close

profit organization

Non profit living

BN Indians: Young community servants show the future is in good hands

Aditi Sharma founded the Inclusive Education Coalition (IEC) when she was a senior at Normal Community High School. She is now a student at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana.

She said the history curriculum particularly caught her attention when she realized the peaceful side of the civil rights movement dominated the narrative.

“You don’t get the real truth that this movement wasn’t always just a peaceful movement,” Sharma said. “That a lot of the change that’s been brought about, has been brought about in a way that people don’t really like to hear.”

She also noticed that the health curriculum was exclusive to LGBTQ+ people and abstinence-based, and that the English class readings were mostly written by white men.

“I believe education is the first step to fostering empathy,” Sharma said. “So that’s what pushed me to create this group.”

Bloomington’s More is a senior at Normal Community High School. She also advocates for inclusion as co-chair of the NCHS Not in our School group. She also started the volunteer youth group Little Free Pantry. More said she heard about a similar pantry in Arkansas and started her own when she learned about 100 kids in McLean Country go to bed hungry every night.

“And it struck a chord with me,” More said. “I couldn’t imagine people in our town going to bed hungry. So, I ended up trying to do something about it.

More said because of her privilege, she assumed hunger was not an issue in McLean County.

“I couldn’t imagine people in our town going to bed hungry. So, I ended up trying to do something about it.”

Raji More, Normal Community High School student

“So to hear that they were concerned about that, and that it was a huge priority for them to get food for a day, was interesting to me and concerning to me,” More said.

Dhruv Rebba is also a senior at Normal Community High School. As WGLT reported in October, he won the National 4-H Council’s 2022 4-H Youth in Action Award for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) for creating several projects. that advance technological learning opportunities for children and the quality of life opportunities for citizens in crisis. This includes founding the nonprofit Universal Help, which digitized and provided textbooks, internet access and technology to schools in rural India.

Rebba also set up a robotics club at Grove Elementary School to increase STEM-based learning opportunities for young children. He told WGLT student reporter Jordan Mead that robotics can be expensive and the club is making it more accessible to younger students. “And a lot of the students I’ve taught are now on robotics teams competitively, and that’s pretty cool to see,” Rebba said.

Bloomington’s Isha Gollapudi is a sophomore at Normal Community. She is a firm believer in community service, with art as her favorite tool.

“Art is a universal language,” Gollapudi explained. “I may not be able to understand what everyone has to say, but when you see a job you understand the message behind it. And it’s extremely impactful.

Like More, Gollapudi is part of the Little Free Pantry, even ruling it for a year. Through the Bloomington-Normal Art Circle, she also participates in “Chairs 4 Change,” where community members paint chairs and other furniture to be auctioned off by Recycling Furniture for Families.

“Just having art around you really brightens people’s moods,” Gollapudi said. “So I like to paint more upbeat or happier things, especially when they go to places like charities. Because I think it’s going to brighten up the mood around everyone there.

Gollapudi is so committed to the power of art that she gave it a 10-minute run on the TED-X Normal stage last year.

“So even though I only look like I’m 14,” she said towards the end of her speech, “the journey that art has taken me and the knowledge that I acquired thanks to him, almost make me feel like I’m 743 years old. Thank you.”

Inspiration struck in sixth grade. His works were part of student selections chosen by local artist Julie Meulemans to be exhibited at her Normal gallery downtown. One piece sold for $20.

“And at the time, it was huge,” recalls Gollapudi. “I was like, ‘I can make money from this.’ Then I realized that I could help people with that too.That kind of started for me.

Sparkling plea

Aditi Sharma said the anti-immigration rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election was the initial fuel that sparked her advocacy for inclusion. But she added that her parents initially pushed for a low profile because they and she were immigrants.

“So maybe I should keep quiet, shut up, not make trouble, just do what my parents came here to do.” It was to help me get a better education and a better job,” Sharma said.

It didn’t last long.

“But I couldn’t sit while I watched all these things happen to people in my community and people in other communities,” said Sharma, who became a US citizen at 14.

Sharma made a point of thanking her parents for instilling in her the generosity and empathy towards the struggles of others that have become her core values. “Because we as immigrants moved here and we struggled a lot,” she said.

Sharma said unlike many South Asians who come to Bloomington-Normal for work, her family has no built-in class privilege. And seeing his parents struggle at first was an eye opener.

“I recognize that this is something that so many families in America go through. And so that has a lot to do with my desire to want to make this change,” Sharma said.

Dhruv Rebba said the founding of Universal Help was at least partly spurred by visiting the rural area where his father grew up in India.

“That’s when I was like, ‘OK, that’s a really big difference in living standards, and basic luxuries just aren’t available there. For example, reliable digital access for school supplies and things like that,” Rebba said.

His non-profit organization is helping to digitize these rural schools with computers, projectors, a digital curriculum, and “uninterruptible power supply to meet electricity needs. Because there are power cuts quite often in this part of India,” Rebba said.

He has also contributed to natural disaster relief in West Bengal after Cyclone Yaas of 2021, running a COVID-19 isolation center to combat the Delta Variant in India, and through grassroots projects such as recycling and composting in McLean County.

“Our mission is to improve the quality of life for people around the world in innovative ways,” said Rebba.

In addition to founding and directing the Little Free Pantry in Bloomington-Normal, Raji More is co-chair of the NCHS Not in our School Group and sits on the city’s Not in our School Steering Committee. Others said they were planning protests and vigils and fighting for inclusivity and equality.

Like Sharma, More credits her parents for being willing to serve Bloomington-Normal, teaching her to be kind to everyone and treat everyone the same.

“Part of that meant that I saw that some people weren’t able to have similar opportunities, and those opportunities included getting food. And I was like, ‘Let’s make sure they have access to food too,'” More said.

Plus was also moved to act as a witness for the division. Between people, between ideas. She touts the restorative circles she uses in Not in our School, where people can express ideas without being combative. And she strives to minimize the labeling of people.

“That’s part of why I do my projects…to really include people. Some people aren’t included and don’t have the same opportunities as me, and I strive to include people,” More said.

“Rooted in Who You Are”

Isha Gollapudi thinks his desire to serve is at least partly cultural, citing the Indian holiday Holi, a festival of colors, and Diwali – the five-day festival of lights.

“When you’re brought up with the idea that all these big parties are about giving back to others, it’s kind of ingrained in who you are,” Gollapudi said.

She said it was no different from Christmas in some ways.

“Because it’s fun to get presents, but seeing your brother’s face when he opens a present you gave him…I think it’s so much better,” Gollapudi said.

Gollapudi adds that she has equated community service with a way of life that will continue into adulthood, with climate change now on her service radar.

Dhruv Rebba said that not only would he serve until adulthood, but he was just beginning.

“Many of the projects we have started locally and in India are relatively long-term projects. So I will definitely keep doing this for a long time,” Rebba said.

Like many youngsters, Aditi Sharma is under some parental pressure to pursue a lucrative career. But she said her passion for social justice and activism comes first.

“Whatever I end up doing after my four years of undergrad, I know I’m always going to want to be part of any community, no matter where I live. This service is at the core of my being,” Sharma said.

Raji More said she loves Bloomington-Normal so much that she hopes to attend college in town, continue her community service and advocate for inclusivity. She cites Camille Taylor and Mary Aplington of Not in our Town as mentors.

“So many community members, I’m so grateful to be in their presence,” More said. “So it’s mostly the people of Bloomington-Normal that keep me wanting to be here.”

ABOUT THE SERIES

Why we did it

Bloomington-Normal has more East Indians than any other southern Illinois metropolitan community. First-generation Indian immigrants and their children shaped Bloomington-Normal in more or less significant ways, and it deserves our attention. The WGLT Newsroom aimed to measure this impact in an 8-part series of human-centered stories.

how we did it

The Bloomington-Normal Indian community is not a monolith – socio-economically, politically, culturally – and this series aims to reflect that. The WGLT newsroom interviewed over 30 people from a variety of backgrounds. We recognize that these sources do not represent all Indians in Bloomington-Normal. They represent themselves and we appreciate their willingness to share their story.

Feedback

We want to know what you think of the series and what future features we should consider. You can message our newsroom at WGLT.org/Contact.

read more
Non profit living

Morehead State Music Ambassadors Prepare for Carter Fold | Living

HILTONS — The Music Ambassadors of Morehead State are ready to bring bluegrass and early music to The Carter Family Fold.

The group includes faculty members and students from Morehead State University’s Traditional Music Program, as well as Raymond McLain, who has his own Carter Fold story.

McLain is the director of the Kentucky Center for Traditional Music at Morehead State University, located in Rowan County, Kentucky. He also sits on the board of the Carter Music Center and is the artistic director of The Carter Family Fold.

He performed at the fold and many Carter family shows over the years, starting with his family, the McLain Family Band. According to a press release from the venue, he first began performing at Carter family shows when Janette Carter began performing concerts at the former AP Carter Grocery in 1974. Saturday night he will also be joined by his sister, Ruth McLain Smith. .

Throughout his 50+ year musical career, Raymond McLain has performed across the United States, in 62 foreign countries and has also toured as the Music Ambassador for the US State Department.

The Carter Family Memorial Music Center is a non-profit organization that offers old-school country and folk music weekly at Hiltons. The venue also pays homage to the legendary Carter family (AP Carter, Sara Carter and Maybelle Carter), whose first recordings in 1927 are credited with giving birth to the commercial country music industry.

Try the Kingsport Times News app today. Download here from Google Play and App Store.

Carter Family Fold shows are on Saturday nights. Doors open at 6 p.m. and music begins at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults; $2 for children 6-11 and children 6 and under are free.

read more
Non profit living

Onward and Upward, the acclaimed military veteran nonprofit, has huge goals for 2022

Classes in session on January 8, 2018. Cabin workspaces

Group of new customers – the photo was taken with their permission

Suicides of active duty personnel and veterans are reaching new heights. This is an alarmingly growing statistic that Onward and Upward want to prevent this from increasing further.

– forward and upward

LOS ANGELES, CA, USA, March 9, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — What has a relatively unknown Wisconsin-based nonprofit been up to for the past 90 days? Onward and Upward, an acclaimed military veterans society, sought to understand why the rate of military suicides has risen from 22 to now more than 30 a day in the United States. According to a Washington Post article written by Peter Marks, dated January 1, 2022, suicides of active duty personnel and veterans are reaching new heights. This is an alarmingly growing statistic that Onward and Upward want to keep from increasing further.

Who is this non-profit organization? It is a veteran-owned and operated community-based online job center (“the Center”) designed to facilitate the employment of home-insecure and unemployed individuals seeking employment. an online or on-site job. Inside this facility is a laptop classroom on one side of the building and on the other side of the building is an area of ​​cubicle computer workstations. For people at the Center who want to work online as remote employees, this arrangement is fine. They have a workplace for their part-time or full-time online employer with mentorship, healthy food and drink, and a six-month program after which they graduate and take their computer home with them and continue to work for their online employer.

For people who are employed to work on-site, the Center mentors them and, if necessary, coordinates transportation to get them to their place of work safely and on time. In either online or on-site employment, the Center offers a six-month program that includes housing and soft skills training designed to provide what is needed to obtain, retain and progress in their employment. During the six months, the client works for their employer, saves up to three months in rent, utilities, and groceries, and attends all professional development training sessions covering topics such as interpersonal communication company, reliability/reliability, conflicts and negotiation, time management. , stress management, money/budget management and networking.

What’s really great about having the Center is to see all the people who once lived in tents, on sidewalks, benches and alleys now employed and safely housed, straighten up and staying up. It is also nice to witness the reunion of mothers with their daughters, brothers with brothers and couples who were once separated and can now be together thanks to a job and a safe place to live.

Onward and Upward helped 17 people in the first year of operation in 2017 (7 of whom were military veterans) to be employed and housed to never be homeless again. In 2018 there were 12 people (7 of which were military veterans) and the third year, 2019, there were 38 people (12 of which were military veterans) who once lived in tents and are now housed and employed and currently all living in their homes. them, working for their employers (online and/or onsite) to never be homeless again. “Our organization within the Center also teaches our clients and community members how to get, keep and grow in any job,” says Onward and Upward. “We enjoy witnessing the personal and professional growth of everyone we have the privilege of meeting and assisting with employment and advancement in employment. Our organization truly enjoys being the conduit and catalyst for new beginnings. for people who are homeless and unemployed, especially military veterans.”

That’s why, over the past 90 days, Onward and Upward is so thrilled to have been introduced to five other veteran service organizations who are equally passionate about ensuring people have the services they need to get back on their feet. foot and stay on their feet. sustainably. After meeting, they formed a coalition of veterans.

Onward and Upward continues, “Collectively and individually, we aim to make a difference in people’s lives, especially for our military brothers and sisters. The other five organizations are Project Diehard, Veterans Warriors One-Stop-Shop (VWOSS), Faith Hope Love for Veterans, Hope Advanced, and Veterans Ranch. Transitional Housing for Veterans and to provide a place for other nonprofit veterans to provide their services is with Project Diehard, more than 5,000 resources and sources for managing military transition issues and advocacy for veterans. VWOSS veterans, women’s issues are resolved and small home villages are established with Faith Hope Love for Veterans, credit issues, background issues and tax liens are resolved with Hope Advanced, and Veterans’ Ranch Veterans works with veterans and their families through horses (horse therapy) with a mission to get these great Americans to put down their heavy coats of burden and walk away as new and improved versions of themselves.

Collectively, the Five Veterans Service Organizations and Onward and Upward is a coalition of veterans whose mission is to prevent 22 military suicides from occurring a day. Onward and Upward have hosted a special day on 02/22/2022 titled “2-22 to Save 22” to bring attention to this crisis and announce that by working together, we can stop military suicide.

The event took place onsite at the Kalahari Resort, Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin, and via online conferencing platform, Whova. The introduction of a “home front forward operating base” was made on 02/22/2022. With the promise of introducing a possible solution to the military suicide crisis, over 200 LinkedIn sign-ups for the 2-22 to Save 22 hybrid event took place, and over 300 connections were made after the event for continue the conversation and start planning this event. concept to become a reality.

Working interdependently with each of the five Veteran Coalition organizations, Onward and Upward is confident that more and more military veterans will avoid going to a dark place and instead have a life worth living.

“We believe that if our brothers and sisters in arms have a life worth living, they will want to live it! We invite individuals and organizations who want to support us in the mission to stop military suicide to visit our website. in our collective and individual missions, we seek people to help us as volunteers, sponsors and/or donors of time, talent and/or treasure. We know that stopping military suicide ‘takes a village’ and we appreciate anyone who would support us in this fight to stop military suicide,” Onward and Upward conclude.

Aurora Of Rose
Media Unlimited Inc.
+1 951-870-0099
write to us here

read more
Non profit living

H&M ANNOUNCES SECOND YEAR OF PARTNERSHIP WITH BUY FROM A BLACK WOMAN IN HONOR OF INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY 2022

Buy From a Black Woman is a non-profit organization founded in 2016 by Nikki Porcher that connects more than 600 black women-owned businesses across United States and provides a supportive community with the goal of helping their businesses thrive. Throughout 2021, H&M sponsored events such as the Buy From A Black Woman Inspire Tour and the BFABW Holiday Market which ran from November to December 2021 at the Times Square location of H&M. These events, which saw products from more than 50 black women-owned businesses sold in H&M stores across the country, exposed new customers to these Buy From a Black Woman member businesses.

“Over the past year, working with H&M, we have been able to shine a light on what it means when you believe in and support the communities that support you. The Black Woman Inspire Tour, The Business Accelerator, The Black Woman Holiday Market, these events have helped open the doors wider and we were able to show the world that black women are here,” said Nikki Porcher, Founder of Buy From a Black Woman. “I am thrilled to continue this partnership through 2022 and show why we believe black women are living examples of what is possible, not only when you believe in yourself, but also when you have the support of others. “a community that believes in you. When you support a black woman business owner, you support an entire community. H&M believes in supporting black women.”

Throughout 2022, H&M United States will continue to support Buy From a Black Woman through a variety of activities and support aimed at continued growth and success for business owners, beginning with a donation of $250,000. Starting this summer, H&M United States will once again sponsor the organization’s Buy From a Black Woman Inspire tour, building on H&M the United States brick-and-mortar channels and locations to highlight black women-owned businesses across the country. On the way to fall, H&M United States will continue to focus on sustainability in business by sponsoring the nonprofit’s Black Woman Business Accelerator program. This 10-week business training course includes a structured, expert-led online program to assist Black women business owners in the different ways they can grow, while providing an opportunity to access finance. Internally, H&M United States will sponsor both eligible colleagues who wish to join the Buy From a Black Woman directory and online network and will spotlight the nonprofit’s various ventures throughout the year.

“We are thrilled to enter the second year of our partnership with Buy From a Black Woman. Our relationship with Nikki Porcher and Buy From a Black Woman vendors have allowed us to witness the growth of these businesses in ways we could not have imagined. This partnership exemplifies the impact we want to have in empowering and building capacity in the communities where we live and work,” said Donna DozierGordonInclusion and Diversity Manager at H&M United States.

“After the success and impact we saw in our first year of partnership, we knew we had to continue and expand our support for Nikki Porcher and Buy from a Black Woman for 2022. Through our continued work together, we can further amplify their mission to uplift Black women, their businesses, and their communities,” said carlos duartePresident, H&M Americas.

To watch the trailer for “The Living Example” and see images from the announcement, click here.

For more information on Buying From A Black Woman, please contact:

Nikki PorcherFounder
E-mail: [email protected]
Customers can also donate here.
Support and learn about businesses owned and operated by black women here.

For more information about H&M, please contact:
H&M press relations
E-mail: [email protected]
*We hope you enjoyed reading the latest from H&M, but if not, just email [email protected] and request to be removed from our media list.

H & M Hennes & Mauritz AB (publ) was founded in Sweden in 1947 and is listed on Nasdaq Stockholm. The business idea of ​​H&M is to offer fashion and quality at the best price in a sustainable way. Besides H&M, the group includes the brands COS, Monki, Weekday, & Other Stories, H&M HOME and ARKET as well as Afound. H&M Group has 54 online marketplaces and approximately 4,800 stores in 75 markets, including franchise markets. In 2021, net sales were 199 billion Swedish crowns. The number of employees amounts to approximately 155,000. For more information, visit hmgroup.com.

SOURCEH&M

read more
Non profit living

Nonprofit group home makes sacrifices to address staffing shortages: ‘I’ve never seen staffing difficulties like this’ – WCCO

MENDOTA HEIGHTS, MN (WCCO) – As group homes across the state struggle to find staff, some have been forced to close, leaving families to scramble. The facilities accommodate people with physical and developmental challenges.

To try to keep their homes open, a non-profit organization has made some changes. John Lauritsen shows us how these changes help.

READ MORE: Black-Owned Amazon Service Partner Creates ‘Living Wage’ Jobs

“In 35 years, I have never seen staffing difficulties like this,” said Rod Carlson of Living Well Disabilities Services.

For group homes across the state, the fight for staff has gotten so bad that there has been talk of bringing in the National Guard to help.

RELATED: Families scramble after group homes close due to lack of workers

“And certainly at some point the National Guard was suggested, the National Guard was early in COVID to help some nursing homes,” Carlson said.

It never came to this for Living Well in Mendota Heights. But sacrifices have been made to keep their nearly 40 homes in operation.

“We compete with restaurants and Costcos around the world. And all these other organizations that also need employees,” Carlson said.

To recruit more workers, Living Well raised their wages from $14.75 per hour to $16 per hour, for direct care workers. A modest increase that made a big difference.

Certified practical nurses also saw their wages increase to $17 an hour, which many group homes were unable to match. But that meant going into a budget shortfall to bring in nurses like Sunday Yengi.

READ MORE: As the March thaw approaches, pothole season officially begins

“I love it. I love working here,” Yengi said.

While the pay rise is attractive, Yengi said group homes need to recruit people who are passionate about helping others. She works in honor of her mentally handicapped brother who lives in South Sudan.

“When I work here with people who have mental disabilities, I feel like I’m helping my only brother,” Yengi said.

As part of its COVID plan, Living Well also lobbied for vaccination requirements before they were imposed.

“These are just rapid tests that we receive and are provided by the state,” said Annelies Stevens, director of health and welfare services.

They say it has made staff more comfortable working around residents with compromised immune systems.

“That’s what we were able to focus on and sustain, which I’m really happy with,” Stevens said.

Living Well said the changes have helped them hire more staff, but they are still missing a few nurses.

NO MORE NEWS: Powdered infant formula recall expanded after 2nd child dies

As the nonprofit celebrates its 50th anniversary next week, it will lobby on Capitol Hill for higher wages for group home workers.

read more
Non profit living

Lexington Nonprofit Sends Funds to Ukraine: How You Can Help

LEXINGTON, Ky. (FOX 56) – Non-profit organization, Christian Mission Ebenezer (CME) joins the fight overseas by helping to send resources to their home country.

CME opened in 1999, and two years ago they opened their bookstore on Old Harrodsburg Rd where they buy books wholesale and give 100% of donations to missionaries around the world.

“That’s why we have this bookstore – we raise money by selling books,” said Alex Chubaruk, owner of CME. “The profits we take and give to different parts of the country.”

In Ukraine, CME is connected to about 30 mission stations, including their own family members, and their active search for monetary donations, so that locations can be supplied with funds to purchase mattresses, blankets, pillows, food baskets, etc.

“So we raised funds on our website and so on to give them funds to be able to buy blankets, food, firewood, food boxes for people in need,” said Chubaruk. “In addition, we are raising funds for people trying to escape, for people fleeing to western Ukraine and Poland.”

Chubaruk’s uncle is in eastern Ukraine and is a bishop in a church that opened as a refuge for refugees. Chubaruk spoke with his uncle earlier on Saturday.

“And so he’s like, ‘I’m not leaving my herd, I’m going to be there with him, stay with them, and so he’s trying to be that leader, and to be that support for the people who live in that area. Chubaruk said, “I asked them what you all need, and they asked us to pray that God might send redemption to the nation.”

When news of the war broke, the Chubaruks immediately took to their website and Instagram page to raise awareness.

Larisa Chubaruk, Alex’s wife, said: “The first thing we did was change everything on the homepage, set up the form, make sure people have a place to donate .”

Chubaruk said she tries to gather facts, not only for their website, but also for her children.

“So it was mostly about trying to figure out what was happening, why it was happening, we didn’t tell our kids about it on the first day,” Chubaruk said. “Mostly because we didn’t want to get emotional talking about it.”

They also wanted to be aware not to break the news to their children in a way that would make them resentful of the Russians.

“Because we know there are good people everywhere, and it’s not just Russians, we don’t try to categorize them and we don’t want them to have anything against Russians when someone mentions their name,” Churbaruk said.

Instead, they want to spread a message of love.

She said: “The one thing I think everyone can take away, Ukrainians, Americans, Russians, cherish what you have when it’s good.”


To connect with them on Instagram, click here: https://instagram.com/cm.ebenezer?utm_medium=copy_link

To donate to the Ukraine crisis through Christian Mission Ebenezer, click on the following link: Christian Mission EBENEZER – Christian Mission EBENEZER – Until now, the Lord has helped us. (cmebenezer.com)

read more
Non profit living

Recognizing Local Charities for Nonprofit Appreciation Week | bloginfo(‘name’); ?>

February 10, 2022 0 comments

By Paula Brown, Local Journalism Initiative reporter

A small group of Dufferin County organizations will recognize the work of local nonprofits next week as part of a campaign for the first-ever Nonprofit Appreciation Week (February 14-February 20) .

In December 2021, the province passed Bill 9 to create Nonprofit Appreciation Week, a motion that received unanimous support from all parties. Beginning February 14 and continuing through February 20, the week is focused on recognizing those in the nonprofit sector whose work changes the lives of individuals, families, and communities.

Michele Fisher, executive director of the Dufferin Community Foundation, said the week of appreciation had been “a long time coming.”

“Most of the other helping professions are recognized for their impact. During the pandemic, for example, healthcare workers have been rightly praised for their efforts. But frontline workers in the nonprofit sector — many of whom were also deemed essential — have flown under the radar. That’s why we like to call them ‘invisible champions’,” Fisher said. “Nonprofit Appreciation Week is an opportunity for us as a community to say ‘Thank You.’ It makes visible all they do to help some of our most vulnerable and to strengthen our communities. I hope this will allow our nonprofit professionals to feel truly recognized for all that they do. »

In Dufferin County alone, there are over 150 non-profit organizations working within the community, ranging from social services, environmental/conservation organizations, arts and culture, recreation, health, mental health, community development, housing and homelessness, food security and much more. .

The Citizen spoke with some of the local nonprofits in Dufferin County ahead of Nonprofit Appreciation Week.

Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County

For people with dementia, a consistent routine can help them thrive. As a non-profit organization focused on support, programming and education, the Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County has taken on the challenge of maintaining this routine for more than two years.

