968 have received less attention.

During nine months in 1957-1958, about 66,000 additional influenza-associated deaths occurred in the United States and about “80 million Americans were bedridden with respiratory illness,” according to one report.

Even so, there have been no nationwide shutdowns or stay-at-home measures, and school closures have only lasted for weeks, if at all. People got sick but society kept spinning. This happened even though 60% of schoolchildren were sick, with schools showing average absenteeism rates between 20 and 30%, and teachers and health workers recording unusually high absenteeism rates. But even in New York, where 40% of students were absent at some schools, administrators said there was “no cause for alarm.” On the advice of the health department, they also did not reduce any activity.

Public health officials have made a conscious decision, in fact, not to cancel large gatherings and gatherings in an effort to stop or slow viral transmission. They considered that the epidemic was spreading too quickly for such measures to be effective. Instead, officials focused on providing medical care to those afflicted, not “preventing” the virus.

The 1957 pandemic came and went, but like the 1918 flu, the epidemiological impact of the virus continued long after normalcy had returned. As Newsweek reported in 1960, two years after the “end” of the 1957 pandemic, the same virus was “quietly wiping out nearly everyone it missed the first time.” One estimate put the number of additional deaths this season at 12,000.

By the late 1960s, a new pandemic virus had arrived: the H3N2 flu, which authorities say claimed 1 million lives worldwide over several seasons. Again, however, authorities put in place few countermeasures and disruptions to social life fluctuated between minimal and non-existent – ​​reflecting a society largely unaware of the deadly pandemic. While in December 1968, The New York Times called the epidemic “one of the worst in the nation’s history”, according to historian Mark Honigsbaum, “there were few school closings and businesses, for the most part, continued to operate normally”.

Why the 1968 pandemic was largely imperceptible to most people is unclear, but it may have to do with how mild it was. The season did not rank as particularly deadly compared to previous years, and much of society was preoccupied with the Vietnam War and other social issues. The pandemic was a major event for virologists and some epidemiologists, but for most of society it was not an event.

Yet as the epidemic wave of the 1968 pandemic receded, the H3N2 virus never disappeared. An analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that strains of the virus were associated with, on average, tens of thousands of deaths per year for three decades after the pandemic.

Something similar happened with the “swine flu” in 2009. While the media devoted considerable airtime to the epidemic, the disruptions to life were fleeting and the epidemic largely spread. removed from public conversation within months. When the World Health Organization officially announced the shift to a “post-pandemic period” in August 2010, few people noticed, as social life had long since returned to normal. Yet, as in previous pandemics, the virus continued to circulate. According to CDC estimates, most post-pandemic seasons have seen the number of flu-related deaths exceed that of the pandemic itself.

Yet, although life has not been interrupted or returned to normal quickly during these four pandemics, we have dealt with covid-19 very differently. Although medicine has advanced over time, the hope of a vaccine or miracle therapy does not fully explain our different response. Indeed, a vaccine was produced in record time in 1968, with a total of 22 million doses distributed in the United States at the end of January 1969. But social life never stopped waiting for this vaccine.

Instead, our unprecedented focus on data may help explain why people have handled covid-19 so differently. Since the first phase of the pandemic, news sites and TV networks have consistently presented dashboards with data fueling perceptions of an ongoing state of emergency, prompting interventions and preventing our lives from resuming. social. The constant saturation of data has fueled the perception that only specific epidemiological measures will allow the resumption of normal life.

But despite our unprecedented ability to monitor the spread of SARS-CoV-2, history tells us that there will not come a time when the data signals the end of the pandemic. If history is any indication, covid cases, hospitalizations and deaths will be there for decades to come.

And for those adopting more stringent mitigation methods, it is crucial to understand that there will be no clearly definable biological endpoint to the pandemic. Only when they integrate the risk of covid into their lives and resume normal social interactions will the pandemic end. While they hope for a clean and neat endpoint, history indicates that such a thing does not exist.

In the end, it’s not the virus that makes the timeline – it’s us. The pandemic will be over when we say it’s over.

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International headquarters

Partnership reports 26 economic development gains in 21

Despite the ongoing challenges of the pandemic, the Houston area continued to see domestic and international business expansions and relocation activity in 2021. The Partnership and its regional allies assisted with 26 economic development projects, representing more than $922 million dollars in capital expenditures and more than 2,900 new jobs in the region.

These include:

  • eagle managementan American manufacturer of high-quality PPE and a health technology company, has announced that it will open a manufacturing plant in Brookshire.
  • Archaea Energyone of the largest producers of renewable natural gas in the United States, is moving its headquarters to 40,000 square foot office space in Houston.
  • Capsule, a leading New York-based digital pharmacy, will expand to Houston with a hub for its pharmacists, pharmacy technicians and delivery drivers. The company plans to grow its local team to more than 100 employees over the next year.
  • Chewy.coman online retailer of pet supplies, expands its distribution network with a 700,000 square foot facility in Houston.
  • Dayton Street Partners, a Chicago-based real estate investment firm, has acquired a 500,000 square foot logistics center in northeast Houston. The company plans a multimillion-dollar renovation of the terminal and the development of an additional 25 acres.
  • First Bank of Taiwan, one of the world’s leading banks, opened its first branch in Houston. It is the first Taiwanese bank to establish itself in Texas. The Houston branch will provide a full range of financial services to meet the operational needs of Taiwanese companies overseas.
  • Fluidity analysisa company-backed startup that provides patented process analytics and control solutions to polymer and biopharmaceutical manufacturers, announced the move of its headquarters from New Orleans to Stafford, Texas, with more than 5,600 square feet of office, manufacturing and laboratory space.
  • Haldor Topsoea world leader in catalysis and process technology based in Denmark, will build a 15,000 ton per year hydrotreating catalyst plant at Bayport’s existing production site in Pasadena, Texas.
  • Han lasera Chinese national supplier of laser equipment, has opened an office in Houston that will support its marketing, R&D, assembly plant and more.
  • Pipe Hobas United Statesan Austria-based global piping systems manufacturer, is expanding to the Houston area with a facility that will support three new product lines.
  • Honeywell International Inc. moved its Performance Materials and Technologies business division to Houston, bringing the company’s workforce in Houston to more than 850 employees. Honeywell also plans to open a new Customer Center of Excellence on the CityWestPlace campus to showcase its technologies aimed at improving efficiency and profitability for industrial customers.
  • JPMorgan Chase, returned to its namesake building and downtown Houston’s tallest tower, with a 250,000 square foot lease. The bank is planning a major renovation of the building’s lobby, outdoor plaza and amenities. As part of the move, JPMorgan Chase will relocate its Houston Technology Center, which employs more than 1,500 people.
  • Neurogenica biotechnology company focused on genetic drugs for patients with rare neurological diseases, announced plans to convert a 19,000 square foot building into a manufacturing facility to support research and development efforts.
  • The Financial Times and Nikkei open the first joint office of their international editorial network in Houston to strengthen coverage of the energy industry.
  • NRG Energya Fortune 500 energy company with 3,000 local employees, announced it had designated Houston as its sole headquarters with plans for continued expansion.
  • ProDevice Corp.a leader in modern storage media data destruction technologies, announced an expansion to Houston with an office that will manage the company’s North and South American operations.
  • Puro Bioplasticsa New York-based sustainable bioplastics solutions provider, is setting up manufacturing operations at a 20,000 square foot facility in Houston.
  • Quantum Servicesa Houston-based company, a leader in specialized contracting services for the energy industry and others, will expand its headquarters.
  • Sourcepoint Mortgagea leader in mortgage business process management services, expands to Houston with a 35,000 square foot office.
  • Flow Floa Canadian manufacturer that supports the oil and gas industry, said it will expand to Houston to support manufacturing of a new line of products.
  • Super Cementa company based in the United Arab Emirates, is going to build a green cement factory in Houston intended to reduce the greenhouse effect.
  • Talaris Therapeutica Kentucky-based biopharmaceutical company, opened a research center in Houston to focus on process and assay development.
  • Texas MedPlastan Argentinian manufacturer of PPE products, opened a manufacturing plant in Houston.
  • Transoceana leading international provider of offshore contract drilling services, develops and updates technology and software platforms used with offshore rigs and mobile fleets on the Houston Gulf Coast.
  • UPSa global leader in distribution and logistics, will replace its existing Houston facility with a state-of-the-art 660,000 square foot packing and sorting facility.
  • Recycled products of the worlda California-based company that has developed proprietary technology to utilize recycled products, recently opened a 34,000 square foot facility in Waller.

The Houston area further cemented its position as America’s top metropolis for business relocations and expansions, with a total of more than 231 projects announced. Of those projects, 24% disclosed jobs related to the announcement, or more than 10,520 jobs, and 15% disclosed capital expenditures totaling $3.4 billion.

Learn more about the Partnership’s work in economic development and other areas of interest in the Annual report 2021.

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History organization

5 landmarks to know, to see 2022

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February is Black History Month, when crowds flock to the National Civil Rights Museum and the Stax Museum of American Soul Music. But other lesser-known places are also worth a visit, for those who wish to contemplate the city’s invaluable contributions to politics and culture. Here are five such locations:

mason temple

With nearly 8,000 seats, the Church of God in Christ’s “world headquarters” building opened in 1945 as “the largest gathering place in Memphis as well as the largest church owned and operated by of African Americans in the United States,” according to the Tennessee Encyclopedia.

Named for COGIC’s founding bishop, Charles H. Mason, the brick-and-stone monument to black religious freedom and Pentecostal expression at 930 Mason St. has become an indelible part of one of the most dramatic civil rights stories of the century when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. gave his “I’ve been to the top of the mountain” speech there on April 3, 1968 – the day before he was assassinated on a balcony of the Lorraine Motel .

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Protesters sing Amazing Grace at the Mason Temple in South Memphis

Hundreds of protesters gather to sing Amazing Grace at Mason Temple in South Memphis, the site of MLK’s final speech

Memphis Trade Call

BLACK HISTORY MONTH IN MEMPHIS: Stax Museum seeks to pass on record label’s legacy with Black History Month programming

Ida B. Wells Square

Dedicated amid the pandemic on July 16, 2021, the Ida B. Wells statue was an overdue addition to a Memphis statue landscape that already included WC Handy, EH Crump, Johnny Cash and Elvis (to name a few). to name a few).

Sculpted by Andrea Lugar of Eads, the statue stands on the corner of Beale and Fourth streets near the historic Beale Street Baptist Church, a congregation of freed slaves that housed the office of the Memphis Free Speech and Headlight, the newspaper who published some of Wells’ crusading anti-lynching investigations, including a famous 1892 op-ed that a white mob used as an excuse to trash the newspaper’s office six days later.

MEMPHIS HISTORY: Ida B. Wells statue unveiled in downtown Memphis

“Some people don’t want our stories, our realities, our perspectives told, heard, or acknowledged,” said Michelle Duster, president of the Ida B. Wells Foundation of Chicago and Wells’ great-granddaughter. “But between all of us present today, in the spirit of Ida B. Wells, we will not be silenced.”

WDIA

Located at 1070 on the AM dial and still a powerful voice in Memphis, WDIA in 1949 became the first radio station in the United States aimed entirely at black audiences.

Employing influential and famous disc jockeys such as BB King, Rufus Thomas, Jean “The Queen” Steinberg and Nat D. Williams over the years, WDIA (now based at a resort in Southeast Memphis and owned by iHeart Media ) originally aired from offices on Union Avenue.

USA CIVIL RIGHTS TRAIL IN MEMPHIS: Beale Street Historic District, WDIA radio station building added to US Civil Rights Trail

A historical marker on Union about half a block east of Main Street commemorates the longtime downtown home of the so-called “Goodwill Station”.

Sion Christian Cemetery

Apparently founded in the 1870s by United Sons of Zion, a fraternal or “benevolent” organization, this 15-acre site in the 1400 block of South Parkway East is the oldest cemetery in Memphis dedicated to African Americans in the area. and is said to have contained nearly 30,000 graves, including those of yellow fever victims; important merchants, doctors and politicians; and some of the lynching victims Ida B. Wells spoke about – see #2 above.

Although listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990, the cemetery was neglected and overgrown until 2005, when the nonprofit Zion Community Project was established to help restore and to maintain the site.

Statuette of Larry Finch

This life-size bronze tribute to shooting guard-turned-coach Tiger, who remains perhaps the most beloved figure in University of Memphis basketball history, was unveiled just three months after the statue was Ida B. Wells.

Located outside the Laurie-Walton Family Basketball Center on the school’s South Campus, the statue captures No. 21 in his Memphis Statue University uniform, halfway through, en route to (presumably) two of his 1,869 career points as a Tiger.

BY MARK GIANNOTTO: At Larry Finch Plaza, Memphis basketball’s past glory embraces the potential of the present

The leader of the Tiger team that coach Gene Bartow took to the NCAA championship game against UCLA in 1973, Finch was a proud product of the Orange Mound neighborhood and Melrose High School. He was embraced in his prime by seemingly the entire Memphis community, but that wasn’t enough to protect him during his controversial final years as a coach, which ended in his forced resignation in 1997.

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International headquarters

US and Russia clash over use and impact of UN sanctions

UNITED NATIONS (AP) – The United States and its allies clashed Monday at the UN Security Council with Russia and China over the usefulness and impact of the UN sanctions, which are currently being imposed to countries ranging from North Korea to Yemen and Congo as well as al-Qaeda and Islamic State extremist groups and their affiliates and supporters.

Russia, which holds the presidency of the Council at this meeting and chose the subject – preventing the humanitarian and unintended consequences of sanctions – also denounced the unilateral sanctions imposed by the United States, the European Union and other countries and groups.

UN political chief Rosemary DiCarlo told the council that there are 14 UN sanctions regimes: for example, in Libya, Mali, South Sudan and Yemen, they support the resolution of the Conflicts ; in Guinea-Bissau, they aim to deter unconstitutional changes of government; in the Central African Republic, Congo and Somalia, they curb the illicit exploitation of natural resources that finance armed groups; in North Korea, they target proliferation activities; and they limit terrorist threats from the Islamic State and al-Qaeda.

DiCarlo said UN sanctions are no longer “the blunt instrument they once were”. Since the 1990s, they have undergone changes to minimize possible adverse consequences on civilians and third countries, and the Security Council has included and provided for humanitarian exemptions in most sanctions regimes, she said. .

Russia’s deputy UN ambassador Dmitry Polyansky, who chaired the meeting, said many sanctions regimes interfere with state-building and economic development plans, pointing the finger at the Central African Republic and Sudan and calling the measures against Guinea-Bissau “anachronistic”.

The Security Council must “pay more attention to what the authorities of states under sanctions think” and be more realistic in setting benchmarks for lifting them to ensure that they do not turn into “mission impossible”, did he declare.

US Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield countered that sanctions are “a powerful tool” that “make it harder for terrorists to raise funds through international financial systems” and have slowed the development of “certain capacities” in programs North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile weapons. Sanctions also “constrain the resources of those who would spoil peace processes, threaten UN peacekeepers, commit atrocities and obstruct humanitarian aid,” she said.

Britain’s deputy ambassador, James Kariyuki, said the value of UN sanctions had been proven in Angola, Côte d’Ivoire, Liberia and Sierra Leone where “they helped end the conflicts and to support the transition to peace and democracy” and were subsequently lifted.

“In the Central African Republic, they improved the practices of a mining company,” he said. “In Somalia, the arms embargo has resulted in the seizure of thousands of cartridges, anti-tank guided missiles and sniper rifles believed to have been destined for al-Shabab”, the extremist group linked to al-Qaeda.

Russia’s Polyansky took particular aim at sanctions imposed outside the UN by countries or groups, which he said ‘remain a serious obstacle to the full functioning of humanitarian exemptions’, citing problems with contractors , carriers, freight insurance and banking.

He also said that Russia operates on the principle that only UN sanctions “are legitimate” and that a wider use of unilateral sanctions “undermines the norms and institutes of international law”.

Polyansky claimed that “secondary sanctions from major Western powers are creating a ‘toxic vibe’ around Pyongyang” that discourages cooperation even in areas not affected by international restrictions. He also cited what he called the “sanctions war” against Russia’s ally Syria, which has very negatively affected its economy, as well as US sanctions against Cuba and Venezuela.

Chinese Ambassador to the UN Zhang Jun called the unilateral sanctions “extremely harmful” and expressed concern that a few countries “threw them left, right and center, with a such a frenzy that they seem to be addicted to it”. He said that these measures “have put a brake on the economic and social development works and the scientific and technological progress of the targeted countries”.

Thomas-Greenfield, the US ambassador, countered that the US much prefers sanctions to be imposed multilaterally, including in the Security Council.

But when some Council members block “critical designations of peace process saboteurs, high-level terrorists, human rights abusers and sanctions evaders”, the United States and many other countries are ready to act – and to use their national monetary regulations and financial systems “as economic leverage to address pressing global challenges such as nuclear proliferation, human rights abuses and violations, and corruption,” he said. she stated.

To Russia’s assertion that sanctions imposed by individual countries may be illegal, Thomas-Greenfield countered, “the United States categorically rejects that position.”

The United States fully supports its partners, regional organizations including the European Union, African Union, and the West African regional group ECOWAS “which are imposing their own sanctions in response to threats,” she said. .

France’s deputy ambassador to the UN, Nathalie Broadhurst, said the EU sanctions were ”in line with international law” and ”do not hinder humanitarian action”.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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History organization

UC Riverside professor is one of the few black archaeologists searching for sunken slave ships and hidden history – Press Enterprise

When you find doll fragments on a former plantation in Florida where slaves lived and worked in the 1800s, it’s impossible not to be amazed.

Who owned the doll? How did children live on a plantation? What was recreation for the children of slaves like?

That feeling of being able to hold a piece of the past before it was placed on a shelf or under a spotlight in a museum – that’s what got Ayana Omilade Flewellen hooked on archaeology.

Ayana Omilade Flewellen, assistant professor of anthropology at UC Riverside, stands in the hallway of Watkins Hall on the Riverside campus Thursday, Feb. 3, 2022. Flewellen is a co-founder of the Society of Black Archaeologists and serves on the board of directors to dive with a purpose. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

Make history tangible

An assistant professor of anthropology at UC Riverside, Flewellen belongs to a small group (less than 1%) within the archaeological community – black archaeologists – and is one of a handful of black-born maritime archaeologists who dive offshore. the coast of St. Croix in the Caribbean and Michigan’s Great Lakes, searching for wreckage of ships that transported slaves and the fuselage of planes that once carried Tuskegee Airmen, the first African-American military aviators of the US armed forces.

At 31, Flewellen, co-founder of the International Society of Black Archaeologists, is carving out a niche for herself as a researcher and archaeologist who works on land and under water, exploring ideas of race, gender, equity and of social justice while linking the truths of the past to the present in each project.

Archaeology, says Flewellen, is a way of showing history rather than telling it.

“Archaeology really makes our history tangible in ways that can’t be denied. It’s important in our country right now in an environment that thrives on misinformation,” said Flewellen, who identifies as no binary (neither male nor female) and prefers the pronoun “they”.

Flewellen’s own history is rooted in Texas. They were able to trace their family members back to the 1850s in Falls County, central Texas. But Flewellen was born in Atlanta and raised in different places – Maryland, New Mexico and Florida. Their time in the Washington, DC area, visiting museums and swimming at Miami beaches influenced their interest in history and, later, maritime archaeology.

“Growing up with a single mother and limited disposable income, we always looked for what we could do for free,” they said. “And that meant visiting many museums and beaches.”

As an undergraduate at the University of Florida, Flewellen was an undeclared major for two years. They found their calling in 2010 during field study at the Kingsley Plantation in Jacksonville, owned in 1814 by Zephaniah Kingsley and run by his wife, Anna Madgigine Jai, a Senegalese whom Kingsley had purchased as a slave. Flewellen was fascinated by how a black woman had actively participated in the management of the plantations, acquiring her own land and slaves after being freed by Kingsley in 1811.

“This project got me hooked on archaeology,” they said.

Ayana Omilade Flewellen, assistant professor of anthropology at UC Riverside, is a co-founder of the Society of Black Archaeologists and serves on the board of directors of Diving With A Purpose, on the Riverside campus, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2022. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

Posts from the past

Much of the work Flewellen does on the land focuses on how African American women in the post-emancipation era dressed their bodies to negotiate the racism, sexism, and classism that shaped their lives.

“I found dress is so important because when we think about the rise of white vigilante movements, they targeted black bodies and property,” Flewellen said. “How people see you as a black person could have a huge impact on your life. We saw it in the Trayvon Martin case.

Martin was a 17-year-old black teenager who was fatally shot by a neighborhood watch coordinator in a gated community in Sanford, Florida on February 26, 2012. He was wearing a hoodie at the time, a everyday who has found himself at the center of the national debate on racial profiling and social justice.

As an artist who makes jewelry, Flewellen said they were always interested in seeing how slaves adorned their bodies.

“I met glasses,” they said. “Buttons made of wood, bone, metal or ceramic. Beautiful hand cut stone beads. When you find these things, you think of the craftsmanship that goes into them. When you look at bone objects, you think about what people ate, what they had access to, and what they created with what little they had.

Flewellen also found fragments of dolls at Kingsley Plantation and a marble at an archaeological site in St. Croix – items that resonated with them the most – they said.

“It made us think about how children lived in those days,” Flewellen said. “It’s not something we talk about often. These objects and remnants of the past help us think more broadly about the human experience.

story under water

Flewellen said maritime archaeology, or the search for historical artifacts underwater, was something that never occurred to them — at least until they were graduate students at the University of Texas at Austin.

“That area was pretty much white male dominated and never presented to me as a possibility,” Flewellen said. “The very cost was staggering to me. Learning to dive can be very expensive.

Connecting with Diving with a Purpose, a Florida-based volunteer underwater archeology program, changed Flewellen’s trajectory. They trained with the group for free at the Dallas YMCA. At first it was terrifying, Flewellen said.

“It took me a while to learn how to float underwater and better control my breathing,” they said. “But most importantly, I had to train my mind to know that everything would be okay. I had to remember to breathe deeply, which also feels like a meditative practice.

Flewellen’s first scuba diving experience was off St. Croix, where they co-administered an archaeological project at the Estate Little Princess Plantation site, teaching students modern archaeological method and theory in the field. and including local community members in data collection. process, giving them the means to appropriate their heritage.

At Sainte-Croix, Flewellen collaborates with her research partner, Justin Dunnavant, assistant professor of anthropology and archeology at UCLA. The project is housed on property owned by The Nature Conservancy, a global environmental organization, and is a collaboration with the Smithsonian’s Slave Wrecks Project, local historic preservation groups, the University of the Virgin Islands, and several universities across the continental United States. The Slave Wrecks Project researches slave ships one voyage at a time and examines the sites, stories and legacies associated with these voyages.

Recently, as part of the project on the island of St. John, the Flewellen team came across a mid-18th century ship, which was not a large enough vessel to have transported enslaved Africans, but existed at a time when there were social problems. processing on the island.

“It helps us think about the maritime connection that black people had during this time,” they said. “The docks themselves were also places where black people congregated.”

Flewellen said the dives off St. Croix, on the edge of the continental shelf, were particularly “incredible and beautiful”.