“Over the past two years we have seen a significant drop in the availability of things like day programs, community support, personal support worker support. Basically anything that would allow a person with dementia and their family to maintain a consistent routine,” said Lindsay Gregory, Outreach and Education Coordinator. “Without this structure, we are seeing an increase in complex cases, an increase in behaviors and the burnout of caregivers.

To help address the lack of structure for clients brought about by the pandemic, the Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County has begun offering online training and education sessions as well as social programs, activities and social sessions. exercises.

One program, which Gregory points to as a proud moment in the face of the pandemic, is their Bring Back Box program.

The Bring Back Box program is a Montessori approach to dementia care where clients receive personalized activity kits based on their hobbies, interests, and memories that provide meaningful stimulation and engagement.

“We see a lot of people with dementia who are bored,” Gregory said. “It’s a really nice way to connect with people in an otherwise virtual world.”

The Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County has approximately 400 people on their active caseload and while their caseload has not increased since the pandemic, they have seen more admissions seeking access to education and support .

“We talk more often with people who are now at home with loved ones and who may be noticing this cognitive decline that they wouldn’t otherwise notice,” Gregory said.

Coming out of the pandemic, Gregory said after seeing how people have connected with them, the Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County will likely continue to use their virtual opportunities in a “hybrid model.”

Community Living Dufferin for over 60 years has been providing support to adults in Dufferin County who have developmental disabilities and when COVID-19 hit, rather than accepting a hiatus from all programs, Community Living Dufferin staff shows creativity.

“It could have been very easy for us to say ‘sorry, the building is closed and the programs are over, we’re just going to get by,’ but our staff didn’t,” Karen Murphy-Fitz explained, executive assistant. . “We changed our programs from those we operated in the main building to programs we offered in each of our homes.”

One of the ways they transformed, Murphy-Fitz added, was by distributing craft boxes in their homes, which contained games, science projects and art supplies.

“Residents had something different to fill their days,” Murphy-Fitz said.

Operating 14 homes that provide housing for more than 60 adults supported by the nonprofit, Community Living Dufferin was challenged early on by isolation as family visits were cut short.

Community Living Dufferin applied for and became the recipient of a number of grants allowing them to purchase smart TVs, iPads and Google Home units so they can continue to connect with families.

“It was huge for helping the people we support stay connected with their families, giving them the opportunity to see each other face to face,” Murphy-Fitz said.

Although Community Living Dufferin has learned, like many organizations, to balance the setbacks caused by the pandemic, it is the emotional impacts that continue to be felt.

While speaking with the Citizen, Murphy-Fitz held back tears as she spoke about their adaptation as hallways and rooms remain empty.

“It’s been hard not seeing people, and it’s going to be nice to have everyone together again.”

As the saying goes, the show must go on.

As a relatively young organization that began with seasonal programming, Streams Community Hub faced the challenge of bringing the arts, a naturally collaborative and in-person discipline, into the virtual space.

“We really spent several months, like anyone working in a space that deals with a lot of in-person programming, trying to figure out what to do,” explained Juli-Anne James, co-founder of Streams Hub. “It’s hard to put on a play without a stage.”

Although not fully equipped with the technology and staff to deliver virtual programs, Juli-Anne and Andrew James have found a way to bring the arts into children’s homes – through a stand-up competition.

The Word of Mouth Monologue competition launched in March 2021 and saw local young people aged 8-17 submit online performances of various monologues and compete in a live final.

“The monologue competition was a really great opportunity that we did after it turned out to be really awesome,” Andrew said. “It made us realize it’s a good outlet and now we need to keep doing it even when things get back to ‘normal’. We recognized the importance of helping young people have another way to express themselves .

Although restricted for a year to offering arts programs to young people, the James duo note that internal work was underway to deepen their roots in the community.

“We were able to see some of the needs in our community and see how we could better meet those needs,” Andrew said.

Streams Community Hub is preparing to open its first permanent location, tentatively scheduled for early March.

“We know the importance of connection, of being together in a space and that we can never escape that need or that want,” Andrew said. “Our show must go on, to move forward creating a bigger space not only for young people, but for the artist who also needs a place to express themselves in their art, while earning a living and teaching the next generation.”

Organizations that have worked to develop local activities in recognition of Nonprofit Appreciation Week include the Dufferin Community Foundation, United Way Guelph Wellington Dufferin, Headwaters Communities in Action, DC MOVES, the Chamber of commerce of Dufferin and Dufferin County.

read more
Non profit living

More and more small houses are coming to the YK Delta thanks to pandemic relief funds. But are they a good idea?

This story was originally posted by KYUK Public Media at Bethel and is reprinted with permission.

BETHEL — A wave of new housing is coming to the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta. Most of these new units should be of the fashionable tiny house variety. But with households in the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta generally much larger than the national average, some tribes are wondering if smaller houses are right for their communities.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) recently announced nearly $7 million in funding for Aniak, Atmautluak, Napaimute, Newtok, Quinhagak, Toksook Bay, and Tununak to begin construction of 25 new homes this year. The funding comes from federal coronavirus relief funding, which has brought a huge influx of money to Alaska for tribes to build homes.

“Blast is a good term for how much it’s increased,” said Greg Stuckey, administrator of HUD’s Alaska Native American Programs Office.

Since these grants are tied to coronavirus relief funding, tribes must use homes as isolation or quarantine units, at least initially.

“And then, you know, later when COVID is finally over, you can use them to reduce overcrowding in your communities, because that’s a major problem in rural Alaska,” Stuckey said.

About 40% of homes in the Yukon Delta are either overcrowded or severely overcrowded. According to a statewide housing assessment, more than 2,400 homes need to be built to address this issue.

Almost all of the homes that will be built in the YK Delta with these HUD grants will be small homes. They will be smaller than 500 square feet, with the kitchen, bed, and living space in the same room. There will be a separate bathroom, but no separate bedrooms.

Tiny houses have been all the rage in recent years, often touted as an answer to affordable housing. But are they well suited to a region where households are, on average, 50 to 80% larger than the national average?

The Yukon-Kuskokwim delta has already experimented with small houses. The non-profit organization, Coastal Villages Region Fund, built one in Eek in 2018. The organization says it will no longer do so.

“We’ve found that people need more space than a small house with the number of people in the family,” said Oscar Evon, regional business manager at CVRF.

Evon said there were other problems with tiny homes, such as banks not funding mortgages for them. CVRF originally planned for homeowners to buy small houses through mortgages, which would have opened up another route to home ownership in the villages of the YK Delta. Most are currently built and paid for by the regional housing authority or by grants. After moving away from smaller homes, CVRF is now building more traditional three- to four-bedroom homes, which Evon says banks fund mortgages and better meet the needs of families.

“A bigger house gives a family more space to raise their family and sometimes even their extended family,” Evon said.

Some of the tribes that have recently received a HUD grant to build tiny homes have come to the same conclusion. Toksook Bay received $1,035,000 to build five small houses, but Tribal Administrator Robert Pitka Sr. said Toksook Bay would prefer to build larger houses.

“We would choose a two-bedroom house instead of a small house,” said Pitka Sr.

However, Toksook Bay applied for a grant and received funds to build small houses. Pitka Sr. said he believed the grant was specifically for small homes.

“The ICDBG (Indian Community Development Block) grant already had wording in there where it’s for small houses,” Pitka Sr said.

HUD’s ICDBG grant requirements suggest building tiny houses as a way to use grant funds, which may have been enough to convince tribes to include tiny houses in their grant application. Tununak, who also received a grant to build small houses, also said he would prefer to build houses with bedrooms.

Stuckey said HUD did not require applicants to build tiny houses or any particular type of housing, and did not favor applications that included tiny houses. For example, Newtok received the same grant to build three three-bedroom houses.

“It’s self-determination. The tribes decide, the tribes are going to tell me what they’re going to build,” Stuckey said.

If tribes like Toksook Bay decide they prefer to build bigger houses, they will be able to do so. HUD spokeswoman Vanessa Krueger said tribes can submit an amendment to their grant application.

In Toksook Bay, Pitka Sr. said new homes, whether tiny or not, will make a big difference to families currently living in old, unsuitable homes.

“They are moldy. They are cold. They are rotten. They have no water and sewage system. Some are even smaller than tiny houses. And at least a brand new little house would make it 100% better,” Pitka Sr. said.

Pitka Sr. said those families could move into their new homes later this year.

read more
Non profit living

Harvard Hillel Hosts Holocaust Remembrance Day Memorial | News

Harvard Hillel held a memorial service on the steps of the Widener Library on Thursday in observance of International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Holocaust Remembrance Day marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp in 1945 and honors the lives of the millions of Jews and civilians who were killed. In his service, Hillel commemorated the life of Ita Warmund, a victim whose name was chosen from the database of Yad Vashem – Israel’s official memorial to the victims of the Holocaust.

College Dean Rakesh Khurana, Dean of Students Katherine G. O’Dair, Associate Dean of Students Lauren E. Brandt ’01, Reverend Matthew Ichihashi Potts, Rabbis Jonah C. Steinberg and Hirschy Zarchi each lit a candle in honor of the victims.

In his speech, Steinberg, executive director of Hillel, stressed the importance of remembering those whose lives were lost in the Holocaust.

“There is hardly a family represented here that has not been touched in some way by the Sho’ah – by the Holocaust – who does not have a wound, which is often a gaping hole, an absence,” Steinberg said.

Despite the loss and tragedy of the Holocaust, Steinberg said it was still important to work toward a “world of unity.”

“That doesn’t mean we go through life traumatized and scared,” Steinberg said. “But that means we go through life wearing that and figuring out how to live forward.”

Harvard Chabad Rabbi Zarchi said in his remarks that revealed knowledge of the Holocaust alone does not guarantee moral choices.

“Today we light a candle for souls with a candle of truth,” Zarchi said. “And perhaps that is what veritas teaches us – that there must be truth in our knowledge and in our wisdom to ensure that this knowledge leads to morality, to ethical living and to ethical choices. “

Addressing the crowd, Khurana said ‘remembering’ is one of the ‘most important human acts’ and stressed the importance of sharing the stories of Holocaust victims, especially with younger generations. .

“Their stories are an essential part of our common humanity, and those who are one, two or three generations apart are committed to understanding these horrific events and telling the stories to the next generation,” he said. . “The Holocaust not only altered the contours of world history, it also shattered the lives of countless families around the world.”

Khurana condemned anti-Semitism, citing the Texas synagogue hostage crisis and the harms of remaining silent in the face of oppression.

“We must not forget the lessons of the Holocaust and the dehumanization it depended on,” Khurana said. “And we must not forget that it is up to each of us, as humans, to decide whether to perpetuate good or evil in the world or remain indifferent.”

Hillel’s memorial was also intended to raise funds for The Blue Card, a non-profit organization that provides financial, emotional and physical support to Holocaust survivors in the United States.

The service ended with a reading from “El Male Rachamim” – a Jewish memorial prayer – by Noa D. Kligfeld ’24.

“May their memory endure, inspiring truth and loyalty in our lives. May their souls be bound by the bond of life. May they rest in peace. And let’s say “Amen,” Kligfeld recited.

—Editor Leah J. Teichholtz can be reached at [email protected] Follow her on Twitter @LeahTeichholtz.

read more
History organization

Census of birds in the sanctuaries of Kazhuveli and Oussudu on January 28 and 29

17,565 birds from 47 species were spotted during the pre-bird count earlier this month

The Villupuram Forestry Department will carry out the annual two-day synchronized bird count at Kazhuveli Bird Sanctuary and adjacent areas of Yedayanthittu Estuary and Oussudu Bird Sanctuary in Villupuram District, the January 28 and 29.

The annual census will be carried out by the Department of Forestry with the coordination of the Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) and technical support from the Universal Eco Foundation and the Indigenous Biodiversity Foundation (IBF), a non-profit organization.

According to District Forest Officer Sumesh Soman, a team of 50 volunteer members from Mayiladuthurai and Tiruchi district colleges and students from Pondicherry University will carry out the census from 6am to 10am on January 28-29.

“Participants will be divided into groups and undertake the census simultaneously in Kazhuveli Sanctuary, Yedayanthittu Estuary and Oussudu Bird Sanctuary. We have planned 12 transect lines including eight in Kazhuveli and two in Edayanthittu and Oussudu,” he said.

Representatives from institutions such as the Federal Bank will also join us as volunteers. Each group will consist of at least one subject matter expert and the data will be recorded in a scientific manner.

The census will also cover important bird areas adjacent to the sanctuaries and will be carried out in accordance with international standards. The data will be compiled in two days, a Forestry Department official said.

Mr Soman said about 17,565 birds belonging to 47 species were spotted in Kazhuveli during the pre-bird census conducted by a team led by Dr S. Balachandran, Scientist, Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) on 14 and January 15.

The highest number was Ruffed (10,000), followed by Blue-tailed Godwits and Plovers in the pre-bird count.

Last year, more than 25,000 birds from 57 species were spotted at the sanctuary.

The second phase of the bird census will cover inland waterbirds while the third phase will cover landbirds. Dates will be finalized soon, the official said.

read more
Non profit living

‘We all have a little PTSD’: Monterey County residents deal with Colorado fire

MONTEREY COUNTY, Calif. (KRON) – “We all have a little bit of PTSD,” Audrey Cray said with a local charity called “All In Monterey.” “When we live in an area that tends to have fires every time we hear about anything, we all get very nervous, very scared.”

Don’t miss any story, start your day with KRON4.com

As firefighters continue to battle the Colorado blaze, many people are still displaced from their homes.
The fire is now 35% contained and affects 700 acres.

Many people have had to leave their homes without notice and situations like this can be very scary.

“They don’t know if they’re going to have a home to come to, if they’re going to lose all of their belongings and we’re just a little bit there’s a big, warm hug,” Cray said.

As the Colorado Fire continues to burn, people living west of 3800 Palo Colorado Road toward Highway 1 and south of Bixby Creek in Monterey County are still being evacuated.

“When you’re told to evacuate, you leave with the clothes on your back and there’s so much that you don’t even think about that you don’t grasp,” Cray said.

Cray says they are doing what they can to help.

The non-profit organization provides support to its neighbors in Monterey.

They are currently working with the Red Cross at the Carmel Middle School Shelter.

“We worked with the evacuation center to make sure they had wash clothes, everything they would need at the evacuation centre.”

Meanwhile, firefighters are working around the clock to put out the fire.

U.S. Representative for the Central Coast, Jimmy Panetta, said he met with Cal Fire about their efforts.

“They feel confident, but the terrain is really steep there,” Panetta said. “If you’ve been along Highway 1, which many of your viewers have, you understand how steep and rugged it is.”

Panetta was happy to report that only one structure was damaged and there were no injuries or fatalities.

“The people of this area, the people of Big Sur are hardy, they’re warm, they’re used to these kinds of natural disasters.”

Panetta says he’s calling on everyone to help prevent fires – like this one – from happening in the future.

Although we don’t yet know what caused this fire, he says most of these fires are caused by human activity.

read more
Canadian army

Positive feedback on the first episode of Veteran Hunters

The second installment of the Veteran Hunters television series premiered last night on the Canada Sportsman channel and will continue to air at various times over the coming weeks.

Titled “Pheasants a Plenty,” it captures a two-day pheasant festival for veterans and first responders hosted by the non-profit organization Veterans Hunter at Wessex Game Birds in Carstairs, AB.

It follows the first episode, titled “Anxious for Antelope”, which began airing on December 27.

Veteran Hunters founder Todd Hisey said the show’s sponsors received a positive response to the first episode. This includes Jeff McClounie, COO for Steelhead Ventures, among the show’s sponsors.

Hisey says it’s possible to get other sponsorships for his show and programming. Their fundraising runs from January to Match before the spring hunts begin.

“Any businesses or organizations in Cochrane or Calgary and area that would like to partner with us to provide donations to the organization or consider an opportunity to sponsor the TV show would be greatly appreciated,” Hisey said.

Veteran hunters also attend the Grand Valley Safari Club’s annual fundraising dinner on January 29.

The dinner started almost 20 years ago as an occasion for a few hunters to come together to swap stories and has grown into an evening that attracts over 300 people. Safari Club president Kevin Firkus said he has raised around $250,000 over the years for many worthy causes.

Hisey says the veterans appreciated the opportunity to be among the partners for the evening.

“It’s a great opportunity for the community, ranchers, hunters and outdoor enthusiasts, to come together for an evening and raise money for worthy causes,” says Hisey.

Veteran Hunters will have items up for grabs in the Silent Auction. At their booth, you can learn more about the organization, its fair and meet some of their hunter hosts.

A few tickets are available and can be purchased by contacting Veteran Hunters through their website. here or by emailing Firkus at [email protected]

Hisey had a 22-year career as an officer in the Canadian Army with deployments to Bosnia, Kosovo and Russia. In 2018, and after nearly six years of treatment for PTSD, it was determined that he could no longer work in a traditional role. In January 2019, he launched The Veteran Hunters with a website, podcast, and social media presence to continue giving back to the community and helping fellow soldiers.

Photo/Veteran Hunters

read more
Non profit living

Beloved Puerto Rican chocolatier Cortés opens ridiculously good restaurant in the Bronx

For nearly 93 years, the Cortés family have been making chocolate in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, creating a brand as well known on these islands as, say, Hershey’s is here in New York. Particularly famous for their hot chocolate, they opened their first restaurant in 2013 in Puerto Rico’s Old San Juan, an all-day cafe with an extensive menu of both savory and sweet.

Last week, after several pandemic delays involving the construction of the current building in which they reside, the family finally opened their second Chocobar Cortés, on Alexander Avenue in Mott Haven. Here they serve a mix of savory and sweet – with a menu that is suitable for breakfast, brunch, lunch, snacks, drinks (alcoholic and / or chocolate) or dessert – and based on a feast that I had earlier this week in the friendly, vibrant space, this is one of the best new restaurants in town right now.

That Chocobar Cortés landed in the South Bronx is no accident. As Carlos Cortés, who runs the restaurant arm of the business, told Gothamist: “If you’re Puerto Rican or Dominican, you grew up with our chocolate. So for us it was important to come to where our food is. community in New York. I “I have lived here for 15 years and have seen how many quintessentially Puerto Rican or Dominican neighborhoods, like Williamsburg or the Lower East Side, have lost their essence due to gentrification. And so if Mott Haven is going to be the next frontier in terms of downtown expansion, it’s important for us to plant our flag and say, yes this neighborhood is going to change, but we the Puerto Rican and Dominican community are going. be included. We’re going to be a part of what this change will look like. “

The food here is great, and while almost everything on the menu has chocolate as an ingredient in one way or another, the inclusion is subtle most of the time. The Top Notch Chocoburger, for example, is a thickly textured, oily patty (eaten more like a meatball than a typical burger) topped with melted cheddar, onion, lettuce, and tomato, and served with a mixture of curly fries. The chocolatey part of the dish is in the ketchup, which is served on the side and is very good when spilled all over the rest of the plate.

The platters and sandwiches featuring steak, chicken, and roast pork are also light chocolatey, with a little cocoa in the meat. And one of the best things I ate involved no discernible chocolate, a Mallorca Iberica sandwich of salted serrano ham, a strong manchego and a layer of guava butter squeezed between the sweet bread of the same name Purto Rican, which the restaurant specially prepared by the local South Bronx bakery Il Forno. It’s a sensational comfort food.

Meanwhile, other dishes are extremely chocolatey. There’s Chocolate French Toast, Chocolate Vanilla Pancakes with Strawberry Marmalade, and a wonderful Chocolate Grilled Cheese Sandwich, which doesn’t hide any ingredients and is a must order. The chocolate-cheese combo is a sort of Cortés signature; their legendary hot chocolate comes in nine different varieties here – I’ve had the traditional Puertorriqueño – and each is served with a little chunk of cheddar on the side, which you drop into your drink like a lump of sugar.

The menu in the South Bronx is pretty much the same as what you’ll find in Old San Juan and was developed by Cortés business owner Ricardo De Obaldia. The secret weapon here, however, appears to be chef Maria Martinez, originally from Quebradillas, Puerto Rico, who had ten years of experience in New York kitchens before leading things on Alexander Avenue. She has a knack for balancing delicate blends in a way that gives everything a chance to shine. To give another example, his mangú, or mashed plantain, is superb, even buried under three eggs coulis, sprinkled with chorizo ​​and splashed with hot sauce. The food is fun, sure, but Martinez is a really good cook.

The space is divided into two rooms, the main dining room with a full bar to the right and a counter service store to the left with coffee and hot chocolate, a few pastries and lots of Chocobar products and provisions. Both are filled with specially commissioned works of art (“my family’s other passion,” as Cortés puts it), including pieces from their non-profit organization Fundación Cortés, like the framed images of the super -Afro-Puerto Rican comic book heroine, La Borinqueña, created by Bronx native Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez.

Read more: Meet La Borinqueña, the Puerto Rican superhero from New York

“The community here is amazing,” says Cortés, who lives a few blocks from the restaurant. “One of the perks of being here in the South Bronx is that everyone is thrilled to collaborate and help make this community something different and special. You can feel that commitment on so many different levels. whether it’s other businesses, local government, or all the folks who live here. I had grandmothers who came by asking me just so they could sing our jingle. They tell me : “Thank you so much for coming here, thank you for opening in the Bronx. I am going back to my childhood. ‘”

Chocobar Cortés is located at 141 Alexander Avenue at the corner of East 134th Street. To follow @chocobarcortesbx for hours, which are in flux right now. Dinner to come. Seating inside only for now. (718-841-9310; chocobarcortes.com)



Source link

read more
Canadian army

BTS Fans Celebrate V’s Birthday By Donating To Charities, Adopting

The end of December doesn’t just bring the holidays, it also brings V‘the birthday of!

December 30, BTS member — whose real name is Kim taehyung– turns 26e birthday and ARMY all over the world celebrate alongside him. From adopting tigers to building elementary schools, BTS fans are going out of their way to ‘Snow Flower’ the big day of the act.

Check out how ARMY is celebrating V’s birthday below.


Ahead of V’s birthday, the Malaysian military adopted a white tiger from Ampang Zoo Negara to celebrate the singer. They also collect donations to take care of the tiger, which they named “Kim Taehyung”. This is one of the many anniversary projects that fanclub Taehyung Malaysia has organized this year.

Billboards are a must for any K-pop birthday party, and ARMY certainly didn’t disappoint for V.’s birthday. From a special doll exhibit called TaeTae Land in Seoul to the large murals in Uruguay to city ​​bus, fans spread birthday joy everywhere!

In line with BTS vision to empower young people, Chinese BTS fans, in partnership with Chinese Foundation for Youth Development, organized fundraisers to build the Taehyung Hope Primary School to provide education to young children in rural China.

The project started in July 2020 for the singer’s 25th birthdaye birthday. Following the success of the project, the Chinese fanclub Baidu V bar are about to build another school in the name of V.

What is a birthday without gifts? But, instead of gifts to V himself, ARMY gives gifts to those in need.

From helping underprivileged and homeless children and supporting people with disabilities, to raising funds for animal shelters, fans have organized a series of charity projects to celebrate the BTS member.

The Canadian ARMY has a project up to ‘Winter bear’ alley of the act. Title The Taehyung Grove, this fan project raises funds to plant trees in northern British Columbia to help provide shelter for animals.


BTS are currently on “official extended rest period” following the success of their sold-out sale Permission to dance on stage in LA concerts earlier this month.

Check out V’s latest track “Christmas Tree” here:




Source link

read more
Non profit living

Pastor Monroe’s work to help underserved creates believers

Pastor Heather Boone once dubbed a campaign to buy a larger church for her growing community mission the “Miracle on Second Street,” and some say the title still applies to the neighborhood she remodeled. to help the under-served.

Oaks Village, a Monroe nonprofit that serves thousands of struggling residents each year, and its dynamic leader have drawn attention to their attention even on the little things that can change lives, from products to clothing to ‘interview. Boone recently won USA Today’s Best of Humankind Awards, and that award made her even more determined to serve.

If his mission was not simple, the way forward is now.

“We just want the world to know what we’re doing in this little corner,” Boone said. “And we hope others will replicate what we do.”

His victory caught the national attention of Boone and his team. She said this would only amplify their mission and broad reach in Oaks Village, with its grocery store, daycare, tutoring, addiction recovery, health clinic and more.

“She’s a great woman,” said Robert Tucker, a former resident of the Oaks shelter who now works there. “… This is not a job for her. It’s his life. “

The program had humble beginnings, with twists and turns and miracles reflecting the scriptures she often shares for inspiration.

Boone grew up in Detroit, where the 45-year-old said she was “a very bad teenager.”

Through a religious awakening and conversion at the age of 20, Boone joined the African Methodist Episcopal Church, met her husband, Britton, and became a youth pastor.

“Once I found God, I wanted to help other young people not to go through all the trials I went through,” she said.

Over a decade ago, Boone was assigned to lead a small congregation in Monroe. The denomination leaders wanted to relocate her after three years, “but I really felt that God had called us here,” she said. “My husband and I made the decision to start our own ministry. “

Inspired by a Bible passage referring to God’s people, the couple launched Oaks of Righteousness in 2012, meeting for the first time at a community center and school. The following year, they bought a building that once housed a Salvation Army church, which also housed shelter for the homeless during the colder months, Boone said.

The first winter drew over 90 people and convinced the Boones to establish a year-round facility. Guided by prayer, they moved into space while working to raise enough money to do so.

Then came what they called a divine turn of events which brought forth an abundance of blessings.

Learning that the Archdiocese of Detroit was selling the nearby St. Joseph’s Church, which had several buildings, Boone embarked on a “Miracle on 2nd Street” fundraising campaign. Supporters raised over $ 320,000 purchase the property in 2016, which paved the way for upgrading the shelter as well as expanding or creating initiatives under the umbrella of Oaks Village.

Today the shelter has 75 beds, with separate floors for men, women and families. Clients are offered help finding housing, recovering from drug addiction and more.

Among them is Eric Uselton, who recently moved there after meeting Britton Boone on the job. He said he lived in a motel in Detroit and spent hundreds of dollars a day on drug addiction.

This month, Uselton marked 35 days of abstinence. Before heading back to a bunk bed one recent night after volunteering to install spotlights outside, he praised the Boones and their work which he calls transformative.

“If I had stayed where I was, I would have ended up in jail or dead,” Uselton said. “They have their hearts in the right place and they do it for the right reasons. They don’t do it to get credit or anything like that. They do it because they are Christians and want to help.

News of this aid regularly draws hundreds of visitors to the mostly volunteer-run “campus” as well as numerous partnerships.

Boone has seen a growing need since the COVID-19 pandemic.

The US Census Bureau estimates that 9.7% of Monroe County residents live in poverty. According to the website of the national network of food banks Feeding America, the county has a food insecurity rate of about 11.9%.

Boone estimates that Oaks Village, which has an emergency pantry, summer lunch cafe and soup kitchen, serves up to 10,000 meals each year.

The donated items come from supporters such as David Voggenreiter, 16, who arrived with his father on Monday to unload canned goods, bread and other items.

The Monroe County Middle College student discovered the site while preparing for a civic engagement project and immediately decided to contribute. “It feels good to be able to help people,” Voggenreiter said.

This is the objective of the association, which also has a “clothes closet” full of accessories, toiletries and free household items as well as a free health clinic which has opened its doors. doors in 2019.

The clinic is run by medical staff from the ProMedica health system and dedicated volunteers such as Sandy Libstorff, a retired registered nurse who first met Boone after helping deliver a patient living at the homeless shelter. -shelter.

Much of their work is now focused on COVID-19 testing, Libstorff said, as well as on patients who “have had bad experiences with mainstream medical care and are suspicious”.

Noting that some patients have reported diabetes or high blood pressure and cholesterol without any transportation to reach fresh food, Boone and his team worked to acquire an old party store shortly before Christmas 2020 and turn it into one. neighborhood market with fresh produce.

Village Market opened this year through a partnership with Meijer, which supplies the products.

“Pastor Boone’s unique approach to bringing fresh food to an underserved community was compelling to us, and something we were delighted to support,” said Frank Guglielmi, senior director of corporate communications at Meijer.

The store participates in a state program that allows EBT / Bridge card users to ‘double’ their fruit and vegetable purchases and is a partner in the special federally funded supplemental nutrition program for women, infants and children. children. He also owns a cosmetics business, tutoring space, and products from a local independent dairy.

All of this “means access to the community,” Boone said as he stood in an aisle wearing a black shirt emblazoned with the words “Be kind.”

“We understand that we don’t have everything because we are still a very small store. But when you don’t have transportation, you can get the things you need.

Recognizing a need for some residents of the shelter and others in the neighborhood looking for work sparked another business. Acorn Children’s Village, which opened last year in a donated building renovated through an Art Van charity challenge that raised over $ 50,000, offers free, low-cost child care for children. children up to 5 years old.

It’s licensed for over 30 kids who “love to learn and grow with us,” said Becky McCollum-McCrea, who helped start the installation and working on it.

The longtime educator argues that the long waitlist for his classrooms is a testament to the community’s need and Boone’s vision.

“She has a genuine love for people, and I’ve seen miracles happen because of her,” McCollum-McCrea said. “In my entire life of involvement in the church, I have never seen anything like this happen. I just feel like God is giving him ideas on what is needed or what to do and before long it will come true.

This prompted Libstorff to nominate Boone to the USA Today competition, which recognizes “everyday people who have demonstrated the highest level of kindness, compassion and persistence,” her website said.

His nomination joined more than 600 others before an advisory committee selected the finalists and 72,000 votes were cast to determine the 11 winners.

In a ceremony broadcast live this month to announce the winners, NBC personality Jenna Bush Hager, daughter of former President George W. Bush, described Boone as “living a life of service.”

The accolade underscores the commitment of a pastor who is known to donate bedding if someone else needs it, Libstorff said. “She has dedicated her whole life to helping people. She is an incredible woman.

Tucker acknowledged his support for helping him quit drugs, embrace spirituality, and become a homeowner. “My fall has become a rise,” he said.

Kellie Vining, a member of Monroe City Council whose precinct includes the non-profit organization, said that “her generous spirit has rubbed off on a lot of people. She has a true pastor’s heart.”

Boone is now focused on the future. Amid her daily watch and long hours meeting with residents, she hopes to find support for a program to build affordable housing on plots near the market.

With her businesses making headlines, she gets calls from across the country to repeat the success.

“There is a role model we can give them,” Boone said. “It has been amazing because we want to be successful and multiply. “

[email protected]


Source link

read more
Non profit living

New famous free store | News, Sports, Jobs

MARQUETTE – The New Free Boutique is currently celebrating the fifth anniversary of its grand opening. It’s a small store with a big goal. A little story reveals how a group of determined organizers joined the community and enabled The New Free Store to supplement more than 1,175 families in need with some of the basic necessities of life.

In 2014, some members of a local church made a commitment to help community members who were experiencing financial difficulties. The group held a series of free clearance sales in the basement of their church, which soon became known as the “The free store”. The organizers have solicited donations from the community in order to be able to supplement the necessities of life for free as many people in financial difficulty as possible. The group worked tirelessly and formed an all-volunteer non-profit organization, renamed “The new free store.” In 2016, the store moved to a small apartment building in Harvey.

Adopt the philosophy: “In God’s economy, there is always enough” the store continues its mission of serving those who need it most with clothes, linens, towels, sheets, blankets and other lightly used items to help others lead healthier lives. New personal hygiene and housekeeping products are also distributed each month and are mainly purchased through grants from community organizations. All items in the store are free for registered participants.

The latest news today and more in your inbox


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Live With This Herbal Recipe From Youth Health Advocate Haile Thomas – Food Tank

At each age, Haile Thomas’ life has revolved around nutritious food. Her Jamaican immigrant mother taught her how to cook when she was five, and three years later, when her father was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, her family turned their diet and lifestyle into a nurturing center and restorative food. When Thomas was 12, she founded The organization HAPPY, a non-profit organization that promotes the mental and physical well-being of young people by developing knowledge about diet and self-advocacy. At 17, she was the youngest certified integrative health coach in the United States. With her messages of healthy eating and youth empowerment, she has appeared in the White House, at Food tank tops, and in the national media.

And last year she published a cookbook-slash-empowerment-manifesto, Live alive, which was nominated for an NAACP Image Award. In addition to the more than 80 herbal recipes, his book opens with a series of essays on his upbringing, how we are shaped by what we consume and Thomas’s seven “Power Points”. From wellness and relationships, to education, creativity and community, and conversations with young women who embody these principles, Thomas breaks down the components of a lively life. And as one of the essays notes, the book is meant to be interactive – “a place where food stains and deep thoughts can coexist!” She writes – so there are journal pages and writing prompts to encourage thought and action.

“We really want [youth] see food and cooking as something that can really permeate their daily life and be something super fun and accessible ”, Thomas told Food Tank President Danielle Nierenberg at the Food Tank Summit 2018.

For our third monthly cookbook series, Food Tank is excited to share Thomas’ recipe for Red Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Chimichurri Sauce. If you missed the first few installments of our cookbook series, we’ve featured two recipes from Jubilee, Toni Tipton-Martin’s award-winning exploration of hundreds of years of black cuisine, and a selection of fall recipes from Beth Dooley’s local and seasonal cookbook The lively cuisine. Make sure to grab these recipes, but first, join us as we cook and live a busy life with Haile Thomas!

And one more thing: when you cook this recipe at home, let us know! Tag us on social media @FoodTank or #FoodTank so we can admire your meals and share your photos.

* * * * *

Red roasted cauliflower steaks with chimichurri sauce

Makes 4 servings

Knowing how to season and roast a good cauliflower steak is essential at home, so I pass this favorite recipe on to you! Due to the neutral flavor of cauliflower, it’s a great canvas for spices and sauces that really pop. Serve with your favorite vegetables and grains!

—Haile Thomas, Living Lively: 80 Herbal Recipes To Activate Your Power And Nurture Your Potential

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER

  • 1 tablespoon of garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon of paprika
  • 1 tablespoon of dried thyme
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 medium cauliflower, cut through the core into four slices about ½ inch thick
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil

CHIMICHURRI SAUCE

  • ½ cup of fresh cilantro, leaves and stems
  • ½ cup of fresh parsley, leaves and stems
  • ¼ cup fresh basil leaves
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • Kosher salt

1. To roast the cauliflower: Preheat the oven to 425 ° F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. In a medium bowl, combine garlic powder, paprika, thyme, cayenne pepper and salt to taste.

3. Arrange the cauliflower “steaks” on the prepared baking sheet and drizzle with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Sprinkle the herb and spice mixture evenly on both sides of each cauliflower steak. Drizzle the cauliflower steaks with the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil.

4. Roast for 20 to 25 minutes, until the cauliflower is golden and crisp on top.

5. Meanwhile, to make the chimichurri sauce: In a food processor, combine the cilantro, parsley, basil, garlic, olive oil, vinegar and salt to taste and mix until smooth consistency. Put aside.

6. Drizzle the steaks with the chimichurri sauce and serve.

From LIVING LIVELY by Haile Thomas Copyright © 2020 by Haile Thomas. Reprinted with permission from William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Join the conversation:


Source link

read more
Non profit living

An aging country shows others how to manage

ESINCE 1,495 residents of Gojome, a town in northern Japan, gathered for a morning market. One recent weekday, along a street with closed and almost empty shops, elderly vendors display their autumn wares: mushrooms and chestnuts, okra, eggplants and pears. It wasn’t always so empty, sighs Ogawa Kosei, who runs a bookstore on the street. He shows pictures taken by his father which show the scene filled with customers.

Gojome’s population has halved since 1990. More than half of its residents are over the age of 65, making it one of the oldest towns in Akita, the oldest prefecture in Japan, which is in its own right. tour the oldest country in the world. Still, Gojome is less of an outlier than an omen. According to UN, each country is experiencing growth in the size and proportion of its elderly population; by 2050, one in six people in the world will be over 65, up from one in eleven in 2019. UN also predicts that 55 countries, including China, will see their populations decline by 2050.

Demographic change has two drivers that are often grouped together: increasing longevity and a falling birth rate. Their convergence requires “a new map of life,” explains Akiyama Hiroko, founder of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Tokyo. The infrastructure created when the population was younger and the population pyramid more solid must be rethought, from health to housing to transport. The new reality demands a “completely different way of thinking,” says Kashiwa Kazuyori, head of Gojome’s planning department. When he started working in the 1970s, the focus was on growth. Now it is a matter of managing the decline.

Part of the challenge is that demographic change affects everyone differently. Two cities or regions may look alike from afar, but have distinct historical, cultural and environmental conditions; two people can be the same age, earn the same money, and live on the same street, but have different mental and physical health. “Context is often lacking,” says Kudo Shogo of Akita International University. He is one of dozens of young foreigners who have been welcomed to Gojome, which was a trade hub at the crossroads of agricultural districts. Comparable agriculture-focused neighbors have been less open to newcomers.

This makes it difficult to design a national policy. “There is no single model,” says Iio Jun, political scientist at HANDLES. While the national government is responsible for finances, including pensions, the new life map is best drawn from scratch. A lot of ideas come from listening to citizens, says Ms. Akiyama. “They know what the problems are and often they know how to solve them. “

One question is how aging is discussed: as a problem or a burden. “Older people feel that society doesn’t need them,” says Hatakeyama Junko, 70, head of Akita Partnership, a non-profit organization that runs a community center. Longevity in itself is not a problem, it should be celebrated. Problems arise when people lead long but unhealthy, lonely or dependent lives. The goal in Japan has shifted from increasing life expectancy to improving “healthy and independent life expectancy,” says Akiyama.

It means finding ways for older people to continue working. Almost half of the 65-69 age group and a third of the 70-74 age group are employed. The Japanese Gerontological Society has called for reclassifying people aged 65 to 74 as “pre-old.” Ms. Akiyama talks about creating “second life workplaces”. But the work of the second life will be different from that of the first; its contribution may not be easily captured in growth statistics. “We need to strive for well-being, not just economic productivity,” says Akiyama. Experiences abound, from municipalities that train retirees to become farmers, to businesses that encourage older employees to launch startups. The elderly “want dignity and respect,” says Matsuyama Daiko of Taizo-in temple in Kyoto, which has a “second life program” that offers courses for retirees to become priests.

The other key is to stay healthy, physically and mentally. Wiser municipalities focus on preventive care. At the stylish Kadokawa Care Center, a former school in Toyama, northwest Tokyo, 70s, 80s and 90s splash about in a pool and soar on exercise machines. “Without this place, I would be in a retirement home,” exclaims Kyoda Taketoshi, 82. Socialization is no less important. “It was expensive to build this place, but it was worth it,” says Saito Yoneaki, 80, before jumping to join friends in the sauna. Although healthy life expectancy in Japan is eight to 12 years less than overall life expectancy, the gap narrowed slightly between 2010 and 2016.

The birth rate is more difficult to change. It fell to 1.34 in 2020, well below the 2.1 needed to maintain a stable population. Even if Japan could increase it, rural areas would still struggle. One study estimates that more than half of Japan’s 1,700 municipalities could disappear by 2040, as young people, especially women, leave. Yet while a return to growth is unlikely in most regions, there is an alternative to outright disappearance: a critical core of newcomers. Even a handful of transplants can revitalize an aging city without fully replacing the population, notes Iio.

Gojome is a good example. Although the population is decreasing, “a new wind is blowing in the city”, explains Watanabe Hikobe, its mayor. Over the past decade, a small group of young foreigners have arrived, drawn by visions of a slow, bucolic life, and the chance to try out new models of loose work and community living. Yanagisawa Ryu, 34, a computer science graduate from Japan’s leading university, quit his job in Tokyo and became a “social entrepreneur”. He oversees Babame Base, a business center in an empty school in Gojome that is home to a graphic design studio, an ecotourism business, a local doctor, and a business that trains farmers in the use of drones, among others.

Such “urban migrants” are still a relative rarity. Mr. Yanagisawa admits his college friends find his lifestyle choices “weird.” But in many ways, they are the vanguard. “Rather than trying to recreate the past, we need to think about: what kind of community, what kind of city do we want now? Mr. Kudo said. They are not the only foreigners to settle.

This article appeared in the Special Feature section of the print edition under the title “Le vieux pays”


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Confront the “myth of more money”

Part three in a series on the last eight years of my Seattle housing work.

From 2016 until the end of Washington State’s legislative session in 2019, I changed my approach to challenge the idea of ​​charging fees on new housing development and giving that money to organizations in non-profit. My argument was that the state’s largest city, Seattle, enforced the most rules, slowing production and thus creating higher prices as demand increased. As a result, most of the state’s available grants were consumed by Seattle, which was unfair to the rest of the state. Not only that, I argued, but building nonprofit housing in Seattle was very expensive and inefficient. Conventional wisdom was and still is that what is needed to solve housing problems is not more housing, but more and more money.

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to challenge big business and government allies to crush your critics, forget the idea that it’s like the movie Silkwood. There is no Cher or Kurt Russell and above all there is no journalist waiting somewhere to write about it. It’s more like the X Files, if you go up against the big guys you’ll be caught on and ignored. The prize will be an effort to make you irrelevant, mad, or part of some kind of unreasonable clique. I had no idea when I took over the industrial non-profit housing complex.

Here is my logic. Having been a nonprofit developer, I knew these developers had to face a steep climb to build their projects, arguably a steeper climb than for-profit developers. The number of contracts, commitments, and acres of paperwork were all stacked on the same demands as the for-profit sector: finding land, zoning, design review, utilities, and labor costs. But because they had political favors, they could ask for more money to solve these problems and the political structure would oblige them with interventions like Mandatory Housing Affordability, the program that would make it worse and not better for the poor because “affordable housing” would be paid for. for with higher rents (see my last post and many more).

I knew the costs and difficulty of building non-profit housing, housing paid for by the MHA program, when exposed, could make people question the whole program itself. If nothing else, if I could find a way to show that more money was being spent on subsidized nonprofit housing in Seattle (where the MHA extortion program operated) than in the Washington countryside. , maybe we could force a conversation. The data supported my point; housing subsidies were consumed quickly by the state’s most blatant regulator of housing production, Seattle. If I could show that this was done to the detriment of the poorest immigrant farm workers, maybe we could get the press interested.

So I analyzed years of data from the state’s Housing Trust Fund and found that indeed, subsidies were piling up in Seattle while in rural areas, workers lived in their cars. I wrote an opinion piece on how access to water was choking the supply in rural areas and thus harming rural workers, primarily immigrants to Mexico. It infuriated House Speaker Frank Chopp as much as it pleased lawmakers in rural Washington, who were outraged by the rushed court decision by a left-wing Seattle advocacy organization. I had entered into a long-standing conflict on the side of the rural Republicans. Here I was a former Democrat from Seattle, working with Republicans.

My conversations with the President and with the Republican leaders were strange; I was making a valid argument, which went against everyone’s sensitivity. Democrats felt out of place, justifying more and more spending on expensive housing in Seattle (up to $ 500,000 per unit) while talking about how much they cared about rural immigrants, the people who did not benefit from housing subsidies because of rampant spending. in Seattle. Republicans were resistant to big spending schemes and more bureaucracy. So my proposal for a farm worker housing authority to take money out of Seattle and funnel it to farm worker housing fell on deaf ears there. I had managed to make valid points, but the policy was not in favor of the solution, of big changes in the subsidy system and of better management.

In a passive and aggressive Washington, my efforts have certainly been noticed. The President complimented me in an argument saying, “People are mad at you! ” Sure. But making people uncomfortable does not necessarily lead to policy change. Both left and right seem to have made peace with the inefficient way of subsidizing housing. I failed to convince Republicans in the Legislature to support the idea of ​​making the system fairer, and farmers and nonprofit real estate developers in rural Washington seemed intimidated by the task of taking over. the well-funded and politically connected non-profit organization. housing agencies in Seattle.

My campaign against the non-profit housing complex was a failure. He revealed, however, that there is an ongoing disparity in the way housing is subsidized in Washington. Recently, I showed how tax credits are pouring into Seattle, even though there is more poverty in rural Washington. Being white and awake means more money for housing. It was a deadly battle that exhausted many of my supporters, but I’m glad I made the effort. With all the money raised from the fees generated by the MHA fees and other largesse of recent federal legislation, I know the problem will not be solved with more money. It will get worse. The day may come when everyone can do the math and agree that fairness and efficiency are compassionate and that inflation is the greatest enemy of the poor.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

After chronic illness, San José woman seeks help to become independent

Almost two decades after leaving the Philippines for San José, Nerissa Ramirez’s life finally started to get easier.

She had climbed the assembly line at an electronics company in Fremont and bought her first car. At night, she spent time with friends or attended local meetings of Jehovah’s Witnesses.

But then she was diagnosed with lupus – a chronic autoimmune disease in which the body attacks its own organs and tissues – as well as kidney disease.

“All of a sudden I’m fighting with my body,” recalls Ramirez, 52. “It was so hard.”

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Nerissa Ramirez cries as she shares the story of her struggles on October 12, 2021, at her new apartment in San Jose, Calif. (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group)

In the years since that 2012 diagnosis, that fight reduced Ramirez’s independence to a fraction of what it once was. After years of working and living alone, her illness forced her to spend most of the past year in a skilled nursing facility, receiving grueling dialysis treatment four times a week, and depending on others. for tasks such as eating, bathing and using the toilet.

It was around this time that she met Tita Das, a case manager at the Silicon Valley Independent Living Center, a non-profit organization that offers people with disabilities in Santa Clara County a range of free services, such as the advocacy, peer counseling and helping with the transition from hospital to independent living.

“I could see she was very sick,” Das said, “but she has that motivation, that aspiration.” Das began to think about a key question: “What can we take away from her so that her journey can end in at least one way?” “

To that end, the association hopes that donations collected through Wish Book can help make Ramirez’s life a little more comfortable.

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Tita Das, Case Manager at Silicon Valley Independent Living Center, speaks during an interview at Nerissa Ramirez’s apartment in San Jose, Calif. On October 12, 2021 (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group)

His journey so far has been marred by painful setbacks. Within months of being first diagnosed with lupus, Ramirez’s energy wore off. She was forced to reduce her working hours in the electronics business and was so exhausted that she could barely move her hands or get out of bed.

As she suffered from different flare-ups, she bounced back between treatments, even going through chemotherapy at one point. A bright spot came in January 2018, when Ramirez finally obtained U.S. citizenship and planned to return home to her home province in the Philippines to reunite with her mother for the first time in 25 years.

Shortly before his arrival, his mother passed away.

“I’ve never seen her, for how many years?” Ramirez said, covering his face with both hands as tears rolled down his cheeks. “I’m so sad – very, very sad.”

She has spent this winter in the Philippines, trying to follow the advice of her doctors to stay stress free and take advantage of the warm weather. The following fall, an unexpected glimmer of hope appeared: Thanks to church friends, she met a man and they started talking every day. After a few months of dating, they got married.

It was this sense of liveliness that Das and the rest of the SVILC team noticed when they first met Ramirez. FaceTiming her husband back in the Philippines before going to bed and eating with friends.

“Even though I’m in this kind of situation, I really, really want to live a normal life like everyone else,” Ramirez said.

Working together under the Section 811 Federal Disability Assistance Program, SVILC was able to secure Ramirez a two-bedroom apartment in San Jose and she left the nursing home in August. Since then, the cozy apartment she shares with a caretaker has been lovingly decorated, with a large portrait of a lush cascading island reminiscent of the Philippines.

But depending so much on others creates constant challenges: Sometimes the van that transports Ramirez to and from dialysis is late, forcing the center to cut his treatment short. Other times, he drops her off in front of his apartment building, too far away to walk the long hallway to the elevator unassisted.

“I am crying, but I have to be patient,” Ramirez said of these cases. ” I can not do anything. Just be patient and keep talking to the right person who can help me.

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Afternoon light shines on Nerissa Ramirez as she spends time in her new apartment in San Jose, Calif. On October 12, 2021 (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group )

Ramirez and Das seek help from Wish Book readers to secure his first motorized wheelchair, which would ensure Ramirez is never left stranded outside his apartment. And to make it easier to access and return to dialysis sessions, they are also looking for help buying a car to refurbish with manual controls.

There is one more thing: a plane ticket for her husband to emigrate from the Philippines. Ramirez – who has already been approved to be her godfather – took an affectionate look at the bench she placed in the kitchen so they could dine side by side.

Until she arrives, she said, she will remain “positive, positive, positive.”

“Whatever happened, it’s happened before,” Ramirez said. “We have to keep moving forward. “

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Nerissa Ramirez chats with her husband, who lives in the Philippines, at his new apartment in San Jose on October 12, 2021 (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group)

THE WISH BOOK SERIES
The Wish Book is an annual series of The Mercury News that invites readers to help their neighbors.

TO WISH
Donations will help Nerissa Ramirez – a client of the Silicon Valley Independent Living Center – purchase a motorized bariatric wheelchair, power recliner, used vehicle with manual controls as well as a one-way trip from the Philippines to San José. Objective: $ 23,700.

HOW TO GIVE
Donate at wishbook.mercurynews.com or send the coupon by mail.

ONLINE SUPPLEMENT
Read more Wish Book stories, view photos and videos at wishbook.mercurynews.com.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

New Catawba College graduate Madison Kluge leads Salisbury towards sustainability goals – Salisbury Post

By Natalie Anderson
[email protected]

SALISBURY – Newly graduated Madison Kluge from Catawba College became the city’s first sustainability coordinator earlier this year, and she stepped up to help transform the goals of a more sustainable lifestyle into reality.

Kluge, 21, graduated from Catawba College earlier this year with a degree in environment and sustainability. She began an internship with the Salisbury Public Works Department in February before assuming a full-time role as Sustainability Coordinator in May. In 2020, she also completed an internship at Bread Riot, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting local farmers and providing access to locally produced food. Kluge said she was still a volunteer for Bread Riot.