“You go from 150 feet to 3,000 feet underwater where it’s so dark,” they said. “It’s terrifying and exciting at the same time. The depth of the ocean is a perfect metaphor for the unknown. There is so much history in our waters that we cannot see.

Move and push the limits

Flewellen’s groundbreaking work is helping to transform the field of archaeology, said Maria Franklin, a professor of anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin, where Flewellen earned her master’s and doctorate degrees.

“The work that Ayana and others are doing is aimed at developing ourselves and training others, as well as achieving more collaborations with communities and organizations so that we can take archeology out of the ivory tower and bring it to the world,” Franklin said. “Whether it’s theorizing the human social condition, doing fieldwork, or picking up a collection and thinking about it, social justice is the mandate. That should be the goal. We need to see more people in this field who look like us.

Franklin says she sees her former student not just as a role model for black students, but for students of all races and genders.

Dunnavant, Flewellen’s collaborator and research partner, said he viewed Flewellen as someone who never felt intimidated by challenges or obstacles.

“It’s extremely important for (Flewellen) to be upfront because it’s important for other women to see their work,” he said.

Dunnavant says his goal is to “become irrelevant” by training future archaeologists.

“We have histories and legacies that we don’t know about,” he said. “We may never learn them in our lifetime. Thus, each of our projects includes a training component. »

Their work, along with that of other black archaeologists probing the depths for slave shipwrecks and experiencing the power of finding their own story, will be featured in National Geographic magazine to be published on Monday, February 7. Flewellen’s work was also featured. in the magazine’s “Into the Depths” podcast series.

Flewellen believes that the future of archeology depends on the ability of current practitioners to show the connections between past and present.

“A lot of people see it as a ground for old white people,” they said. “In the future, I see, it’s a practice that roots the way humanity existed in the past and connects it to what we experience today. I like to see a future where projects are driven by the community members and what people want to know about the past – our collective past.

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Canadian army

Global Future Soldier Programs Featured at Future Soldier Technology Conference 2022

SMi Group Reports: The Future Soldier Technology Conference, taking place in London next month, features nine different nations presenting updates on their Future Soldier programs.

There is just one month left until the 8th Annual Future Soldier Technology Conference and Exhibition returns to London on March 8-10, 2022, alongside a Dismounted Soldier Situational Awareness Day on March 7, 2022.

As the world’s leading meeting dedicated to improving dismounted soldier technology, Future Soldier Technology 2022 will provide an engaging networking space to foster new working relationships and discuss current equipment modernization requirements and experiences.

This event usually sells out early – for those wishing to attend the conference, it is advisable to register early to avoid disappointment. Register at http://www.futuresoldiertechnology.com/pr2.

Delegates will have the opportunity to hear key updates on future soldier programs from these countries: the United Kingdom, France, Portugal, Canada, Australia, the Netherlands, Sweden, Germany, the United States, etc.

Featured presentations include:

• Brigadier Matthew Cansdale, Head of Future Force Development, British Army, presenting: “Future Soldier”: Transforming the British Army

• Lieutenant-Colonel Sébastien Gasnier, Field Deputy, Department of Infantry Doctrine and Advanced Studies, French Armed Forces Infantry School, presenting: Maximizing the lethality and situational awareness of dismounted soldiers through improved weapon optics

• Major Pedro Miguel Martins Grifo, Staff Officer (Area Coordinator – C4I, ISTAR and EW) Capabilities Branch, Portuguese Army*, presenting: Development of Portuguese dismounted soldier systems to improve knowledge of the situation

• Major Philippe Rhéaume, Soldier System Project Director, Directorate of Land Requirements, Canadian Armed Forces, presenting: Optimizing Soldier Maneuverability with the Canadian ISSP

• Colonel Michael Bassingthwaighte, Army Advisor, London, Australian Defense Staff, presenting: Improving situational awareness for the dismounted Australian soldier

• Colonel Jan H. Vonk, STRONG Program Manager, Defense Material Organisation, Dutch MOD and Ms. Ilse Kroesen, System Integration Manager Individual Soldier, Defense Materiel Organisation, Netherlands Armed Forces, presenting: STRONG Programme: Improving the Capabilities of Dutch Dismounted Soldiers

• Major Magnus Hallberg, LCD DSS Chairman, NATO/Swedish Armed Forces, presenting: Developing the NATO Future Soldier System

• Mr. Geert Vanlinthout, Program Manager, Night Vision Capability Programme, OCCAR-EA, presenting: OCCAR: Improving Night Vision Capability for Participating Nations

• Lt. Col. Denny Dresch, PdM PEO Ground Soldier Systems, PEO Soldier, US Army, presenting: Transforming Soldier Situational Awareness with the Nett Warrior IVAS Program
*subject to final confirmation

The full agenda and list of speakers is available at http://www.futuresoldiertechnology.com/pr2.

Future Soldier Technology Conference
Conference: March 8-9, 2022
Pre-conference Focus Day: March 7, 2022
Main Sponsor: Glenair | Gold Sponsor: Thales | Sponsors and exhibitors: 3M, Bren-Tronics, Domo Tactical Communications, Excelitas Qioptiq, FalCom, Instro Precision, L3Harris, Marlborough Communications, Silvus Technologies, Steatite, Teleplan Globe and Ultra Electronics

For sponsorship and exhibition enquiries, contact Sadia Malick Sadia Malick, Director on: +44 (0) 20 7827 6748 or email [email protected]

For delegate enquiries, contact James Hitchen on: +44 (0) 20 7827 6054 or email [email protected]

— ENDS –

About the SMi Group:
Established since 1993, SMi Group is a global event production company specializing in B2B conferences, workshops, masterclasses and online communities. We create and organize events in the defense, security, energy, utilities, finance and pharmaceutical sectors. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward-thinking thought leaders and visionaries, enabling us to bring our communities together to learn, engage, share and network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk

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Non profit living

US evacuated 10 civilians in raid, Pentagon says

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Islamic State leader kills himself with bomb in US raid in Syria

President Biden says the Islamic State leader died in a raid by US special operations forces. All US troops returned safely from the operation, he said.

Knowing that this terrorist had chosen to surround himself with families, including children, we made the choice to pursue a special forces raid at a much greater risk than for our own people, rather than targeting him with a air strike. We made this choice to minimize civilian casualties. This operation is a testament to the reach and ability of the United States to eliminate terrorist threats no matter where they try to hide anywhere in the world.

President Biden says the Islamic State leader died in a raid by US special operations forces. All US troops returned safely from the operation, he said.CreditCredit…Yahya Nemah/EPA, via Shutterstock

President Biden said on Thursday that the Islamic State leader died in a raid by US special operations commandos in a risky pre-dawn attack in northwestern Syria. Rescue workers said women and children were among at least 13 people killed in the raid.

In brief remarks at the White House, Biden said the choice to use special forces to target ISIS leader Abu Ibrahim al-Hashimi al-Qurayshi was made to minimize civilian casualties , despite the greater risk to US troops.

Speaking in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Mr Biden was understated when he described the story of the Islamic State leader, saying he ordered a series of atrocities, including against the Yazidi people. “Thanks to the bravery of our troops, this horrible terrorist leader is no more,” he said.

Mr Biden said Mr al-Qurayshi died when he detonated a bomb, killing himself and members of his family.

Mr Biden said the raid served as a warning to terror groups.

“This operation is a testament to America’s reach and ability to eliminate terrorist threats no matter where they try to hide anywhere in the world,” he said.

Ahead of his White House remarks, Mr Biden said in a statement: “All Americans returned safely from the operation.”

John F. Kirby, the Pentagon’s chief spokesman, addressed victims associated with the raid at a press conference Thursday afternoon. “To the extent that there is loss of innocent life, it is caused by Abdullah and his lieutenants,” he said, using a nickname for Mr al-Quaryshi. He said US forces were able to evacuate 10 civilians from the building, including several children.

Asked about the timing of the raid, which officials said had gone months into the planning, Mr Kirby said several factors played a role: intelligence levels, certainty about the location of the leader of the ‘EI, weather and operational conditions (it was a nearly moonless night, ideal for night operations).

“A lot of factors had to line up to be perfect,” Kirby said. “It was the best window to execute the mission.”

The helicopter assault was carried out by about two dozen American commandos, supported by helicopter gunships, armed Reaper drones and attack aircraft. The operation resembled the October 2019 raid in which Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the former Islamic State leader, died when he detonated a suicide vest as US forces raided a hiding place not far from where Thursday’s operation took place.

The operation came days after the end of the biggest US fight against the Islamic State since the end of the jihadists’ so-called caliphate three years ago. US forces backed a Kurdish-led militia in northeast Syria as it fought for more than a week to drive Islamic State fighters out of a prison they had occupied in the city of Hasaka.

Little is known about Mr. al-Qurayshi, who succeeded Mr. al-Baghdadi, or the top command structure of ISIS. But analysts said the death of the Islamic State leader was a blow to the terror group.

US helicopters ferried the commandos into position after midnight, surrounding a house in Atmeh, a town near the border with Turkey in the rebel-held province of Idlib, according to eyewitnesses, social media and the Observatory Syrian Human Rights, a Britain-based conflict monitor.





A tense standoff ensued, with loudspeakers blaring warnings in Arabic for everyone in the house to turn themselves in, neighbors said. Then an explosion shook the building. After that, some of the occupants of the house had not come out and a major battle broke out, with heavy machine gun fire and, apparently, missile strikes.

During the operation, one of the American helicopters suffered a mechanical problem, was forced to land and was later destroyed by American attack aircraft. After about three hours, the American commandos and their remaining helicopters took off, witnesses said.

Given the fluid nature of early reports of a complex raid like Thursday’s operation, the Army’s initial version may be incomplete. Accounts of other events have sometimes turned out to be contradictory or sometimes completely wrong.

The report was provided by Falih HassanMuhammad Najdat Hij Kadour, Asmaa al-Omar, Hwaida Saad and Evan Hill. Jean Ismay

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Canadian army

The Pentagon announces the dispatch of 3,000 troops to Eastern European countries

  • Direct Crisis in Ukraine
  • Crisis Blinken urges Russia to ‘immediately’ withdraw army from border with Ukraine

The United States decided to send 3,000 soldiers in Poland, Romania and Germany, in response to the 126,000 troops that Russia has placed on the border with Ukraine. Additionally, an additional 8,500 troops have been on standby in the United States for more than a week in case they need to be sent to the region. The measure is a new escalation of tension on Ukraine triggered after the dispatch of 126,000 Russian soldiers on the border by Vladimir Putin and the threat of Russia to undertake “military-technical actions” against this country if NATO does not agree to withdraw to the positions it occupied 25 years ago. France has also placed several hundred soldiers on alert in case it decides to send them to Romania.

The decision not only raises the tone of the dispute between the United States and Russia. It also exposes the split within NATO, where Germany has adopted an appeasement tone towards Russia. In fact, the sending of the 3,000 soldiers did not have the “green light” from the Atlantic Alliance, but was rather negotiated bilaterally between Washington and the countries concerned. Pentagon spokesman, retired admiral John Kirbystated in this sense that “NATO, as an organization, has no right of veto” over the movements of the American armed forces and their allies, and stressed that “Nothing prevents the United States from making its own decisions”. It is a clear warning to Germany and other NATO countries that do not support the US position, that he makes it clear that Washington will go it alone, with the support of willing allies.

Kirby also took the French deployment to Romania for granted, explaining that the deployment in Romania “takes place at the express invitation of the government” of this country, but did not clarify the position of Poland and Germany. In any case, he insisted on the fact that this type of action “implies consultations” with the host countries. The soldiers will not fight in Ukraine, but they have “a wide range of missions”. Its deployment seems to confirm the idea that some Eastern European countries do not fear a Russian invasion of Ukraine, but of their own territory, and that the United States accredits these fears.

Washington – and neither its allies – did not specify why it made this decision at this time. Russia has maintained its deployment for more than a month, and although it has sent medical units to the border with Ukraine and continues to increase its forces in Belarus – a former Soviet republic that is in practice a Moscow satellite – no one has indicated that the invasion will be imminent. The US Department of Defense said the deployment was temporary.but everything will depend on the development of the situation on the ground.

The units to be moved are in the front line. Of the 3,000 soldiers, 2000 belong to the 82nd Airborne Division and the 18th Airborne Corpsbased in Fort Bragg (North Carolina), specialized in air assault actions (paratroopers).

The 82nd Airborne has a long history, dating back to Normandy and the Ardennes during World War II and continuing through to the war with the Islamic State in Iraq. The 18th Airborne Corps is a unit that is created according to circumstances, with troops and equipment from other groups. Their motto is “US Contingency Forces”and played a leading role in the American wars in Iraq.

Most of the soldiers from these two units will be deployed in Poland, with a small contingent in Germany. The other 1,000 soldiers belong to a Stryker squadron based in Germany. The Stryker Squadrons take their name from this armored vehicle, released in Iraq, which gives ground forces great mobility. The squadron will barely need a day or two to cover the distance from Germany to Romania. A Stryker force is halfway between an infantry unit and an armored unit.

Biden’s decision to send this contingent took observers by surprise, especially since the US government itself said yesterday that there was no indication that Vladimir Putin had made the decision to attack Ukraine again. . In 2014, when this country left the orbit of Russian influence. Moscow annexes the Crimean peninsula and creates a guerrilla force that occupies 7% of Ukrainian territory, in the industrial region of Donbs, on the border with Russia. The Russian government again accused the United States of “provocation” for sending troops to the region. Till date, the largest troop movement in NATO countries had been the sending of two F-35 fighters by the Netherlands and seven Eurofighters by Spain to Bulgariawhere they will conduct aerial patrol missions, in addition to resupplying Canadian Army Special Forces in Ukraine.

Britain also has a small contingent of soldiers training Ukraine’s armed forces in the use of the 2,000 anti-tank missiles the country has sent to deal with a possible Russian invasion. A sign of NATO’s division, the planes that transported these weapons from the United Kingdom to Ukraine did not fly over Germany because Berlin was delaying the “green light” for the passage of planes in its airspace.


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Canadian army

Survey Respondents Say Canada Should Boycott Beijing Games

59% of Canadians remain adamant that this country should stay away from the 2022 Winter Olympics, up three points since December.

We are days away from the start of the Winter Olympics and Canadians can be forgiven for not feeling particularly cheerful.

The ramifications of the COVID-19 pandemic continue to rock our lives, with increased discussions of vaccine mandates and daily statements from health authorities. Residents of the country are also more concerned about economic stability and inflation than in the past.

If the Games were held in the United States or in Europe, the feeling of Canadians might be different. However, as those interested in skating, skiing and hockey will no doubt know, the Olympics are held in Beijing, which makes the city unique as the premier host of both summer and winter varieties of the event. jock.

From the perspective of the average spectator, the Olympic Winter Games will be unusual in North America. Broadcasters who secured the rights to the Games years before anyone knew what COVID-19 was won’t send the usual army of reporters and commentators to Beijing. These Games, like those held in Tokyo last summer, will feature little local flavor and many virtual settings operated from Ontario and Connecticut.

Research Co. and Glacier Media have consistently tracked Canadians’ views of China and the 2022 Olympics. Only about one in five Canadians have had a positive view of the People’s Republic of China over the past year and a half (20 % when we last asked this question in December).

As well in December, 56% of Canadians thought Canada should boycott the 2022 Winter Games because of China’s human rights record. The poll also highlighted that Canadians want athletes to have freedom of expression during the Games, as well as concerns about their safety: partly because of COVID-19, but also because they keep mind the arbitrary detention of Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig.

A few days ago, we asked Canadians again about Beijing 2022. Perhaps the lure of a sporting event that Canadians have watched closely in previous editions would change minds. Or perhaps, to follow the rhetoric of past and current presidents of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), it’s “time for sport, not politics.”

The answer to both questions is a resounding “No”. In our latest survey, 59% of Canadians are adamant that Canada should boycott the Beijing Olympics, up three points since December and the highest level seen in four different polls conducted since March 2021.

The generational divide that is typically present in national public opinion polls is not prominent in this regard. The majority of Canadians aged 18-34 (59%), 35-54 (54%) and 55+ (65%) want to send a message that goes beyond the absence of an official at the opening ceremonies – essentially what a “diplomatic boycott” enacted by Canada and the United States entails.

As was the case a few weeks ago, residents of three provinces are particularly keen to keep Canadian athletes at home: Quebec (66%), British Columbia (also 66%) and Ontario (57% ). There is no political divide on this issue either. More than three in five Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party of Canada (67%), the Liberal Party of Canada (63%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (62%) last year also support a boycott.

Regardless of participant status, most Canadians strongly believe that athletes should be able to protest China’s human rights record at Beijing 2022 (72%, down two points) and that the CIO should not punish those who choose to do so (also 72%, up one point).

An equal proportion (72%, down two points) remain concerned about the health and safety of Canadian athletes traveling to Beijing. In addition, 47% of Canadians (up two points) say they will make a conscious effort to refrain from watching the Games, a proportion that rises to 53% in Quebec.

We also continue to see consistency in the relationship between Canadian portfolios and Chinese exports. Only 30% of Canadians (down two points) say they never avoid products from China. Of the remaining 70% who try to be careful what they buy, 41% avoid Chinese products “most of the time” and 16% say they follow this course of action “all the time”.

As the start of Beijing 2022 approaches, nearly half of Canadians say they will pull out of this edition of the Winter Olympics altogether. The negative opinions of Canadians about the host country have not changed. Compared to last year, a slightly higher proportion of Canadians believe a full boycott is warranted.

Mario Canseco is president of Research Co.

The findings are based on an online survey conducted January 21-23, 2022 of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data was statistically weighted according to Canadian census counts for age, sex and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

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International headquarters

Entain launches the Global Innovation Hub, Ennovate

Ennovate supports Entain’s ambition to be a global leader in interactive entertainment, delivering great products and moments of excitement for customers. As media, entertainment and games converge, customers expect richer experiences, with greater variety of content, immersive experiences, personalization and social interaction that increase their enjoyment and engagement.

Early technology companies to work with Ennovate include Verizon, BT and Theta Labs, all of which seek to develop groundbreaking customer experiences in gaming and interactive entertainment. Non-profit organizations are also collaborating with Ennovate, using technology for innovations that bring societal and environmental benefits. All external partners will collaborate with Entain’s own technical team and use the Ennovate hub to design, develop, experiment and bring their innovations to life.

“We want to lead the way with exciting new products and experiences for customers and use our cutting-edge technology to innovate sports, games and interactive entertainment for the metaverse,” said Jette Nygaard-Andersenmanaging director of Entain.

“We also want to use our position as a global technology leader to drive innovation on a larger scale. Working with partners around the world, Ennovate will demonstrate how Entain’s cutting-edge technology can both revolutionize consumer experiences and deliver real benefits to society,” she added.

Ennovate’s first dedicated innovation lab will be located in Charterhouse Square, Farringdon, in the heart of London entrepreneurial tech community, close to the UK headquarters of TikTok and Snapchat. It will host members of Entain’s innovation technology team, working alongside its business and nonprofit partners.

Inaugurated this spring, the place is equipped with state-of-the-art technology, in order to create a unique environment in which to build and experience new entertainment experiences. These will include the development of new entertainment products for the Metaverse, a virtual reality space where people can interact in a computer-generated environment.

The centerpiece of this and future Ennovate Labs will be an Experience Zone, allowing customers, investors, partners and employees to try out new, immersive experiences in sports, games and interactive entertainment.

“Our goal is to bring to life the most exciting experiences in immersive sports, gaming and interactive entertainment as the metaverse takes shape,” said Sandep Tiku, chief operating officer at Entain, which leads its work on disruptive innovation. “By working with partners, we believe we can achieve great things faster, both for customers and to apply these technologies and skills to benefit society at large.”

Ennovate will initially present:

New consumer products and experiences to drive immersive entertainment

  • Non-fungible tokens (NFT), or unique digital collectible assets, that Entain develops for the Group’s brands. Partypoker today announces plans to launch its first official Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) soon, powered by Theta Labs. NFTs are unique, non-fungible certificates of authenticity of digital files, which may include items such as artwork, music, video, or tweets. Partypoker NFTs will feature some of the most iconic video moments and tournament hands in partypoker and partypoker LIVE history.
  • Immersive experiences in Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) will also be presented and developed at the Ennovate Hub. These will include a pioneering multi-sport club experience in virtual reality, which the Group will launch shortly.
  • VR arcades. Entain will make immersive experiences available to customers on the high street, converting two locations into new VR retail experience zones where consumers will soon be able to try ground-breaking new experiences in immersive sports and interactive entertainment for themselves- same. Entain is working on innovations for VR in retail and plans to open its first VR arcades later this year.

Technology partnerships

Entain builds relationships and partnerships with technology innovators and companies, based in the UK and around the world, through the Ennovate hub. Initial technology partners include:

  • Verizon, one of the world’s leading digital communications providers, is one of the first major technology companies to work with Entain to build the Ennovate 5G Lab and explore the power of 5G to deliver immersive customer experiences in the field of sports and entertainment. Additionally, the two companies are collaborating to deliver more immersive and connected gaming experiences in international markets, including the United States.
  • LV will partner with Ennovate Hub to explore new immersive products and experiences. As one of the UK’s largest investors in technology R&D, BT will work with Ennovate to bring the power of its cutting-edge 5G connectivity, high-speed fixed networks and explore the use of edge computing to provide bespoke services and disruptive experiences to Entain customers in the UK, delivering immersive experiences in sports, games and interactive entertainment.
  • Theta Laboratories, which provides end-to-end infrastructure for decentralized video and powers NFT and metaverse platforms, is working with Entain to launch a white label NFT platform for partypoker customers. Entain technologists will work further with Theta Labs to use its technology in video streaming, metaverse, gaming and more.

Accelerator and incubator programs

  • The Ennovate Hub will host accelerator and incubator programs, combining disruptive innovative ideas, technology and startup entrepreneurship with Entain’s unparalleled experience serving millions of customers worldwide.
  • The accelerator will initially invest up to £5 million in individual initiatives to develop and boost innovative concepts to revolutionize interactive entertainment, as well as new technologies that deliver societal benefits in line with Entain’s sustainability agenda.
  • Ennovate is already inviting startups focused on immersive customer experiences, interactive entertainment, and the metaverse to be part of this accelerator program, which will officially launch this summer.
  • The first Ennovate laboratory will open in Farringdon, London in spring. It will house on-site experimentation work involving approximately 50 full-time Entain developers and software engineers working on disruptive technologies around the world.

Non-profit and ESG partnerships

Entain wants the advanced technology and innovations being developed at the Ennovate hub to deliver environmental and societal benefits. Nonprofit partners will have access to Ennovate’s technology expertise and workspace, as well as additional support and funding through Ennovate. Initial partnerships include:

  • chance for childhoodan award-winning charity that supports vulnerable children through Africawill work with technologists from the Ennovate hub on an innovative mobile app that digitizes and leverages Chance for Childhood’s breakthrough approach to detecting hidden disabilities and developmental delays in preschoolers Africa. Entain’s technology, using artificial intelligence, will promote personalized and play-based learning for children with disabilities and special educational needs (SEN), which will go a long way towards improving their lives and their learning prospects.
  • Climate Hack.AI Also through Ennovate, as joint lead sponsor with Newcross Healthcare, Entain will fund and support Climate Hack.AI, an international competition that features some of the brightest students from 25 of the world’s top universities such as University College London , Stanford, Harvard, MIT, Oxford and Cambridge – seeking to use artificial intelligence to help fight climate change. The first competition is now underway and focuses on designing algorithms using satellite imagery of the Earth to predict the movement of weather fronts over the UK – an important step in the pipeline to predict weather production. solar energy and, subsequently, to reduce the amount of backup power needed to be produced by carbon-based generators.

Through train, the Group’s global D&I technology initiative, the Group will also explore new opportunities for collaboration within the Ennovate hub to improve the representation of women in STEM industries. Existing partners include Girls Who Code, a nonprofit Entain supports to attract more young women to the tech industry, and the Tech Girls Movement Foundation, which challenges perceptions of gender that limit women’s participation. girls in STEM.

Through its non-profit Foundation, the Group also works with The Berlin University of Technology and the Nexus Institute develop international training for executives to strengthen diversity in research and development and University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV)to support internships for graduates who will work alongside Entain’s US-based global innovation team at UNLV Harry Reid Research and Technology Park.

Photo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1736169/Entain_Ennovate_Experience_Zone.jpg

SOURCEEntain

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History organization

Trinity College hires Methembe Ndlovu as men’s football head coach

Trinity College has announced the appointment of Methembe Ndlovu as Head Men’s Football Coach. Ndlovu comes to Trinity with an impressive wealth of experience as a coach and player at many levels. A four-time All-Ivy League player at Dartmouth College, Ndlovu has coached at numerous clubs in the United States and abroad and most recently served as an assistant coach at Penn State University and women’s associate head coach at Claremont- Mudd-Scripps in California. Ndlovu was also the CEO of Grassroot Soccer for Africa and played both professionally and for the Zimbabwe national team. He replaces Mike Pilger who retired from coaching after the 2021 season.

“We are delighted to welcome Methembe to the Bantam family and have him write a new chapter in the long and storied history of men’s football at Trinity College,” said the Trinity Sporting Director. Drew Galbraith. “His personal history with the game is marked by successes at all levels. Methembe has a clear vision for our men’s soccer program that includes competitive success and the holistic development of our student-athletes. He is a competent teacher and his passion for the game is contagious.

Ndlovu earned his bachelor’s degree in government from Dartmouth in 1997, where he played on the pitch for the Big Green. He went on to a professional career that saw him spend six years with the Albuquerque Geckos, Highlanders FC in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, and the Boston Bulldogs. Additionally, Ndlovu earned nine international caps with the full Zimbabwe men’s national team between 1997 and 1999. Ndlovu began his coaching career as an assistant player coach with the Cape Cod Crusaders and later the PDL, in 2002. In his first season as head coach in 2003, he led the Crusaders to the 2003 PDL National Championship. He then joined the PDL Indiana Invaders as general manager and head coach. Holder of the USSF B license, he was elected National Coach of the Year 2004 PDL. That year, Ndlovu also served as a volunteer assistant coach for the University of Notre Dame men’s soccer team under one of his mentors, the legendary Bobby Clark.

Ndlovu was the head coach of Highlanders Football Club from 2006 to July 2008, leading the club to qualification for the CAF African Champions League in 2006 and the CAF Confederations Cup in 2008. Ndlovu also served as Zimbabwe’s National Under-20 Head Coach from 2007 until 2010, and guided that team to the COSAFA Championship in 2007 and COSAFA Silver Medal in 2008. Ndlovu has then founded and served as CEO and Technical Director of Bantu Rovers Football Club in Zimbabwe for 10 years (2008-17). Bantu has encouraged athletic and academic excellence, sent players to professional leagues in Africa and beyond, and sent student-athletes to prestigious preparatory schools in the United States. As CEO he was responsible for all club operations and as Technical Director he oversaw the clubs technical staff. He returned to varsity coaching at Penn State under another of his mentors, Jeff Cook, in 2020 and helped guide the Athenas to a 9-4-3 record at Claremont-Mudd-Scripps the last fall.

Ndlovu’s accomplishments as co-founder of Grassroot Soccer, Inc. (GRS), a youth health non-governmental organization that uses soccer as a tool for social change, are equally, if not more, impressive than those as as player and coach. In 2010, Ndlovu received the Dartmouth College Martin Luther King Social Justice Award for his vision, enthusiasm and perseverance in youth health education. Ndlovu was part of the organization’s leadership team for Africa and was the CEO of Grassroot Soccer Africa when he left the organization’s leadership team in 2018 to serve on the GRS board. Global as administrator.

“Trinity College is distinguished by its student-centered culture, reputation for academic and athletic excellence, commitment to the whole person, and deliberate fostering of an environment of inclusion,” said Ndlovu. “I am truly honored to accept the position of Men’s Soccer Head Coach at Trinity College and join the team of amazing coaches and staff. I am grateful to Drew Galbraith, Kristen Noone and the entire search committee for selecting me for this role.

Trinity men’s football finished the 2021 season with an overall record of 3-11-1 and a New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) rating of 0-9-01. The Bantams have qualified for 10 NESCAC Championship Tournaments and played in the NCAA Tournament in 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1997 and 2011.

What people are saying about Methembe Ndlovu

Bobby Clark, former head coach, Notre Dame, Stanford, New Zealand and Dartmouth

“Methembe Ndlovu was one of the best players I ever coached. His great strength was reading the game and he integrated it well into his coaching role. It was a joy to have him on my team when I coached at Notre Dame and he coached the Indiana Invaders in the Pro Development League. I’m sure Trinity players will enjoy having him as their coach.

Jeff Cook, Head Coach, Penn State University

“Trinity College has made an inspired choice to lead its men’s soccer program. Methembe Ndlovu is one of the most outstanding, knowledgeable and thoughtful coaches I have had the pleasure of working with. I know that Methembe will immediately put his vast experience to good use in transforming the student-athletes he works with into a top team. His commitment to holistic youth development is unparalleled, Methembe’s impact will be transformational. I’m very excited to be part of the Trinity program, exciting times are ahead for the Bantams.

Brian Wiese, Head Coach, Georgetown University

“Methembe is that rare form of coach who has a wealth of experience that could be unmatched in college football, allowing him to be a great teacher of the game on the pitch and a great teacher of life off of it. I can’t wait to see the program that Methembe will build at Trinity to compete in the best DIII football conference in the country The Trinity soccer family could not have found a better coach and, truly, a better person to lead his program.

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Canadian army

Canada’s CDS ‘sickened’ by Capitol Hill-style protests at National War Memorial in Ottawa

Given the anti-vaccination protests in Canada on Sunday, its Chief of the Defense Staff, General Wayne Eyre, expressed his disagreement with the ongoing protests. Speaking to the microblogging site Twitter, he raised strong objections to protesters at the National War Memorial and underscored the feelings of Canadian Army soldiers who died “for rights, including freedom of expression, but not for that”.

General Eyre said: “I am sickened to see protesters dancing at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and desecrating the National War Memorial. Generations of Canadians have fought and died for our rights, including free speech, but not for this. Those involved should hang their heads in shame.”

Protests against Canada’s vaccine mandate

Meanwhile, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau left Ottawa on Saturday with his family to a “secret location” after security concerns erupted following escalating anti-vaccine mandate protests in the capital, reported CBC News. The decision to evacuate the Prime Minister’s residence came after the Sergeant-at-Arms of the Canadian Parliament warned that protesters could show up at official residences. The prime minister’s office declined to comment on Trudeau’s relocation, citing security concerns.

Protests against the vaccine mandate for cross-border truckers began on Saturday when the Parliamentary Protective Service estimated a gathering of nearly 10,000 protesters in Canada’s capital, Ottawa. Additionally, a convoy of truckers against the COVID-19 vaccine mandate descended on Ottawa, setting off an impending violent turn of events.

While Ottawa Police Chief Peter Sholy said on Wednesday he had been in contact with protest leaders, who claimed peaceful protests, Deputy Chief Steve Bell raised concerns about the presence of “parallel groups” that Canadian intelligence speculated.

It is pertinent to mention that Canadians launched protests against the vaccination mandate after the government launched a new requirement that truckers entering Canada must be fully immunized as of January 15. This happened after the United States imposed an identical mandate on truckers entering the country.

However, according to the Canadian Trucking Alliance’s estimate, about 15% of truckers in Canada, or about 16,000, are not fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Canadian opposition from Conservative lawmakers backed the convoy, saying the vaccine mandate has created a bottleneck for the supply chain, leaving store shelves empty across the country.

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Non profit living

Harvard Hillel Hosts Holocaust Remembrance Day Memorial | News

Harvard Hillel held a memorial service on the steps of the Widener Library on Thursday in observance of International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Holocaust Remembrance Day marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp in 1945 and honors the lives of the millions of Jews and civilians who were killed. In his service, Hillel commemorated the life of Ita Warmund, a victim whose name was chosen from the database of Yad Vashem – Israel’s official memorial to the victims of the Holocaust.

College Dean Rakesh Khurana, Dean of Students Katherine G. O’Dair, Associate Dean of Students Lauren E. Brandt ’01, Reverend Matthew Ichihashi Potts, Rabbis Jonah C. Steinberg and Hirschy Zarchi each lit a candle in honor of the victims.

In his speech, Steinberg, executive director of Hillel, stressed the importance of remembering those whose lives were lost in the Holocaust.

“There is hardly a family represented here that has not been touched in some way by the Sho’ah – by the Holocaust – who does not have a wound, which is often a gaping hole, an absence,” Steinberg said.

Despite the loss and tragedy of the Holocaust, Steinberg said it was still important to work toward a “world of unity.”

“That doesn’t mean we go through life traumatized and scared,” Steinberg said. “But that means we go through life wearing that and figuring out how to live forward.”

Harvard Chabad Rabbi Zarchi said in his remarks that revealed knowledge of the Holocaust alone does not guarantee moral choices.

“Today we light a candle for souls with a candle of truth,” Zarchi said. “And perhaps that is what veritas teaches us – that there must be truth in our knowledge and in our wisdom to ensure that this knowledge leads to morality, to ethical living and to ethical choices. “

Addressing the crowd, Khurana said ‘remembering’ is one of the ‘most important human acts’ and stressed the importance of sharing the stories of Holocaust victims, especially with younger generations. .

“Their stories are an essential part of our common humanity, and those who are one, two or three generations apart are committed to understanding these horrific events and telling the stories to the next generation,” he said. . “The Holocaust not only altered the contours of world history, it also shattered the lives of countless families around the world.”

Khurana condemned anti-Semitism, citing the Texas synagogue hostage crisis and the harms of remaining silent in the face of oppression.

“We must not forget the lessons of the Holocaust and the dehumanization it depended on,” Khurana said. “And we must not forget that it is up to each of us, as humans, to decide whether to perpetuate good or evil in the world or remain indifferent.”

Hillel’s memorial was also intended to raise funds for The Blue Card, a non-profit organization that provides financial, emotional and physical support to Holocaust survivors in the United States.

The service ended with a reading from “El Male Rachamim” – a Jewish memorial prayer – by Noa D. Kligfeld ’24.

“May their memory endure, inspiring truth and loyalty in our lives. May their souls be bound by the bond of life. May they rest in peace. And let’s say “Amen,” Kligfeld recited.

—Editor Leah J. Teichholtz can be reached at [email protected] Follow her on Twitter @LeahTeichholtz.

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Canadian army

Russian envoy urges Justin Trudeau to call Vladimir Putin to discuss Ukraine crisis

Russian Ambassador to Canada Oleg Stepanov said that if Justin Trudeau called Vladimir Putin, the Russian President would “pick up the phone immediately”.Dave Chan/The Globe and Mail

Moscow’s envoy to Canada is urging Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to phone Vladimir Putin so he can hear the Russian president explain there’s “no chance” Russia will invade Ukraine.

Oleg Stepanov, the recently arrived Russian ambassador to Canada, told The Globe and Mail on Tuesday that Mr. Putin would accept a phone call from Mr. Trudeau to discuss the crisis in Ukraine and the gathering in Moscow of more than 100,000 troops to the Russian-Ukrainian border. .

“I am 100% sure that my president would pick up the phone immediately,” Mr. Stepanov said, noting that the two leaders never attended a bilateral meeting during Mr. Trudeau’s seven years in office.

Mr. Putin would welcome the opportunity to make it clear to Mr. Trudeau that he has no intention of invading Ukraine and to explain the Kremlin’s opposition to the encroachment of the NATO on its borders, Mr. Stepanov said.

He noted that the leaders of the United States, Britain, Germany and many other Western countries regularly dialogue with Mr. Putin and he urged the Government of Canada to do the same.

But even though he ruled out the possibility of an invasion, Mr Stepanov mentioned a scenario in which some Ukrainian politicians – whom he declined to identify – could spark a conflict.

He urged Canada and other Western governments to work with Kyiv to deter this group.

“My government’s concern is that there is a war party in Kiev. There are radical politicians out there who could use the current stormy situation to provoke conflict on their side,” the envoy said.

When it comes to Ukrainian national security, Vladimir Putin has already won

Stepanov’s comments come a day after the NATO military alliance announced it was putting forces on standby and bolstering Eastern Europe with more ships and fighter jets in response reinforcement of Russian troops near its border with Ukraine.

He called on Ottawa and its allies “who have vested interests in Ukraine to work with the Kyiv government to keep them under control and deter them from any possible provocations in Donbass or elsewhere in Ukraine.”

As he spoke about the need for Russian-Canadian engagement, the envoy said the Kremlin would even drop a travel ban imposed on Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland in 2014 after Canada imposed sanctions to the Russian elites for the annexation of Crimea by Moscow and the destabilization of Ukraine. At the time, Russia retaliated by issuing travel bans on Ms Freeland and other Canadian officials – actions the ambassador called “how the game is played”.

The travel ban, however, would only be ignored if Ms Freeland were to come to Moscow for serious high-level talks – talks which the Russian envoy expressed hope would transform Canada into what he called a “voice of moderation” on the Ukrainian crisis. .

“If miracles happen and Madame Freeland wants to come to Moscow with a special message from the prime minister, I’m sure the exception can be made,” he said.

However, he expressed concern that Ms. Freeland, a Ukrainian-Canadian whose mother helped draft Ukraine’s constitution, is heavily influencing government policy in favor of Kyiv. He noted that she holds regular discussions with the Congress of Ukrainian Canadians, a group that represents people of Ukrainian descent in Canada.

“She is a member of the Ukrainian diaspora,” Mr. Stepanov said. “She’s the prime minister’s right-hand man… so she’s an influential voice in decision-making.”

The ambassador laughed when he learned that Canada was recalling spouses of diplomats and their children under the age of 18 from Kiev as a precaution against a possible Russian invasion.

“It’s your taxpayers’ money,” he said. “You want to remove them, you [will] I have to bring them back because I’m sure the situation will calm down.

On Ukraine, let’s not forget what history teaches us about appeasement

Mr. Stepanov denied that Russia hacked into Global Affairs Canada’s computer system last week; it suffered a multi-day meltdown that security experts called a cyberattack. And the ambassador dismissed warnings from the Communications Security Establishment, the top-secret federal agency that handles signals intelligence and cybersecurity, to be wary of Russian cyberattacks.

“No, absolutely not,” he replied when asked about the disruption of computer networks at Global Affairs, discovered on January 19. “Russia does not conduct any malicious activity in the cybersphere against Canada or any other country.”

When told that Washington had accused Russian intelligence of a major hack of US government departments and private companies, such as Microsoft Corp., in late 2020, Mr Stepanov said: “They still do this. if it helps to increase their self-esteem, but the problem with Americans and others is that it is very easy to blame the Russians.

The federal cabinet met on Tuesday and will meet again on Wednesday to approve a six-month extension to the Canadian Armed Forces training mission in Ukraine. He should approve a package of measures including the supply of small arms to the army of this country.

The Russian ambassador questioned why Canada would supply arms to Ukraine when Kiev appears to have a sufficient inventory of weapons – since it also exports defense equipment abroad.

Stepanov noted that the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), which tracks arms sales, records arms exports from Ukraine. In 2019, according to the SIPRI database, Ukraine exported missiles and armored fighting vehicles. In 2020, Ukraine exported missiles and aircraft. The United Nations Conventional Arms Register also shows that in 2020 Ukraine exported missile launchers and portable anti-tank rocket systems, as well as firearms, including pistols, submachine guns and rifles. assault.

“For me, it is quite surprising to see that the country continues to profit from arms exports and at the same time asks its foreign partners to provide it with additional weapons,” he said.

“If you feel threatened by Russia or any other country, you don’t sell your weapons; you store them.

When asked why Russia had placed more than 100,000 combat-ready troops on the border with Ukraine, the ambassador replied: “This is our land, this is our army. The army must conduct exercises from time to time.

With a Reuters report

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International headquarters

All the registrations and certificates you need to visit Saudi Arabia

A Saudi hospitality project will allow visitors to walk in the footsteps of the royal family, in palaces steeped in history

MAKKAH/RIYADH: Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman recently announced the launch of the Boutique Group, which plans to turn a number of historically and culturally significant palaces in Saudi Arabia into ultra-luxury hotels.

The move is part of efforts to showcase the Kingdom’s rich heritage and vibrant culture to domestic and foreign visitors, as well as the hospitality for which the country is renowned. The first phase of the project focuses on the development of three historic destinations: Al-Hamra Palace in Jeddah, Tuwaiq Palace and Red Palace in Riyadh.

Al Hamra Palace

Al-Hamra Palace is one of the most historically significant palaces of the modern era, according to Saleh Al-Misnad Al-Tamimi, a contemporary Saudi history researcher.

Inspired by Andalusian culture and style, it was built during the reign of King Saud bin Abdulaziz for Prince Faisal bin Abdulaziz but was not intended to host official functions and conferences.

The palace, located north of the US embassy, ​​was relatively small when it was built in the late 1950s, Al-Tamimi told Arab News. It was later expanded and transformed into a place to receive royal guests and hold official meetings.

The prince had an office on the south side of the building, directly overlooking the palace mosque, according to Al-Tamimi. Palace workers would hear requests and complaints from citizens, then relay them to the royal in his office, near reception.

The palace hosted many important events, Al-Tamimi said, including the first conference of foreign ministers of Islamic countries in March 1970, which resulted in the formation of the General Secretariat of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, now known as the Organization of the Islamic Conference. Cooperation.

Inspired by Andalusian culture and style, Al-Hamra Palace was built during the reign of King Saud bin Abdulaziz for Prince Faisal bin Abdulaziz. (Provided)

Among the many foreign leaders and heads of state who met King Faisal at the palace were US President Richard Nixon, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, Lebanese President Suleiman Frangieh and Sudanese President Jaafar Nimeiry. Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser was a rare exception, who was instead received at the royal court at Khuzam Palace.

Al-Hamra Palace was built by the Arab Engineering Company, which had built many similar structures in Jeddah, including those belonging to Prince Nawaf bin Abdulaziz and politician, economist and poet Mohammed Surur Sabban.

After its development by Boutique Group, Al-Hamra Palace will have 77 rooms, including 33 luxury suites and 44 luxury villas.

Mohammed H. Al-Ruwaili, of the Al-Sudairy Cultural Center in Jouf, described the launch of the Boutique Group as a civilizational, historical and cultural investment leap that will open up Saudi Arabia’s heritage and cultural treasures to the world. . and enjoy.

He said the project aims to capitalize on the aspect of Saudi heritage represented by the luxurious palaces nestled in nature and once owned by kings and princes, turning them into tourist attractions that visitors from all over the world can enjoy. .

With their eye-catching courtyards, gardens and floors, they will be transformed into world-class luxury hotels with ornate interior decorations and unprecedented architectural designs, he told Arab News.

The palace, located north of the US Embassy, ​​was relatively small when built in the late 1950s. (Supplied)

“I think we are on the verge of making a significant and qualitative shift in investing and introducing valuable historical and cultural destinations in our country,” Al-Ruwaili said, referring to the first phase of the Boutique group project.

“The announcement (by the Crown Prince) is historic as it will likely be followed by milestones and milestones that Saudi citizens will benefit from.”

Abdullah Almuneef, dean of the faculty of tourism and antiquities at King Saud University, also welcomed the announcement, saying the project will ensure the restoration and preservation of historical sites by turning them into elite tourist destinations.

“It is an important experience for the Kingdom, similar to that in Europe, where many famous palaces have benefited from restoration and preservation projects,” he said.

The red palace

King Abdulaziz ordered the construction of the Red Palace in Riyadh in 1942 to serve as the residence of his son, Saud, who was then the crown prince. It was also used to receive official guests.

After King Saud moved to his Nasiriyah Palace in 1956, the Red Palace became the seat of the Council of Ministers during the reigns of King Faisal, King Khalid and King Fahd, before becoming the seat of the Committee of Grievances .

After the redevelopment, the Red Palace will have 71 rooms, including 46 luxury suites and 25 luxury guest rooms. (Provided)

It was called the Red Palace because of the distinctive color of its exterior. Among the notable guests hosted within its walls were Egyptian Presidents Nasser and Sadat, Syrian President Shukri Al-Quwatli, Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru and King Talal bin Abdullah of Jordan.

The palace consists of 16 suites and rooms equipped with air conditioning and ceiling fans, as well as a system that allows sunlight to illuminate the interior of the palace. After the redevelopment, the palace will have 71 rooms, including 46 luxury suites and 25 luxurious guest rooms.

Tuwaiq Palace

Tuwaiq Palace is located in the diplomatic district of Riyadh, occupying an area of ​​approximately 24,000 square meters. Designed in 1981 and completed in 1985, it received the Aga Khan International Award for Architecture in 1998.

Today, the palace is a center for cultural activities, conferences, seminars, specialized exhibitions and social activities. It also hosts workshops, festivals, meetings and training events.

It comprises several halls, public facilities and reception areas behind a long undulating wall clad in Riyadh stone, a beige-colored limestone quarried in Saudi Arabia.

Designed in 1981 and completed in 1985, Tuwaiq Palace received the Aga Khan International Award for Architecture in 1998. (Supplied)

It also has a three-story guest house overlooking the valley, with four suites and 25 rooms.

There are several reception halls and amphitheatres, all equipped with presentation and translation facilities, in addition to dining halls and other hospitality services.

Three distinctive white canopies span the main halls, whose walls of glass offer a breathtaking panorama of the surrounding valley, gardens and scenic outdoor pathways. After redevelopment, the palace will feature 96 rooms, including 40 luxury suites and 56 luxury villas.

Khuzam Palace

Although not currently included in the redevelopment plan, Khuzam Palace has great potential to become a boutique hotel. Located in Al-Nazla Al-Yamaniya, in the southeast of historic Jeddah, the palace was named after the Khuzam tulips that grow abundantly on its grounds. Construction began in 1928 and was completed in 1932.

“The palace was built of stone bricks and its roof was constructed of Javanese timber,” Al-Tamimi said. “About three years later, the Egyptian National Company built reinforced concrete annexes there, including the palace that King Abdulaziz used to receive kings, heads of state, ministers, ambassadors and high officials.”

Located in Al-Nazla Al-Yamaniya in the southeast of historic Jeddah, Khuzam Palace was named after the Khuzam tulips that grow abundantly on its grounds. (Provided)

According to Al-Tamimi, Khuzam Palace was where the concession agreement allowing oil exploration was signed between the Saudi government, represented by Finance Minister Sheikh Abdullah bin Suleiman, and Standard Oil of California, represented by Lloyd Hamilton, May 29, 1933. .