Also during his stay in Catawba, Kluge did an internship at the school’s Environmental Center for over two years. She said her teachers helped guide her to the position she currently holds, which suits her well as she enjoys coordinating and collaborating with multiple groups.

Kluge, from Maryland, said she was living in Mocksville when her sister decided to attend Catawba College, which resulted in several trips to Salisbury with the option to explore while her sister was in class.

“I fell in love with the city, the culture it has here, the possibility of growth and the good people,” Kluge said.

Much of his work now requires him to strengthen relationships with city, county, and nonprofit organizations, in addition to strengthening environmental education and awareness of sustainable living.

Kluge is working with city staff to help draft the Forward 2040 plan, which aims to frame priorities and decisions over the next 20 years as Salisbury. In addition to this, Kluge is responsible for working on the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals of Salisbury City Council.

“I help steer the city towards a sustainable mindset,” Kluge said. “And put the goals they have in mind into perspective and make them come true.”

In March, board members adopted a set of goals for 2021 following a goal setting retreat in February. Among the priorities for the city’s infrastructure and human capital was the focus on reducing waste and promoting efficiency as well as improving infrastructure to promote foot and bicycle transport. In addition, council members have indicated that they want to support public transit for neighboring communities and explore alternative modes of transportation.

Also this year, the city used an amount of $ 818,000 Volkswagen Public transportation / facility shuttle program gdiatribe from the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality to purchase two electric buses for Salisbury Transit. Kluge said finding and applying for such grants is another part of his job. She is currently working to obtain a community subsidy for waste reduction from the NCDEQ.

Kluge told Salisbury that much of the thinking “towards sustainability” is already in place among residents and staff, which is part of what attracts him to the position. She said she is often pushed by older residents and colleagues who want to see Salisbury flourish with things such as increased use of electric vehicles and improved air quality.

“It is really my colleagues and community members who inspire me to help Salisbury follow this green vision,” she said.

Although her role falls under the Public Works Department, Kluge said she often works with communications and planning staff.

Current projects include a new Sustainability Salisbury newsletter, the first edition of which will be launched in January. This newsletter will provide more information and education for a sustainable lifestyle in Salisbury. She is also working to roll out more sustainability education through social media apps like TikTok and Instagram.

Other initiatives Kluge is working on include increasing awareness of waste, recycling, composting and waste prevention during the holiday season, promoting city and county parks, and working with neighboring schools to implement more sustainability-oriented programs. In 2022, the city will launch a nature city challenge in the spring on the occasion of Earth Day. City Nature Challenge is an event that takes place across the country, where local residents take photos and make observations of nature in their area and support the city’s naturalists.

Among its long-term goals is establishing a more robust internship program where students from Catawba, for example, can intern with the city to conduct research on sustainability, which is beneficial to the community. both for the city and students interested in careers related to sustainable development.

Eventually, Kluge said she would like to see the city’s composting program expanded to accept more types of waste. Creating a carbon inventory to assess how much carbon the city sees is another long-term goal that requires a lot of training that it is currently undergoing.

Additionally, another goal is to work with businesses to create a business alliance and neighborhood alliance with established sustainability goals, including increased recycling and waste reduction initiatives.

Kluge suggests that city residents take advantage of the free compost available at the Grants Creek Composting Facility, located at 1955 Grubb Ferry Road. Residents can pick up the compost generated from the previous year’s yard waste on Friday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, contact [email protected] or call 704-638-5260.

Contact reporter Natalie Anderson at 704-797-4246.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Avondale’s new workforce housing symbolizes hope and success for black residents

CINCINNATI – A workforce housing development is coming to Avondale, and residents have said they are thrilled with the hope and wealth the project is supposed to bring to the community.

The Avondale Development Corporation inaugurated the first phase of the Hale Avenue Townhomes project on Thursday. Seven new townhouses with two and three bedroom units will be built on land on Hale Avenue between Harvey Avenue and Hallwood Place. The units will cost between $ 230,000 and $ 260,000, prices suited to families earning 120% of the region’s median income.

“It gives families the opportunity to own property here in the community instead of just relying on apartment living,” said Terresa Adams, Treasurer of the Avondale Community Council.

Vince Terry, vice president of ADC, said the development is in Cincinnati’s second highest employment area, “so having the property here within walking distance of a lot of jobs is going to be amazing.”

The subdivision means many achievements for its leaders, almost all from disadvantaged backgrounds. The Townhouses are the first development led by black women in Avondale, with Maria Collins of ADC and architect Bridget Harris, president of BTH Construction Delivery, at the helm. The project is also notable for being primarily supported by entities owned and operated by people of color – Kaiker Development & Construction, owned by Kai Lewars, is the general contractor for the project.

“It has been wonderful working with the other companies and organizations who have all contributed professionally to this project,” Lewars said.

Lewars noted how rare it is for black businesses to have the opportunity to collaborate and make developments like townhouses a reality. The fact that this was a black-led development helped allay fears from onlookers who thought townhouses would lead to gentrification.

“From the community itself to the black professionals who have been under contract, whether under contract or volunteering, it took a bit of everyone to bring it to fruition – and I know the community has it. appreciates, ”Lewars said. .

“Being a minority woman leading this charge and being our first project as a non-profit organization, many people have questioned whether we would have the ability or the capacity to make it happen,” said Maria Collins. . , ADC’s director of real estate and community development. “I think that’s what’s really important in this whole process and why we encountered so many obstacles. We did not yet have a proven track record.

Still, Collins said a small group of people believed in the effort and helped move his team forward.

“These people have worked with us to make sure we can innovate on this project and I appreciate their support and partnership to date,” Collins said.

This is ADC’s first stand-alone project. There will ultimately be two dozen townhouses built on Hale and Hallwood avenues in three phases. The houses are particularly marketed to blacks and first time buyers. Organizers say they want to foster opportunities for aspiring black homeowners and provide them with equity in the neighborhood.

CDA officials note that only about 27% of Avondale residents are homeowners, while the remaining vast majority of residents are in rental properties. They hope projects like the Hale Avenue townhouses will continue to introduce more affordable housing to Avondale and surrounding areas.

“There just isn’t enough of that stock in Cincinnati and we’re excited to be able to provide it,” said Harris. “This is something that hasn’t happened in the past, and it makes it even more special that we are really here, that we are innovating and that this project is going to move and build. “

“We want to make a sizable difference in what it means to own a home here in Avondale so that when you think of this community as an owner, you think of it as a place where you want your kids to be, your grand- parents be. You want to be able to contribute to the community and make it a great place, ”said Royce Sutton, CDA Chairman of the Board.

These townhouses are part of a dramatic increase in major neighborhood improvements and investments in what was once a struggling neighborhood. Last month, Fifth Third Bank announced it was investing $ 20 million in Avondale as part of an effort to revitalize predominantly black neighborhoods across the country.

Nearby, the expansion of the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and the development of the Uptown Innovation Corridor on Martin Luther King Boulevard are further signs of Avondale’s transformation in real time. Despite all the changes, leaders say they want all residents, new and old, to feel like they have a place in the community.

“Avondale is one of the most sought after communities in town right now,” said Tony Moore, chair of the Avondale Community Council. “What concerns us is: how do we get the current residents to stay who want to stay and get them to mingle with the new residents? It is our job: to keep what we have and to grow with what we will have.

Like Moore, Russell Hairston, the executive director of the Avondale Development Corporation, acknowledges the concerns of longtime residents who fear eviction due to the new development coming to the neighborhood. It supports affordable housing projects like the Hale Avenue Townhouses as a solution for the most vulnerable people to always find stability and a better quality of life in Avondale. He is also optimistic about the positive message this development sends to the community.

“When you’ve faced intergenerational poverty, when you’ve faced crime, when you’ve faced all the hardships that a distressed community has to go through, it’s uplifting to see the development. It’s uplifting to see homeownership. It’s edifying for kids to see that if they want to be an architect, developer, banker, or association manager, look: you can do it.

Monique John covers gentrification for WCPO 9. She is part of our donor-supported journalism program Report For America. Learn more about RFA here.

If there are any stories about gentrification in the Greater Cincinnati area that you think we should cover, let us know. Send us your tips at [email protected]


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Bezos Day One Fund Provides $ 2.5 Million to Family Life Center in Kahului, Maui

Family life center, Kahului. File photo by Wendy Osher.

Family Life Center, Inc., a non-profit organization serving the homeless on the islands of Maui, Moloka’i and Kaua’i, has been selected to receive a $ 2.5 million grant from Bezos Day One Families Fund, the largest grant in the history of the Family Life Center. .

This is the second year in a row that the organization has received a donation from the Bezos Day One Families Fund. In 2020, the association received $ 1.25 million from the same fund. The Family Life Center is one of 32 organizations in 21 states, and the only one in Hawaii to be included in funding allocations this year.

Launched in 2018 by Amazon Founder and Executive Chairman Jeff Bezos, the Day One Families Fund presents annual leadership awards to organizations and civic groups doing compassionate and needle-moving work to provide shelter and support. against hunger in order to meet the immediate needs of young families.

“The Family Life Center is incredibly grateful to the Day 1 Families Fund, which has so generously supported our organization for the second year in a row,” said Maude Cumming, Executive Director of the Family Life Center. “Our Day One Families Fund 2020 grant allowed us to expand our reach beyond Maui and Kaua’i to reach Moloka’i as well. This year’s donation will allow us to improve and expand the services we offer on the three islands.

This one-time grant will allow the Family Life Center to continue expanding its services on the islands of Kaua’i and Moloka’i, where the homeless population is “very underserved,” according to Cumming. The organization also plans to develop a suitable shelter model for families, replicating a pioneering approach during the COVID-19 pandemic in Maui.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW THE AD

Family Life Center was selected as a Day One Families Fund grant recipient by an independent advisory board of homeless experts with experience in politics, advocacy, racial equity, protection child and housing and service delivery, as well as direct experience of homelessness.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW THE AD

This year, the Day One Families Fund awarded a total of $ 96.2 million in grants to dozens of organizations across the country.

“Without the support of the Family Life Center, my family and I may still be living in our car,” said a former client of the Family Life Center. “I am so grateful to have a home for our son. We will never be homeless again.

The Bezos Day One Fund has pledged $ 2 billion to focus on creating meaningful and lasting impacts in two areas: funding existing nonprofits that help homeless families and the creation of a network of new non-profit first-level preschools in low-income communities. .

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

The Day One Families Fund presents annual leadership awards to organizations and civic groups that do compassionate and needle-moving work to provide shelter and support from hunger to meet the immediate needs of young families.

Since 2018, the Day One Families Fund has awarded 130 grants totaling more than $ 398 million to organizations across the country that fight homelessness and help families gain housing and stability. The vision statement comes from Mary’s Place in Seattle: No child sleeps outside.

Founded in 1982, the Family Life Center serves the homeless in Maui County. The organization has grown to employ over 40 employees. As a primary resource for homelessness services in Maui County and a growing key resource in Kaua’i and Moloka’i, the organization has assisted over 1,271 families over the past three years.

The Family Life Center offers a holistic approach to meeting the needs of the homeless through a wide range of services, including outreach, shelter, shelter and prevention services.

Bezos recently purchased a 14 acre Maui beachfront estate at Keoneʻōʻio “La Perouse” in the Mākena area of ​​South Maui.

The Family Life donation is the latest in a list of contributions Bezos made to Maui this year. Other donations were made to:


Source link

read more
History organization

Delta Chi Brotherhood Helps Clean Up Greystone | News, Sports, Jobs

Delta Chi fraternity members at the pitch in Greystone.

The Delta Chi Brotherhood of SUNY Fredonia recently spent three days serving Greystone Nature Reserve. The men performed a variety of tasks, including removing invasive species, supporting gardening activities, harvesting crops, and reassembling piles of wood. All of this vigorous work was aimed at helping Greystone Nature Reserve prepare for the upcoming winter season. Greystone Nature Preserve is a non-profit organization whose mission is to preserve 72 acres of Chautauqua County by eliminating invasive species and planting native trees and shrubs while caring for native animal species. It also provides experiential environmental education to surrounding schools, organizations and individuals.

Delta Chi is a fraternity of service whose mission is to help students who seek structure, direction and fellowship.

Their chapter started at SUNY Fredonia in 1991, making this their 30th anniversary.

Their goals are to promote friendship, advance justice, develop character and help in acquiring a good education. Throughout their 30 years of history in the Dunkirk and Fredonia region, community service continues to be one of their main objectives.

Current President Dylan Serrano explained why they are focused on giving back to the community they call home.

“We think it’s important to lend a helping hand because the community has been so supportive of our fundraising and philanthropy efforts. We just want to give back the support we have received and continue to be an organization that the people of our community are proud of. Too often fraternities are seen as a black eye for a college town, causing trouble and disrupting the peace. We believe that with the continuous teaching of our values, we can be quite the opposite, as an ally of our neighbors rather than a nuisance ”.

Delta Chi plans to help with a variety of other causes, including cleaning veterans’ headstones at Forest Hill Cemetery, working at Friendly Kitchen in Dunkirk serving breakfast and lunch to the less fortunate, and attending Fredonia’s “Autumn sweep” managed by the Applied Communications Association (ACA).

Delta Chi continues to explore the community for more opportunities to help.

If organizations request their services, they can be contacted through their Community Services Representative, Jamison Horch, by phone at (716) 248-4821 or by email at [email protected]

The latest news today and more in your inbox


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Music in the Mountains live choral concert on November 7 – YubaNet

Nevada County’s Music in the Mountains (MIM) will present its fall choral concert this Sunday, November 7 at 3 p.m. at the Center for the Arts in Grass Valley, California.

Under the direction of artistic director and conductor Ryan Murray, the MIM 60-Voice Choir and select musicians from the orchestra will be joined by renowned organist Dr. Ryan Enright; and the haunting soprano soloist, Liisa Davila.

Organist Dr. Ryan Enright holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees and an artist’s diploma in organ performance from McGill University. He participated in international competitions; its awards include first prizes in the Canadian Music Competition and the National Organ Performing Competition of the Royal Canadian College of Organists. Dr. Enright is known regionally for his performances in the San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento and for accompanying the Sacramento Choral Society and Orchestra (SCSO) on their tour of Italy.

Soprano Liisa Davila is recognized for her vocal clarity and dazzling coloratura, combined with a richness and depth that enables her to possess a highly desired level of versatility in her work. Its repertoire includes both traditional and contemporary works. She has appeared in Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, Mendelssohn’s Christmas Oratorio, Mozart’s Mass in C minor as well as Handel’s Messiah,

The highlight of the program will be Dan Forrest’s Requiem for the Living, composed in 2013, which garners widespread acclaim as it is discovered around the world. Conductor Murray describes this work as “neo-romantic”, with rich melodies and harmonies. The ethereal movement of Sanctus in this piece was inspired by photos from the Hubble Space Telescope.

“For anyone interested in vocal music this is a must see gig,” said Murray. “” Forrest’s Requiem is one of the choir’s favorite pieces and is packed with beautiful melodies, incredible solos, and some of the greatest choral moments in the repertoire. It will truly be an unforgettable concert!

Under Murray’s direction, the MIM Chorus is an auditioned group of experienced singers from Nevada County and surrounding communities with roots dating back to the 1960s. With weekly rehearsals and individual studies and practices, the MIM Chorus is dedicated to presenting superior performance and to maintain professional standards of excellence. The group presents an ambitious summer music festival, performs with the MIM Orchestra and wows audiences with two performances of their popular holiday concert in December.

Murray will give a 30-minute talk before the concert at 2 p.m. before the concert, for those who want to know more about the compositions on the program and their composers, as well as the pleasure of singing.

In addition to his work with Music in the Mountains, Ryan Murray is also the Associate Conductor of the Modesto Symphony Orchestra. He is also Director of the Symphony Orchestra and Opera at California State University, Sacramento, and Conductor of the First Orchestra of the Sacramento Youth Symphony. Award-winning opera conductor, Murray is currently Music Director of Opera Modesto.

Music in the Mountains is a Nevada County-based non-profit organization that celebrates 40 years of delivering classical music live to the Sierra Foothills, Metro Sacramento and surrounding communities. Tickets for the MIM Holiday choral concerts are available online at musicinthemountains.org, at the box office at 131 S. Auburn Street, Grass Valley, or by calling 530-265-6124.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Lake Chamber presents awards to community leaders at fall dinner

It was a great evening for the Lake District Chamber of Commerce.

The chamber last week held its annual fall dinner and awards ceremony in Camden on the Lake.

Among the awards during the evening, the Boy Scouts Great Rivers Council was named Nonprofit of the Year.

“The scouts have been going well here at the Lake of the Ozarks. The Cubs, the BSA scouts all survived 2020 and I think we’re doing pretty well ” says BSA executive director Chris Harper on behalf of the Boy Scouts.

Other accolades include: Mike Smith of Precision Auto with the President’s Award, Morgan Crainshaw with Arrowhead Senior Living and Luke Hagedorn with Dog Days (and, of course, KRMS / 93.5 Rocks the Lake) sharing the honor of being a member of the Board of Directors of the Year, Sandy Waggett as Distinguished Citizen of the Year, Sam Beck as Young Professional of the Year, the Barrett Restaurant Group as Big Business of the Year and Ball Parks National as the small business of the year.

There were also 10 business members known to have been with the chamber for 25 years.

***Read more:

Lake District Chamber of Commerce hosts annual fall dinner and awards ceremony

LAKE OZARK, Mo. – Over 200 members of the Lake business community gathered for the Lake Area Chamber of Commerce Annual Fall Dinner and Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, October 27, 2021 at Camden on the Lake Resort and Conference Center .

Seven prestigious prizes were awarded throughout the evening in the following categories:
Non-Profit Organization of the Year, Small Business of the Year, Large Business of the Year, Young Professional of the Year, Board Member of the Year, Emeritus Citizen of the Year and Awards Of the president.

The winners of the LACC Annual Awards 2021 are:

  • Nonprofit of the Year: Great Rivers Council – Boy Scouts of America
  • Small Business of the Year: BallParks National
  • Great Business of the Year: Barrett Restaurant Group
  • Young Professional of the Year: Sam Beck – Edward Jones – Financial Advisor
  • Distinguished Citizen of the Year: Sandy Waggett – MSW Interactive

Lake Area Chamber staff presented the Board Member of the Year award to Morgan Crainshaw with Arrowhead Senior Living and Luke Hagedorn with Dog Days Bar and Grill for their exceptional service to the Lake Area Chamber and the countless hours spent serving. Mike Smith of Precision Auto & Tire Services received the President’s Award in recognition of his outstanding service to the Lake Area Chamber and the Lake community.

Members of the Lake District Chamber of Commerce celebrating 25 years of membership were also recognized. These members include:

  • Central Bank – Lake of the Ozarks
  • Old kindergarten crochet
  • Instant signs and banners
  • S. Station management
  • Town of Linn Creek
  • Windows and more
  • Holiday Inn Express
  • StoneBridge retirement home
  • Miller companies
  • Lutheran Church of Christ the King

The Lake District Chamber of Commerce is a non-profit membership organization with over 590 members ranging from home businesses to large corporations. The House’s mission is to enhance economic and community prosperity in the Lake of the Ozarks region by providing services and advocating for businesses. To learn more about the Chamber, including membership, please contact Casey Alexander, Director of Membership, at (573) 964-1008 or [email protected]


Source link

read more
Non profit living

-profit celebrates 10 years of healing with horses | Online features

Silver Lining Riding, a non-profit organization providing adaptive riding and horse-assisted therapy, celebrates 10 years of helping others heal through horses.

The organization, located at 7220 N. 185th Avenue in Waddell, offers therapeutic and educational horseback riding and horseback riding programs for people with physical, mental and cognitive disabilities. It caters to a wide range of special needs, aimed at challenging its students physically, cognitively and socially.

Founded in 2011, Silver Lining Riding is a member of the Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA) and celebrates a decade since achieving non-profit status, according to Silver Lining Riding Board Chairman Gregg Brown.

“We work with special needs, but it’s a pretty big topic and we’re trying to be a little vague,” Brown said. “Our mission is to help people overcome the obstacles in life, whatever those obstacles, whatever.

Silver Lining typically serves 35-40 clients per week, ages 4-90. Classes can be delivered as semi-private or group lessons in six-week blocks. They are also adapted, with the help of parents and guardians, to the needs of each student.

According to Cori Morris-Sweetalla, instructor and manager of the Silver Lining Riding program, horse-assisted experiences help improve balance, strength, range of motion, coordination, motor skills, reflexes, breathing, circulation and sensory integration, to name a few.

“We adapt it to the needs of each student. Our main goal is to make sure that all students end up riding independently, ”she explained. “With that in mind, we know this may not always happen. We do admissions so our students know what their goals are, and from there we build. “

Because horseback riding moves the body rhythmically in much the same way as a human gait, the act can be therapeutic, said Morris-Sweetalla, who has seen students with physical disabilities improve their flexibility, balance and strength. muscular.

“When you are on horseback, after you finish your first lesson, you get off and it hurts – so it’s the same with these kids when they are out and riding them (the horses) for 30 minutes of lessons” , she said.

“We’re looking for that automatic reaction where, when you see them start sliding to one side, their body automatically adjusts, regains their balance and readjusts themselves,” he said.

Physical benefits aside, horses have gained a reputation within the mental health community as quality companions for relieving stress, anxiety, and depression.

Equines can “mirror and respond” to human behavior, says the Anxiety Treatment Center. With similar social and responsive behaviors, it’s easy for clients to bond with the animal in the herd.

The benefits of Silver Lining can also be educational, Brown said.

“We have a riding program where we teach the different parts of the horses, how to saddle them and how to groom them,” he explained.

Riding students work with their equine partners in the field, building a stronger relationship. Brown suggests pairing the adaptive riding lessons with the riding feature to get the maximum benefit.

Silver Lining Riding is scheduled to host its 10th Anniversary Student Showcase in February of next year. Originally scheduled for May 2021, the two-day event has been postponed due to security measures related to COVID-19.

The student recital gives the nonprofit organization’s students a chance to show off their riding skills through a series of locally judged events, Brown explained. They will also have the opportunity to qualify to compete in the Silver Lining Riding Special Olympics Track and Field Games.

“We’re just starting to plan for it, but I don’t think it will differ from previous years,” Brown revealed. “We have different classes and they follow a pattern. We have judges, and it’s very much like a horse competition – just for special needs. We make trophies and have a trophy party – for everyone to receive a trophy. “

Morris-Sweetalla added that the Special Olympics portion of the recital is the highlight of his career each year.

“This is literally why I come to work every day, especially the Olympics,” she said. “When you see the kids, it’s really worth it to see how their faces light up. Some of these kids will never get the chance to do a horse show, and it’s their day. “

To be eligible, students must complete a full six-week session. Riding lessons suitable for groups of four are $ 35 each, or $ 55 with the riding program.

Semi-private two-rider lessons cost $ 45 each and $ 65 to include horseback riding. Private lessons are available for $ 60.

Although most of the funds go towards operating expenses, Morris-Sweetalla said Silver Lining Riding is always open to volunteers.

Brown echoed his partner’s sentiments, adding that he was eager to get Silver Lining Riding up to standard with his students in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I have seen real breakthroughs,” he shared. “But the great thing I take in – and I’ve heard this from a lot of parents – is that they become a normal family, at least one day a week.”

To complete a student registration form, go to silverliningriding.org/student-

registration. For more information visit

silverliningriding.org or contact Morris-Sweetalla at [email protected]


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Berghoff is passionate about supporting seniors |

FORT WAYNE —Sherri Berghoff is clear when she shares her philosophy of life.

“Be better today than yesterday and better tomorrow than today,” said Berghoff.

Berghoff is currently focused on growing his three businesses and a nonprofit organization from scratch: One Purpose Senior Healthcare; Single-use services for the elderly; Single objective marketing; and One Purpose Senior Adventures nonprofit.

“I’ve been working in the healthcare industry for about 18 years now,” Berghoff said.

“I was looking to redefine who I was and what I wanted to be and I started working in the healthcare industry and fell in love with long term care. “

When setting up his three new businesses and his non-profit organization, Berghoff said, “An opportunity presented itself and I just had a few ideas on how I might turn those opportunities into certain businesses. So I took the leap of faith the first part of June and I jumped and started three for-profit businesses and one non-profit organization.

“My goal with these three for-profit companies is to end up getting them to where they operate successfully and make money so that I can really focus on the nonprofits, because that’s where my heart is really in, ”she added.

Berghoff’s nonprofit, One Purpose Senior Adventures, works to make the wishes of seniors in need come true. The seed that led to the creation of the organization was sown about five years ago.

“My mom lives in southern Tennessee. She was 78 at the time … At least once a year, I made a point of spending time with my mother. And normally when I went to visit, we would go shopping, go out to eat, that sort of thing. But on that visit, I asked her, “Mom, what would you like to do while I’m here this time?” And she said, “Well, we don’t have to do it this time, but I saw pictures you posted, taking your kids’ zipline and I would love to try that.”

Berghoff said she told her mother there would be no wait until next time and, thanks to Google, was able to find a place nearby and the mother-daughter duo went to do of the zip line the next day.

It started an annual tradition, and subsequent adventures included whitewater rafting, attending Dollywood’s opening day, and a hot air balloon ride.

Bergoff also took his father zipline after seeing photos posted on social media that showed Berghoff and his mother on their adventures.

“So at 82 I took my dad’s zipline for the very first time,” she said.

Checking things off his mother’s to-do list, Berghoff figured there were other seniors who had things on their to-do list that they had never been able to do due to calendar or finances.

“Through our non-profit agency, our focus will be on fulfilling some of the bucket list wishes for individuals – primarily focused on low-income people living in a long-term care facility. And he doesn’t have to be adventurous. It doesn’t have to be ziplining and whitewater rafting. But whatever it is, it’s on their bucket list, ”Berghoff said.

Berghoff went on to describe his three businesses.

One Purpose Senior Healthcare aims to provide personalized healthcare coordination for the elderly.

“Basically, this is an attempt to improve communication between all providers involved in the care of an individual,” Berghoff explained.

Berghoff said that while working in healthcare, she found there was a lot of disconnection between providers and her business attempts to involve everyone involved in the care of an elderly person in communication. of what was going on with that person.

One Purpose Senior Services provides consulting services to healthcare organizations.

One Purpose Marketing offers services such as sales coaching, sales training, website design, logo design, branding, and social media management.

Berghoff said her passion for serving the elderly likely stemmed from the relationship she had with her grandmother.

“It was such a special relationship… It was such a positive experience in my life… It was like a way of honoring him,” she said.

“I feel like if I’m living my own mission, which, I say, is to be better today than I was yesterday and better tomorrow than I am today, my only hope is that people are not afraid to step out of their comfort zone and really go for the things they want. I think if there is anything I could say to anyone, it’s not to be afraid. And I think that is holding us back. So often in our lives the fear of what other people will think or the fear of failure or, I think, fear in general just holds us back and I’m inspired by the women who have been in my life and I don’t. can only hope that I can be half of what these women have done for me for someone else.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Zena empowers women living in poverty in Uganda

OXFORD, UK – Zena, a non-profit organization with a deep and lasting impact on women living in poverty in Uganda, works in several parts of Uganda, including Kamuli, one of the most poor people of the country.

Women in Uganda

Due to pervasive gender inequality in Uganda, women are treated like second-class citizens. Women are marginalized in many ways, whether due to lack of access to education, political under-representation or the violation of harmful cultural practices such as female genital mutilation and marriage. of children. Although overall poverty has declined over the years, the poverty rate is still high in Uganda, rising to 21.4% in 2016. Notably, high poverty rates have a disproportionate impact on women.

In an interview with The Borgen Project, Loren Thomas and Caragh Bennet, co-founders of Zena, point out that the women they work with “are not beneficiaries but benefactors”. Entrepreneurship women are enrolled in The Zena Launchpad program, where they gain confidence, education and community, while simultaneously gaining a learning / employment opportunity to create jewelry for the community. Zena brand. This work allows women to save to start their own business and escape poverty.

Origin story

Thomas and Bennet met in Uganda while volunteering on a gap year after high school. After active discussions on best practices in aid, Thomas’ experience in developing a social enterprise program for women, and Bennet’s research thesis in Uganda, they agreed that “women entrepreneurs needed debt-free capital ”. From there was born the idea of ​​Zena.

Zena has two bodies that go together. One is the Zena Launchpad where the focus is on social impact. The other is the product line, The Zena Brand, which focuses on creating unique jewelry. The quality and style of Zena’s products make the brand popular, featured in Vogue Italia, Marie Claire and Harper’s Bazaar.

Hybrid model

What makes Zena unique is that it is not a traditional charity. Zena is partly nonprofit because she works with donors who invest in women, wishing to have an impact rather than getting a capital reward. At the same time, Zena is a social enterprise as women gain access to stable employment and acquire skills and earned capital for their business ideas.

Thomas explains: “The hybrid model Zena Launchpad allows women to access start-up capital without loans and without handouts. This is extremely important in fostering a sense of agency, as it “allows them to start businesses from a real place of strength and trust, knowing that they have fully earned this opportunity themselves”.

The model in practice

The selection process is simple: the participants / potential members of the program are women living in poverty in Uganda with viable business ideas. Women are an eclectic mix of backgrounds, all “from a variety of religions, tribes and even different countries,” says Thomas. Some were once refugees, others were abused, but all women come into Zena and find not only a new livelihood, but a new community of support. Women end up becoming clients of each other and looking after each other’s children.

Once selected for the jewelry apprenticeship program, women receive education and training in business and literacy. Each member is assigned a unique contract based on their business idea and the amount they need to save to start the business. Zena supports achievable goals so that women graduate and the next cohort can then be enrolled.

But, Zena doesn’t stop there. Bennet and Thomas intentionally decided to use only recycled and locally sourced waste to make their products, believing in the power of the fashion industry to do good not only for workers but also for the environment.

Education

Education in Zena is extremely important. The program takes a holistic approach through three areas of learning: classroom instruction, work experience, and personal development through mentoring. Zena sees literacy as crucial in changing the lives of women living in poverty in Uganda alongside formal business education and leadership training. Women gain “project management experience and communication skills” while working and discussing important topics, such as violence, family planning and mental health in a supportive environment.

Bennet and Thomas are continually looking for a way to improve their program. They are now planning a course on social media and smartphones after noticing during the COVID-19 pandemic that a lack of computer literacy can be a barrier to success.

Combat gender inequalities

In Uganda, there is a significant gender disparity in human capital wealth, with women accounting for only 39%, while men accounting for 61%. What is more, girls and women of lower socioeconomic status are the most affected by gender inequality. Therefore, the Zena Launchpad program, active since 2016, deliberately focuses on creating future women entrepreneurs by empowering women living in poverty.

The Zena team believes that these women will then also become leaders in their communities, defending and supporting other women. Some of Zena’s graduates now only hire women at their startups, and a graduate called Susan is going one step further, focusing on hiring single mothers. Thomas says that another graduate, Eva, “is currently working to run for local government to better advocate for women in her community.”

The empowerment and social awareness gained through the model has a clear impact on the community, not just the women in the official program. This belief in solidarity is something Bennet and Thomas stand for, with weekly team bonding sessions mandatory for all Zena members, regardless of the role of the participant, from security personnel to board members. .

An exemplary model

In her first five years, Zena supported the development of 31 women entrepreneurs, with 19 graduating from her program. This impact means that 200 people are lifted out of poverty, 90 children receive an education and 17 women are literate.

Zena’s founders are now looking to expand their program to help more women living in poverty in Uganda, believing the success of their model is proof of its potential for replication around the world. Zena, a community power-driven nonprofit, is one to watch for the future and be inspired by today.

– Hope Browne
Photo: Courtesy of Zena


Source link

read more
History organization

WaterFire Welcomes First-Ever Lighting in Honor of BIPOC Residents

As the sun set on Saturday, hundreds of visitors and residents of Providence gathered at the Providence River to watch WaterFire, a community gathering and fire-lighting show that takes place regularly from summer to late. of autumn. The October 16 show was the first WaterFire to celebrate Blacks, Indigenous people and people of color.

The event was sponsored by Papitto Opportunity Connection, a Rhode Island nonprofit that aims to invest in “education, skills training and entrepreneurial ventures” for BIPOC communities across the state, according to the website organisation.

Besides the long tradition of lighting fires and the presence of many local food vendors, participants also had the chance to attend dance performances and learn about different initiatives sponsored by Papitto Opportunity Connection.

Peter Mello, Managing Director of WaterFire Providence, told the Herald he was grateful for the opportunity to host the “first BIPOC-themed WaterFire, where we celebrate Blacks, Indigenous people and people of color. in the arts, business and culture in the State of Rhode Island. “

“The WaterFire event has been going on for 25 years, and a big part of what happens at WaterFire is that we celebrate the best of Providence and Rhode Island – the people, the organizations, the culture, the history,” Mello said. . He noted that local organizations often use the platform provided by WaterFire “to engage their audience” with social issues relevant to the community, so they were “super excited to work with (Papitto Opportunity Connection) to create a special evening. “uplifting the members of the BIPOC community.

“Each event is a little different,” added Mello. This week’s WaterFire included performances by members of the BIPOC community and demonstrations of Capoeira, a Brazilian form of martial arts that integrates dance and music.

A number of local organizations were invited by Papitto Opportunity Connection and spent the evening educating passers-by on community initiatives to support residents of BIPOC Rhode Island. One of those organizations was Southside Community Land Trust, a non-profit organization that aims to help low-income neighborhoods in Rhode Island access organic food.

“We’ve been around for over 30 years,” said Chandelle Wilson, SCLT training program manager. “Our hope and goal right now is to support many immigrant and migrant farmers, people from other countries, and our hope is to connect more with the people of BIPOC.”

Throughout the event, SCLT discussed current food safety initiatives and distributed products such as “chayote squash, kale or collard greens, fresh lemongrass (and) dried onions” to community members in attendance, Wilson added.

“We’re here to connect people with a space to grow their own food,” Wilson said. All products distributed were “grown here in Providence and Cranston”.

Allison Cavallo ’24, who first attended WaterFire on Saturday, enjoyed the performances and the music. Considering it was the family weekend at college, “my mom dragged me a bit (to the event), but I’m having a great time,” she said.

“I was surprised at the amount of activities, tents and music,” she said. “I didn’t know they were doing all of this. I thought it was just fire and water, but I like the festival aspect.

Lisa Tutaj, a medical assistant from Chicago, attended the event as she visited her stepdaughter for the family weekend. “So far it’s been a lot of fun,” Tutaj said, pointing out how much she enjoyed one of the dance performances of the evening.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on WaterFire, and the first insights and performance since the onset of the pandemic took place on September 4 in honor of those who served as essential workers during the pandemic.

Mello noted that despite the challenges posed throughout the pandemic, events like Saturday’s WaterFire show the organization’s renewed commitment to supporting local arts. “It’s probably the most complicated fire we’ve done,” Mello said.

Mello remains confident that WaterFire will remain important in uniting community members in the weeks and years to come. “There is no special language you have to know to experience this. There is nothing intimidating, ”he said. “It’s a visceral experience.

This year’s WaterFire will take place every two weeks until December 4th.

Receive The Herald delivered to your inbox daily.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

I am a fashion editor and am blown away by these eco-friendly heels

This fancy shoe brand is committed to saving the planet and our feet from the throbbing pain

Rachel richardson

As for the heels, we have a lot options, but it’s actually very rare to find a fancy shoe brand that boldly makes lots of promises up front – and actually delivers. Well, that’s precisely what Ma’am Shoes did, and I’m so here for it. The new Los Angeles-based brand made its debut by declaring that women no longer have to choose between style and comfort, and went one step further by using sustainable materials to source locally and produce their very cute and colorful line of quality sandals, heels and ankle boots (coming soon).

Jennifer chan

Jennifer chan

Courtesy

madam shoes

madam shoes

Courtesy

Buy now: $ 300; maamshoes.com

My interest immediately piqued when I browsed the site for more details and I was pleasantly surprised to find that Ma’am was more than just cute suede shoes. The eco-conscious line makes it known that they are created by women for women, and their mission is to make the world a better place. Understandably, there are strong feelings of empowerment and equality for women on their minimalist packaging, and upon closer inspection, I found that Ma’am even partnered with nonprofits. like United States of Women and I Am a Voter to give back and make an impact where it matters. If there was a shoe election in the fashion world, I would definitely vote for Ma’am Shoes.

So when the brand offered to send me a pair of their cute Ruth heels, I took them out for a walk to see how they performed. I wore them for brunch followed by a walk around town afterwards, and I felt cool, confident, and totally at ease. The (very) manageable heel height made for an enjoyable day without any complaints, and it turned out that the Ma’am team tested different heel heights, widths, insoles, outsoles and fabrications for finding the perfect equation to keep consumers comfortable on their feet to “walk the walk”. I like this.

Jennifer chan

Jennifer chan

Courtesy

“At Ma’am, we reject the idea that the bigger the better and that women need throbbing feet to be powerful,” the website proclaims. Music to my ears. The older I get, the more I realize that more reasonable heel heights are better for my joints (did I really just say that?) On your precious feet.

Jennifer chan

Jennifer chan

Courtesy

This particular style comes in four fun colors, and the soft petal pink hue I chose was a good start from the typical beige and neutral hues I usually gravitate towards in the fall. At $ 300, these shoes don’t come cheap, but the quality and brand history are well worth it, if you ask me.

madam shoes

madam shoes

Courtesy

Buy now: $ 300; maamshoes.com

And later this month, Ma’am is expanding its line to offer ankle boots in a rich ink indigo hue with a cool cylindrical heel. As if they weren’t tempting enough, for every pair of Shirley Boots sold, $ 10 will be donated to Baby2Baby, a non-profit organization that provides diapers, clothing and more to children living in poverty.

madam shoes

madam shoes

Courtesy

Buy now: $ 350; maamshoes.com

In short, Ma’am Shoes makes the difference in more than one way.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Spokane teenager helps found refugee outreach program Youth Brining Immigrants Together

When immigrants and refugees arrive in Spokane, they often struggle to make connections in their new community. This can be especially true for young people, who find themselves in a school system that they do not understand, speaking a language that is foreign to them.

Neharika Sharma, junior at Gonzaga Prep, and a group of teens around the world hope to ease this struggle by connecting recent immigrants with local residents through a new nonprofit they have founded called Youth Bringing Immigrants Together (YBIT).

Students from the United States and Ukraine have been invited to participate in a training camp organized by Global Youth Entrepreneurs. There, Sharma teamed up with Larry Huang, a Taiwanese immigrant living in Vancouver, Washington, Daria Malevka from France and Barbara Potochevska from Ukraine.

Soon they realized that they all had something in common: a family experience with immigration. This inspired them to create a non-profit organization dedicated to connecting local residents with immigrants and refugees to ease their transition.

YBIT has been selected as the winner of the non-profit Global Youth Entrepreneur competition. This competition attracts hundreds of applicants from all over the world.

Students in the United States and Ukraine were matched in groups of four to compete for a $ 1,000 grant and the opportunity to receive financial advice from Nike CFO Mehran Nikko and former Microsoft vice president Dan’l Lewin.

This is how Sharma, Huang, Malevka and Potochevska connected. Using their shared family experience with immigration, they introduced a non-profit organization that matches locals with immigrants and refugees to ease their transition.

“We had to create business presentations, financial and business plans within a week, and it was overwhelming with the jet lag,” because two of the founders lived in Ukraine, Sharma said.

“Some of us didn’t have enough time to sleep because the competition was going on,” Potochevska added.

Sharma said the group didn’t know the financial side of doing business, so when they got $ 1,000 they didn’t know how to use it. As a result, Nike’s CFO and Microsoft’s vice president told YBIT how to set up a non-profit organization, register it with the government, and distribute the funds properly.

Shortly after YBIT won the grant, COVID-19 took the world by storm. However, this roadblock benefited the building of their non-profit organization. This saved the group a lot of money as they have built a positive reputation through social media.

Sharma’s parents immigrated from India to Spokane. She is a junior at Gonzaga Prep and enjoys participating in musical theater and Indian classical dance. She said the process took her family about 13 years to immigrate to the United States. Understanding how difficult and trying this process is for so many people, Sharma sought to make this transition easier, especially for families.

When she first started working with YBIT, Sharma was surprised to find that unlike her, most immigrants quickly abandon their culture to assimilate into American life.

“If I had left my culture behind,” she said, “half of my life would have been gone.

She said she tries to prevent this assimilation by posting topics on Instagram that mentees can discuss with their mentors. One week, she asked mentees to share a recipe from their culture with their mentors. With this program, Sharma hopes to encourage teens to embrace their uniqueness.

Huang immigrated to Vancouver from Taiwan at the age of 3. Huang said that because his family spoke Mandarin Chinese, he struggled to overcome the language barrier. His school enrolled him in ESL, which made it difficult for him to adapt to an unfamiliar environment.

“Coping with the language barrier was difficult for me. So I signed up for this innovation boot camp (Global Youth Enterprises) and met the YBIT team and from there I discovered this common story in this field, ”said Huang.

The team decided that the nonprofit would target teens desperate to find a home in the community.

“With the stress and responsibilities that adults have to take on, it’s easy for teens to feel lost in the equation,” Huang said.

Afghan families who fled their homes continue to arrive in Spokane as the Taliban gain traction following the US withdrawal. Sharma said YBIT is “absolutely” looking for opportunities to help Afghan refugees.

When an immigrant family files their documents, they learn about resources designed to facilitate their transition. YBIT presents documents from immigration agencies as a resource for young people. This advertisement is the reason YBIT hosts operations in over 55 countries.

“The language barrier is the most difficult barrier facing immigrants and refugees,” said Jackson Lino, director of youth programs at World Relief.

The four co-founders echoed Lino’s statement, saying easing the language barrier is YBIT’s top priority. Meeting a mentor each week allows mentees to learn the language of their new home and provides teens with a unique opportunity to experience phrases, slang and nuances of the language they are learning.

Ahmed Hassan participated in the YBIT Refugee Mentor / Mentor Program. Hassan recently moved from Saudi Arabia to Ukraine to study at university and is no stranger to moving countries. He was born in Germany and has also lived in Canada and the United Arab Emirates.

He said the YBIT team had it set up with a friend and they instantly hooked up.

“We shared a lot of cultural knowledge and acquired a good amount of new things,” Hassan said. “We both knew different languages ​​as well, so we also practiced this together. “

In this mentorship, Hassan said he found a place to share his experience and realized that the YBIT participants “were one family with the same goals.”

After completing his mentorship, Hassan was invited to remain a volunteer.

“We do our best to give young people all the support they need and to help them get involved in any new environment they find themselves in,” he said.

In order to facilitate communication, mentors must be at least bilingual. Huang is the leader of the Chinese language, Sharma the Hindi leader, Malevka the French and Potochevska the Ukrainian.

In addition to language proficiency, YBIT is looking for likeable, kind and enthusiastic teens about learning about another culture.

Potochevska lives in central Ukraine and plans to study at Taras Shevchenko National University in Kyiv in the fall. She understands the challenges of immigration because she saw her brother immigrate to Australia. She said the process was “really stressful” for everyone involved.

“For migrants, it’s a big cultural difference,” she said. “For me alone, communicating with Americans is sometimes difficult for me, and sometimes I just don’t understand (their) mentality.

YBIT is delighted to welcome a new group of mentees and mentors for the 2021-22 school year. Their mentee application form is open to refugee and immigrant youth. Applications to become a mentor are closed, but teens are encouraged to contact YBIT to find out how they can be of assistance. Visit YBIT online at ybitinternational.wixsite.com/ybit.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Green Sudan: the crossroads of well-being

It’s a Friday morning in September and Sudan Green is driving one of his three younger brothers to school.

“See you, man,” he says as his brother gets out of the car. “Be careful.”

Be careful? I ask. Is this your farewell note to everyone? Just him? For some special reason?

He stops ; on the phone, I hear him turn on his flashing light. “When people close to you have been taken away,” he said, the signal fading, “you have some caution about those you hold nearby. “

Seeing Green, like most of the people he has known his entire life growing up in Philly, is no stranger to loss. One of his earliest memories as a toddler? See someone shot in West Philly, near 47th and Kingsessing, where his family lived at the time.

“Having mentors around me and people who change my life is probably the reason I didn’t go looking for a gun or drugs,” says Green.

It would be years later, at the end of 2018, when he would experience one of the most painful tragedies of his life: the murder of his best friend, Nantambu, in Germantown, where Green had grown up.

But Green is no stranger to the role of Big Brother, either. It is a badge of honor that he has worn for as long as he can remember. Older son of poet / musician / goddess Ursula Rucker – he also has an older half-brother – Green grew up leading his pack of siblings. Tayyib Smith, who produced two of Rucker’s albums, remembers Green as a little boy hanging out at Larry Gold’s music studio while mom worked.

“Sudan has always been placed in a leadership position, like it or not,” says Smith. “I remember he and his brother had the code for a particular door in the studio, and it was like an adult honor for them, because they could move around the studio without the help of an adult. And I remember seeing that they were taking Pride in there.

A loss, then a different path

Moving through the artistic and creative circles forged by his mother, Green was exposed early on to the power of community, the glitz of entertainment, the sheer force of music, language and words. He attended the private progressive school in Philadelphia for a while, which he says was life changing, breaking out of the toxic masculinity that often permeated his neighborhood.

He didn’t realize it yet, but these worlds showed him the full gamut of masculinity, of humanity.

“The fact that I had mentors around me and people who changed my life was probably the reason why I didn’t go looking for a gun or drugs and didn’t have unhealthy relationships with these people. things, ”he said. “Because I’ve seen a lot of these things in front of me, like most people of all races, but it’s about what you do with it.” “

Of course, he was also a kid who wanted the same things that so many Philly kids did: work at Ubiq on Walnut Street, with his cool sneakers and streetwear. To hang out with his friends, even when it meant getting involved in the shadows, violence, or “jumping people,” immature activities that Green says he grew up on.

I just believe in being strong in your morals and going back to your standards on a daily basis, ”Green said. “You wonder who are you presenting yourself for and why? “

He grew up and started making his own music; he lived in New York for a few years, tapping into the yoga community through the now defunct, paid studio Yoga For The People; he further broadened his view of the world. He attended Smith’s Institute of Hip Hop Entrepreneurship.

Then, in 2018, Nantambu was assassinated.

“I fell into a depression. I lost 15 pounds in two weeks. It was crazy, ”he said, his voice starting to break. To cope, he turned to music, writing a song called “Spirits Up!”

The earth continued to revolve around the sun and, lo and behold, it was 2020, with all its turmoil, the tensions that had always been part of Green’s Philadelphia rising to the surface of the nation. The Whites – not enough, but more – have started to pay attention.

Green leaned into the protests, of course, but he also listened intently to what they were revealing about the pain, a pain he recognized in his bones; he decided to do something about it.

This something? It encompasses the influences that have shaped Green his entire life: music, community, love. He organized Spirits Up !, a nonprofit movement that invites blacks and brunettes to come together through free community yoga, mindfulness and wellness events.

RELATED: Free Yoga Series for Black Philadelphians After George Floyd Protests

During the past 18 months, Spirits Up! organized nearly 50 events that touched the lives of over a thousand people. At one point on June 17, 2020, over 400 people, mostly people of color, were doing yoga at Malcolm X Park.

“Having the foresight, wisdom and maturity to bring people together in a space that is centered, welcoming and safe for black people, it’s revolutionary, ”says Smith. “I think Sudan is a brilliant man with enormous potential. And I think the Spirits Up! addresses are a priority for everyone who talks about the health and well-being of the city.

Because let’s be honest: seeing a group of white women or suburban children doing yoga, talking about wellness or sharing the names of their therapists? It’s important, but it’s not revolutionary. But among black and brown men, the stigma surrounding mental health issues and barriers to seeking care persists: just 26.4% of black and Hispanic men aged 18 to 44 who experienced daily feelings of loss. anxiety or depression were likely to have used mental health services, compared with 45.4 percent of non-Hispanic white men having the same feelings. What when black men ask for help and would prefer a provider of the same race? Well, they only make up about 4% (albeit rising) of the psychology workforce at the doctoral level.

“You go to white wellness areas, and they’re super nice. They have a lot of support, and that’s my goal. I don’t wanna do it if it’s not gonna be really nice. We have to take people out of the ordinary. You can’t just do the recreation center all the time, ”says Green.

And so bring well-being to light and bring people of color to to kiss this? It’s revolutionary. This is what makes Green the natural fit for Generation Change Philly, The Citizen’s new series in partnership with Keepers of the Commons to shine a light on and support the next generation of Philly change agents.

Since the launch of Spirits Up !, Green has also achieved her certification as a yoga teacher and the group has received fiscal sponsorship from BlackStar, the non-profit organization that produces the BlackStar Film Festival and serves as a platform for them. artists and designers of color. He was approached by sneaker brand Allbirds and LuLuLemon as a brand ambassador, worked with Ars Nova and artist Hank Willis Thomas on events.

Look ahead

Despite everything he has accomplished in the past 18 months, Green’s work has only just begun: he is committed to opening up a physical space, a cool recreation area for yoga, mindfulness, meditation. and workshops, ideally in Germantown and West Philly. But he doesn’t want to rush; he wants it to be nice. Truly attractive.

“You go to white wellness areas, and they’re super nice. They have a lot of support, and that’s my goal. I don’t wanna do it if it’s not gonna be really nice. We have to take people out of the ordinary. You can’t just do the recreation center all the time. It is also moving forward with its plan to offer a virtual platform. “I want to be able to reach everyone. “

Smith admires the path Green has taken and recognizes the pitfalls that abound.