The palace also hosted the signing ceremonies of a border agreement with Kuwait and a reciprocal memorandum with Egypt regarding construction projects, according to Al-Tamimi. Other notable events that took place there include the renewal of the Jeddah Treaty with the British government in 1943, the signing of the Dhahran Airfield Agreement with the United States, a trade agreement with Syria and a friendship treaty with Pakistan.

The palace’s importance throughout the kingdom’s history has been such that its iconic main gates were once featured on Saudi banknotes.

Al-Saqqaf Palace

Al-Saqqaf Palace, also known as Al-Bayyadiyah Royal Palace, is located in the holy city of Makkah. It should be included in the next phase of the Boutique Group project, as it is currently undergoing restoration work.

“The palace is a high beacon of architectural art and one of the oldest archaeological buildings,” Makkah history researcher Samir Ahmed Barqa told Arab News.

“It represents heritage architectural designs and bears the Islamic architectural character as it contains a lot of Islamic arts and decorations. He has also witnessed many high-profile occasions throughout a royal era, whose roots stretch to the first Saudi state.

Al-Saqqaf Palace, also known as Al-Bayyadiyah Royal Palace, is located in the holy city of Makkah. (Provided)

The site consists of two older palaces, Al-Bayyadiyah Al-Shamali and Al-Bayyadiyah Al-Janoubi, which were combined with a newer palace built by King Abdulaziz, who lived there from 1924.

“The palace became the seat of government when the founding king came to Makkah,” Barqa said. “After that, the palace was used as the headquarters for King Abdulaziz’s deputy in Hejaz, his son Prince Faisal, and later it was used as the headquarters of the Muslim World League, and then as the headquarters of Makkah Police.”

King Abdulaziz ordered the construction of several halls to accommodate visiting presidents, kings and other dignitaries, as well as heads of Hajj missions. (Provided)

King Abdulaziz ordered the construction of several halls to accommodate visiting presidents, kings and other dignitaries, as well as heads of Hajj missions. The palace became the seat of the Royal Court in 1953, then was occupied by a number of government departments between 1960 and 1982.

It has over 100 rooms, including a central meeting room. The main entrance stands out for its exquisite grandeur.

If included in the boutique project, it would undoubtedly become an important attraction for religious tourists visiting Makkah and captivated by the heritage of the Kingdom.

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International headquarters

Prosecute the International Finance Corporation and the Chicago Police’s Kill or Sell Policy

Petitions of the week

Jeffrey Fisher pleads for plaintiffs in jam c. International Finance Corporation. in 2018. (Art Link)

This week, we highlight cert petitions that ask the Supreme Court to consider, among other things, whether the International Finance Corporation is immune from prosecution for its actions regarding the Tata Mundra power plant in Gujarat, India, and whether the Chicago Police Department’s policy of destroying or selling property of arrested persons not recovered after 30 days violates the Fourth or Fifth Amendments.

The Business Activity Exception of the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court of Cassirer c. Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection Foundation heard oral argument in a case under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act regarding conflict of law rules. In jam c. International Finance Corporation, the Supreme Court faces another problem under the FSIA in a case that is back before the justices after sending it back to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit earlier in 2019. Jam began in 2015, when farmers and fishermen who live near the Tata Mundra power station in Gujarat, India, along with other petitioners, sued the IFC in federal district court in Washington, DC. The petitioners alleged that the power plant – financed by the IFC and approved from its headquarters in Washington – has “devastated” the local environment and way of life. First Jam case, the Supreme Court ruled that the IFC did not have absolute immunity as an international organization, but only “limited immunity”, meaning that plaintiffs could sue the IFC for claims involving its commercial activity carried on in the United States, or they could sue if the IFC had waived its immunity.

On remand, the DC circuit ruled again that the IFC was immune from suit against the applicants. First, upholding the district court, the appeals court held that the FSIA’s business activity exception did not apply. Since the “construction and operation” of the power plant in India was what “actually harmed” the claimants, their claims were not based on any of IFC’s business activities in the United States. Second, despite the wording of the IFC charter stating that “[a]actions may be brought against it”, the Court of Appeal considered itself “compelled” by the case law to find waivers of immunity only if a waiver “benefited” the organization – and the court estimated that it would not be in this case.

In their motion for judicial review, the petitioners argue that the DC Circuit created a new divided circuit with its approach to the FSIA’s business activity exception and invented its doctrine avoiding waiver in the face of seemingly clear text. waiver of immunity.

The Chicago Police’s Sell or Destroy Policy

In Conyers v. City of Chicago, Illinois, Blake Conyers challenges the Chicago Police Department’s policy of selling or destroying personal property seized from arrestees if the arrestee does not recover it within 30 days. After Chicago police destroyed an earring, bracelet and two cell phones belonging to Conyers (who was in pretrial detention when the 30 days elapsed), Conyers filed suit under the fourth, fifth and 14th amendments. The United States Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit upheld the district court’s dismissal of Conyers’ claims, in part on the grounds that he had been notified of his need to recover property.

These and others petitions of the week are below:

Conyers v. City of Chicago, Illinois
21-898
Publish: If a municipality may, pursuant to the Fourth and Fifth Amendments and pursuant to an explicit policy, destroy or sell property seized during an inventory search of an arrested person because the arrested person remains in custody awaiting trial for more than 30 days and is unable to recover the property.

Corbeau v. Fontenot
21-970
Publish: if “new” evidence, within the meaning Schlup vs. Delo and McQuiggin v. Perkins, means evidence that was not available at the time of trial or, as broadly construed below, encompasses any evidence, including evidence known to the defendant and/or available with due diligence, not presented at trial .

Idaho vs. Howard
21-975
PublishIf, when officers are lawfully deploying a narcotics detection dog outside a vehicle, and without any instruction, prompting or facilitation from officers, the dog briefly touches the vehicle or sticks its muzzle through a window open, the conduct of the dog constitutes a Fourth Amendment investigation by officers.

Helix Energy Solutions Group, Inc. v. Hewitt
21-984
Publish: If a supervisor earning more than $200,000 a year is entitled to overtime pay because the stand-alone regulatory exemption set out in 29 CFR § 541.601 remains subject to the detailed requirements of 29 CFR § 541.604 to determine whether highly paid supervisors are exempt from the overtime pay requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

jam c. International Finance Corporation
21-995
Problems: (1) If the business activity exception to the immunity for foreign sovereigns and international organizations under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act authorizes suits where the alleged acts of the defendant giving rise to its liability constitute a commercial activity carried on in the United States, whether or not the conduct of another party more directly caused the damage; and (2) if a treaty provision stipulating that “[a]actions can be brought against [international organization]” waives the immunity of the organization.

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Non profit living

Leadership Development for Racial Equity

After working 26 years in the for-profit capital sector of our economy and nine years working with the poor, forgotten and demonized people in our society, I see life much differently. I feel like I’ve awakened to a new understanding of the rules of how we interact for the good of society. The Homeboy Way is the “how” of mutuality, compassion and relatedness for a better society.

Homeboy Industries is the largest and most successful gang reintegration program in the world. It was founded and is run by Father Greg Boyle, a Jesuit priest, who dedicates his life to helping men and women get out of the gang lifestyle. By transforming their lives, these men and women show us why people shouldn’t be defined by the worst thing they’ve done. Homeboy has helped thousands of people heal from complex traumas and become contributing members of our society, even when it seems everyone in society has let them down. In many ways, this effort can be seen as a fight against racial and economic inequality – because the population we serve is made up of poor people of color who have never had a fair chance in our society.

As a human services nonprofit, Homeboy has always struggled to secure the financial resources to stay afloat. I came to Homeboy exactly when they needed someone like me with the skills to lead successful organizations. I also came at a time when I needed to know more about myself and my spiritual journey. Working with Homeboy Industries has given me knowledge and insight into my own spirituality and the plight of the people Homeboy Industries serves.

I have made friendships and relationships that are remarkable. I have experienced more heartbreak and more joy in recent years than in my entire life before that. Along the way, almost by providence, I have been able to see how business can be run with a different set of priorities so that everyone benefits: owners, management and those who have never been able to maintain a job but are doing so now. I learned how to help the “unemployable” to become employable. I participated in the development of business models that provide not only economic impact but social impact. Doing business the Homeboy Way is the direction in which we must lead our collective efforts and a roadmap to revamp capital markets.

In today’s environment, we have massive tidal currents around the issues and causes of social injustice and racial inequality. What I didn’t know then, but what I know now, is that I was lucky enough to be on the front line with those involved. I became not only a non-profit CEO of a social service agency, but more importantly, a participant in the fight to bring resources and help to those on the margins of our society.

I learned a lot about leadership development for racial equity. Every organization, be it a non-profit or government agency and especially a for-profit business, must address this issue and strive to improve the lives of everyone around us.

The struggle for any organization is to develop the next generation of leaders from within, and at Homeboy, that’s not just vitally important to the mission, but an order of magnitude more difficult. Our ex-gang population needs to see people like them in leadership roles so that the actions we take are genuine and have the best interest of the client in mind.

Outside organizations have the luxury of hiring mid- to high-level executives into their organization and can groom them to be the best leaders. For Homeboy, to have leaders who share the lived experiences and stories of those we serve – gang life, incarceration and trauma – we must prepare our people from the bottom up. They start as customers to transform their lives and, when ready, become frontline workers, followed by a series of supervisory jobs before moving into middle management. Once in middle management, they acquired a combination of positive leadership and some functional skills. However, going beyond middle management at Homeboy or any organization is about knowing how many other functional skills one can pick up along the way. When one becomes a senior leader, they function like a general manager. This is where the task becomes the greatest challenge, as it is partly about the motivation of the individual and the ability of the organization to provide such learning experiences.

Motivating our clients can be complicated. One of the ideas of our founders is that young people, who are stuck in the gang lifestyle, don’t see themselves living past 30. (That’s one of the reasons tougher sentencing laws don’t deter crime, because they don’t feel like their lives are going to last long anyway.) When they come to Homeboy to change their life, this is the first time they start dreaming and planning a long life. Once they complete our 18-month program, they rightly feel like they’ve accomplished something magical: “What’s next and how can I move up the corporate ladder?” is no longer so far from their thoughts. However, many just want to revel in the life they now have, “the good life”. I’ve had many conversations with interns taking that first step into management and they’re ecstatic and don’t even want to think about the next step. They are now a success for their children, their families, their friends and themselves.

Another aspect of developing a career is that you need to be aware of your “work flaws”. When our homies reach “the good life”, it’s after so much deep introspection to transform their lives, they avoid considering another level of introspection concerning life at work. This period of calm can last a few years. Then, for some, they start wanting more and developing more. When that time comes, we can start discussions about further developing business and managerial skills.

We have to keep in mind that the only organizational structure our peeps have known is the gang hierarchy, which is a very different structure from the grassroots-based nonprofit world and the corporate world of matrix organizations. In the world of gangs, the leader must make a call and everyone must follow and listen. When our insiders first become managers at Homeboy, they expect absolute authority, which rarely happens, and so a clash occurs. This can cause them to question their own worth or even stir up a desire to fire everyone. For them, realizing this issue and changing their own mindset usually takes time to overcome.

The final area of ​​challenge is organizational mundane things like emails, phone calls, and report writing. This is where Homeboy’s insiders struggle the most: they don’t see it as a priority, and some see it as “women’s work” and think it’s a waste of their talent. If they refuse to do so, it often becomes their biggest obstacle to career advancement. However, after a lot of “straight talk” type coaching, they come back and eventually come to a point of reconciling these issues.

Even with these challenges, we have wonderful managers who have overcome their obstacles and reached high leadership positions. The effort to develop the leadership team that is partly made up of leaders with family backgrounds requires time, money and, most importantly, a mindset that the entire organization must adopt.

From a broader societal perspective, I believe one of the key drivers will be how to lift more people out of poverty and into quality jobs that ensure growth on the economic ladder. It’s not enough to provide entry-level positions (usually at minimum wage), but work that leads to something more substantial. This would mean an over-investment in terms of developing people’s job skills while they work. A proactive approach for people of color with the same type of lived experience is to provide counseling, mentoring and coaching. I suspect that the same factors that present challenges for Homeboy will be the same factors that other organizations face when trying to really push people up the economic ladder. Our hard-won lessons should be a model for other organizations wishing to follow a similar path and work towards racial equity.


Written by Thomas Vozzo.

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Follow the latest news live on CEOWORLD magazine and get news updates from the United States and around the world. The opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of CEOWORLD magazine. Follow CEOWORLD magazine on Twitter and Facebook. For media inquiries, please contact: [email protected]

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Canadian army

Over 500 Canadian troops at ‘high readiness’ in case of invasion of Ukraine – National

The Canadian commander of a multinational battle group in Latvia says he is working to ensure his troops have enough supplies and can talk to each other, as tensions rise between the NATO military alliance and Russia feed fears of a new war in Europe.

Canada has more than 500 troops in Latvia as part of a larger NATO reassurance mission first launched in 2017 in response to concerns about Russian aggression in Eastern Europe.

The Canadian contingent includes about 350 soldiers mainly from Valcartier, Quebec, who form the core of a 1,000-man NATO battle group stationed at Camp Adazi, about 30 kilometers northeast of Riga, the Latvian capital. .

Read more:

Ukrainian Canadians worried about conflict with Russia: ‘I fear for my family’

This battle group also includes military personnel and equipment from nine nations of the alliance, including Poland, Spain, Italy and the Czech Republic, all of which fall under the command of the lieutenant colonel. Dan Richel.

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In an interview with The Canadian Press on Thursday, Richel said one of his main responsibilities since taking command last month has been to ensure that the various contingents are able to communicate quickly and accurately with each other. others in the field.

“English is a second language for pretty much everyone in the battle group right now,” he said. “They are all NATO countries, obviously, so their tactics are generally the same. We just have to make sure everyone has the same understanding of all the terminology.

Clear communication would be essential in the event of a Russian invasion, which the battlegroup is specifically designed to defend against. It is also important to ensure that the NATO force has fuel, ammunition and other supplies to fight.


Click to play video: ''Don't Panic: ''Ukrainian President Addresses Nation Over Possible Conflict With Russia''







‘Don’t panic’: Ukrainian president addresses nation on possible conflict with Russia


‘Don’t panic’: Ukrainian president addresses nation on possible conflict with Russia

The battle group is designed for conventional warfare, that is, the battle with an army similar to that of Russia. Although Canada’s contribution is primarily infantry with armored vehicles, other partners have contributed tanks, artillery and other equipment.

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“We all come with very different gear, different gear that uses different ammo and requires different support,” Richel said. “It’s a challenge that I think we handle quite well.”

The Canadian commander said the main objective of the battle group was to train and prepare for a possible attack, as it has done since its creation five years ago.

“The battle group itself is already a high-readiness combat unit,” Richel said. “I would say what you see here today is a lot of what you would have seen in the other rotations as well.”

Read more:

Biden predicts Russia will ‘intervene’ in Ukraine and test Western leaders

In addition to those assigned to the battle group, Canada also has about 200 support personnel and a headquarters in Riga responsible for the overall planning and coordination of NATO efforts in Latvia.

Similar battlegroups led by Britain, Germany and the United States were established in Estonia, Lithuania and Poland respectively. The Liberal government has said Canada will lead the mission in Latvia until at least March 2023.

Designed to defend against a Russian invasion, the battlegroups’ small size means they would almost certainly be overwhelmed in a real war. Instead, their primary goal is to deter Russian aggression, with the idea that an attack on one would draw in all of NATO.

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Click to play the video: “Questions remain about the additional assistance the Canadian military can provide to Ukraine”







Questions remain about how much the Canadian military can help Ukraine


Questions remain about how much the Canadian military can help Ukraine

The Russian government has in recent weeks asked the alliance to withdraw all its forces from the region, including those from the Baltic and Poland, after mobilizing around 100,000 troops on the Russia-Ukraine border.

Canada, the United States and other NATO members have rejected the request, sparking growing concerns that an armed conflict between the two sides could start in Ukraine and spread to the rest of Europe. from the east.

Asked Wednesday whether the government would repatriate Canadian troops from Latvia and Ukraine if Russia attacked, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau underscored Canada’s commitment to NATO’s Baltic members.

“We are in Latvia to defend the Baltic states – Latvia, Lithuania and the states of Eastern Europe – against any incursion by Russian forces,” he said in French during a briefing on the COVID-19 in Ottawa. “We will continue the important work that NATO is doing to protect its eastern front.”

© 2022 The Canadian Press

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Non profit living

Accountant who embezzled over $1 million from adoption agency sentenced to 4.5 years in prison

A former international adoption agency accountant who stole more than $1.6 million from her employer and her own family was sentenced to four and a half years in federal prison on Wednesday.

U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernandez said he believed the fraud lasted about eight years and involved multiple victims. He said he also considered the COVID-19 pandemic as a mitigating factor when determining his sentence.

Melodie Ann Eckland, 56, of Hillsboro, pleaded guilty to wire fraud, aggravated identity theft, filing a false tax return and willfully failing to collect or pay payroll taxes.

She was also ordered to pay more than $1.6 million in restitution.

The illegal scheme was uncovered in March 2018, when one of the owners of Journeys of the Heart adoption and surrogacy agency received a call from a Premier Community Bank representative requesting information on several company checks that had been presented for payment with a signature of the owner. which appeared to have been tampered with, prosecutors said.

Eckland stole funds directly from the adoption agency’s business account at the bank by using the Journeys of the Heart computer to make unauthorized wire transfers to his personal bank account in the United States and writing checks unauthorized to herself, according to prosecutors.

She also transferred unauthorized funds by computer as a “bonus” from the adoption agency’s bank account to her own bank account.

To hide his fraud, Eckland kept two separate QuickBooks files on the adoption agency’s computer.

To cover the money she had stolen, Eckland applied for loans from at least five loan agencies in the adoption agency’s name, using the agency owners’ names without their permission. Eckland altered the agency’s financial records to give the impression that she owned the agency and was authorized to enter into the loan agreements. As of 2016, Eckland stopped making the agency’s quarterly employment tax payments to the IRS and stopped filing employment tax returns. As a result, the agency owed more than $94,000 in overdue employment taxes.

In yet another cover-up, she transferred $123,900 she had stolen from an account belonging to her deceased brother-in-law’s estate to the adoption agency’s bank account by forging her husband’s signature , according to prosecutors.

Eckland, who worked as an accountant for the adoption agency from 2011 to April 2018, spent her flight money on gifts and living expenses for her adult children, trips to Hawaii, Mexico and Disney World, event tickets, groceries, household items and living expenses, prosecutors said.

As part of the plea agreement, Eckland admitted that the amount of loss she caused to the adoption agency, the owners of the agency, and the estate of her brother-in-law and IRS was over $1,565,000.

“The crimes committed by Melodie Eckland reveal an astonishing level of greed, deceit and callousness towards her victims. Eckland repeatedly victimized the adoption agency and its owners over seven long years, bleeding the organization nonprofit over $1 million,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Claire M. Fay wrote in a sentencing memo.

“The owners of the adoption agency are devastated by the accused’s embezzlement and identity theft. They have worked hard for 26 years to fulfill an important mission: to help children around the world find caring and loving families,” Fay wrote. “However, due to the theft, selfishness and greed of the defendant, the owners feel they can no longer continue financially with the adoption agency.”

Eckland, a mother of two and grandmother of three, began stealing from her employer because she was heavily in debt and felt pressured to support her children and grandchildren, the company’s attorney said. defense Jamie Kilberg. She used the stolen money for household expenses, retail expenses, family support, debts, some travel and repayment of stolen funds, Kilberg said.

Kilberg argued for a maximum sentence of three years, noting that Eckland has no criminal record, is unlikely to commit future crimes, is remorseful and is working hard to repay her victims.

“In my quest to take the financial burdens of my family on my shoulders, I have wronged others,” Eckland wrote to the judge. “It’s just not okay and it’s not the person I want to be. … I want to right my wrong, and I don’t feel like I have the opportunity to do that if I’m incarcerated… I promise to work every day to become a more honest and trustworthy person.

Appearing via video for her remote sentencing hearing, she apologized to her former employers, saying she felt regret and shame for betraying their trust and stealing from them.

“I know better and I should have done better,” she said.

–Maxine Bernstein

Email to [email protected]; 503-221-8212

Follow on Twitter @maxoregonian

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International headquarters

Capewell appoints Lieutenant General (Rtd) Edward Davis as UK Strategic Director

Davis served 35 years in the naval service as an officer in the Royal Marines. During his distinguished career, he was the 63rd Commanding General of the Royal Marines and Commander of UK Amphibious Forces and Deputy Commander of NATO Land Command Headquarters. Retired from the British Armed Forces at the rank of Lieutenant General, he was transferred to the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office and was appointed, by Her Majesty The Queen, 67and Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Gibraltar in January 2016. He completed his term as Gibraltar Governor in February 2020.

Davis spent his early years in the naval service in regimental service in the United Kingdom, the the falkland islands, Cyprus, Norway, and Belize. He commanded a specialized military unit from 2002 to 2004, which included Operation TELIC 1 in Iraq, and later commanded 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines from 2010 to 2011, during which time he deployed to Afghanistan as commander of Task Force Helmand on Operation HERRICK 14. He was appointed 63rd Commanding General of the Royal Marines and Commander of the United Kingdom Amphibious Forces in December 2011. His last appointment to naval service was as Deputy Commander of NATO Land Command Headquarters in Izmir, Turkey, from July 2014 at January 2016.

“Ed’s significant leadership experience as Governor of Gibraltar, his vast expertise in international governance and his long tenure as a military leader with our allies in the United Kingdom are invaluable,” said Gregory Bloom, CEO of Capewell. “Our global team has gained immeasurable strength with his arrival.”

“Faced with the persistent challenges of our ever-changing world,” said Davis, “I particularly relish the opportunity to contribute to Capewell’s strategic ambition to become the premier provider of air and life support systems across the Kingdom. -United, Europe and the Commonwealth. It is an ambition that Capewell will undoubtedly achieve, given its 140 years of successful engineering that is innovative, agile and reliable for mission and life. It is indeed a proud moment for me to join Capewell.”

About Capwell:
Founded in 1881, Capewell is the world’s leading custom engineer and manufacturer of critical air delivery systems and combat water survival solutions for United States government and its partner nations. Capewell’s core mission – to protect people who operate systems in hazardous environments to support national security – continues to this day. Operating from South Windsor, Conn., and Meadows of Dan, Va., the company offers four primary product segments of critical components and systems: aerial and parachute delivery systems, air and marine safety and life support equipment, operator and maintainer training and logistics, and engineering.

SOURCE Capewell

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International headquarters

UPSC CSE Key – January 17, 2022: What you need to read today

COVER PAGE

Collarwali breathes his last, MP’s Pench Tiger Reserve loses ‘Supermom’

Program:

Preliminary examination: General questions on environmental ecology, biodiversity and climate change

Main examination: General Studies III: Environmental Conservation, Pollution and Degradation, Environmental Impact Assessment.

Key points to ponder:

• Pench Tiger Reserve and Pench National Park (Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra)

• Cartographic work – Pench River and Kanhan River – Origin

• Rudyard Kipling, The Jungle Book and Pench National Park – Connect the Dots

• Collarwali (Tigress) – Why was she so famous?