“A lot of times the people most connected to the community are supposed to do everything from a sweat equity space and then jump through a blank stare to qualify for a nonprofit system that isn’t really about invest in you, but the tax benefits make it see like they’ve invested in you, ”he says. “I think this is the fight that Sudan and its advisers must wage. And that’s a challenge. I mean, as far as I read on Build Back Better money… I don’t see a lot of capital, energy or empathy flowing to organizations like the one in Sudan, or a host of people who bring innovation and passion to space. “

Sudan Green | By Sabina Louise Pierce

Green knows this, is not naive. And he’s mature enough to understand the difference between being exploited and being supported on his journey: Oh he Fortunately working with Penn, with IBX, with Comcast, doing the work to bring his work to more people.

He wants to do the job in an inclusive way, for black men (and all people), including those who want to embrace wellness while being part of pop culture, if they so choose; in other words, you can practice yoga and healing while still loving beautiful things. You don’t have to be, say, a bearded ascetic: it doesn’t have to be a choice, because wellness runs deeper than the clothes or sneakers you wear.

Morale! home page, there is a text that describes the mission of the group as “To work collectively to heal the black community through yoga and meditation.” By any means necessary. “

just reread The autobiography of Malcolm X, I ask Green about this last sentence, famous adaptation of Fanon and Sartre. Green says that as much as this quote inspires him, he is even more motivated by another quote widely attributed to the revolutionary leader.

“A man who represents nothing will fall in love with everything. “

“I just believe in being strong in your morale and going back to your standards on a daily basis,” Green said. “You wonder who are you presenting yourself for and why? “

To show up. Perhaps this is what Green does most significantly: he presents himself on behalf of the community that raised him; the brothers who admire him; the best friend he lost; and the city that needs him more than ever.

This is the logo of Generation Change Philly, a joint project between The Philadelphia Citizen and Keepers of the Commons that shines a light on the change makers in Philadelphia.

The Philadelphia Citizen partners with the nonprofit Guardians of the commons on the “Generation Change Philly” series to provide educational and networking opportunities for the city’s most dynamic change makers.

RELATED READING

Business for Good: Welcome to Nalaverse

The color of the coronavirus: black cues from mental health

Breaking down barriers to black health

Heal after the trauma



Source link

read more
History organization

NKY Montessori Academy begins its 54th year with a new name, Crescent Ridge Academy, and a new branding

Northern Kentucky Montessori Academy has gone beyond its name and space and begins the first step of the next chapter in the organization’s 54-year history with a new name and brand identity.

Crescent Ridge Academy is the new name of the non-profit organization that includes Montessori education for children and Montessori teacher training for adults.

“In 2019, the Northern Kentucky Montessori Academy partnered with the Greater Cincinnati Center for Montessori Education to provide Montessori education and instruction to children and adults,” said school principal Lisa Dieso.

“When these two organizations merged into one, names were often swapped and confusing for our community, so we made the decision to participate in a brand study and ultimately a new name and brand identity. “

Crescent Ridge Academy has developed a new website and logo to reflect the changes in the organization.

“In our current space, our listings are at maximum capacity and we have started working with our Board of Directors to develop a plan to meet our long-term needs,” said Lisa Dieso.

Lisa Dieso

Crescent Ridge Academy is currently the only accredited Montessori school in northern Kentucky and one of only three in Kentucky.

The new name and logo are simplistic but full of meaning. A crescent moon symbolizes opportunity and imagination. The word ridge connects to the geographic location of the school, and Montessori describes the nature of the organization.

The new name is accompanied by a new logo, mascot and website that work together to identify as a hotbed of opportunity, imagination and growth for all learners. The crest appears like an open book. With the trees at the top, it represents growth and an organization rooted in lifelong learning.

Crescent Ridge Academy welcomes children between the ages of two and twelve and has over 100 registrants. The teacher training program provides quality education for people who wish to become certified Montessori teachers. It is affiliated with the American Montessori Society and accredited by the Montessori Accreditation Council for teacher education.

For more information, visit https://crescentridgeacademy.org/.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

“It’s like having another job” – poverty relief programs hard to navigate during pandemic

Rain Chamberlain, who identifies with the pronoun they / them, lives in a small stucco house in Fresno with their child and a roommate. Chamberlain’s workspace is tucked away in a corner of the living room.

“This is my office here,” they say as they sit down at the desk and begin a regular routine, logging into one of the many government websites they use to access assistance programs. .

“So if I were to go to ‘My Benefits, Calwin’,” they say, waiting for the page to load.

“Oh hey, guess what. The internet decided it wasn’t there, ”Chamberlain laughs.

It takes at least a minute to reconnect the laptop to Wi-Fi.

“That’s a lot,” Chamberlain said, concentrating on the screen.

It takes another 30 seconds for the website to load.

“And a lot of times, I’ll be multitasking. I’ll be working in other tabs while I wait for these items to load, ”Chamberlain says.

Chamberlain writes grants for nonprofit organizations, including one they just started on their own.

“You know, it’s not there yet, but it’s getting closer. I get to the point where I work pretty much full time, ”they say.

Chamberlain, who is a single parent, has also recently started taking online classes. But Chamberlain says one of the most time-consuming and stressful parts of their routine is keeping up with government assistance programs that are helping them get by.

“The housing authority, social assistance, the rehabilitation department, the telephone and the Internet are benefiting,” says Chamberlain, finally referring to the California LifeLine program.

Right now, they have four assistance programs and have applied for a fifth – utility assistance from the Fresno Emergency Rental Assistance Program.

Chamberlain is disabled and sometimes uses a wheelchair. And once COVID hit, their household lost jobs and income.

“Living in poverty usually means going through eight different crises simultaneously,” explains Chamberlain.

It’s like having another job to maintain program benefits.

“So there’s this expectation that from 7:00 am to at least 6:00 pm, you have to be available for any random phone calls, any random text, any random email,” Chamberlain explains.

They say they spend 10 to 60 hours a month keeping up to date with all the programs. They say a lot of the skills needed are financial.

“Bank statements and paypal records and everything to show all my itemized income,” Chamberlain says.

Chamberlain goes through a stack of papers in a trash can. There are 12 bins for each month of the past year. Chamberlain says it helped them sort through the paperwork to re-apply for the housing authority voucher, which is key to lowering the cost of their monthly rent.

“I have to be the one to sit there and professionally make sure it all adds up,” Chamberlain said, flipping through the papers.

Chamberlain says it took about 60 hours over a three month period to complete this app. Before COVID, recipients could schedule appointments to help fill out forms. But everything changed very suddenly.

“Even the desks that they are still there, even though the workers themselves will still go to work every day, that doesn’t mean beneficiaries can enter,” Chamberlain says.

They say browsing can be overwhelming for some of the most vulnerable populations, especially when reliable internet access and often a printer or scanner are needed.

“People who have been disenfranchised, who have multiple marginalizations, all these different things absolutely need to be part of these programs. And the punishment, the pretty literal punishment if you don’t, is homelessness and often death, ”Chamberlain says.

That’s why Chamberlain created a non-profit organization. It’s called Navigating Structures and now has 501c3 status.

“This is by and for people who fit into both the crossroads of disability and chronic homelessness or at chronic risk of homelessness,” Chamberlain said.

It was designed from Chamberlain’s own experiences in and out of homelessness. The goal is to build a stronger community by paying homeless people to work on their own passions, whether it’s fixing bikes or cooking. At present, Chamberlain is still seeking grants to fund the organization.

“We can have the time and the energy to really invest in our community, without having to worry about where that next paycheck comes from,” Chamberlain said.

Although Chamberlain is not yet making any money in this phase of the nonprofit organization, they are hopeful that this effort will pay off in the future.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Two men strengthen friendship at Boston Marathon – and homeless families benefit – CBS Boston

BOSTON (CBS) – The Boston Marathon is more than just a race. It brings people together to test their endurance on the course and a community’s commitment to helping others in need.

Trainer Rob Vasquez runs the marathon for FamilyAid Boston, a non-profit organization that provides solutions to homeless families in Greater Boston.

READ MORE: I-Team: Traffic Stop delays organ delivery to patient at children’s hospital

“You are running for a cause; you’re running into a goal, ”said Rob. “You are running for someone. You are running for a community.

Rob was introduced to the association through his trainer client, Jim Partridge of Newton. The pair got close as Rob continued to push Jim to go harder, faster, and harder in his workouts. And Jim did just that.

Jim Partridge and Rob Vasquez have developed a friendship that includes Rob who ran the Boston Marathon this year in place of Jim. (WBZ-TV)

“He was one of the most energetic and motivating in the gym. As well as in life, ”Jim told WBZ.

Rob says their relationship means a lot to him. “It has become a great friendship. It turned out that I would do anything for him.

Jim had already run the Boston Marathon for FamilyAid Boston in 2013 and wanted to do it again. However, a cancer diagnosis put that goal on the back burner. Instead, Rob will run for Jim.

“It really is,” Jim paused and bit back tears. “Sorry. It’s very emotional. It’s special to see someone who is so dear to me experiencing the joy that I may have felt.

And Jim says he’ll be at mile 17 to give his friend a big hug and give him the motivation to keep going.

READ MORE: Court rules striking nurses at St. Vincent Hospital no longer eligible for unemployment

“I’m not a big crier, but that will be the point,” Rob said.

Khanisha Felder and her daughter Serenity slept in a car most nights before FamilyAid Boston’s help. (WBZ-TV)

And their efforts in the marathon benefit families who really need the help, like Khanisha Felder and her daughter Serenity of Dorchester. Khanisha says she and Serenity slept in a car most nights before FamilyAid Boston’s help.

“I remember having to go to Dunkin Donuts to wash myself. Wash her and change her clothes in a Dunkin Donuts.

This despite Khanisha’s work. She still had difficulty finding accommodation.

“When we were sleeping in the car it was very scary. And just be alone. It was very scary.

But, things have improved dramatically over the past year for this mom and daughter, thanks to FamilyAid Boston.

“I am able to cook my own meals. I can take a shower. I’m just able to feel comfortable, happy, and secure.

And November will be a happy month for Khanisha and Serenity as they mark the first anniversary of their lives in their own apartment.

NO MORE NEWS: Crews paint Boston Marathon start line in preparation for race day

You can donate to FamilyAid Boston through the Boston Marathon donation site, https://www.givengain.com/cc/familyaidboston/.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Waukegan nonprofit helps families in need of diapers

Waukegan Mayor Ann Taylor welcomed volunteers and toured the Waukegan warehouse where baby, toddler and adult diapers, vintage supplies, infant formula, children’s books, baby seats, cars, winter coats and more are waiting to be distributed to the hundreds of families served by Keeping Families Covered.

“I am very impressed,” said Taylor, who on September 20, along with Waukegan City Council, proclaimed September 27 to October 3 as Diaper Awareness Week in the city.

“I knew you offered the diapers, but I didn’t know you had clothes and those other offerings too.”

The non-profit organization that Ann Marie Mathis created 11 years ago in her basement to provide mothers in need with lightly used equipment and clothing has indeed come a long way. Today, diapers, pull-ups and more are stacked over about two floors at his North Oak Grove Avenue facility. The organization serves 1,200 families and 1,800 children per month and is set to distribute 1.5 million diapers this year.

The National Diaper Bank Network, of which Keeping Families Covered has been a member since 2014, estimates that one in three families needs diapers. That is, they cannot afford enough diapers to keep their babies’ buttocks clean, dry and healthy.

The domino effect can include making it more difficult for parents to find and keep work, as daycare centers will not take babies without a sufficient supply of diapers for the day.

“The more I learned about diaper needs, the more determined I was to do everything possible to meet them,” said Mathis, herself a mother of seven children aged 3 to 12.

With the help of a small group of volunteers, Keeping Families Covered operates monthly mobile pantries in Gurnee, Grayslake, Waukegan, Round Lake Park and Kenosha, Wisconsin, and weekly distributions in Highwood.

The agency recently partnered with six other like-minded Illinois nonprofits to form an advocacy coalition to raise awareness of unmet diaper needs.

“A lot of people don’t realize that programs like WIC (the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children) and other government safety nets don’t cover diapers,” Mathis said. . “And efforts to lower the Illinois diaper tax rate have yet to be successful.

“The unmet need for diapers is a major source of stress for parents, especially those who are struggling to make ends meet,” she said. “On average, diapers cost $ 70 to $ 80 per month per child. For families living in poverty, this represents about 14% of their monthly income. These families need help, and we are here for them.

As she walked through the offices and warehouse of Keeping Families Covered, Taylor said she was amazed at the size, scope and efficiency of the operation. The need, she said, is certainly critical.

“All of these items are so expensive,” Taylor said. “They say you can change a child’s diapers for $ 70 to $ 80 a month, but I think that’s a conservative estimate.”

And even that amount breaks the bank of thousands of families, Mathis added.

“Many parents have to choose between groceries and diapers,” she said. “It’s a vicious circle.”

In the diaper packing room during the tour, five volunteers filled packages of 25 diapers each, carefully labeling them by size and preparing them for distribution.

“One thing I would say about this place is it’s so easy to volunteer,” said Gurnee resident Bryan Pearson, who was there with his wife, Sandy. “It’s so well organized.”

Mathis said there are many ways for those interested in volunteering. Thursday Night Wrappy Hours, Neighborhood Diaper Drives, and Saturday Duty Days are just a few examples, with more opportunities listed under the “Help Out!” Heading. ”Tab on keepfamiliescovered.org.

A new changing table sponsorship program has also been launched, with cash donation options ranging from $ 500 to $ 5,000 and benefits ranging from social media ads to the company name and logo on the organization’s 16-foot trailer and box truck.

Mathis said his agency’s partnership with the National Diaper Bank Network allows Keeping Families Covered to buy diapers in bulk at a great price, so every dollar donated is stretched considerably.

Additional sponsorship details are available at keepfamiliescovered.org.

Taylor said she wished Mathis and her team continued success in achieving their goals, including advocating for reductions in sales taxes on items such as diapers and period supplies.

“What you do is really, really important,” the mayor said. “I am so impressed.”

• To submit your news, visit dailyherald.com/share.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Parents of shooting victims hope New Haven collaboration will reduce violence – NBC Connecticut

New Haven partners with CT Against Gun Violence (CAGV) to fight violence in the city.

The non-profit organization will engage community members and guide the city’s new violence prevention office.

The CAGV says it will be holding community listening sessions soon to discuss ways to prevent gun violence, in particular preventing it, intervening and also focusing on the after-effects.

The announcement was made at the Healing Botanical Garden in Elm City on Friday.

There, bricks commemorate the lives lost in New Haven to gun violence.

“It’s sad. My heart goes out to all of these moms,” said Pamela Jaynez, who doesn’t want to keep adding names to a path she helped create.

“Ten more bricks are being laid tomorrow and it’s not even for September and October. We go back to the months of June and July for which these are asked. “

Jaynez took NBC Connecticut to see his son’s brick.

Walter Jaynes Sr. would have turned 44 in June. He was killed in 1997.

“He’s been gone longer than he’s lived… It was six days before his 20th birthday when he was murdered.

The grieving mother is hoping New Haven’s collaboration with CAGV will have an impact, a step she believes is in the right direction to stop this growing path of deadly gun violence.

“I had no idea going to this funeral, that one day I would be one of those front row relatives,” said Thomas Daniels, who has the same background as Jaynez.

Her son Thomas was killed in 2009.

“These young murderers don’t know the effect they have on families, and the long-term effects, because for the last two or three years, I’ve just started to live. I just started living, ”said Daniels, who started the Fathers Cry Too group to help others experience what he has.

As New Haven searches for creative ways to fight violence, Daniels hopes all Connecticut communities come together to make a difference.

“It is no longer a black against black crime. Gun violence is everywhere. Death knows no boundaries.

A push for change – a Jaynez says she will never stop doing while her son watches over her.

“Every time I come here and start talking about my son, the chime (starts ringing) and I know he says to me, ‘Yeah, mom, yeah. “”


Source link

read more
Non profit living

10 in-demand jobs of the decade that don’t require a bachelor’s degree

A college degree can put you on the fast track to success in today’s job market by increasing your earning potential and your access to different work opportunities – but higher education is a costly investment that continues to grow. be inaccessible to many.

Over the past 10 years, college costs have increased by about 25%, according to a CNBC Make It analysis of College Board data. Along with these rising costs, student debt has skyrocketed; Americans currently owe over $ 1.73 trillion in student loans.

According to a recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there is a range of jobs that do not require a bachelor’s degree in several industries that are expected to be in high demand over the next 10 years.

Many of these jobs require a high school diploma, an associate’s degree, or a non-degree post-secondary scholarship. A non-degree post-secondary scholarship is a course typically taken in less than two years that teaches you the specific skills or knowledge needed for a job. Community colleges often offer these programs, which can include EMT certificates or library technician training, as two examples, Bureau of Labor statistics division chief Michael Wolf told CNBC Make It.

“It’s a bit of a mishmash,” Wolf says of the job classification. “It’s hard to find a common explanation as to why they are all popular… there are specific reasons why each is in demand, and will continue to be in demand over the next ten years.”

However, three trends are driving the growth of almost every job: increased demand for sustainable energy, an aging population and a renewed interest in personal care during the coronavirus pandemic.

Wind turbine maintenance technicians and solar PV panel installers are expected to be among the fastest growing jobs of the decade due to the climate change emergency and the resulting demand for sustainable energy.

Occupational therapy assistants, physiotherapy assistants, orderlies and physiotherapist assistants will become essential roles as more baby boomers retire and depend on these services. In a recent analysis, the University of Southern California notes that health care costs for this group are expected to be high, as this generation “lives longer, but experiences higher rates of obesity, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension ”.

Wolf specifies that physiotherapist assistants and physiotherapist assistants have separate and distinct roles: assistants are actively involved in providing patient care, while assistants are not involved in providing care, but rather focus on providing care. administrative tasks such as setting up equipment and completing office documents.

After dealing with the exhaustion and isolation induced by the pandemic over the past 18 months, people are investing more in personal services like massages and self-enrichment classes, resulting in increased demand massage therapists and teachers. “People are realizing that focusing and maintaining their personal care is important not only for their mental state, but also for their overall well-being,” said Vicki Salemi, career expert at Monster.

If you are interested in pursuing one of these careers, Salemi recommends that you read job descriptions to identify the skills recruiters are looking for, and read professional publications or blogs for up-to-date industry information. It also helps to have related work experience, she adds, whether through an online certification course, a work-study program at your local community college, or volunteering. in a non-profit organization. “Even if you don’t have any work experience, you can train yourself or follow someone in the field,” says Salemi. “Not only will you gain valuable skills, but you will also be able to meet contacts and references for that next job.”

To verify:

These are the 6 fastest growing jobs of the decade grossing over $ 100,000

How Networking Helped a 23-Year-Old Student Make an “Early Career” Discovery

The 3 fastest-disappearing jobs in the United States over the next decade

Register now: Be smarter about your money and career with our weekly newsletter


Source link

read more
History organization

Announcements for October 1, 2021

Posted: 10/01/2021 08:43:24 AM

HopkintonWalk to the cemetery

Hopkinton Historical Society presents its eighth cemetery walk to Clement Hill Cemetery on October 16 and 17 at 1 p.m. Visitors will hear 27 of Hopkinton’s former residents, performed by local actors in period costumes. This small cemetery was part of a once vibrant community tucked away in the northwest corner of Hopkinton. Its residents will tell stories of how the community went from farms to summer camps to summer residences; soldiers from all wars, from the American Revolution to the Civil War; and thieves and murderers. The event is not scary; rather, it is a glimpse into Hopkinton’s rich heritage through the lives of its citizens. The fully local distribution is led by Beth Spaulding and includes Connor Allen, Elissa Barr, Roxanne Benzel, Jean Buck, Neal Cass, Nancy Jo Chabot, Dan Coen, Jeff Dearborn, Joanne Debold, Ingrid Dinter, Ko Dustin, Sylvia Dustin, Nadine Ferrero , Carrie Flaherty, Sherry Gould, John Hardenbergh, Lissa Jones, Susan Lawless, Pete Mosseau, Mike Metcalf, Gabe Nelson, Jim O’Brien, Caleb Parsons, Paul Piecuch, Steve Shurtleff and Jim von Dongen. The research and writing of the screenplay was carried out by Lynn Clark and Beth Spaulding. The event will take place at Clement Hill Cemetery, which is located on Clement Hill Road between Sandy Beach Campground and Bass Lane in Hopkinton. Visitors are encouraged to bring a folding chair and to wear comfortable shoes. The event will take place rain or shine. Tickets cost $ 10 for members and $ 15 for non-members and can be purchased at the event or in advance at the Society during normal business hours. Proceeds from the cemetery walk will benefit the Hopkinton Historical Society, a non-profit organization founded in 1859. The company’s 2019 Putney Hill Cemetery Walk received a National History Award from the American Association for State and Local History. For more information, please contact Hopkinton Historical Society at 603-746-3825, [email protected], or visit the hopkintonhistory.org website.

Wilmotchildren’s author

On October 20 at 2 p.m., local children’s author Mary Lyn Ray will visit the Wilmot Library and read her latest book, The house of grass and sky. Louisiana-born Mary Lyn Ray is an environmentalist who has worked in museums for 15 years and as a professional consultant in land protection and historic preservation. She is also the author of several picture books for children including Christmas farm, Pumpkins and Stars. Danbury resident Mary Lyn continues to regularly publish a variety of children’s books. For more information, please visit the library’s website at wilmotlibrary.org or call Glynis at 546-6804 or email her at [email protected]

HopkintonAutumn Festivities

Back in the Saddle Equine Therapy Center is hosting a Halloween and Fall festivities event on October 22 from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. , face painting, games, bonfire and s’mores, pumpkin painting and lots of fun all around! Tickets can be pre-purchased online by texting Fall4Fun to 91999, or on the day of the event. Proceeds from this event will be used to support a recent BITS program, “Hope for Young Heroes,” a program designed to help strengthen families facing challenges (such as cancer, disability, mental illness, etc.) by providing them with opportunities to connect in meaningful ways. Come support this program while having fun during our Halloween and Fall Festival!


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Argus Wesleyan | WesCeleb: Philippe Bungabong ’22 on Freeman Scholarship, Nonprofit Work and American Idol

c / o Yongxi Tan ’22

During his college application, Philippe Bungabong ’22 was looking for an opportunity to further broaden his intellectual horizons. Throughout his time at the university, Bungabong has made himself an indispensable member of several campus communities, including the sailing team, the economics department and the Career Center. Outside of class, Bungabong can be found co-managing his non-profit organization, cooking delicious meals or singing. The Argus caught up with Bungabong on a foggy Tuesday evening over a glass of wine.

Argus: Why do you think you are nominated to be a WesCeleb?

Philippe Bungabong: [Laughs.] I think I was nominated for, well, part of it has to be nepotism.

A: Yeah, WesCeleb is talking about nepotism. [Laughs.]

PB: I have a number of great friends on The Argus, but I also think the other part of that should be the time I spent working at different levels on campus. I have been a residential counselor, I have worked as a teaching assistant for several classes and I am also part of the sailing team. I also sing and write songs and am friends with several people on the artistic side of campus. It’s just a gift, to know different people from different walks of life, and I am honored to be a WesCeleb.

A: Could you tell us more about the Freeman scholarship?

PB: The Freeman scholarship program, as it operated during my year, was that Wesleyan selected one student each from 11 countries in the East and South East Asia regions. I believe the countries are Philippines, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Indonesia, Malaysia, Japan, China, South Korea, Thailand and Vietnam. Of course, this has been a great opportunity to learn Wesleyan at no cost, but I also think the Freeman Scholars community is such a powerful community just to have students who really love to learn and study so many different things. I like the way I study economics and applied data science, but a number of other Freeman fellows are more in computer science or more in environmental studies or government. And they’re always the first, or among the first, groups of people I would tap into for insight into these areas.

A: Speaking of fields of study, did you know you wanted to study economics when you arrived? How did it happen?

PB: I came in thinking I wanted to study something more quantitative. I was either thinking about physics, math, or economics, and I took the three years of first and second year, but I think what I was most excited about was economics, and the ECON300 class, of which I am currently CA. It is a course on quantitative methods in economics. It was in this course that I really realized how economics is an area that will help me see and quantify the systems and interactions in the world.

A: It makes sense! I want to go back to your experiences at Wesyou mentioned that you have met so many different people on campus, people from all walks of life through your engagements. Which were the most valuable in shaping your Wesleyan experience?

PB: My closest friends are on the sailing team. I live with two of my co-captains. I had never sailed before entering college and it was just something I had chosen in first year and kept. I love sport. I also like the people in it. But aside from the sailing team, I would say my time as a tour guide, and now as a senior interviewer, continues to inform my time at Wesleyan. As a tour guide, I continue to introduce Wesleyan to future students, and this has given me a new set of eyes again through which I look at Wesleyan…. I always try to keep finding things that I love about Wes and also things that I want to improve about Wes, or things that I would like them to be different about Wesleyan, all with the goal of communicating why I think Wes might be a good fit for someone. I would say Wesleyan is not a perfect school, but for some people it is the ideal school, and I want to make sure that I am able to communicate that to all the potential students who come here.