• Map Work-Tiger reserves in India

• Tiger Conservation Program (Project Tiger) – About, Mission and Vision

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 The Story of Collarwali – The “Empress Pench National Park”

📍 Supermom: What makes Collarwali Baghin of Pench Tiger Reserve a tigress like no other

GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

Devas investors cite Canadian court order, want AI assets seized in US

Program:

Preliminary examination: News of national and international importance

Main examination: General Studies II: Effect of Policies and Policies of Developed and Developing Countries on India’s Interests

Key points to ponder:

• Mandate and Headquarters of the International Air Transport Association

• Convention on International Civil Aviation, as well as the Chicago Convention and India

• Antrix-Devas Agreement Controversy – Background (2005 agreement, 2011 UPA government canceled agreement, legal disputes, etc.)

• Why are Airports Authority of India (AAI) and Air India targeted?

• Decision of the National Court of Company Law on Devas Multimedia

• Know the National Court of Company Law, Antrix, restrictive immunity

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Explained: Why NCLAT Called the Devas-Antrix Deal a Fraud

📍 The story of a Rs 4,400 crore fiasco at ISRO

Stop unilateral road construction, Nepal tells India

Program:

Preliminary examination: News of national and international importance

Main examination: General Studies II: India and its neighborhood relations.

Key points to ponder:

• India-Nepal Bilateral Relations

• Border disputes between India and Nepal (Kalapani and Susta region)

• Map Work-Limpiadhura, Lipulekh and Kalapani, Kali River, Dharchula

• Measures taken to resolve the border dispute

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Interpretation of the Indo-Nepal border dispute

📍 Mapping the history of the Kalapani dispute between India and Nepal

📍 Border dispute between India and Nepal at Kalapani: an explanation

THE EDITORIAL PAGE

In Crypto Garb

Program:

Preliminary examination: Economic and social development

Main examination: General Studies-III: Indian Economy and Awareness of IT Fields

Key points to ponder:

• What is crypto investing?

• Can crypto then be considered an asset?

• Cryptocurrency or virtual currency – what do you mean by this term?

• What is Bitcoin?

• What is Blockchain technology and why is it associated with Bitcoin?

• The Cryptocurrency and Official Digital Currency Regulation Bill, 2021-Highlights

• Supreme Court on Cryptocurrency in 2018

• What is RBI Sandbox?

• What are the problems with cryptocurrency in traditional financial markets or simply in the market?

• Initial Coin Offering (ICO)

• Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC) – Meaning, Issues and Challenges

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Explanation: digital currencies and how they work

📍 Explanation: how are cryptocurrencies regulated in countries around the world?

📍 The Myth and Lure of Crypto

IDEAS PAGE

An Indian Green Accord
Program:

Preliminary examination: General questions on environmental ecology, biodiversity and climate change

Main examination: General Studies III: Environmental Conservation, Pollution and Degradation, Environmental Impact Assessment.

Key points to ponder:

• According to the author of this article, what is the Indian Green Deal (IGD)?

• Components of the Indian Green Deal (IGD) and how will this program help?

• What does ‘Net Zero’ mean?

• India’s commitment to carbon neutrality by 2070 at the 26th Conference of the Parties (COP) Climate Summit in
Glasgow or India’s enhanced climate commitments – the “Panchamrit”

• Difference between ‘Net Zero’ and ‘Carbon Neutral’?

• India’s new renewable energy target

• How to reach net zero?

• Public-private partnership frameworks to achieve “net zero”

• Current India Emissions Scenario

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Praveer Sinha: “Net-zero carbon emissions by 2070 is totally doable”

📍 1 billion tons of emissions reduced: why it’s a big step forward

EXPRESS NETWORK

WEF summit starts today; Modi, XI to deliver special addresses

Program:

Preliminary examination: News of national and international importance.

Main examination: General Studies II: Important international institutions, agencies and forums – their structure, mandate.

Key points to ponder:

• World Economic Forum – About, Role, Mission, Vision, Mandate, Headquarters

• Initiatives taken by the World Economic Forum

• India and World Economic Forum

• Reports published by the World Economic Forum

In 2021, the incomes of 84% of households fell, but the number of billionaires increased

Program:

Preliminary examination: News of national and international importance.

main examination: General Studies I: Poverty and Development Issues

Key points to ponder:

• Oxfam Report, ‘Inequality Kills’ – Key Points

• Get to know Oxfam International

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Covid has widened inequalities: wealth, education, gender

THE WORLD

Russia issues more subtle threats than invading Ukraine

Program:

Preliminary examination: News of national and international importance.

Main examination: General Studies II: Effect of Policies and Policies of Developed and Developing Countries on India’s Interests

Key points to ponder:

• What do you mean by “hybrid warfare”?

• Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) – About, Member Countries, Mandate and Headquarters

• Where is Ukraine-locate on the map

• United States-Russia and Ukraine crisis

• Request/Proposals from Russia – Main Highlights

• 2014 Crimean crisis

• Crimea’s strategic location – why is it important for Russia?

• Ukraine, NATO, USA and Russia – where are we?

• Article 5 of the founding treaty of NATO (Collective security)

• India’s position in the Ukrainian crisis

• Bilateral relations between India and Ukraine

• How can India help the United States and Russia keep the “peace” in this conflict?

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE)

📍 Ukraine crisis: Risks remain as Russia and the West talk

📍 Ukraine accuses Russia of being behind cyberattack in ‘hybrid warfare’

📍 Hybrid War – New Threats, Complexity, and “Trust” as an Antidote

📍 On the edge of the abyss

ECONOMY

Why the road ahead could be bumpy for India’s early harvest deal with the UK

Program:

Preliminary examination: Economic and social development

Main examination: General Studies II: General Studies II: Bilateral, regional and global groupings and agreements involving India and/or affecting India’s interests

Key points to ponder:

• What is the Early Harvest Agreement?

• What is a Free Trade Agreement (FTA)?

• Know other types of trade agreements such as bilateral investment treaty (BIT), preferential trade zone, single market, customs union, etc.

• What is the definition of trade given by the WTO?

• Reinforced commercial partnership between India and the United Kingdom

• Trade between India and the UK

• Importance of trade relations between India and UK

• India and Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP)

Other important articles dealing with the same subject:

📍 Unlocking a new era: India-UK trade deal

📍 Explained: why India is trying to strike a free trade agreement with the UK

Get an e-paper subscription via our special offer – click here

For any questions or comments, contact [email protected]

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Canadian army

Canada must prepare for a potentially hostile government in Washington

In the 155 years since Confederation, most Canadians have rarely thought about national security. For the first 60 years after Confederation, we were protected by the British Empire. Then, in August 1938, United States President Franklin Roosevelt, during a visit to Kingston, Ontario, said, “I assure you that the people of the United States will not stand idly by if the domination of Canadian soil is threatened. Since then, our national security has been guaranteed by the United States.

It would be wise for Canadians to rethink this dependence on the United States. Since Donald Trump’s election to the White House in November 2016, we have seen a rise in right-wing extremism fueled by Trump’s irresponsible and sometimes dangerous rhetoric. We have seen massive unrest in cities across the United States as people protest against police violence against minorities. On January 6, 2021, we witnessed the infamous uprising as Trump supporters attempted to prevent election certification. Since then, the right-wing media and Trump have continued to “fan the flames” of fury and outrage. The majority of the Republican Party seems to tolerate this.

Why should we care, you may ask. We live in Canada after all. We need to be concerned about this, because violence can very easily spread across our borders. Prime Minister Lester Pearson knew this when he deployed Canadian troops to the border crossings between Windsor, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan during the Detroit Riots in July 1967. President Richard Nixon moved American troops to the border areas near Quebec during the October Crisis. of 1970. Both leaders knew that their primary duty was to protect their citizens and they took steps to achieve it.

The modern Republican Party is nothing like the party of decades past. This is not the party of Dwight Eisenhower, Nixon, Ronald Reagan, etc. This is a party that embraces violence, intolerance, disregards logic, reason and science (witness the horrific deaths in pandemic ‘red’ states) and opposes rights reproduction of women. These values ​​upheld by the current Republican Party are totally foreign and repugnant to most Canadians. We also have to believe that the Republicans oppose most of the values ​​that are dear to Canadians.

If the Republicans take control of Congress in November and the White House in 2024, it will mean Canada has a potentially hostile government across the border. We must prepare for it and do it immediately. What actions should we take?

We must first ensure that we can protect our borders. That means we have to make sure that we can mobilize enough military personnel and deploy them to any part of the border that is needed quickly. It will also require a change in military policy in Canada. Currently, army reserve units have very little ammunition available to them in their arsenals. In an emergency, ammunition would be brought to them from larger bases. This must change. We need to be able to mobilize our reserves and they can’t wait for enough ammunition to deploy to the border.

Next, we need to be able to show a potentially hostile Republican president that no threat will come to the United States via Canada. This means, for example, that we must have a modern, well-equipped air force that can destroy any threat entering Canadian airspace and heading towards the United States. No US president would hesitate to order US military forces into Canada if he felt Canada had failed to deal adequately with a crisis that could threaten the United States. We cannot give them any excuse to do so.

The current Republican Party is not a friend of Canada and could indeed threaten us if it regains power. This means that we must be prepared to keep a respectful distance and ensure that we can defend our people.

Craig Wallace is a Hamilton resident and author of five books.

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International headquarters

Three Graduates Receive Thomas R. Pickering and Charles B. Rangel Graduate Scholarships | News | Notre Dame News

University of Notre Dame alumni Irla Atanda and Amber Bryan have been named Thomas R. Pickering Graduate Fellows. Alumnus DeJorie Monroe has been named a Charles B. Rangel Scholar. He is the University’s first Rangel Graduate Fellow and the second and third Pickering Graduate Fellows.

Funded by the U.S. Department of State and administered annually by Howard University, the Pickering and Rangel Graduate Scholarship Programs each award 45 scholarships that cover tuition, room, board, books, and fees for obtaining a two-year master’s degree.

The programs also offer two internships. The first, an internship at the headquarters of the US Department of State in Washington, DC The second, an internship abroad in a US embassy or consulate. The program provides additional support for summer travel, housing, and other related expenses.

Both programs encourage applications from members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, women, and those in financial need.

Irla Atanda

In applying for the scholarships, the alumni worked with Elise Rudt, Senior National Fellowship Program Manager with the Flatley Center for Undergraduate University Engagement (CUSE), which promotes the intellectual development of Notre Dame undergraduates through scholarly engagement, research, creative endeavours, and scholarship seeking.

“Irla, DeJorie and Amber epitomize excellence and international service. Their trajectories should be examples for all Notre Dame students. I often say that scholarships beget scholarships, and Irla, having won the Gilman and Boren scholarships, DeJorie, having won the Orr and Fulbright scholarships, and Amber, having worked as an AmeriCorps fellow, perfectly demonstrate the possibilities of such scholarships to build a clear career path,” Rudt said. “I want to thank rivers of holly (associate director of Kellogg Institute for International Studies) and Dr. George Lopez (Reverend Theodore M. Hesburgh, CSC, Emeritus Professor of Peace Studies at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies) for their assistance with practice interviews.

Atanda graduated from Notre Dame in 2020 with a BA in American Studies and a minor in International Development Studies. She studied abroad at the University of Cape Town as a Gilman Scholar and at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

While at Notre Dame, she was a recipient of the David L. Boren Scholarship, Charles B. Rangel Alternate, and QuestBridge Scholar.

Amber Bryan 300x
Amber Brian

She currently works at Refugees International as Special Assistant to the President.

Bryan graduated from Notre Dame in 2017 with a bachelor’s degree in business administration. She studied abroad at the Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo.

While at Notre Dame, she was a Scholar AnBryce and served as Vice President and Community Services Coordinator for the Black Student Association.

She currently works at Terminix as a senior internal auditor.

Monroe graduated from Notre Dame in 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in Spanish and minors in Latin American studies, Middle Eastern studies and theology. She also studied abroad at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

While at Notre Dame, Monroe was a Hesburgh-Yusko Fellow and a Dean’s Scholar in the College of Arts and Letters, and was awarded a position as a Fulbright English teaching assistant in Argentina.

She received her Master of Science in Management and Leadership from Western Governors University.

Monroe is currently a dual-language immersion teacher at an elementary school in Columbia, South Carolina, and marketing operations coordinator at Urbanforce/Generator Power Systems Inc.

Dejoriemonroephoto 300x
By Jorie Monroe

Upon completion of the fellowship programs, Atanda, Bryan, and Monroe will serve as Foreign Service Officers in the Department of State.

The Pickering Fellowship for Foreign Affairs is named after Ambassador Thomas R. Pickering. Pickering has served as Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs and United States Ambassador to the Russian Federation, India, Israel, El Salvador, Nigeria, and Jordan. He also served as United States Ambassador and Representative to the United Nations in New York.

The Rangel Fellowship in International Affairs is named after Charles B. Rangel. Rangel served in the United States Congress, representing New York City for 23 terms and 46 years. He retired in December 2016. Rangel made history in 2006 as the first African American to lead the Committee of Ways and Means, which oversees international trade, health care, economic policy and development. other major political issues.

Current students and alumni interested in applying for the Pickering, Rangel, or Payne Fellowships (a similar award for working with USAID) can contact Rudt at [email protected].

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Canadian army

Ukraine dust off Cold War bunkers in case of Russian invasion, many believe it won’t happen

Under an administrative building in Kiev, a concrete stairwell leads to a thick metal door – the entrance to a Cold War-era air raid shelter. It is just one of hundreds of shelters that city officials are inspecting in case the simmering conflict in eastern Ukraine turns into a full-scale Russian invasion.

“Our goal is to have shelters for 100% of our population,” said Nikolai Budnik, director of the city’s shelter system, as he showed CBC on Monday a bunker built in 1986.

Due to the recent escalation of tensions between Ukraine and Russia, he said, authorities are inspecting shelters and restocking supplies stored inside, such as gas masks.

Diplomatic talks on several fronts to ease ongoing tensions

While Russian officials have denied that they are planning an offensive, US and Ukrainian intelligence sources estimate that around 100,000 Russian troops are amassed near the Ukraine-Russia border.

A series of high-level diplomatic talks are underway in an attempt to ease escalating tensions and avoid the risk of war.

US and Russian negotiators met in Geneva on Monday, and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg is due to meet Russian officials in Brussels on Wednesday. Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau, meanwhile, discussed the extension of Canada’s military training mission and the prospect of new sanctions against Moscow during an appeal with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on Tuesday.

Supplies are lined up in an air raid shelter in the Ukrainian capital, Kiev. The shelters are being assessed to ensure they have enough space and supplies for the nearly three million people who live in the city. (Jean-François Bisson / CBC)

The particular shelter that CBC visited this week is outfitted with old bunk beds and water tanks and is meant to house essential workers to keep the city running and utilities running in the event of an attack.

Russia has issued a series of demands and repeatedly warned of the dangers of crossing its so-called red lines, gestures by the West towards Ukraine that would trigger a response from Russia. He warned, for example, that Ukraine should never be allowed to join NATO, although the United States has already called the request a non-starting.

Officials on both sides have expressed doubts that diplomatic talks will lead to a breakthrough, but that doesn’t mean all Ukrainians believe a bigger war is imminent or even likely.

Inside one of the Cold War era bomb shelters in Kiev being prepared for possible use again. (Jean-François Bisson / CBC)

“Not the Ukraine of six or seven years ago”

In Kiev’s historic Podil district, crowds strolled through a holiday market on Monday. Some sipped mulled wine, and others took a ride on a Ferris wheel.

“I wouldn’t say we care a lot,” said Oksana Dalko, 23.

“Ukraine now is not the Ukraine of six or seven years ago… we have a strong army now.”

Oksana Dalko, 23, says that while Ukraine traditionally looks like Russia, Ukrainians wish to be more like Western democracies. (Corinne Seminov / CBC)

Ukraine has grown its military in recent years with the help of allies, including the United States and Canada. In 2021 alone, the United States provided $ 400 million in military assistance to Ukraine, and Canadian troops helped train the country’s soldiers on Operation UNIFIER.

A war between Ukrainian forces and Russian-backed separatists in eastern Ukraine has continued since 2014, killing around 14,000 people. But, about 750 kilometers into the country’s capital, Dalko says there are few signs of an imminent threat.

The Donbass region in eastern Ukraine is currently divided into government-controlled territory, in yellow, and that held by Russian-backed separatists, in orange. The opposing parties have been fighting since 2014. (SRC)

An invasion poses an economic risk

Volodymyr Korniienko, 27, was among the crowd at the holiday market.

He doesn’t think Ukraine will be allowed to join NATO for years to come, but that it will eventually happen and says Russia should just accept it.

He says he is also not worried about the apparent political stalemate.

“I’m pretty sure that no kind of military escalation will happen on the Russian side,” he said.

“Even if Russia invades Ukraine, it won’t make economic sense.”

Volodymyr Korniienko, 27, believes Ukraine will eventually join NATO, but says the ongoing fighting in the Donbass region means it is unlikely to happen anytime soon. (Briar Stewart / CBC)

He is referring to the new punitive sanctions that the United States and NATO have threatened to impose if Russia launches an attack. Officials have hinted that the sweeping measures could include financial sanctions that could target Russian assets abroad, which would deal a heavy blow to the country and in particular to the ultra-rich elite who have investments and accounts. banking abroad.

“They depend on it a lot,” said Illia Ponomarenko, 29, a defense reporter for the Kyiv Independent, an English-language news site.

“Our enemy is nasty but not stupid. They still need their billions in the West. They take advantage of the villas in the south of France.”

Journalist Illia Ponomarenko said Russia’s growing rhetoric was part of a plan to intimidate Ukraine and put pressure on the West. (Jean-François Bisson / CBC)

He worked for the Kyiv Post, Ukraine’s main English-language newspaper, until the owner abruptly sacked all of the newspaper’s staff in November. He and some of his colleagues banded together to start the Kyiv Independent.

Ponomarenko, from the Donbass region in eastern Ukraine, says he has seen three wars and two revolutions in his life. Thus, he feels less anxious about the situation today than it did last spring, when Russia also amassed troops near the Ukrainian border.

“It was a real apocalyptic atmosphere here in Kiev. I have to admit I was scared. I was really scared.”

A psychological campaign

Now, he says, he’s less emotional. If Russia had wanted to take over all of Ukraine, it would have tried in 2014 when it annexed the Ukrainian peninsula from Crimea, he said.

He suspects that the war rhetoric this time is more of a psychological campaign by Russia to maintain its influence.

Ponomarenko says the more Westward Ukraine leans and develops its democracy and civil liberties, the more likely Russian residents are to take notice.

“They will start to wonder … ‘if the Ukrainians can do it, why can’t we do it too?'”

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International headquarters

The most powerful passports in the world for 2022 | To travel

However, these new freedoms are mainly enjoyed by Europe, North America, and wealthier Asian countries – passport holders from countries like Angola, Cameroon and Laos can only enter around 50. between them.

Christian H. Kaelin, president of Henley & Partners and creator of the passport index concept, says opening migration channels will be crucial for post-pandemic recovery. “Passports and visas are among the most important instruments impacting social inequalities in the world, as they determine the opportunities for global mobility,” he said. “The borders within which we are born and the documents we are entitled to hold are no less arbitrary than our skin color. Richer states must encourage positive internal migration in order to help redistribute and rebalance human and material resources around the world. . “






A photo illustration shows a Singaporean passport in Singapore on March 29, 2020 as authorities imposed strict measures to slow the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus.


ROSLAN RAHMAN / AFP via Getty Images


The best passports to hold in 2022 are:

1. Japan, Singapore (192 destinations)

2. Germany, South Korea (190)

3. Finland, Italy, Luxembourg, Spain (189)

4. Austria, Denmark, France, Netherlands, Sweden (188)

5. Ireland, Portugal (187)

6. Belgium, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States (186)

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History organization

GOP State Senator reflects on his comments on Nazi history in schools | Education in the United States

An Indiana state senator backed down on his remarks that teachers must be impartial when discussing Nazism in classrooms after triggering a widespread backlash.

At a state Senate committee hearing last week on Senate Bill 167, a bill that would ban “concepts that divide,” Republican Senator Scott Baldwin, who co- wrote the bill, said that teachers should be free from prejudice when teaching lessons about fascism and Nazism.

“Marxism, Nazism, Fascism… I have no problem with the education system providing instruction on the existence of these“ isms, ”Baldwin said, adding,“ I think we’ve gone too far when we take a stand… We must be impartial. He went on to say that teachers should “only provide the facts” and that he is “not sure whether it is fair that we determine how this child should think and this is where I try to provide the facts. safeguards ”.

Baldwin has since retracted his remarks. In an email to the Indianapolis Star last Thursday, he said his intention with the bill was to ensure teachers are impartial when discussing and teaching “legitimate political groups.”

“When I drafted this bill, my intention with respect to ‘political affiliation’ was to cover political parties within the American legal political system,” Baldwin said. “In my comments to the committee, I thought more about the big picture and tried to say that we shouldn’t be telling children what to think about politics. “

He went on to denounce the aforementioned ideologies, stating: “Nazism, Marxism and Fascism are a stain on our world history and must be seen as such, and I have failed to adequately express it in my words. comments during the meeting. I believe that children should learn more about these horrific events in history so that we no longer experience them in humanity. “

SB 167 was tabled in recent weeks in response to the heated debates that have emerged in Indiana and the rest of the country over the past year regarding how schools should teach children about racism, history and other topics.

The bill prohibits preschools up to grade 12 from teaching students that “any gender, race, ethnicity, religion, color, national origin, or political affiliation” is inherently superior, inferior, racist, sexist, oppressive . Teachers would also be prohibited from making individuals feel “unease, guilt, anguish, responsibility or any other form of psychological distress” when it comes to meritocracy and the idea that it has been. created by one group to oppress another.

The bill also prohibits teachers and educational programs from teaching that Indiana and the United States were founded as a racist or sexist state or nation.

The Midwestern Chapter of the Anti-Defamation League has critical Baldwin’s apology, saying it “does not change the profound wrongs of using” fairness “or” neutrality “as tools to clean up history.”

“This is part of the continuing efforts by some to try to rewrite history and characterize extremism, racism and genocide as somehow legitimate. It is dangerous and despicable. This should be categorically, universally and strongly rejected, ”the organization added.

The incident comes less than three months after a North Texas school official said classrooms with Holocaust books must offer “opposing” views.

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History organization

With black man in leadership role, leading real estate organization issues formal apology for past discrimination against black homebuyers

In the 1930s, it was not uncommon for realtors to use language describing areas as “marred by darkness” and filled with “an infiltration of unwanted racial elements” to dissuade white buyers from buying into properties. specific communities.

This language, led by the National Association of Real Estate Boards, has led to the development of tracking maps and discriminatory practices within the real estate industry that have contributed to de facto segregation across the United States, lowering home values. in black communities and contributing to community resource inequalities.

NAR logo, 1923-1973 (Image: Society of American Archivists website) Bryan Greene, newly appointed NAR Fair Housing Policy Director, a newly created position (Photo: NAR website)

Today, the leadership of the National Association of Realtors, the largest business group representing real estate agents, issued a formal apology to black Americans and other non-whites who have experienced housing discrimination in the United States. . (NAR is the successor to the National Association of Real Estate Boards.)

The apology comes despite internal conflicts within the organization, which is 78% white, and which had already supported Donald Trump’s Make America Great Again campaign until 2019.

Yet as the socio-political climate in the United States is changing, leaders within the organization see the importance of confronting past discrimination and current inequalities head-on.

Bryan Greene, who worked for the US Department of Housing and Urban Development for 29 years, joined NAR in 2019. Green became the organization’s first director of fair housing policy in 2019 and is now vice president of NAR’s policy advocacy and oversees laws and regulations. advocacy initiatives.

With Greene, a black man, as a member of the executive leadership of the organization, it looks like change is happening in the organization.

Yet NAR recently had to pass a rule against hate speech as several members were caught making racist comments on social media. Additionally, NAR supports President Biden’s initiative to add three million black homeowners over the next 10 years.

Additionally, a faction of NAR members lobbied for changes within the organization, such as reduced commissions for non-white buyers and sellers.

“It’s a tough story,” Greene said at a recent NAR event. “But we took the leap. “

Read Finurah’s full story here.


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International headquarters

Fitch warns overseas travel ban threatens Hong Kong’s trade status

International business groups in Hong Kong are begging the government to restart flights as a rating agency warned that a ban on overseas travel would deter companies from using Hong Kong as their regional headquarters.

Executives who returned home for Christmas found themselves stranded outside the Asian financial hub after authorities suspended flights from eight countries, including the United States and the United Kingdom, to protect the city from the Omicron variant.

David Graham, executive director of the British Chambers of Commerce in Hong Kong, said the “unfortunate” theft ban had taken many by surprise.

“This will inevitably cause considerable disruption and inconvenience, especially for the many Hong Kong-based executives and employees who traveled to the UK over Christmas time to be with family and who were considering returning to Hong Kong in early January. “, did he declare. the Financial Times.

“We very much hope that the ban will be for a very limited period given the quarantine and testing measures already in place for those returning from the UK.”

Hong Kong, which pursues a ‘zero-Covid’ policy, has reimposed numerous social distancing regulations after an outbreak that was sown by the flight crew of Cathay Pacific, who had been exempted from traveler quarantine orders .

Flights from the eight nations were banned for 14 days on Wednesday last week. Other airlines, such as Air Canada and Virgin Atlantic, have temporarily halted flights because they were unable to meet the Hong Kong government’s quarantine requirements for crews.

You see a snapshot of an interactive chart. This is most likely because you are offline or JavaScript is disabled in your browser.

The government said tougher measures needed to be implemented as the city faced the risk of a “major epidemic”.

Fitch Ratings, however, said the new restrictions could dampen Hong Kong’s economic growth prospects. “We believe that the tightening of restrictions on international arrivals will create new obstacles to the territory’s ability to serve as a regional headquarters for foreign multinationals,” he said.

Hong Kong also recently introduced a mandatory seven-day quarantine for pilots and crews on cargo flights. The measure has wreaked havoc on flight schedules, with Cathay Pacific reducing its cargo capacity to 20% and passenger capacity to 2% of pre-pandemic levels.

The latest flight cancellations have prompted warnings of a sharp rise in food prices.

Those wishing to enter Hong Kong from most countries are already subject to three weeks of isolation in a hotel and, in some cases, a government quarantine facility.

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The restrictions prevented the deaths and strains on health systems seen elsewhere, but also cut the city off from the rest of the world.

At the same time, however, the city has failed to persuade very old people to get vaccinated, with just over 20% of those aged 80 and over vaccinated.

International business groups have previously warned that Hong Kong is risking its crown as the region’s top financial center if it does not reopen its borders.

“The flight restrictions add further stress, cost and uncertainty for business executives living in Hong Kong,” said Tara Joseph, director of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong, which represents 1,400 companies on Chinese territory.

“Some people are stuck, others are afraid of what will happen next, and there is no indication when it will end.”

The US Consulate in Hong Kong said there was a need for “increased dialogue and transparency regarding travel, testing and quarantine measures that affect Hong Kong as a place to live and trade.”


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Non profit living

Community hero: saving animals, a long-standing ambition for a resident of Ramona

Jeanne Cannon says she doesn’t feel like a hero, but she’s saved and trained enough animals over the years to deserve praise.

Now around 70, the longtime Ramona resident has spent 30 years saving animals, primarily for the non-profit Help for the Homeless Pets.

Cannon, a mother of three grown children, said she got involved with the organization after meeting its founder Bea Hoskins. Cannon was working at Ramona Animal Hospital when Hoskins brought a dog from Newfoundland for an exam.

“I loved him and adopted him,” said Cannon, who discovered she had a lot in common with Hoskins and formed a friendship that spanned 30 years. “Bea invests a lot of money and effort in the animals she takes in and she mainly welcomes dogs with special needs, small ones.”

Hoskins said the dog was one of two Newfoundlanders who were thrown from a van in front of her as she picked pomegranates on a property near Highland Valley Road.

“She is a true compassionate and caring friend who has never let me down,” Hoskins said of Cannon. “He’s someone you can count on in the worst of times. We have always leaned on each other’s shoulders. He’s someone you don’t meet every day.

In addition to saving animals in Ramona and neighboring communities, Hoskins has rescued dogs and cats as far as Siberia. Cannon has helped save stray animals in Mexico. Sometimes dogs with special needs that have been injured or abused are brought to the United States.

But these days, Cannon mostly gathers supplies due to health concerns.

Hoskins said Cannon was rewarded, along with the other volunteers, for working tirelessly and without pay.

“Every little money we have goes to animals,” said Hoskins, who founded Help for the Homeless Pets in Ramona in 1993. “We never hired any employees.”

Cannon said she always had an affinity for animals, even though her parents never had more than one small dog. As a girl, she played with a farm set instead of dolls.

“It’s always been in my blood from the start, even though I wasn’t raised that way,” she said.

By the time Cannon met Hoskins, she had already been living in Ramona for a decade with her husband, Jerry. While the couple were building their home in Ramona, they acquired a number of animals, including horses, pigs, sheep and chickens. By the time their house was built two years later, they had set up a whole farm.

“The animals just kept on multiplying and when we moved here to four acres we ended up taking things that people didn’t want anymore,” Cannon said. “My husband called them drive-bys. People were dropping off animals.

“We had pets and we did wildlife rescues for a while and had some exotics. Our barn was always full and we had a variety of things. I had lots of interesting wildlife including skunks and raccoons. These are animals that have improved and have for the most part been released. “

As their menagerie grew, local school children visited his home to take lessons on his animals. Cannon would teach them vocabulary words, such as the difference between nocturnal and daytime, and also how to care for animals and be responsible pet owners.

Hoskins said she felt blessed to have met Cannon and a few others who genuinely care about animals and can be counted on to help them. Even if it means getting up in the middle of the night to set a living trap for a lost or abandoned animal.

“The rewards are when these animals recover and trust people again,” Hoskins said. “Not all of them do. If we can find loving homes for them, that’s the rewarding part. These are the highlights. “

For a decade, Cannon also helped the San Diego Humane Society bring animals to nursing homes. Cannon told the elderly how she acquired the animals and how she took care of them.

When her daughter, Lisa, was 11 and involved in a 4-H club, she wanted to learn how to breed guide dog puppies. As Cannon learned more about training guide dogs, she became a leader. Thanks to Guide Dogs for the Blind, Inc. in San Rafael, Cannon took dog owners to stores and other places to teach them how to get dogs to behave in public.

She volunteered with guide dogs for the blind for 18 years. Lisa also continued to breed dogs with her husband after her marriage, and together the family has raised over 20 guide dogs.

In addition to his work with animals, Cannon has also contributed to other causes. One provided respite care to caregivers of terminally ill patients through the Elizabeth Hospice. Cannon said her 14 years volunteering with Elizabeth Hospice has been a rewarding experience.

One day, she met a woman at the checkout of a grocery store who told her about the Heart to Heart organization and its mission to help people in Romania who had lost their homes and jobs and were without food or clothes.

Cannon organized a clothes drive, recruiting local schools who held contests to see who could make the most clothes.

“The kids would get rid of last year’s wardrobe anyway,” Cannon recalls. “For a month, we put the clothes together and separated them into boys ‘and girls’ clothes, tops and bottoms, and approximate sizes. We put them in boxes of bananas that I continued to collect in grocery stores. “

Eventually, Cannon said they had enough clothing to fill a large storage unit. With financial help from the local wireless technology company Qualcomm, they put the clothes in a shipping container and shipped them to Romania.

“I have had many wonderful opportunities to live a life of love and I am blessed to have encountered these things,” said Cannon, noting that the first congregational church in Ramona that she attends has a motto of living a life of love. love life. “And that’s also my mission statement to be who I am. It suits us perfectly.

Over the years, Cannon has said that she has parted ways with many animals, but she still has four pigs, a few goats and alpacas, a llama, a deer, a miniature horse and an emu in addition to a few dogs and cats.

“If I was young and could live my life, that’s all I would do is continue to save animals that need a home,” she said, adding that she appreciates the help she receives from her husband. “This is my main reason for being, is to help animals and we have done a lot of it over the years.”

How to help

Anyone interested in helping Help for the Homeless Pets, a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit, can send donations to PO Box 1406, Ramona, CA 92065.

Animal adoptions are organized in conjunction with the AmazingDogs.org website at least twice a month at the Poway PetCoach store and at a private residence in Carlsbad, Hoskins said. Adoption event schedules are posted on the website.

For more information call 760-789-4483 or email [email protected]


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Kivnon USA sets up its North American headquarters in Farmington Hills, Michigan

Mike Kotzian, Managing Director of Kivnon USA, recently opened the company’s North American office in Farmington Hills, Michigan. Kivnon is a leading supplier of automated guided vehicles headquartered in Spain and growing rapidly in North America.

Kotzian shared that so many Midwestern manufacturers have added to the Michigan site selection. Located at 37640 Hills Tech Dr. Operation will feature the robots and serve as headquarters in the United States. According to Kotzian, “Whether it is kits for the assembly of the automotive industry or intralogistics, we are happy to deploy our teams throughout North America to provide the best service and product delivery. faster than any other supplier ”.

Kotzian is currently building a strong team of industry professionals, from sales engineers to installation experts. He said, “The return on investment (return on investment) for AGV begins with delivery and installation. Most AGV suppliers are over a year behind schedule. In Kivnon, customers who order standard products by March 31, 2022 will be delivered by Q3 2022. We are the only company to guarantee a ROI start-up time in 2022.

Kivnon is an international company dedicated to mobile robotics. Since its founding as a family business in 2009, the company has offered its customers innovative and high-tech solutions for the implementation of AGV and AMR. The company continues to grow with complete projects including installation service and technical support.

Kivnon will be exhibiting at MODEX 2022 in Atlanta from March 28-31 at booth # C5488.

About Kivnon:

Kivnon offers a wide range of autonomous vehicles (AGV / AMR) and accessories for the transport of goods, using magnetic navigation or mapping technologies, which adapt to any environment and industry. The company offers an integral solution to customers. Kivnon products are characterized by their robustness, safety, precision and high quality. Each product has been designed with a user-friendly philosophy creating a pleasant working experience that is simple to install and intuitive.

Mike Kotzian, Managing Director of Kivnon USA based in Farmington Hills, Michigan, said, “Kivnon advises, installs, maintains and provides exceptional after-sales service. We consolidate our commitment to technological innovation and the continuous improvement of all products. Kotzian can be reached on LinkedIn.

The company offers a wide range of mobile robotics solutions automating different applications in the automotive, food, logistics and warehousing, manufacturing and aerospace industries. Follow Kivnon on Twitter @KivnonUSA.

Media contact
Company Name: Kivnon
Contact: Mike Kotzian
E-mail: Send an email
Call: (810) 220-9304
Address:37640 Hills Tech Drive
City: Farmington Hills
State: MID
Country: United States
Website: https://www.kivnon.com/



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What life was like 50 years ago in America, compared to now in 2022

A lot can change in 50 years.

Take a look at how America has evolved from 1972 to 2022. From music and fashion to monumental political events and notable economic statistics.

7 NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION IDEAS AND HOW TO OVERRIDE THEM

Best song

In early 1972, the most popular song in the United States was “Brand New Key” by Melanie, according to Billboard’s Hot 100 list.

In 2022, Mariah Carey’s vacation hit “All i want for christmas is you“topped the Billboard Hot 100. The song was originally released in 1987.

Bell-Bottom

Detailed photo of a girl wearing flared jeans.
(iStock)

Elephant leg jeans were a fashion staple for both men and women in 1972. Fast forward 50 years and elephant legs are all the rage again among Gen Z.

DOES “JANUARY DRY” REALLY IMPROVE YOUR HEALTH?

Space Shuttle Program

The International Space Station photographed by Expedition 56 crew members from a Soyuz spacecraft after undocking.  Image from the ISS as of October 4, 2018.

The International Space Station photographed by Expedition 56 crew members from a Soyuz spacecraft after undocking. Image from the ISS as of October 4, 2018.
(NASA)

President Richard Nixon and NASA Administrator James Fletcher presented the Space Shuttle program on January 5, 1972. Since then, the program has had a list of accomplishments, including building the International Space Station, launching of the Hubble Space Telescope and several space lab missions.

In 2022, billionaires Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson are racing to build reliable space tourism.

Gas prices

On average, the cost of gasoline in the United States in 1972 was 36 cents per gallon.

On average, the cost of gasoline in the United States in 1972 was 36 cents per gallon.
(iStock)

On average, the cost of gas in the United States in 1972 was 36 cents per gallon, according to data from the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy.

Today, retail gasoline prices nationwide are on average around $ 4.49 per gallon, according to an updated forecast of the Energy Information Administration’s short-term energy outlook.

THE DESIGN OF THE 2022 TIMES SQUARE NEW YEAR’S BALL REVEALED BY CRYSTAL MAKER

Median income

According to the Census Bureau, the median family income was $ 11,120.

According to the Census Bureau, the median family income was $ 11,120.
(iStock)

According to the Census Bureau, the median family income was $ 11,120, coming from 54.4 million American families. That number had risen to $ 67,521 by 2020 – the most recent information available to the statistical agency.

Median cost of a house

In 1972, the median selling price of a new home sold in the United States was $ 27,600.

In 1972, the median selling price of a new home sold in the United States was $ 27,600.
(iStock)

In 1972, the median sale price of a new home sold in the United States was $ 27,600, according to data released by the Census Bureau. More recent figures from 2020 indicate that the median selling price of a new home was $ 336,900.

MILLENNIALS SLAM GEN Z ON FASHION, BEAUTY, EMOJI PREFERENCES

Age of consumption

There was no standard federal age for alcohol consumption in 1972.

There was no standard federal age for alcohol consumption in 1972.
(iStock)

There was no standard federal drinking age in 1972. Several US states had a minimum drinking age of 18. The Uniform Federal Drinking Age Law of 1984 standardized the legal drinking age to 21, which is still the case to this day.

Water gate

A burglary at the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate office complex in Washington in June 1972 turned into a wide-ranging political scandal that culminated in the resignation of President Richard Nixon two years later.

A burglary at the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate office complex in Washington in June 1972 turned into a wide-ranging political scandal that culminated in the resignation of President Richard Nixon two years later.
(AFP via Getty Images)

On June 17, 1972, the Watergate scandal began when five men broke into the Democratic National Committee headquarters in Washington, DC. The scandal ultimately led to President Nixon’s resignation in 1974. Learn more about the timeline of the Watergate scandal here.

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Vietnam War

People visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on Veterans Day in Washington, DC, November 11, 2015.

People visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on Veterans Day in Washington, DC, November 11, 2015.
(REUTERS / Carlos Barria)

On August 11, 1972, the United States withdrew its last ground troops from South Vietnam. The war was officially declared over in the summer of 1975 when North and South Vietnam united under the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. The country remained a one-party communist state in Southeast Asia.

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19 cookbooks for food justice and sustainability – Food Tank

Food Tank has chosen 19 cookbooks from a range of different authors to guide us through the evolution of our food system. Filled with vibrant flavors, personal stories, and rich traditional knowledge, these books will help any cook find their way around the kitchen.

Many of these books focus on sustainable living. Some will take readers out of the house and into the forest, while others will help them get creative with the staples that were in their pantry. Whether you want to explore a zero waste lifestyle or just want recipes to make it through the week, our list has something delicious for everyone.

1. #EATMEATLESS: Good for Animals, Earth and All by Jane Goodall

A companion to Jane Goodall’s decades of activism, her book #To eat less is a new call to action. After years of campaigning for the recognition of animal rights, Goodall turned to an even more universal subject: our food. Combining environmental sustainability, animal welfare and healthy eating, Goodall’s book gives home cooks the chance to make a revolutionary impact just by making a few changes.

2. A Bite of the Big Apple: A Food Justice Cookbook by Clara Pitt and Leila Tilin

In the first half of their cookbook, food justice activists Clara Pitt and Leila Tilin shine a light on family recipes in New York City communities. The food system reflects many social issues and dynamics across the city, write Pitt and Tilin. To solve it, the authors devote the second half of their book to “recipes” for change that aim to make the system better at the service of the people.

3. A collection basket by I-Collectif

A digital cookbook assembled by the organization of indigenous chefs I-Collectif, A gathering basket highlights a rich tradition of Native American foods across the United States. Each recipe in the book comes with a lesson – about the recipe’s ingredients, its history, and the people who have been cooking it for centuries. The cookbook will be released in installments, timed at the start of the moon cycle.

4. Black Food by Bryant Terry

In his love letter to the kitchen of the black diaspora, Bryant Terry shares the voices of more than 100 black cooks around the world. Chapters in the book move from black history to black future, highlighting how community, spirituality, and food come together to form a complete feast. Recipes range from the comfortable to the experimental, and are accompanied by artwork from designers like Emory Douglas and Sarina Mantle, as well as a playlist curated by Bryant himself.

5. Cook more, waste less by Christine Tizzard

Every home cook is faced with the problem of waste, from forbidden fruits to leftover vegetables that are hard to find room for. Consumers have an important role to play in the fight against food waste and Chrstine Tizzard wants to help them. Cook more, waste less offers options to save money, help the planet, and get the most out of ingredients, even though they’re a little past their prime.

6. Cooking at home by Priya Krishna and David Chang

Cookbooks often contain techniques or ingredients that are difficult to master. Cooking at home recognizes that not everyone can buy expensive ingredients or follow difficult recipes. To remedy that, this book helps cooks find their own way, whether it’s inventing your own recipes or turning your microwave into a gourmet tool. Through this book, Priya Krishna and David Chang hope to help home cooks think like a chef.

7. Cooking for Your Kids by Joshua David Stein

Cooking for your children harnesses the knowledge of some of the world’s best chefs, whose children are often their harshest critics. Encompassing breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks and desserts, the book is full of stories. Each starter is accompanied by an explanation to show why children love the dish and what they learn by tasting new flavors.

8. Diet for a Small Planet (50th anniversary edition) by Francis Moore Lappe

In 1971, Francis Moore Lappe Diet for a small planet rocked the culinary world with its revolutionary vision of the environmental impact of meat. Decades later, the book is still as relevant as ever. This 50th anniversary edition includes a host of new plant-based recipes to warm eaters’ taste buds and reduce their carbon footprint.

9. Dreaming in Spice: A Sinfully Vegetarian Odyssey by Hari Pulapaka

Vegetables aren’t normally considered a ‘sin’, but Hari Pulapaka’s new cookbook will have readers thinking that cauliflower is guilty pleasure. The recipes are easy to modify, regardless of individual dietary preferences, and are packed with nutrients to complement the flavor. The book also includes an organized list of wines to pair with cooking.

10. Foraging in 2021: The Ultimate Guide to Foraging and Preparing Edible Wild Plants by Joseph Erickson

After a year of being indoors, there is no better way out than to dig in the forests and search for wild food. Picking in 2021 is an insightful primer on how to find food in the wild and what to do with it. As an added bonus, readers will learn if they are able to eat this brilliant red mushroom by the side of the trail.

11. Grist: A Practical Guide to Cooking Grains, Beans, Seeds and Legumes by Abra Berens

Grist offers classes on 29 different grains, beans, seeds, and legumes, combining inexpensive ingredients with quick recipes. With over 100 photos and 125 recipes, the book is the perfect companion for home cooks who want to know a little more about their ingredients, while remaining healthy and satisfied.

12. Jubilee of Toni Tipton-Martin

In her cookbook, Toni Tipton-Martin traces black cuisine through the centuries and celebrates its impact on food around the world. Like the biblical jubilee which marks “the restoration of a people by deliverance”, writes Tipton-Martin, “our culinary jubilee is also about liberation and resilience”. The recipes in her book are infused with creativity and joy, easily jumping between technical lessons and history.

13. New indigenous cuisine by Freddie Bitsoie and James O. Fraioli

Freddie Bitsoie and James Fraioli’s upcoming book celebrates the diversity of Native American cuisine. Dishes include Northeast Wampanoag Cherry Clam Chowder and Pueblo Spiced Pork Tenderloin. With recipes from coast to coast, New Indigenous Cuisine has something for everyone, combining flavor education with lessons in culinary heritage.

14. Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love by Yotam Ottolenghi

“Being good with yourself,” writes Yotam Ottolenghi, “means savoring great flavors and highlighting vegetables without too much work. ” Ottolenghi test kitchen will help home cooks clean their pantries by getting creative with their meals. It could mean adding new touches to old favorites or letting a few simple ingredients stand up for themselves.

15. Rice by Michael W. Twitty

Michael Twitty’s book traces the influence and reach of rice through culinary history and the African diaspora. Offering a diverse range of tastes and textures, the humble grain has become one of the most adaptable foods we have. Whether crispy or smooth, steamed or fried, topped with okra or on its own, the rice in Twitty’s recipes will bring cooks closer to the traditions and customs of kitchens around the world.

16. Catch a Fish by Josh Niland

Finding sustainable seafood can be difficult, and for some cooks, figuring out what to do with this fish after they’ve eaten it can be an even bigger challenge. Catch a fish will help you experience the flavor and potential of 15 different fish, using all parts of the scale to the tail. Be bolder and more creative every step of the way with unexpected flavor combinations and happy imperfections.

17. The book of forage flora: recipes and techniques for edible plants in the garden, fields and forests By Alan Bergo

The book of the chief of the forage on flora by Alan Bergo is filled with photos, stories and lessons that will bring readers closer to the plants that grow around them. The book emphasizes the importance of exploring by cooking with young plants before they ripen and using the lesser-known parts of a vegetable. Readers can benefit from the traditional knowledge shared in each chapter.

18. Perennial Cooking: Simple Recipes for a Healthy Future by Beth Dooley

Perennial cuisine doesn’t just teach cooks what to do with their ingredients. It also shows them where each ingredient comes from, how they were prepared and what they are doing for the environment. The book offers an overview of the grains, fruits, nuts and vegetables that add color to diets and protect the planet. In addition to the origins of each food, the cookbook includes nutritional information, offering information on which dishes have the most filling and healthiest punch.

19. The zero waste chef’s cookbook by Anne-Marie Bonneau

Reducing waste is hard enough. Going to zero waste seems, for many, an impossible task. Fortunately, The zero waste chef’s cookbook teaches free and easy solutions to get the most out of what they buy. With 75 recipes and end-of-cook tips on what to do with leftovers, the book shows that zero waste might not be too difficult, after all.