A: Speaking of college admissions and helping people find perfect universities, you also run an educational non-profit organization.!

PB: I co-founded CAUSE Philippines when I was a freshman here. I co-founded it with two other low income Filipino students and we really built it with the idea that talent is everywhere, but opportunity not. We wanted to equip other low income Filipino students with the best college education they can receive so that one day they can go home and develop their community for the better, as we believe low income students know the more intimately the problems of their community. focused towards.

A: Could you explain what CAUSE does in particular?

PB: We organize a variety of programming events. We have a mentoring program, where we match mentees (low income high school students) with mentors, who are currently students in the US, UK, Singapore and around the world. We guide them step by step through the university application process, preparing for the SATs, writing their common application activities, their essays, requesting recommendations from teachers, all because it There is no defined infrastructure with which these students can really work, especially in terms of applying abroad.

Apart from that, we also run webinars that are more open to the public, and we do that on topics like how [to] get scholarships abroad, which scholarships are even available. We run these events throughout the year where we really try to bring together talent, not only from the capital of Metro Manila, but also from remote provinces in the Philippines.

A: Beyond non-profit and academic work, you are also an artist! What does music mean to you? You always joke about how you want Ryan Seacrest to work, so tell me about “American Idol” and the role he’s played in your life.

PB: [Laughs] Music has always been an outlet for me. I grew up watching American Idol, Kelly Clarkson, Carrie Underwood from the living room, even though I lived in Manila, Philippines, a 17 hour flight from New York. Growing up, I was always drawn to singing competitions. I think it’s so much fun watching people sing, but also from a competitive point of view, strategizing and trying to win a singing competition. My interest in music really arose from the fact that I grew up watching shows like American Idol, but also growing up in the Philippines, where everyone sings karaoke. So I sang a lot of karaoke growing up, and now music is still my biggest outlet. I rely on a number of songs for whatever mood I’m in. If I can’t find the appropriate song for this moment, and if I have enough creativity in me, I would write the song and my approach to songwriting This is typically what I want to learn from my own experiences , but also wanting to generalize, so that a number of other people can also feel what I felt.

A: It’s really beautiful, isn’t it? The interaction between an audience and the artist and how it reinforces meaning.

PB: Yeah yeah.

A: Well Philippe, we’re kinda friends because of the pandemic.

PB: [Laughs] Yes.

A: [Laughs] Well we were stuck here [on campus] for a long time.

PB: [Laughs] During a very long time.

A: How do you think COVID-19 impacted you and your time at Wesleyan?

PB: The pandemic really made me appreciate the importance of community, of staying in touch with those who matter to you, whatever the circumstances. Of course, respecting the safety and hygiene measures. During the pandemic, I realized that my friends in the Wesleyan community are so important to me and so important to my college experience and that they really add a lot of color to a genre of college learning that was otherwise mostly black and White. When we were all sent home in second year, I realized that, my God, I’m still so lucky to have other Wesleyan students around me.

And when people were sent home, Nalu Tripician, my best friend on this campus, was so far away from me, but we still called every now and then, and that was one of the times I really realized that I wanted to stay in touch with many members of the Wesleyan community and friends that I have met over the years. And now that we’re all in person again, I really try to cherish every moment that I have with my friends in Wesleyan.

A: What advice would you give your freshman?

PB: I would say “breathe”. Breathe and recognize that everything will be fine. Just keep doing your best, but also live in the moment and don’t always think about what to expect.

A: Certainly not! [Laughs]

PB: I think as a senior now I realize that college is really short. And it’s the last four years (unless you’re in graduate school), the last four years of your life that are super structured, after that you’ll be released into the workforce and you’ll have 17 days of paid leave. So for my first year, breathe, have fun, and keep doing your best, but rest assured knowing that if you do your best, you’ll be fine too.

A: In that vein, how did Wesleyan shape you?

PB: I think Wesleyan made me more open-minded, in every sense of the word. I came here from a rather conservative Asian family, studied at a science high school and grew up with the idea that you would only be successful if you studied something in science or something quantitative, but coming to Wesleyan, meeting so many open-minded people like that, also made me realize that there are so many different perspectives that I could learn from, recognize and grow with. It is something that I will strive to keep in my heart even as I leave Wesleyan. Being open to as many experiences as possible, to as many right perspectives as possible, and not always having a clear idea of ​​what is right and wrong on my mind, and being open to changing your mind.

The interview has been edited for length and clarity.

You can reach Magda Kisielinska at [email protected].


Source link

read more
History organization

Forkland Festival 2021 – celebrating 50 years of history and entertainment – The Advocate-Messenger

Press release

The 50th anniversary of the Forkland Festival, October 8 and 9, will mark “50 years of memories”. In 1971, when Forkland School was closed, residents of this rural community in southwest Boyle County purchased the school buildings and incorporated the Forkland Community Center as a non-profit organization. lucrative. The following fall, the first Forkland Heritage Festival & Revue was held to help preserve the history of the community and to provide funds for the community center. Since then, every October, the Forkland Festival has taken place, drawing visitors from all over Kentucky and other states. Many aspects of Festival 2021 will incorporate memories from the past 50 years and honor the Forklanders who have made every Festival a success.

Story: At the Festival, we celebrate our rural heritage with many historical exhibitions and activities. You can visit the 1790s log cabin housed by relatives of Abraham Lincoln. The Forkland Museum (inside the brick building) is full of interesting artifacts from the Forkland area, in addition to many historical and genealogical books and documents. Also in the brick building: the gift shop (with Forkland memorabilia and books), wildlife and Native American artifact exhibits, the school and military room, and the family history room . The Old Farm Equipment Museum (behind the main buildings) is full of many items that were once used on local farms: horse-drawn farm equipment, a replica of the tobacco stripping room, old tools and items rural household appliances, as well as a large new library on horse-drawn carriages and carts. You can also see a huge old steam tractor, an ancient high-speed motor grinding cornmeal, and demonstrations of soap making, sorghum, blacksmithing, broom making, quilting, chair caning, etc. The Festival is run by volunteers dressed in old-fashioned clothes to add to the atmosphere.

Arts and crafts: There are many crafts for sale, both outside and inside the gymnasium: many varieties of carpentry, jewelry, soaps, paints, hand-woven and cloth items, brooms, art made of metal, candles, quilling, dried herbs, wreaths, painted pumpkins and much more. . The silent auction (inside the brick building) will feature many unique crafts and other items for you to bid on, including a beautiful hand-sewn queen-size quilt made by Amish.

Kids: There are several stalls and activities that are particularly popular with children: carriage rides, petting zoo, barrel train rides, fish pond, clown stand, handmade toys, playground, body art at the henna, Indian teepee and art room (downstairs inside the brick building) where kids can create their own art while viewing an exhibition of 50 years of Forkland art.

Food: You won’t go hungry at the festival! Start your day at the Coffee Shack with slices of award-winning homemade cake served with delicious coffee or hot chocolate, or grab ham and cookies at the Ham Shack. On Saturday morning, from 8 am, you can enjoy an all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast. Many other meals and snacks are also available throughout the day: choose from burgers and hot dogs, pulled pork and chicken, rib eye sandwiches, beans and cornbread, country ham, authentic mexican dishes, barbecue beef, nachos, french fries pies, kettle corn, ice cream, crazy taters, pie and much more. You can also buy food products to take home: sweets, cupcakes, bread, cakes, sorghum, jams and jellies, apples, honey, etc.

Entertainment: Throughout the day, country and gospel musicians will perform on the outdoor stage. Due to COVID-19, we have canceled the Old Country Supper indoor theater and moved the Bean Supper entertainment that would have been in the gym to the outdoor stage at 7 p.m. On Friday night, Phillip Clarkson of Marion County will perform his country tunes. On Saturday evening there will be a short ceremony honoring the hundreds of volunteers who have made the Forkland Festival a success for 50 years; this will be followed by music from Cadillac Tractor playing country and southern rock.

Following: Saturday morning starts at 8 a.m. with the annual Fox & Hound 4K Race through the Buttons of Forkland. For more information and to register, contact John Ellis at 859-319-9974 or [email protected], or Jordan Ellis at 859-576-5777 or [email protected] Saturday also includes a vintage car show. Contact Nathan Stevens at 859-583-6193 for more information. Please register to win a door prize at the information booth, located next to the entrance to the brick building. You can also participate in cake, costume, kiosk and photo contests.

Protection against covid19: Much of the Forkland Festival takes place outdoors with plenty of room to spread out. We ask volunteers and visitors to wear masks inside buildings and also practice social distancing. Hand sanitizer will be available.

Entry and information: The Forkland Festival takes place at the Forkland Community Center, 16479 Forkland Road, Gravel Switch, KY 40328, approximately 30 minutes from Danville or Lebanon. It is open Friday, October 8 from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday, October 9 from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Festival admission: adults $ 3, children under $ 13, preschoolers free. For more information, visit www.forklandcomctr.org or call 859-332-7146 or 859-332-7839.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Oregon nonprofit looking to hire staff for home support for people with disabilities

PORTLAND, Ore. (KTVZ) – Advocates for Life Skills & Opportunity (ALSO), a non-profit organization committed to supporting people living with intellectual and developmental disabilities, is looking for several direct support professionals who will support people disabilities and will help them achieve independence and person-centered lifestyle choices.

These positions at ALSO, which is consistently rated by current employees as a preferred place to work, do not require any prior healthcare experience, and the organization will provide all the necessary training.

“Our mission is to stand up for people with disabilities and promote their full inclusion in the life of their community,” said Brett Turner, CEO of ALSO. “As COVID-19 restrictions and economic issues hamper the ability of some employers to hire, ALSO is confidently launching our “The work of the heart is my work” campaign to recruit candidates deeply committed to a profession centered on love and care.

The Direct Support Pro position assists people with a multitude of home care needs, provides accompaniment on social outings and appointments, helps with medication and performs other critical support tasks. The position is eligible for signing and retention bonuses and potentially eligible for the Public Student Loan forgiveness program. ALSO provides a robust benefits package, including medical, dental, vision, LTD checks, life insurance, sick leave, PTO and 401 (k) plan with match up to ‘at 4% (for full-time employees).

Interested candidates can apply directly on the ALSO website: heartworkoregon.com

“I don’t think there’s a more rewarding job with a more people-focused organization statewide than a direct support pro at ALSO,” says Ben McClure, chief engineering officer. systems at OCHIN and chairman of the board of ALSO. “It’s a demanding job, but one that comes with tremendous personal and professional rewards. In short, it is really for people who want to work from the heart.

About ALSO

ALSO is a non-profit organization committed to providing the best residential, employment and assisted living services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. ALSO promotes full community inclusion, creativity, independence and employment opportunities. Our main goal is to ensure that our customers live the life of their choice. ALSO serves people all over Oregon from its Metro Portland, Bend and Klamath Falls locations. For more information, visit alsoweb.org.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Where to give Halloween candy

There’s no better time to give back and spread the joy than a holiday – Halloween included! If you are looking to make a positive impact in someone’s life this Halloween, you may want to consider donating candy to those who could use a treat to lift their spirits. Whether you’re planning to give back on your own or looking to instill charitable values ​​in your kids after a treat, read on to learn more about where you can give Halloween candy this spooky season.

United Way

United Way is a non-profit organization whose mission is “to improve lives by mobilizing the benevolent power of communities around the world to advance the common good”. The organization is known for hosting Halloween events for kids and making the holidays a little more special for underserved communities. Visit their website to find your local chapter and learn about Halloween candy donation.

Ronald McDonald House Charities

Ronald McDonald Houses is a non-profit organization that seeks to support families struggling with serious childhood illness. Because these children are unable to go out and make treats, many Ronald McDonald House chapters will accept unopened Halloween candy to share with children with illness and their families. Find your local and ask whether or not they could use candy donations to help spread the Halloween joy.

Operation Gratitude

Operation Gratitude proudly distributes candy to deployed troops, local military units, veterans and first responders. Complete the registration form and pair up with a local military unit, first responder service, or veterans organization. If no match can be found, you can always send your candy to the organization’s Candy Processing Center in Los Angeles.

Operation Shoebox

Operation Shoebox sends thoughtful care packages to troops and is known to include candy, especially during the holidays. Other sugary treats they’ll accept as donations for their treatment packages include individually wrapped granola bars and cookies. Visit their website to learn more about the donation.

Local organizations

Sometimes you don’t have to look far to tell the difference. Call your local pantries, nursing homes, and shelters to see if they would be interested in accepting new unopened Halloween candy. There is something special about giving back to your own community and doing something positive for other members.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

American Dream Center in Tulsa helps families integrate into the United States

The American Dream Center in Tulsa helps families from other countries settle in Oklahoma.

Founder Casey Jones told News On 6 they have helped nearly 100 families this year. Jones grew up in Oklahoma, then began to travel and live abroad.

“I have lived abroad, I have lived in Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Ivory Coast,” Jones said.

Friends helped him adjust to life in other countries. When Jones returned home, he realized that there were people moving to Oklahoma from outside the United States who needed the same help and guidance as overseas. , so he created the American Dream Center.

“We are helping immigrants and refugees adjust to America,” Jones said.

The non-profit organization provides immigration legal services, it helps people find jobs, it even provides a translator who does errands, like going to the DMV a bit easier.

“We walk alongside them and help them navigate the ins and outs of our system,” Jones said.

American Dream Center has already helped 90 families this year and hundreds since the doors opened in 2017, including people like Ariana Wilson, who immigrated to the United States with her triplets from Venezuela.

“This country has opened the door to new life,” Wilson said. “Sometimes God sends angels into your life.”

Wilson thinks these angels are at the Dream Center. She said that before moving to the United States, she was robbed several times at gunpoint, would not have electricity for weeks, and could not regularly access the medications her son took. need. Jones and his team helped Wilson and his family gain Temporary Protected Status.

“We can help inexpensively since we’re a non-profit organization,” Jones said. “These people have left their friends and family, their culture, their language to try something new. We have to accept them, welcome them and help them succeed because if they succeed, we succeed.”

The American Dream Center has said it is ready and willing to help Afghan refugees in the coming months, but has not yet been contacted.

For more information, visit the American Dream Center website here.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Diapers and push-ups desperately needed for children living in Village of Hope – Orange County Register

Orange County Rescue Mission is in desperate need of diapers for toddlers and young children living in Village of Hope, a transitional living center for homeless families.

The association is looking for diapers in sizes 5 and 6, as well as diapers and wet wipes for boys and girls 3T-4T.

“We have received generous community donations of newborn and small infant diapers, but the continued need for larger diapers and retractable diapers is often underestimated,” said Jim Palmer, president of the Orange County Rescue Mission.

The increase in homelessness in the wake of the pandemic has contributed to this continued need, the mission said.

Those wishing to donate or organize a diaper drive can drop off their donations at the Village of Hope at 1 Hope Drive, Tustin, 92782. Donations can also be made online and delivered to this address.

For more information, visit rescuemission.org/urgent-baby-needs.

The facility’s donation warehouse is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Sunday.

Upcoming fundraisers

The Orange County Community Foundation is hosting a fundraiser on Wednesday, September 22 for 17 local nonprofits, seeking to raise $ 200,000.

The 24-hour Ignition Potential event will support programs that help Orange County youth.

Participants include Assistance League of Irvine, Child Creativity Lab, Court Appointed Special Advocates, Early Childhood OC, Giving Children Hope, Helping Others Prepare for Eternity, Irvine Public Schools Foundation, Kid Healthy, Kidworks Community Development Corporation, MOMS Orange County, Parentis Foundation , Pretend City – Orange County Children’s Museum, Scholar’s Hope Foundation, Literacy Project, Prentice School, Orange County Youth Center and YMCA.

To donate, go to igniting-potential-giving-day.ocnonprofitcentral.org or bit.ly/2VOfvSz

The Santa Ana Chick-fil-A at 3601 South Bristol St. will contribute 20% of sales from 4 pm to 7 pm Tuesday, September 22 to the non-profit MOMS Orange County if you mention “Spirit Night”.

Donations for MOMS

Eat chicken, help a mom.

The Santa Ana Chick-fil-A at 3601 South Bristol St. will contribute 20% of sales from 4 pm to 7 pm Tuesday, September 22 to the non-profit MOMS Orange County if you mention “Spirit Night”.

MOMS Orange County helps moms caring for newborns and pregnancy health, helping improve birth outcomes, infant health and development.

Body Spa Salons, a concept that leases space to beauty professionals, has opened an 8,000 square foot location at 3333 West Coast Highway in Newport Beach. The company rents spaces to specialists in hair, nails, skin, massage and medical / wellness care such as weight loss services, medical spas, vitamin infusions and acupuncture. (Courtesy of Body Spa Salons)

New spa debuts in NB

Body Spa Salons, a concept that leases space to beauty professionals, has opened an 8,000 square foot space in Newport Beach.

Spa salon at 3333 West Coast Highway rents spaces to professionals specializing in hair, nails, skin, massage, and medical / wellness treatments such as weight loss services, medical spas, herbal teas of vitamins and acupuncture.

The company has 11 sites in California, Nevada and Arizona. For more information, visit bodyspasalons.com.

  • Justine Cromer is the new director of Goodwill at the Tierney Center for Veteran Services in Orange County. She is a retired US Air Force Lieutenant Colonel with 28 years of military service in the Air Force, Air Force Reserves and Air National Guard. (Courtesy of Brocoff Photography)

  • Gynecologist-oncologist Antonio Castaneda has joined Hoag Gynecologic Oncology. He comes to Hoag from the Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University. (Courtesy of Hoag)

  • Paul Fleck, partner at the law firm Atkinson, Andelson Loya, Ruud and Romo, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based non-profit organization. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

  • GK Kannan, vice president of research and development at Grifols, a Los Angeles-based biopharmaceutical company, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

  • Jay Lee, family physician and co-founder of Family Medicine Revolution, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

  • Robert Handy, former police chief and assistant faculty member at Arizona and California universities, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

Moving

Justine Cromer is the new director of Goodwill at the Tierney Center for Veteran Services in Orange County. She is a retired US Air Force Lieutenant Colonel with 28 years of military service in the Air Force, Air Force Reserves and Air National Guard. As Director of the Tierney Center for Veteran Services, Cromer will lead strategic planning, project implementation, collaboration and innovation for the Goodwill program. She started her new role on September 1st.

Gynecologist-oncologist Antonio Castaneda has joined Hoag Gynecologic Oncology. He comes to Hoag from the Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University. Her research and expertise covers a wide range of gynecologic oncology issues, from the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for women with early-stage cervical cancer to the incidence of ovarian metastasis. in small cell neuroendocrine tumors of the cervix.

On board

Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit, has added four new members to its board of directors, including Paul Fleck, Robert Handy, GK Kannan and Dr. Jay Lee.

Fleck is a partner at Atkinson, Andelson Loya, Ruud and Romo, a firm of professional lawyers, with a focus on federal, state and local employment and labor laws.

Handy is a former police chief and was an adjunct faculty member at the universities of Arizona and California.

Kannan is vice president of research and development at Grifols, a global biopharmaceutical company based in Los Angeles.

Lee works in family medicine and co-founded the Family Medicine Revolution, a popular social media brand.

Venture capital financing

Vibrato Medical, a medical device startup in Irvine, closed a $ 4 million Series A funding round led by Newport Beach-based Horowitz Group.

Vibrato also received a $ 1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

The money will support a clinical trial of the company’s non-invasive wearable device designed to treat patients with critical limb ischemia, peripheral artery disease, directly from their homes.

Vibrato’s technology is based on ultrasound research which has shown increased tissue perfusion and vessel growth. The company believes that the approval and commercialization of its device could reduce the costs of the current average annual treatment.

The 10th edition of the Getzlaf Golf Shootout, held on September 11 at the Monarch Beach Golf Links, raised $ 800,000 for CureDuchenne, a non-profit organization focused on finding a cure for muscular dystrophy by Duchenne. Seen here are Ryan Getzlaf, Jeff Frieden of F&F Capital and title sponsor, Zandy Davidson, Ryder Getzlaf and David Bradley.

Good work

The 10th edition of the Getzlaf Golf Shootout, held on September 11 at the Monarch Beach Golf Links, raised $ 800,000 for CureDuchenne, a non-profit organization focused on finding a cure for muscular dystrophy by Duchenne.

The event, hosted by Anaheim Ducks captain Paige and Ryan Getzlaf, included a golf tournament, awards reception and dinner.

Status Update is compiled from press releases from Editor Karen Levin and edited by Editor-in-Chief Samantha Gowen. Send high resolution articles and photos to [email protected] Allow at least a week for publication. Elements are edited for length and clarity.


Source link

read more
Canadian army

Evening update: pandemic dominates federal campaign after Jason Kenney’s overthrow in Alberta

Have a good evening, let’s start with today’s best stories:

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau calls the COVID-19 situation in Alberta “heartbreaking” and says Ottawa will send ventilators to the province. Meanwhile, Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole wouldn’t say if he still supports Prime Minister Jason Kenney’s response to the pandemic.

The federal campaign has been disrupted by Kenney’s decision this week to declare a state of public health emergency and introduce a vaccine passport system in the province. Trudeau on Thursday criticized O’Toole’s previous support for the premier of Alberta. In turn, Mr. O’Toole sued Mr. Trudeau for calling an election amid a pandemic, and said the $ 600 million spent on the campaign could have been sent to the provinces to fight the Delta variant. highly contagious instead. .

The story continues under the ad

“The fans are on. Anything more we can do, be it sending more health professionals like we did to Ontario a few months ago when they were overwhelmed. We’re going to make sure Albertans get the support of everyone in this country in the way they need to get through this time. “

Alberta Health Services said on Wednesday the agency will ask other provinces if they can take care of patients in Alberta’s intensive care units, as well as if they can send frontline staff.

Related:

  • Federal campaigns must do everything to get supporters to the polls
  • Saskatchewan to Require Proof of COVID-19 Vaccination to Try to Increase Adoption

This is the daily evening update bulletin. If you’re reading this on the web, or if it was sent to you as a transfer, you can sign up for Evening Update and over 20 other Globe newsletters. here. If you like what you see, share it with your friends.

Chinese PLA general collaborates with licensed scientist at Canada’s top infectious disease lab

A high-ranking People’s Liberation Army officer collaborated on Ebola research with one of the scientists who was later fired from the Canadian High Security Infectious Disease Laboratory in Winnipeg.

Research by Major-General Chen Wei and former Canadian government laboratory scientist Xiangguo Qiu indicates that cooperation between the Chinese military and scientists at the National Microbiology Laboratory has gone much further than previously thought. previously. major-general. Chen Wei was recently praised by President Xi Jinping for developing a Chinese vaccine against COVID-19,

The story continues under the ad

major-general. Chen Wei and Dr Qiu, who until recently headed the vaccine and antiviral therapy development section at the Winnipeg lab, collaborated on two scientific papers on Ebola, in 2016 and 2020. These papers did not identify the major-general. Chen as a high-ranking officer in the military wing of the ruling Chinese Communist Party. Instead, she is identified as Wei Chen, who holds a PhD and works at the Beijing Biotechnology Institute.

Common? SpikeVax? Health Canada Authorizes Rebranding for Approved COVID-19 Vaccines

Health Canada has approved new names for the Pfizer, Moderna and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine will now carry the brand name Comirnaty, which the company says represents a combination of the terms COVID-19, mRNA, community and immunity. The Moderna vaccine will go through SpikeVax and the AstraZeneca vaccine will be called Vaxzevria.

Manufacturers said the changes followed full approval of the vaccines by Health Canada on Thursday. During the interim order, which expired Thursday, the vaccines did not carry their brand names.

Read more:

  • NHL says it expects 98% of players to be fully vaccinated before the start of the season
  • France suspends around 3,000 health workers for failing to comply with COVID-19 vaccine mandate

ALSO ON OUR RADAR

The story continues under the ad

Ontario is requiring universities and colleges to update their policies on sexual assault: The province says policies need to better support students who file complaints. The guidelines were released amid calls from University of Western Ontario students to tackle the threat of sexual violence on campus after allegations that young women were drugged and sexually assaulted in residence last week.

The world risks missing its climate targets despite the pandemic pause in emissions, according to the UN: The economic slowdown linked to the virus caused only a temporary drop in CO2 emissions last year and that was not enough to reverse the rising levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, said the ‘World Meteorological Organization, adding that there is a growing likelihood that the world will miss its Paris The deal aims to reduce global warming to 1.5C above pre-industrial levels.

Suncor is partnering with eight Indigenous communities to purchase TC Energy’s remaining interest in Northern Courier Pipeline: Suncor, three First Nations communities and five Métis communities will own a 15% interest in this approximately $ 1.3 billion pipeline asset. The partnership is expected to generate roughly $ 16 million per year in gross revenue for its partners and provide reliable revenue, Suncor said in a statement.

The Maple Leafs and Sabers will play an outdoor game in Hamilton on March 13: Buffalo is listed as the home team against the Maple Leafs in the NHL Heritage Classic, which will be played at Tim Hortons Field. Buffalo becomes the first US-based team to compete in what will be the sixth Heritage Classic.