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Prepare for America’s right-wing dictatorship before 2030, urges Canadian scholar

A Canadian political scientist urged his country’s government to prepare for the possibility of the United States becoming a right-wing dictatorship before 2030.

In an editorial published in The Globe and Mail Thomas Homer-Dixon, executive director of the Cascade Institute at Royal Roads University in British Columbia, on Friday warned his country had to prepare for the worst-case scenario.

“By 2025, America’s democracy could crumble, causing extreme domestic political instability, including widespread civil violence,” Homer-Dixon wrote.

“By 2030, if not sooner, the country could be ruled by a right-wing dictatorship. We should not rule out these possibilities just because they seem ridiculous or too horrible to imagine.

“In 2014, the suggestion that Donald Trump would become president would have struck almost everyone as absurd as well. But today we live in a world where the absurd regularly becomes real and the ugly banality.”

The scholar added: “The [U.S.] is becoming more and more ungovernable, and some experts believe it could escalate into civil war. “

Three retired U.S. military generals last month warned of the possibility of civil war if the 2024 presidential election results are not accepted by sections of the military.

In November, more than 150 U.S. academics wrote a public letter supporting the Freedom to Vote Act, which deals with voter registration and access, and has yet to be passed. These researchers warned that “democracy advocates in America still have a slim window of opportunity to act. But time is running out and midnight is approaching. “

In the editorial, Homer-Dixon detailed the reasons for what he called the “ongoing crisis” in the United States, writing that there had been multiple “warning signs” and the reasons for a changing political landscape.

Among them, he cited “stagnant middle-class incomes, chronic economic insecurity and growing inequality,” and a broadcaster such as the late Rush Limbaugh who he said had “hammered” the “moral authority of political institutions. American “.

He also pointed to “right-wing ideologues” stoking fears of a white “replacement”, the refusal of the rich and powerful “to pay taxes, invest in public services or create opportunities for vertical mobility” .

The editorial made reference to former President Trump, his administration and “Trumpism” 28 times.

At one point, Homer-Dixon wrote that “if Mr. Trump is re-elected, even under the most optimistic scenarios, the economic and political risks to our country will be innumerable. “

News week has contacted Trump’s rep for comment.

Discussing the “big lie” – Trump’s false claim that the 2020 presidential election was stolen – Homer-Dixon said that if Trump were re-elected in 2024, the GOP leader would have “only two goals: justification and revenge “.

“A terrible storm is coming from the south and Canada is absolutely unprepared,” wrote the political scientist.

“Over the past year, we have turned our attention inward, distracted by the challenges of COVID-19, reconciliation and the accelerated effects of climate change. democracy in the United States.

“We must begin by fully recognizing the extent of the danger.”

Homer-Dixon advised the Canadian government to create a permanent, non-partisan parliamentary committee to “receive information on the state of democracy in the United States and make recommendations.”

The American flag flies in front of the dome of the United States Capitol on September 10, 2021 in Washington, DC. A Canadian political scientist has warned that his country should prepare for the possibility of an American dictatorship by 2030.
Drew Angerer / Getty Images


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Rally in Baghdad on the anniversary of the death of the Iranian general

Hundreds of people chanting anti-American slogans gathered in the Iraqi capital to mark the anniversary of the murder of a powerful Iranian general and a senior Iraqi militia official in a US drone strike

The crowd called for the expulsion of the remaining US forces from Iraq during the demonstration commemorating the airstrike at the Baghdad airport. The strike killed General Qassim Soleimani, who was the leader of the elite Iranian Quds force, and Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, deputy commander of the Iranian-backed militias in Iraq, known as the Popular Mobilization Forces. .

“We will not let you stay after today in the land of the martyrs,” read some of the signs. American and Israeli flags littered the ground, people trampling on them.

The murder of Soleimani and al-Muhandis at Baghdad airport pushed Iran and the United States dangerously close to all-out conflict and sparked outrage in Iraq, leading parliament to pass a resolution no binding a few days later calling for the expulsion of all foreign troops from Iraq.

The US-led coalition officially ended its combat mission supporting Iraqi forces in the ongoing struggle against ISIS in late December. Some 2,500 troops will, however, remain for the foreseeable future to continue to support Iraqi forces in an advisory capacity. Some militia leaders insisted on the departure of all American troops.

“We will not accept anything less than a total withdrawal as revenge for the blood of our martyrs,” said Hadi al-Ameri, leader of an Iran-aligned coalition.

Supporters of Iran-aligned Shia factions were transported by bus from various Iraqi provinces to the rally in Jadriyah, near the headquarters of powerful militias.


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Measuring Growth – Chabad Lubavitcher World Headquarters

Dave litman likes to keep a low profile. An innovative giant of the tech boom of the 1990s and a pioneer with his business partner Bob Diener in the online travel and hospitality industry, Dave started a low cost airline business in 1984 that grew into a consolidation operation. wholesale multi-million dollar airline tickets. In 1991, he and Bob founded what has become hotels.com, to finally sell their stake in the company in 2004.

Today CEO of Travel finance network, the Texas resident spends some of his time working with Chabad representatives on the strategic development of data-driven decision making. In cooperation with Chabad on Campus International, it has launched an initiative that will allow it to accurately measure the ROI (Return on Investment) of its programs.

LI: How do you see yourself, a remarkably successful entrepreneur, compared to Chabad and the shluchim who are in the business of counting souls?

DL: I am an investor in the Chabad business. Of course, I want a return on my investment. But unless someone can tell me what the back and forth is, I don’t know. So I started to mix the lessons I learned in business with the lessons of Chabad. It was the start of the measure.

What first brought you to Chabad?

DL: I connected with Rabbi Zvi Drizin in 2004, just as he moved to Dallas. Zvi focused on young Jewish professionals, and I quickly realized that Chabad attracted more young adults than any other organization in town. I have seen the advantages of the Chabad model.

It’s different from synagogues and temples membership models where you pay membership fees – like a subscription model – and go to services. In the Chabad model, you have these very enterprising people going out and establishing Jewish communities. These people dedicate their entire lives to making the world a better place for the Jewish people. This is their main concern and it is extremely effective. It is a model that relies mainly on donors.

But as a donor-based model, it’s more vulnerable than a subscription model, isn’t it?

DL: Yes, so you need donor buy-in. There’s no better way to gain buy-in than to measure performance. If you can produce a report that shows your performance this year compared to last year, you can dramatically increase your donations and production. So it’s a victory for the shlou’him, for donors and for the Jewish people.

I believe that measured performance is improved performance. And to measure performance, you need to identify your target outcomes (i.e. what you’re doing) and you need metrics. You can’t hit a target that you can’t see.

Dave litman

Does the investment that Chabad will make, for example, in sending shluchim to an isolated town with very few Jews, make business sense to you?

DL: I’m looking at addressable markets. So for example, if you are in the middle of Manhattan and your target market is 50,000 people, I want to know, how many do you see? If you’re in Montana, where there are say 2,000 Jews in the state, and you hire 1,500, you’re probably doing better than Manhattan, which gets 5,000 out of 50,000.

Measuring, collecting, monitoring and analyzing data are things that the shluchim, who usually carry the weight of their communities on their shoulders, have not been able to afford to focus.

DL: Yes, so we have created a portal that makes it accessible and easy for them. We started with a handful of Chabad reps, and as he grew we brought him to Chabad on Campus International. We have now launched a pilot program with around 30 Chabad centers. My business partner Bob Diener is funding the development of proprietary software that will allow us to deploy it more widely in all Chabad centers. I think we will have a strong turnout.

In the future, what does Jewish life in America look like to you?

DL: Things are changing and becoming more dynamic in different places. Texas is now the largest migrating state, and over the next thirty years it will likely overtake California in terms of population and economy. Chabad is sensitive to these demographic changes in the United States. Jews leave Illinois, New York and California for Texas, Tennessee and Florida. And Chabad is in a good position to take advantage of it.

Chabad is the bright spot for the future of Jewish life in America. He is vibrant, young and energetic, and he is essential to the future of Judaism in America. I want to see it continue to grow and measure that growth every step of the way!


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Save the Children workers go missing after the massacre of 30 villagers by Burmese troops | Burma

Two members of the international humanitarian group Save the Children are missing after Burmese government troops round up villagers, some believed to be women and children, shot dead more than 30 and burned bodies, witness and others say reports.

Alleged photos of the aftermath of the Christmas Eve massacre in Moso, a village in the east of the country, just outside of Hpruso township in Kayah state where refugees were sheltering from an offensive by the army, spread on the country’s social networks, fueling outrage against the army which seized power in February.

The accounts could not be independently verified. The photos showed the charred bodies of more than 30 people in three burned-out vehicles.

A villager who said he visited the scene told The Associated Press that the victims fled fighting between armed resistance groups and the Burmese army near the village of Koi Ngan, which is just outside Moso, Friday. He said they were killed after being stopped by soldiers on their way to refugee camps in the western part of the commune.

Save the Children said two of its employees who were returning home for the holidays after carrying out humanitarian response work in a nearby community were “overtaken by the incident and are still missing”.

“We have confirmation that their private vehicle was attacked and set on fire,” the group added in a statement. “The army reportedly forced people out of their cars, arrested some, killed others and burned their bodies. “

The government has not commented on the allegations, but an article in the state daily Myanma Alinn on Saturday said fighting near Moso erupted on Friday when members of the ethnic guerrilla forces, known as the National Party. progressive Karenni, and those opposed to the military drove “suspicious” vehicles and attacked the security forces after refusing to stop.

The newspaper said the seven vehicles they were traveling in were destroyed in a fire. He gave no further details about the murders.

The witness who spoke to the PA said the remains were burnt to the point of being unrecognizable and children’s and women’s clothing was found along with medical supplies and food.

“The bodies were tied with ropes before being set on fire,” said the witness, who requested anonymity because he feared for his safety.

He did not see the moment they were killed, but said he believed some of them were Moso villagers who were allegedly arrested by troops on Friday. He denied that those captured were members of locally organized militias.

Myanmar’s independent media reported on Friday that 10 Moso villagers, including children, were arrested by the military. Four members of a local paramilitary group who went to negotiate their release were reportedly tied up and shot in the head by the military.

The witness said villagers and anti-government militia groups left as military troops arrived near Moso as bodies were being prepared for cremation. The fighting was still intense near the village.

“This is a heinous crime and the worst incident of Christmas. We strongly condemn this massacre as a crime against humanity, ”said Banyar Khun Aung, director of the Karen Human Rights Group.

Earlier this month, government troops were also accused of rounding up villagers, some believed to be children, of tying them up and slaughtering them. Opposition leader Dr Sasa, who uses only one name, said civilians were burned to death.

Video of the aftermath of the December 7 assault – apparently in retaliation for an attack on a military convoy – showed the charred bodies of 11 people lying in a circle in the middle of what appeared to be the remains of a hut.

Fighting resumed on Saturday in a neighboring state bordering Thailand, where thousands of people have fled to seek refuge. Local officials said the Burmese military had launched airstrikes and heavy artillery on Lay Kay Kaw, a small town controlled by ethnic Karen guerrillas, since Friday.

The military’s action prompted several Western governments, including the United States Embassy, ​​to issue a joint statement condemning “the serious human rights violations committed by the military regime across the country.”

“We call on the regime to immediately cease indiscriminate attacks in Karen State and throughout the country, and to ensure the safety of all civilians in accordance with international law,” the joint statement said.


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Vancouver’s Salvation Army sees donations drop 40%

The Salvation Army Vancouver’s Red Kettle Campaign – the annual holiday fundraiser where volunteers collect cash donations outside grocery stores and other businesses – records 40 percent fewer donations compared to to last year.

“Although we have already made a commitment to help hundreds of families with food and Christmas gifts, this drop in income will have a serious impact on our ability to help families throughout the year,” said Steve Rusk, Salvation Army Vancouver business manager.

Last year, the organization raised approximately $ 308,000 by the end of the campaign, which ends today.

This year, the organizers aimed to raise $ 300,000, which represents 15% of the organization’s annual budget. On Thursday, Rusk said achieving that goal would be a challenge.

“It really puts us in a difficult position,” he said. “From what I’ve seen, donations are also below average for our virtual campaign. “

The Salvation Army Vancouver has sought to raise $ 10,000 as part of its Virtual Red Kettles campaign. By Christmas Eve, the campaign had raised $ 1,886.

Solicitation by mail makes up the remainder of the organization’s annual budget, and those funds are so far down 50% from last year, according to Rusk.

However, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day are generally great fundraising days for the Red Kettle campaign. On Thursday, Rusk said donations for that day matched last year’s levels. In addition, the organization generally sees an increase in donations during year-end donations.

“We have some ground to catch up,” said Rusk. “It’s unlikely to catch up with the days before when the Red Kettle campaign ends, but the year-end donations could definitely help. “

Multiple factors could explain the decrease in donations to the organization, such as the COVID-19 pandemic limiting in-person purchases.

A Wall Street Journal Editorial published on December 16 criticized the Salvation Army nationwide for being ruled by “awakened ideals”, pointing to a guide to discussing racism published by The Salvation Army’s international headquarters in London and withdrawn later.

The organization’s national commander, Kenneth G. Hodder, refuted this claim in an open letter Wednesday, writing: “The Salvation Army has never been in politics. Hodder wrote that the editorial negatively impacted Salvation Army donations across the United States.

Rusk declined to comment on the controversy, saying he was not authorized to represent the organization nationally.

“We can only speculate on the reason for this reduction,” he said. “There is no really solid way to measure the motivation of donors to give or not. “

In Vancouver, if the Red Kettle campaign does not meet its goal of raising $ 300,000, Rusk said donations at any time of the year will go to the organization’s annual budget.

“Please consider a gift today to help us make up for this loss,” he said.

Those interested in donating to The Salvation Army Vancouver can do so on their website and on its virtual Red Kettle Campaign Website.


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Unfazed by pandemic and supply chain issues, Santa prepares for his annual flight

DENVER, Dec.24 (Reuters) – Undeterred by pandemics, supply chain problems and labor shortages plaguing overland commerce, Santa Claus was due to launch his reindeer sleigh on Friday for giving Christmas gifts to good girls and boys around the world, according to military officials who track his flights.

“Santa has been doing this for centuries, he’s a professional,” said Canadian Army Captain Alexandra Hejduk, spokesperson for the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD).

NORAD, a joint US-Canadian military command based at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is responsible for monitoring air defenses and issuing aerospace and maritime warnings across North America.

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NORAD’s Santa Claus tracking practice originated in 1955, when a Colorado Springs newspaper misprinted the phone number of a local department store so young people could call and talk to Santa, mistakenly listing the number of what was then called the Continental Air Defense Command. A duty officer took the calls and assured the children that Santa Claus, also known as Kris Kringle or Saint Nicholas, was aware of their wish lists and was on his way.

The annual tradition has continued for 66 years and is now part of NORAD’s mission.

Followers of the Merry Old Elf can get real-time updates on his whereabouts by logging into noradsanta.org or through various social media platforms, or they can call a NORAD-sponsored Santa Hotline to talk with a live operator.

Other US government agencies were also preparing for Santa’s visit.

The US secret service, which is responsible for protecting the president, also ensures the safety of Santa Claus, the agency said in a statement posted on Twitter, accompanied by a video showing its agents preparing for the duties of protecting Santa Claus. .

“The Big Red Protective Detail is selected, assembled and ready to fulfill its seasonal mission,” the statement said. “The American public can be assured that MS Claus here from the North Pole will travel safely throughout his tour of the United States.”

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Reporting by Keith Coffman in Denver; Editing by Steve Gorman and Leslie Adler

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Brazilian companies hear the siren call of US stock exchanges

SAO PAULO, Dec.22 (Reuters) – Pharmaceutical company Blau Farmaceutica SA, which listed its shares on the Brazilian B3 stock exchange (B3SA3.SA) in April, opened its first U.S. plasma bank and may consider relocating its headquarters social and its stock market listing in the United States.

The company (BLAU3.SA), which is currently headquartered in the state of Sao Paulo in Brazil and, until now, was mainly focused on activities in Latin America, intends to open 10 plasma backs to the United States in addition to its new location in Florida. . Once the expansion is complete, Blau may consider moving its headquarters to the United States.

In an interview with Reuters, Blau CFO Douglas Rodrigues said international investors, unlike those in Brazil, are used to the business models of pharmaceutical companies, including those engaged in plasma-based medicine.

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Blau is one of several Brazilian companies considering relocating to the United States and listing on a U.S. stock exchange, a trend fueled by the desire for greater access to investors, lower taxes. on corporations, more flexible regulation for controlling shareholders and better dynamics in capital markets.

This change shows how the success of U.S.-listed tech startups – including digital lender Nubank (NU.N) – has spurred Brazilian companies’ interest in other industries, ranging from retail to cosmetics, for moving from their legal domicile, primarily to the United States. but also to other places like Great Britain, Ireland and the Netherlands.

Banco Inter SA (BIDI3.SA), backed by SoftBank, web service provider Locaweb (LWSA3.SA), retailer Lojas Americanas (LAME3.SA) and cosmetics manufacturer Natura & Co (NTCO3.SA) are among the companies that have announced such measures. .

Brazilian company JBS SA (JBSS3.SA), the world’s largest meat processor, also announced that it will continue with a U.S. listing of its international operations next year.

On Tuesday, the Brazilian aircraft manufacturer Embraer SA (EMBR3.SA) unveiled an agreement with the ad hoc company Zanite to list its subsidiary of electric flying taxis on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Embraer’s shares have skyrocketed on the news. Read more

The exit of Brazilian companies represents a growing risk for B3, which begins to look for ways to contain it, as well as for local fund managers who may find their investment universe small.

Lawyers, bankers and executives, however, expect the trend to continue for the time being, although they stress that it will be largely limited to companies with significant operations abroad. They don’t expect a corporate scramble for exits.

“Some Brazilian companies want access to a larger and more diverse investor base,” said Alessandro Zema, Morgan Stanley’s operations manager in Brazil.

They also want to take advantage of the generally higher valuations abroad.

Shares of Natura & Co, which has announced plans to trade its main B3 listing on the NYSE, are trading at a price / earnings multiple of around 29, compared to 41.5 for rival L’Oréal SA (OREP .PA).

Banco Inter, which was first listed on B3 in 2018, is trading at just over 12 times its book value, about half that of rival Nubank, which debuted on the NYSE this month- this. Read more

Companies listed outside of Brazil look for markets with more comparable companies as well as higher valuations, said Jean Marcel Arakawa, corporate lawyer at Mattos Filho in Sao Paulo, citing asset managers Patria Investment Ltd (PAX .O) and Vinci Partners Investments Ltd. (VINP.O) as examples.

Tech companies often decide to re-register as venture capitalists tend to prefer to supplement funding rounds using overseas holding companies. Another reason is to encourage founders or controlling shareholders to stay at the helm by allowing them to hold shares with special and higher voting rights.

For example, 3G Capital’s founding partners, including tycoon Jorge Paulo Lemann, will remain powerful players at Americanas SA (AMER3.SA) after the retailer’s merger with Lojas Americanas and listing in the United States. Banco Inter’s controlling shareholders, the Menin family, will occupy a position similar to digital banking.

NEW RULES

Until recently, Brazilian companies could not locally list receipts for their shares listed abroad through Brazilian Certificates of Deposit (BDR). Some have decided to ditch the local exchange, causing B3 to lose the initial public offerings and trading fees to the NYSE and Nasdaq exchanges.

Brazil’s securities industry watchdog CVM has changed this listing rule, prompting companies like Nubank and investment broker XP Inc to list their BDRs on B3. These BDRs recorded huge volumes of transactions when they started out.

“We try to meet the demands of businesses as they change,” said Flavia Mouta Fernandes, director of regulation at B3.

Brazil has also attempted to relax regulations governing the ownership of controlling shareholders of majority voting shares, although Fabiano Milane, corporate lawyer at Stocche Forbes in Sao Paulo, said local regulations are still not not equivalent to those of other countries.

“Companies already listed cannot use super-voting, and extraordinary voting rights are temporary,” said Milane.

Frustration over the perceived lack of predictability in the Brazilian legal system is another reason large companies choose to redomiciate, says Luis Semeghini Souza, lawyer and founding partner of Souza, Mello e Torres in Sao Paulo.

Some bankers, however, are skeptical that the current business migration will become a long-term trend.

“I think the universe of companies that could move represents maybe 5% of the companies in B3, mainly those that have or intend to have significant activities abroad”, said Roderick Greenlees, manager global investment bank at Itau BBA.

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Reporting by Tatiana Bautzer and Carolina Mandl Editing by Paul Simao

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NHL postpones two Vancouver Canucks games as league emphasizes cross-border travel

The Vancouver Canucks won’t play until Christmas.

The NHL announced on Sunday afternoon that a dozen games would be postponed during the holidays due to concerns about cross-border travel.

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“Due to concerns over cross-border travel and given the fluid nature of federal travel restrictions, as of Monday, all games involving a Canada-based team versus a United States-based team from Monday, December 20 to start of the Dec. 23 vacation will be postponed and rescheduled, ”the league said in a statement.

For the Canucks, two games will be affected: Tuesday in San Jose against the Sharks, and Thursday when the Anaheim Ducks were due to visit.

The following other games are affected:

Monday, December 20

  • Montreal Canadiens vs. New York Islanders
  • Anaheim Ducks vs. Edmonton Oilers

Tuesday, December 21

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  • St. Louis Blues at the Ottawa Senators

Wednesday 22 December

  • Montreal Canadiens vs. New York Rangers
  • Winnipeg Jets vs. Dallas Stars
  • Edmonton Oilers vs. Los Angeles Kings

Thursday, December 21

  • Saint-Louis Blues vs. Toronto Maple Leafs
  • Carolina Hurricanes to the Ottawa Senators
  • Montreal Canadiens vs. New Jersey Devils
  • Edmonton Oilers vs. San Jose Sharks

The league has said it expects the regular season to resume normally.


Zach Laing is the Nation Network’s chief news officer and senior columnist. He can be followed on Twitter at @zjlaing, or contactable by email at [email protected]




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Where is West Virginia on COVID-19 vaccinations?

CHARLESTON, WV (WOWK) – Today, Tuesday, December 14, it’s been a year since COVID-19 vaccines became available in Mountain State.

Since then, 63.8% of eligible West Virginia ages 5 and older have now received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, 53.4% ​​are fully vaccinated and 30.5% have received a reminder. The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources reports that a total of 2,265,389 doses of the vaccine have been administered to residents of West Virginia.

According to DHHR, Kanawha County administered the most doses with 123,370 doses of the vaccine. Statewide, 41,152 doses of a first dose, second dose or booster were given in the past seven days.

To mark the anniversary of the vaccine’s availability, health experts statewide shared an open letter urging more West Virginia to get vaccinated against COVID-19 and receive their boosters for additional protection against variants such as Delta and Omicron.

“With the strictest safety oversight of any vaccine in US history and a year of evidence and experience, we remain confident in the safety and effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccination,” American Academy of Pediatrics West Virginia Chapter President Lisa M. Costello, MD, MPH said.

Health officials wrote the letter because of what they called a “troubling challenge” – the state’s overall low vaccination rate combined with COVID-19 variants are causing hospitalizations to rise and deaths as well as overwhelming health systems.

“Immunization is our most powerful tool to protect ourselves, ourselves, our communities and our health systems,” Costello said. “With this letter, we hope to remind West Virginia that the pandemic continues to have serious implications for all of our lives, and that the best way to reduce the consequences of COVID-19 is for everyone to choose vaccination,” Costello continued.

More than 30 West Virginia health and public health leaders and organizations signed the letter, which said, “It is devastating to see people suffering from what is now a vaccine-preventable disease. Yet, just as we were a year ago, we remain hopeful. We now know more than ever that the COVID-19 vaccine is our key to protecting ourselves and ending this pandemic, only if we all choose it. West Virginia, protect yourself and others from COVID-19. Please get vaccinated and boosted.

Below is a full copy of the letter:

A year ago, we wrote to you when the first COVID-19 vaccine was on its way to our Mountain State. Authorizing a safe and effective vaccine has been an important career milestone, bringing hope and relief during this life-changing pandemic.
A year later, we have seen hundreds of thousands of West Virgins choose the COVID-19 vaccination, alongside millions in the United States and billions around the world. For more than a year, COVID19 vaccines have undergone the most rigorous safety screening of any vaccine in US history. Scientific and medical evidence continues to support that vaccination is safe and highly effective in reducing the risk of hospitalization and death from COVID-19.
We trust COVID-19 vaccines because we have followed the science, and we see the role vaccination plays in protecting us, our loved ones and our patients every day. Without a doubt, countless lives have been saved thanks to the COVID-19 vaccination. This is why we have chosen to be vaccinated and why we recommend it to our patients.
We have made progress towards improving public health in the face of an ever-evolving pandemic. However, we still have a pressing concern: West Virginia’s COVID-19 vaccination rates are among the lowest in the country, increasing our hospitalization rates from COVID-19.
When vaccination rates in a community are low, the virus that causes COVID-19 can more easily spread and turn into new strains. These are the “variants” you might hear about, like Delta or Omicron. New variants could be more contagious, cause more serious illness, or even develop in a way that allows it to overcome the vaccines that work so hard for us now. The spread of variants has contributed to the recent increase in hospitalizations and deaths in West Virginia.
We know that the overwhelming majority of people who are now hospitalized or who die from COVID-19 are not vaccinated. While no vaccine is 100% effective in preventing disease or disease complications, COVID-19 vaccines are our most powerful tool in protecting against serious illness and death.
If you have not yet chosen vaccination, please get vaccinated. West Virginia people aged 5 and over can now be protected from COVID-19. And if you were vaccinated more than 6 months ago with Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, or more than 2 months ago with a Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, please recall. Boosters are an important step in maintaining maximum protection against the virus and its variants.
The vaccines are readily available at several locations in all 55 counties. You can learn more and find a location near you at vaccinate.wv.gov.
A year ago, we wrote to you about how we mourned with the families we have cared for and served, watching them battle serious illness and death from complications from COVID-19. Many of those who survived continue to show symptoms weeks and months later – what you may have heard called “long COVID.” The images and memories of these West Virgins – some of whom are our neighbors, colleagues, patients or loved ones – remain and will remain with us for the rest of our lives.
It is devastating to see people suffering from what is now a vaccine preventable disease. Yet, just as we were a year ago, we remain hopeful. We now know more than ever that the COVID-19 vaccine is our key to protecting ourselves and ending this pandemic, only if we all choose it. West Virginia, protect yourself and others from COVID-19. Thank you for getting vaccinated and boosted.

Letter from wv healthcare leaders

The following health officials, listed alphabetically, signed the letter: Sven T. Berg, MD, MPH – CEO, Quality Insights; Kenneth Canipe, PharmD, BCPS, BCCCP – President, West Virginia Society of Health System Pharmacists; Lisa M. Costello, MD, MPH, FAAP – President, West Virginia Chapter American Academy of Pediatrics; D. Scott Davis PT, MS, EdD – President, West Virginia Physical Therapy Association; VJ Davis, RS, MS – President, West Virginia Association of Local Health Departments; Laura Davisson, MD, MPH, FACP – Governor, West Virginia Section of the American College of Physicians; Shawn Eddy – President, West Virginia Health Care Association; Sherri P. Ferrell – CEO, WV Primary Care Association; Suzanne Gharib, MD – President, West Virginia Rheumatology Society; Melissa Jensen, MSPA, PA-C and Megan Ross, MPH, CHES – Co-Chairs, WV Immunization Network; Jim Kaufman – President and CEO, West Virginia Hospital Association;
Howard Lafferty, DO – President, West Virginia Academy of Family Physicians; Sharon L. Lansdale, RPh, MS -President / CEO, Center for Rural Health Development, Inc .; PS Martin, MD, FACEP, FAEMS – President, West Virginia Chapter of the National Association of EMS Physicians; Eleisha J. Nickoles, DDS – President, West Virginia Dental Association; L. Michael Peterson, DO, FACEP – President, West Virginia College of Emergency Physicians; Kara Piechowski, PharmD, BCPS, BC-ADM, CTTS – Director, Tobacco-Free Me WV; Michael Robie, DO – President, West Virginia Osteopathic Medical Association; Susan Russell, MSN, NE-BC, RN-BC – President, West Virginia Organization for Nursing Leadership; Gregory Schaefer, DO, FACS – President, WV Chapter of the American College of Surgeons; Angela D. Settle, DNP, APRN, BC, FNP – CEO, West Virginia Health Right, Inc .; Shafic A. Sraj, MD – President, West Virginia State Medical Association; Lauren WM Swager MD – Division Director, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and WVU Medicine, Department of Behavioral Medicine and Psychiatry; Matt Walker – Director, West Virginia Independent Pharmacy Association; West Virginia Affiliate of the American College of Nurse-Midwives; West Virginia School Nurses Association; West Virginia Orthopedic Society; West Virginia Pharmacists Association; West Virginia Section of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; West Virginia Society of Anesthesiologists; and Joyce Wilson, MSN, APRN, FNP-C – President, West Virginia Nurses Association.

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Biden calls on tribes to influence high-stakes pipeline talks

The Biden administration has invited Great Lakes tribes to participate in unprecedented talks with Canada over the fate of a contentious pipeline that is creating what sources say is a rift between the two countries.

The Enbridge Inc. Line 5 litigation is at issue in a dispute resolution process established by the “1977 Transit Pipeline Treaty” that Canada first invoked in this case.

The treaty, Canada argues, secures the uninterrupted flow of petroleum products between the United States and Canada, while Michigan Democratic Governor Gretchen Whitmer pushes to close Line 5 in state court (Energy wire, 1st December).

Because the negotiations are unprecedented, experts say there is no way to tell when the talks will begin, how long they will last, or if the results will be public.

“That thing was never really used – period,” said Andy Buchsbaum, a lawyer with the National Wildlife Federation and lecturer at the University of Michigan Law School. “And certainly, the negotiations between these two countries never took place within the framework of this treaty.”

The 68-year-old Line 5 pipeline, which transports light crude oil and natural gas liquids from Superior, Wisconsin, to Sarnia, Ontario, has become a lightning rod among tribal communities and activists concerned about the effects that ‘a spill could have on the Great Lakes.

In addition to treaty negotiations, the pipeline is also at the center of a fight in Michigan state court and an environmental review by the Army Corps of Engineers.

While the State Department has repeatedly said it is weighing political options and plans to enter into treaty talks with Canada soon, the Department has provided few details.

But Aaron Payment, president of Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, confirmed that the State Department invited her tribe to participate in treaty negotiations with Canada.

Payment joined the 12 federally recognized tribes of Michigan last month in to call President Biden in supporting Whitmer’s efforts to decommission the pipeline, citing tribal fishing and hunting rights in the pipeline area that date back to an 1836 treaty.

The White House and State Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The Biden administration’s invitation to the Great Lakes tribes to intervene is notable given the limited information available on how the treaty talks would unfold. But the White House has spoken openly about giving tribes a big say in treaties and spurring consultation on energy issues.

“The Biden administration has been very silent on this issue and will soon have to take a stand,” said Kristen van de Biezenbos, professor of law at the University of Calgary.

“Yes [the White House] accepts that this treaty applies, and that appears to be the case since they agree to the arbitration process, “she said,” so do they think the provisions of the treaty would prevent Michigan from doing what he is trying to do this by forcing the removal of the Straits of Mackinac section of line 5? “

“You do not have public access”

Canada kicked off the arbitration process by invoking the pipeline treaty in early October and said formal negotiations would begin soon.

“Canada’s goal remains to work with the United States in these formal negotiations to seek a solution where Line 5 remains open and operates safely,” said the Canadian Embassy spokesperson, Diana Tan. “As this process is ongoing, we are unable to provide further details at this time. “

Now, time is running out to establish a three-person panel to decide the fate of a pipeline of disproportionate social and political importance.

Under the terms of the treaty, the United States and Canada each have 60 days to choose an arbitrator to represent them in the discussions and an additional two months to choose a third arbitrator who will serve as a neutral party.

If the two countries do not choose a third arbitrator within that time frame, either country can ask the president of the International Court of Justice to nominate a person or choose someone to make the decision, depending on the treaty. The third arbitrator, who cannot be a national of one or the other country, will then determine the place of the talks.

A decision in the dispute would be taken by majority and would be binding on both countries.

Van de Biezenbos said arbitrators usually have a legal background and some are former judges or lawmakers. Countries and large multinational companies, she added, generally opt for arbitration over court proceedings because, in addition to being confidential, the decisions do not set a legal precedent.

“Many parties (…) choose arbitration deliberately, so that if they have a dispute, the procedure and the decisions are all confidential,” van de Biezenbos said.

“It’s entirely possible that we won’t see the US submissions to the arbitrator. I mean, I’m not 100% sure, because we’ve never seen arbitration under this treaty before and there’s no specific procedure, ”she continued. “But normally you don’t have public access to arbitration submissions unless the parties agree to disclose them.”

It is unclear what role the Great Lakes tribes will play, but members called on the Biden administration to stop the pipeline and an underwater tunnel replacement project.

In a request to Biden earlier this year, the Michigan tribes that make up the Three Fires Confederacy of Ojibwa, Odawa and Potawatomi asked the president to intervene and shut the pipeline, arguing that there is a reasonable risk of spill taking into account the history of the anchor. pipeline strikes.

Tribes also pointed to Enbridge’s track record, noting that the company was at the center of a spill that polluted the Kalamazoo River watershed more than a decade ago, a disaster that is still being remedied. .

In addition to asking Biden to revoke a 1991 presidential cross-border permit for Line 5, the Great Lakes tribes claim that Enbridge for years violated the security conditions of the 1953 easement and “repeatedly concealed these violations to the state, while putting the The Great Lakes are seriously threatened.

The White House did not respond to questions about inviting tribes to treaty talks or whether it asked other parties to participate.

Cross-border conflict

Line 5 battle fuels tensions between Canada and the United States over energy issues that began with Biden’s decision to shut down the Keystone XL pipeline to credits for electric vehicles in his debated “Build Back Better” proposal at Capitol Hill.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said last month he had asked Biden directly about concerns arising from Line 5 at a trilateral summit as well as other issues complicating the countries’ trade relations. He gave no details of what they discussed.

In one letter First reported by POLITICO, Canadian officials told Senate leaders on Friday that the provisions of the “Build Back Better” bill “discriminate against Canada, Canadian workers and our auto industry”. They have officially threatened tariff retaliation against the auto industry and other parts of the U.S. economy if the provisions remain intact.

When asked about the treaty negotiations, an Enbridge spokesperson said any attempt to close Line 5 would have “serious ramifications” under the pipeline treaty and raise “substantive questions” about federal law relating to the pipeline. interstate commerce and federal jurisdiction over pipeline safety matters.

The company said Whitmer’s decision to shut down the pipeline and remove an easement for the project was a “clear violation” of the 1977 treaty.

“We greatly appreciate the Government of Canada’s efforts and its commitments to keep Line 5 open. We also greatly appreciate their desire to move forward with the timely construction of the Great Lakes Tunnel Project, ”the company spokesperson said.

Maryscott Greenwood, CEO of the Canadian American Business Council, said the pipeline and continuous flow of oil and other products – jet fuel, propane and refined fuels in the Midwest – are essential for Americans and Canadians.

“The issue of an international, multi-jurisdictional infrastructure that can be actioned by a single office holder is a daunting one, so it has a broader life,” said Greenwood. “We are completely interconnected. … It is important that we act as the integrated unit that we are and that we do not turn against each other.


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JPMorgan on hiring wave as it targets pan-European consumer bank

A sign outside the offices of JP Morgan Chase & Co. is visible in New York, United States on March 29, 2021. REUTERS / Brendan McDermid

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LONDON, Dec. 14 (Reuters) – Chase, JPMorgan’s UK retail bank (JPM.N), plans to hire hundreds more next year to boost its workforce above 1,000 in order to help roll out investment, savings and consumer credit products, the company’s boss told Reuters.

The fledgling bank – the first overseas consumer bank for US giant JPMorgan – has already processed hundreds of millions of pounds of purchases across more than a million transactions, fueled by spending insanity as it approaches. Christmas, the bank said.

The business is a test for the lender as CEO Jamie Dimon plans to expand his massive U.S. retail banking franchise globally through a digital platform.

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Sanoke Viswanathan, head of international consumer activities at JPMorgan, said the company has hired 200 people since launching in September to increase its workforce to 800, and plans to hire hundreds more next year as ‘it was expanding its range of products.

JPMorgan plans to replicate the Chase model in other continental European markets over the next several years, he said.

“We had a plan and we are definitely ahead,” Viswanathan said. “We want to be present in all major European markets over time, everything is fine. The idea is to be pan-European.”

In Great Britain, the bank plans to expand in investment and savings services by integrating its acquired digital wealth manager Nutmeg, before embarking on consumer loans.

Creating new services will help him turn a profit over time, but Chase is expected to experience losses for several years in the meantime, Viswanathan said.

The new hires will span the entire company, including its headquarters in London and customer support centers in Edinburgh and Manila in the Philippines.

Viswanathan declined to release Chase’s customer numbers, but said registrations exceeded internal expectations and reaffirmed plans for expansion.

JPMorgan was ready to launch a UK retail bank if needed rather than slowing its growth, Viswanathan added. Banks are currently required to manage any retail bank with £ 25 billion or more in deposits on a stand-alone basis, although this rule is under review.

“We will deal with the consequences if we have to,” Viswanathan said. “The UK bank was not created to help fund investment banking. This is a real foray into long-term retail banking.”

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Reporting by Iain Withers; edited by Rachel Armstrong and Jason Neely

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As violence increases in Haiti, aid groups struggle to help

title=

FILE – People line up for food aid in Camp Perrin, Haiti on August 20, 2021, six days after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake struck the region. The United Nations agency estimates it needs $ 97 million to help 1 million people in Haiti next year. (AP Photo / Fernando Llano, file)

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A spike in violence has worsened hunger and poverty in Haiti while hampering aid organizations fighting these problems in a country whose government struggles to provide basic services.

Few aid workers are willing to speak publicly about the cuts – perhaps worried about drawing attention after the October kidnapping of 17 people from Ohio-based Christian Aid Ministries – 12 of whom remain hostages.

But several confirmed, without giving details, having sent personnel out of the country and having been forced to temporarily reduce aid operations.

Gang-related kidnappings and shootings have prevented aid groups from reaching parts of the capital, Port-au-Prince, and beyond where they had previously distributed food, water and equipment. ‘other commodities.

A severe fuel shortage also prevented agencies from operating at full capacity.

“It’s only getting worse in every way it can,” said Margarett Lubin, Haiti director for CORE, a US nonprofit organization.

“You see the situation deteriorating day by day, affecting life at all levels,” Lubin said, adding that aid organizations have gone into “survival mode”.

Few places in the world depend as much on aid groups as Haiti, a nation often referred to as “the republic of NGOs.” Billions of dollars in aid have flowed to hundreds – by some estimates several thousand – of aid groups even as government has become weaker and less efficient.

Shortly after the assassination of the president on July 7, Prime Minister Ariel Henry took charge of a country still struggling to regain political stability. Almost all seats in parliament are vacant and there is no specific date yet for a long-delayed election, although Henry has said he expects them early next year.

Less than ten elected representatives currently represent a country of more than 11 million inhabitants.

And in the streets, the gangs hold the power.

More than 460 kidnappings have been reported by the Haitian National Police so far this year, more than double what was reported last year, according to the United Nations Integrated Office in Haiti.

The agency said Haitians “live in hell under the yoke of armed gangs. Rapes, murders, thefts, armed robberies and kidnappings continue to be committed on a daily basis, on populations often left to their own devices in the disadvantaged and marginalized neighborhoods of Port-au-Prince and beyond.

The agency added: “Without being able to access these areas under gang control, we are far from knowing and measuring the extent of these abuses and what Haitians really experience on a daily basis …

“Humanitarian actors have also limited their interventions due to security risks for their staff and access problems,” he added.

Large organizations like the United Nations World Food Program have found other ways to help people, such as using barges rather than vulnerable trucks to transport goods from the capital to the southern region of Haiti. But small organizations do not always have such resources.

World Vision International, a California-based organization that helps children in Haiti, told The Associated Press it had moved at least 11 of the 320 employees due to the violence and was taking undisclosed safety measures for other members of the team. staff.

Water Mission, a South Carolina nonprofit, said it was considering moving to other parts of Haiti and said kidnappings and general violence had forced it to change its staffing plans. to ensure the safety of people.

“These issues sometimes cause a slowdown in progress in our ongoing work on the drinking water project,” the organization said. “However, we continue to work despite the temporary disruptions that occur.”

The difficulties arise at a time when calls for help multiply. A magnitude 7.2 earthquake in mid-August destroyed tens of thousands of homes and killed more than 2,200 people. The country is also struggling to cope with the recent arrival of more than 12,000 deported Haitians, the majority from the United States.

In addition, more than 20,000 people have fled their homes due to gang violence this year, according to UNICEF, many of whom are living in temporary shelters in extremely unsanitary conditions and the pandemic. The United Nations agency estimates it needs $ 97 million to help 1 million people in Haiti next year.

Among them, Martin Jean Junior, a fifty-something who sold scrap metal. He said his house was burnt down in mid-June amid fighting between police and gangs.

“I’ve been on the street ever since,” he said as he lay on a blue sheet he had spread out on the hard floor of a school in Port-au-Prince temporarily converted into a shelter.

Things could soon get worse: A prominent gang leader warned Haitians this week to avoid the besieged community of Martissant, as rival gangs will fight each other in the coming days.

“Even dogs and rats will not be saved. Anything that moves, trucks, motorcycles, people, will be considered an ally of Ti-Bois, ”the gang leader known as“ Izo ”said in a video, referring to a rival gang. “Martissant is declared a combat zone, and those who ignore this warning will pay with their lives.” “

Most are already avoiding the area for fear of being kidnapped, shot, or having their cargo looted. This largely cut off the southern peninsula from the country because the main road runs through the neighborhood.

Among those recently killed by crossfire in Martissant include a nurse, a 7-year-old girl and at least five passengers on a public bus. Violence forced aid group Médecins Sans Frontières in August to close an emergency clinic that had served the community for 15 years.

Liman Pierre, a 40-year-old mechanic, said he had recently had to drive through Martissant to get to work and saw four dead, including two elderly neighbors and the biker carrying them.

“Criminals kill with impunity and leave the dead to dogs,” he said. Those who are not devoured by dogs are set on fire, outright. It cannot be.

For the moment, Pierre is sleeping in the streets of Port-au-Prince because he fears having to cross Martissant to get home: “We don’t even have the opportunity to visit relatives and friends in difficulty.

“The state does not exist,” says Pierre. “Criminals have been in power for over six months. It is December and we do not see the light at the end of the tunnel.


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Non profit living

Live With This Herbal Recipe From Youth Health Advocate Haile Thomas – Food Tank

At each age, Haile Thomas’ life has revolved around nutritious food. Her Jamaican immigrant mother taught her how to cook when she was five, and three years later, when her father was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, her family turned their diet and lifestyle into a nurturing center and restorative food. When Thomas was 12, she founded The organization HAPPY, a non-profit organization that promotes the mental and physical well-being of young people by developing knowledge about diet and self-advocacy. At 17, she was the youngest certified integrative health coach in the United States. With her messages of healthy eating and youth empowerment, she has appeared in the White House, at Food tank tops, and in the national media.

And last year she published a cookbook-slash-empowerment-manifesto, Live alive, which was nominated for an NAACP Image Award. In addition to the more than 80 herbal recipes, his book opens with a series of essays on his upbringing, how we are shaped by what we consume and Thomas’s seven “Power Points”. From wellness and relationships, to education, creativity and community, and conversations with young women who embody these principles, Thomas breaks down the components of a lively life. And as one of the essays notes, the book is meant to be interactive – “a place where food stains and deep thoughts can coexist!” She writes – so there are journal pages and writing prompts to encourage thought and action.

“We really want [youth] see food and cooking as something that can really permeate their daily life and be something super fun and accessible ”, Thomas told Food Tank President Danielle Nierenberg at the Food Tank Summit 2018.

For our third monthly cookbook series, Food Tank is excited to share Thomas’ recipe for Red Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Chimichurri Sauce. If you missed the first few installments of our cookbook series, we’ve featured two recipes from Jubilee, Toni Tipton-Martin’s award-winning exploration of hundreds of years of black cuisine, and a selection of fall recipes from Beth Dooley’s local and seasonal cookbook The lively cuisine. Make sure to grab these recipes, but first, join us as we cook and live a busy life with Haile Thomas!

And one more thing: when you cook this recipe at home, let us know! Tag us on social media @FoodTank or #FoodTank so we can admire your meals and share your photos.

* * * * *

Red roasted cauliflower steaks with chimichurri sauce

Makes 4 servings

Knowing how to season and roast a good cauliflower steak is essential at home, so I pass this favorite recipe on to you! Due to the neutral flavor of cauliflower, it’s a great canvas for spices and sauces that really pop. Serve with your favorite vegetables and grains!

—Haile Thomas, Living Lively: 80 Herbal Recipes To Activate Your Power And Nurture Your Potential

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER

  • 1 tablespoon of garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon of paprika
  • 1 tablespoon of dried thyme
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 medium cauliflower, cut through the core into four slices about ½ inch thick
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil

CHIMICHURRI SAUCE

  • ½ cup of fresh cilantro, leaves and stems
  • ½ cup of fresh parsley, leaves and stems
  • ¼ cup fresh basil leaves
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • Kosher salt

1. To roast the cauliflower: Preheat the oven to 425 ° F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. In a medium bowl, combine garlic powder, paprika, thyme, cayenne pepper and salt to taste.

3. Arrange the cauliflower “steaks” on the prepared baking sheet and drizzle with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Sprinkle the herb and spice mixture evenly on both sides of each cauliflower steak. Drizzle the cauliflower steaks with the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil.

4. Roast for 20 to 25 minutes, until the cauliflower is golden and crisp on top.

5. Meanwhile, to make the chimichurri sauce: In a food processor, combine the cilantro, parsley, basil, garlic, olive oil, vinegar and salt to taste and mix until smooth consistency. Put aside.

6. Drizzle the steaks with the chimichurri sauce and serve.

From LIVING LIVELY by Haile Thomas Copyright © 2020 by Haile Thomas. Reprinted with permission from William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

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