WAKE-UP

A drop in commodities depressed the major Canadian stock index a day before heightened volatility associated with the quarterly expiration of options known as quadruple witching.

The story continues under the ad

The S & P / TSX Composite Index closed 91.69 points lower at 20,602.10.

In New York, the Dow Jones Industrial Index lost 63.07 points to 34,751.32. The S&P 500 Index lost 6.95 points to 4,473.75, while the Nasdaq composite was up 20.39 points to 15,181.92.

The Canadian dollar was trading at 78.90 US cents against 79.05 US cents on Wednesday.

Got a topical tip you’d like us to review? Write to us at [email protected]. Need to share documents securely? Contact us via SecureDrop.

DISCUSSION POINTS

Climate change puts Canada’s seniors at risk

The story continues under the ad

“If you think the pandemic has been incredibly difficult, remember that the World Health Organization and The Lancet have both declared climate change to be the number one health threat of this century. And just as we’ve seen with COVID-19, climate change won’t affect all Canadians equally. “- Amit Arya and Samantha Green

Canada’s gun violence epidemic is unlike what you might think

“Instead of just hearing an audio clip of Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole’s opinion on Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau’s semi-automatic rifle ban, it would have been nice to hear it as well, as well as other leaders, discuss the details of Bill C-21. Gun owners and community leaders have voiced opposition to the legislation, which contains many provisions that are not rooted in evidence-based science. “- Jooyoung lee

Low-income Canadian households will suffer the most from surging inflation

“If we truly appreciate the essential services that our workers provide to our economy, we should also appreciate the increase in their wages. Higher wages will cushion the impact of inflation on low-income Canadians, encourage more of these workers to re-enter the workforce, and alleviate labor shortages in businesses. – Sohaib Shahid

LIVE BETTER

The story continues under the ad

Five shows to see across Canada (and five to watch online) as theater returns to normal

Globe Theater columnist J. Kelly Nestruck says it has never been clearer than this month that theater is a local art form. As such, Canadian cities are in very different return states.

In Montreal, for example, the performing arts have almost returned to a pre-pandemic level of activity. In Toronto, on the other hand, many large theater companies wait until winter or even spring to resume in-person performances indoors.

Nestruck is taking a look at some in-person shows to look forward to this fall, but also has a few alternatives online.

LONG READING OF THE DAY

Ocean Cleanup struggles to deliver on pledge to eliminate plastic from the Pacific

An offshore supply vessel used by the nonprofit Ocean Cleanup to remove plastic from the ocean is docked in a port in Victoria on September 8, 2021.

GLORIA DICKIE / Reuters

Ocean Cleanup, a non-profit organization launched in 2013 and funded by cash donations and support from companies such as Coca-Cola, had hopes of ridding the world’s oceans of 90% of floating plastic by here. 2040. The meager transport shows how difficult the task will be.

The group’s best-case scenario allows it to remove 20,000 tonnes per year from the North Pacific, a small fraction of the roughly 11 million tonnes of plastic dumped into the oceans each year. And that amount entering the ocean is expected to nearly triple to 29 million tonnes per year by 2040, according to the Pew Charitable Trusts.

During a month’s 120-hour trip, Ocean Cleanup collected 8.2 tonnes of plastic – less than the standard haul of a garbage truck.

“I think they came from a good place to want to help the ocean, but by far the best way to help the ocean is to prevent plastic from getting into the ocean in the first place,” said Miriam Goldstein, Director of the Ocean. politics at the Center for American Progress think tank.

Read the full story here.

The evening update is presented by Rob Gilroy. If you wish to receive this newsletter by e-mail every weekday evening, go to here register. If you have any comments, drop us a line. Remark.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Hello Kitty arrives at the new Sanrio store in Irvine; Madison Reed opens 2 stores – Orange County Register

Hello Kitty, Chococat, My Melody, and Keroppi head over to UC Irvine.

There’s no word on what classes they might take, but the popular characters will soon be on sale at a new Sanrio store that will debut at the University Center in early October.

The Japanese company is known for making kitschy characters and collectibles. Wendy Hsu is the franchise owner of Sanrio Irvine.

The store will sell the latest versions of Sanrio and limited edition collectibles such as back-to-school items, stationery, clothing, accessories and housewares.

Hello Kitty, Chococat, My Melody and Keroppi arrive at Orange County in a dedicated Sanrio store. The store filled with plush toys, stationery, clothing, accessories and housewares opens Oct. 2 at the University Center near UC Irvine. Address: 4255 Campus Drive (Courtesy of Sanrio)

Sanrio Irvine, which opens on Sunday, October 2, will have sections dedicated to plush, clothing, beauty and stationery walls, as well as space for Hello Kitty and friends.

Address: 4255 Campus Drive Ste-B-142; Hours: 11 am to 7 pm, Monday to Thursday; From 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. from Friday to Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday.

  • Madison Reed, a San Francisco-based do-it-yourself hair dye startup, opens its first Orange County locations, one at Tustin Market Place on El Camino Real (September 15) and the other at Fashion Island at Newport Plage (Sep 23). The startup specializes in matching colors and can apply the dye in their Madison Reed Hair Color Bar. (Courtesy of Madison Reed)

  • Madison Reed, a San Francisco-based do-it-yourself hair dye startup, opens its first Orange County locations, one at Tustin Market Place on El Camino Real (September 15) and the other at Fashion Island at Newport Plage (Sep 23). The startup specializes in matching colors and can apply the dye in their Madison Reed Hair Color Bar. (Courtesy of Madison Reed)

  • Madison Reed, a San Francisco-based do-it-yourself hair dye startup, opens its first Orange County locations, one at Tustin Market Place on El Camino Real (September 15) and the other at Fashion Island at Newport Plage (Sep 23). The startup specializes in matching colors and can apply the dye in their Madison Reed Hair Color Bar. (Courtesy of Madison Reed)

Madison Reed opens its first OC locations

Pandemic lockdowns have left millions of dyed, highlighted and swept women in quarantine at home with no living room and few good ways to hide those pesky roots.

Some women just let it grow, while others turned to startups offering DIY hair dye kits.

One of them was Madison Reed, a do-it-yourself hair dye startup in San Francisco that exploded early in the pandemic months. The company is opening its first locations in Orange County, one at Tustin Market Place on El Camino Real (September 18) and the other at Fashion Island in Newport Beach (September 23).

CEO Amy Erret told Yahoo Finance last summer that Madison Reed saw her sales increase 12-fold as the pandemic changed lives as we knew it.

“I’m not happy that it took a pandemic for this to happen,” she said in July 2020. “I’d rather it didn’t happen. But I think it proves that the coloring of the hair is really important to people emotionally.

The startup uses unique color matching technology in their kits, which can be mailed to clients, or a professional can match and apply the color in a Madison Reed coloring bar. The company says it employs licensed colorists and uses products that are ammonia-free, paraben-free, and cruelty-free.

Addresses: 3003 El Camino Real, Tustin (next to the White House / Black Market); 313 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach.

Fullerton’s Women’s Transitional Living Center, under the leadership of CEO Mark Lee, is raising the minimum wage for its full-time employees to $ 22.44 from $ 18.27. The nonprofit’s salary increases benefit 26 of its 49 part-time and full-time employees. (Courtesy of Bill Nichols and the Women’s Transitional Living Center)

Nonprofit salary increase

The Women’s Transitional Living Center in Fullerton is increasing its minimum hourly wage for full-time employees from $ 18.27 to $ 22.44.

The nonprofit’s salary increases benefit 26 of its 49 part-time and full-time employees.

The new wage standard was based on the Living Wage Calculator created by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology so that a single adult without children could afford adequate housing, food and other expenses.

The WTLC said it previously relied on the Southern California nonprofit compensation report to determine a market rate for staff positions. The nonprofit, said chief executive Mark Lee, now recognizes that such reports are based on a system with “built-in inequalities that undermine people in lower paid positions.”

“Our new compensation standard is no longer influenced by external unfairness factors,” Lee said in a statement. “This positive change has been made possible by the dedication and commitment to the WTLC that our staff demonstrate every day.”

The non-profit organization helps individuals and families escape domestic violence and exploitation by providing resources aimed at independent living. WTLC has 24 hour bilingual telephone support at 877-531-5522 or can be contacted by email / text at [email protected] For more information, visit www.wtlc.org.

Moving

Yunkyung Kim has been appointed COO of CalOptima in Orange. Kim returns to CalOptima after leaving Blue Shield of California Promise Health Plan, where she was Vice President of Medi-Cal Growth and Vice President of Medi-Cal Performance. She has 20 years of experience in the healthcare industry. CalOptima provides state-funded health care coverage for low-income children, adults, seniors, and people with disabilities in Orange County.

Good work

The Orange County Community Foundation raised $ 144,502 from 450 donors to Protect & Preserve, a day of giving to support the county’s open spaces and marine protected areas. The money will go to seven local nonprofits that help protect marine areas along the 12 miles of Orange County coast. Participating organizations included Laguna Canyon Foundation, Laguna Ocean Foundation, Newport Bay Conservancy, OC Habitats, Ocean Defenders Alliance, Pacific Marine Mammal Center and The Ecology Center.

Ralphs and Food 4 Less raised $ 100,000 in donations for their Hunger Action Month campaign. Proceeds will support Cal State Fullerton’s permanent pantry for students, Homeboy Industries’ Feed HOPE program and “Fill the Fridge,” an ongoing campaign that benefits Project Angel Food, the Los Angeles LGBT Center and the Los Angeles Unified School District.

The City National Bank recently presented a check to the Small Business Development Corporation of Orange County as a Community Reinvestment Act grant to help small businesses. From left to right, Eduardo Brugman, news director of SBDC-OC; Theresa Don Lucas, City National Bank CRA Officer; Richard Lee, Senior Vice President of Commercial Lending at SBDC-OC; City National Bank SVP Sal Mendoza. (Courtesy of City National Bank)

Subsidies

The Orange County Small Business Development Corporation received $ 20,000 in Community Reinvestment Act bank grants that will help the organization guide entrepreneurs and small business owners through tough times or expansions. The association received a grant of $ 10,000 each from City National Bank and CIT Bank this summer. the money will go to its entrepreneur loan fund which lends directly to businesses.

Milestones

Stretto, an Irvine-based technology and services company, was recognized at the 15th Annual M&A Advisor Turnaround Awards as Turnaround Product / Service of the Year. This recognition marks the second consecutive year that Stretto has received this award for its services. Stretto was also honored in the Chapter 11 Reorganization of the Year category.

Laguna Cafe and Grill was honored as Local Restaurant of the Month for August by MP Cottie Petrie-Norris (District 74). Laguna Woods Restaurant is known for its all American-style cuisine and breakfast. The Laguna Cafe was founded by Richard Martinez and is co-owned by Tammy Martinez and Monja Chavez.

Editor’s Note: This post has been updated to correct Madison Reed’s opening date to Tustin.

Status Update is compiled from press releases from Editor Karen Levin and edited by Editor-in-Chief Samantha Gowen. Send high resolution articles and photos to [email protected] Allow at least a week for publication. Elements are edited for length and clarity.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Saginaw Neighborhood Celebrates Planned Return of Children’s Community Center

SAGINAW, MI – Eight-year-old Asia Pratt was sitting breathlessly laughing next to her friends during a break as she jumped inside the inflatable house set up for an event reconnecting a neighborhood in Saginaw on the south side with an old community center ready to reopen in the coming month.

“I feel very happy,” she said of the celebration going on outside the facility at 3145 Russell. “It was so much fun. I can’t wait to be able to go here.

Organizers say the building – known as “The Nabe” – will likely not open to the community until 2022, but the excitement surrounding the news warranted some sort of block party on Saturday, August 28. The rally included The Nabe’s future target demographic. : Pratt and children his age.

Pratt plans to be the third generation in his family to run and play inside the facility when it reopens. Her father, Michael Pratt, 50, was part of a group of nine adults who formed a non-profit organization and bought the community center where they once played as children.

The Saturday celebration also catered to its demographic age. A DJ played Rick James; Earth, Wind and Fire; Kool and the Gang and other old hitmakers.

Still, the rally seemed to remain focused on the future: more specifically, The Nabe’s potential for the South Side neighborhood that has become largely desolate over the past two decades. Organizers say they hope when the community center reopens it will help revive the area and provide a place to grow up for children living nearby.

Leola Gochett, 80, moved to the South Side neighborhood in December 1970. Her three children spent their youth at The Nabe, known for decades as the Lutheran Charities Neighborhood House Community Center. After several changes of ownership, the building has remained largely unused in recent years, after decades of declining participation.

Gochett said she was delighted to hear that former attendees are planning to resuscitate the community center. She has known the nine members of the association since they played there when they were children.

“I believe in them,” said Gochett, who attended the celebration on Saturday. “This community needs this, to help us get back to the way things were in this neighborhood.”

After purchasing the old building, members of the nonprofit – which bears the same name as the community center – began tidying up the Nabe earlier this summer. It has fallen into disrepair in recent years, so the walls have been repainted, the floors have been repaired and the rooms have been cleaned.

The work remains, organizers say, but the progress of their efforts was visible to anyone who saw the interior of the 24,000-square-foot facility a month ago compared to today.

During the visits organized on Saturday, the participants got a glimpse of this renovated interior. However, much of the event activity at the start of the day took place on the community center lawn and parking lot, which organizers have turned into something that looks like a small fair.

Food vendors were camping on the outskirts of the rally. Children rushed between two inflatable houses and a mobile truck carrying playable video game consoles. Within sight of these children were their parents and other adults socializing to the music of the event.

“I’m so grateful that it brought this community together again,” said Anthony Dent, a 52-year-old man who once attended the community center as a child. “I can’t wait to see how this place will grow when it opens. “

James Carthan, a member of the nonprofit that owns the facility, said the support expressed by the community on Saturday was a sign that more success could be in store for the Nabe.

“It takes a village to raise a child,” said Carthan, 50. “I want this place to be a bright light for the young people of Saginaw.”

Organizers have organized tours of the interior of The Nabe, a Saginaw community center that the owners hope to open within the next year. Here, participants visit a basketball court where a mural was being completed.

RELATED:

Childhood friends reunite to revive Saginaw children’s community center


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Mother whose son was shot and killed offers help to families affected by gun violence

HAMPTON, Virginia – A mother who lost her son to gun violence has founded a non-profit organization to help other grieving parents after losing a child.

The support group is called MM2K, which stands for “Mommies Matter to Kyyri”.

Sevhn Doggette’s son Kyyri was 25 when he was shot and killed in August 2017. It happened in Charlotte, North Carolina, where Doggette now lives.

She tells News 3 that she is from Hampton Roads and comes here often, and when she heard about the recent violence involving young people, she felt compelled to publicize her organization.

Doggette says MM2K initially provides a listening ear to grieving moms and dads. She also said they have licensed therapists who volunteer their time.

“As for the different mechanics to help them go through, basically every day because it’s like a roller coaster ride for us,” Doggette explained.

As part of the support services, they sometimes even accompany parents to court in the face of the person (s) accused of having killed their child.

“Now you have to deal with this,” she added. “I’m also facing a life sentence and haven’t even committed a crime.”

Related: Norfolk Mother Who Lost Son To Gun Violence Hosts New Podcast to Help Grieving Families

Doggette says that while MM2K is active in Charlotte, she also hopes to host community events in Hampton Roads. She encourages families affected by gun violence to reach out.

More information about MM2K can be found here.

read more
History organization

Socrates Sculpture Park welcomes new ruler as search for permanent director continues – QNS.com

Subscribe to our Policy NewsletterNY for the latest coverage and to stay informed about the 2021 elections in your district and across New York

Socrates Sculpture Park has a new leader – for now.

Suzy Delvalle has been appointed interim executive director, succeeding John Hatfield, who held the position for almost a decade before stepping down in October 2020. The search for a new director is underway.

The Artist Oasis on Vernon Boulevard was created by a coalition of artists and community members who transformed an East River landfill and illegal landfill into an open studio and exhibition space in 1986.

“John Hatfield has grown the organization in countless ways over his nine years here, including doubling the operating budget and staff size, and opening new exhibitions that have been critically acclaimed,” said declared Delvalle. “I look forward to working with the rich family of artists, staff and collaborators of Socrates, as well as the surrounding community. “

Delvalle was most recently President and Executive Director of Creative Capital, a national non-profit organization that supports innovative and adventurous artists across the country through funding, advice, gatherings, and career development services. She is known as an “ardent defender of art and artists”.

With over 20 years of leadership experience in the cultural sector, Devalle has dedicated his career to improving the impact of mission-based organizations and creating opportunity and equity in the arts.

“The board is delighted that Suzy is taking on the role of interim director during this important time for the organization,” said Ivana Mestrovic, secretary and treasurer of the board of directors of Socrates. “Suzy brings a wealth of experience working with artists and communities, and we have the utmost confidence in her ability to lead Socrates as we continue to seek a permanent executive director.”

As the second director in the history of Creative Capital, Delvalle has overseen some of the most dramatic changes in the organization’s two-decade history. Under his leadership, Creative Capital increased its annual budget by 20% and expanded the board of directors with 12 new active members while creating a National Advisory Board. It has also expanded its services to artists by instituting Creative Capital Awards and annual retreats.

“Suzy has been a valued colleague in the field for many years, and I am delighted to hand over the reins to her,” said Hatfield. “I am extremely proud of the progress of the organization over the past nine years and of all that the board, staff and I have accomplished together.

Hatfield will be joining NYU faculty in September to teach a course for their graduate program in Museum Studies.

While exploring other activities, he will continue to serve in an advisory capacity on the Socrates Capital Project to build a permanent structure in the 5-acre park, which sits on the ancestral land of the Lenape, Canarsie and Matinecock peoples.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Closure of Mary’s Kitchen, a sanctuary for the homeless, would be a “tragedy” for those who depend on it

For Derek King and many like him, Mary’s Kitchen is a sanctuary.

King, who has been homeless for almost a decade, found Mary’s Kitchen in Orange at a time when he had reached his limits. Malnourished physically and spiritually, he was ready to give up.

Mary’s Kitchen provided her with food, a shower and clothes. It helped restore something that many homeless people had to give up when they lived on the streets: dignity.

He found a new meaning in the relationships he established and the spirituality fostered by the leadership of the association.

“There are times when the fear of living for nothing strangles you,” King said in an interview this week with Mary’s Kitchen.

King’s story is not uncommon.

Charles Cousert hadn’t eaten in days before finding Mary’s Kitchen, where he was given food and clothing.

He said he would have died if it hadn’t been for the association.

“This place is literally a blessing,” Cousert said. “It’s a sanctuary.

Craig Lasky and America Sanchez are biking at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13th.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

Homeless people who rely on Mary’s Kitchen said it was the only place they could find whatever they needed. Led by Gloria Suess, the association offers three meals, six days a week, to anyone who requests them. Showers and laundry facilities are also available, and the association receives mail for hundreds of customers.

After speaking with over half a dozen homeless people this week, it’s clear anyone can approach Suess with a problem they’re having and she’ll try to fix it.

During a visit to the association this week, Michael Lohse, accompanied by his dog Mildred, approached Suess and thanked her for helping him pay for the late registration of his car. Like other visitors to the site, Lohse, a victim of three strokes, has had a hard time. He said the nonprofit gave him $ 440 for the $ 1,300 he needed so he could drive again.

“Whatever you need, you’ll get it from Gloria,” said Patrick Hogan, volunteer at Mary’s Kitchen.

But after the city sent a letter of formal notice last month ending the association’s lease, the homeless people who rely on Mary’s Kitchen are now wondering what they will do if it is closed.

On June 18, the city sent Mary’s Kitchen a formal notice terminating its lease three years earlier. The city is giving the association until September 18 to vacate the property and they’ve asked Mary’s Kitchen to provide the city with a move plan within two weeks.

The letter from the city, signed by City Manager Rick Otto, indicates that the city has been a leader in Orange County in supporting the efforts of the homeless. However, Mary’s Kitchen is the only homeless service provider listed in the city’s housing component.

Marie’s kitchen has been operating in Orange since the mid-1980s, and at its current location at 517 W. Struck Ave., since 1994. Mary’s Kitchen is a humble, non-profit organization run by donations and volunteers, some of whom are themselves even homeless.

Natalie Wolf, center, and other volunteers prepare meals for the homeless at Mary's Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday, July 13.

Natalie Wolf, center, and other volunteers prepare meals for the homeless at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday, July 13.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

While Otto’s letter praises Mary’s Kitchen, it goes on to state that the association’s actions only serve to “enable roaming and can no longer be supported by the city.”

The letter says there has been an increase in crime and police calls from Mary’s Kitchen. The city says this has created an “unreasonable demand for municipal services.”

The letter also states that the city recently approved an affordable housing project nearby, which is “incompatible” with Mary’s Kitchen, which is located at the end of an industrial dead end. An Orange Police Department headquarters is across the street. There are no houses on the street.

Suess, the association’s president and CEO, said in a phone interview that Mary’s Kitchen had already complied with city requests to install security cameras and a security guard.

“Whatever they asked us to do, we did it,” Suess said.

Suess said the city does not want Mary’s Kitchen to serve people who are not from Orange, but that is inconsistent with the nonprofit’s mission to serve all who are hungry.

“We don’t judge who deserves food or not,” Suess said. “We take care of those who really need help.

“… I don’t think Orange understands, all these people who have considered Mary their home for all these years, where are they going to go?” Where do they get their mail from? Where are they going to shower? Where are they going to eat?

Mike Harrison, a volunteer at Mary's Kitchen in Orange, cooks meals for the homeless on Tuesday, July 13.

Mike Harrison, a volunteer at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange, cooks meals for the homeless on Tuesday, July 13.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

Mary’s Kitchen and some members of the community back off.

The association hired lawyer Brooke Weitzman, who sent a letter to the city on July 9 saying the city’s notice did not include a substantial reason for prematurely terminating a rental agreement. He asks the city to cancel his letter.

“The notice does not meet substantive and procedural standards for early termination of the agreement,” the letter said. “The only reference to the lease in the notice indicates that the City can terminate the agreement, but it does not specify any reason supported by the terms of the agreement.

“Despite the recognition of the critical support Mary’s has received over the years, the letter draws baseless conclusions that are simply not supported by the facts, in effect blaming Mary’s Kitchen for the city’s failure to resolve the crisis. housing, the health care needs of its poorest residents, and everything and all other issues in the public space outside of Mary’s Kitchen property. Certainly nothing in the lease places the onus on Mary’s Kitchen to address the City’s failures to meet the needs of low-income and homeless people.

Weitzman’s letter also calls on the city to determine the environmental impact of closing Mary’s Kitchen in order to comply with California’s Environmental Quality Act.

The letter says water and soil may be contaminated by the loss of hygiene facilities at Mary’s Kitchen and other public spaces could be affected as homeless people are forced to move.

“The immediate shutdown of a service provider leaving around 150-200 people a day without this safe place to sit, receive meals to eat and clothes to wear, access mail, access hygiene facilities, use a laundromat and more will inevitably have an impact on the environment, ”the letter said.

Weitzman also argues that the lease termination violates the city’s housing element, which requires the city to take into account the homeless, low-income people, the elderly and people with disabilities – all of whom frequent Mary’s Kitchen. Weitzman notes in the letter that Mary’s Kitchen is the only homeless service provider in the city listed in its housing element.

The letter notes that the city must “make adequate provision in its housing element for the existing and anticipated needs of all economic segments of its community, including its homeless population.”

Patrick Hogan has a glass of water at Mary's Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13.

Patrick Hogan drinks a glass of water at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

Orange City spokesman Paul Sitkoff said in an email he could not comment on the closure of Mary’s Kitchen due to a possible ongoing litigation.

Weitzman said on the phone that she wondered who in town was leading the effort to shut down Mary’s Kitchen after decades of existence.

“There was no public meeting, so I know the letter is from the city manager, but who is it? Said Weitzman. “This sort of thing would normally be a decision of city council, especially given the long history of community service. It is not clear because there has been no public involvement.

Mary’s Kitchen is currently collecting signatures from supporters to show the city how crucial it is to the community. Suess said she wanted a few thousand signatures before sending them to the city.

The community also supports the association. Several members of the public showed up at a city council meeting on Tuesday night to criticize the city and express their support for Mary’s Kitchen.

“This city has lost its soul,” resident Heidi Zimmermann said at the meeting.

Pancho Sambrano shares lunch with her cat Ice Cream at Mary's Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13th.

Pancho Sambrano shares lunch with her cat Ice Cream at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

The city declined to provide crime statistics on Mary’s Kitchen, despite its allegations of increased crime in the area. The city called the association a “nuisance” in its letter, but there was no sign of it during a visit to Mary’s Kitchen this week.

Dozens of people had lunch and chatted among themselves. Some slept in the shade.

Everything fell silent as Suess recited a prayer through a megaphone. Many stood up and some took off their hats.

“Send blessings to Mary’s Kitchen,” Suess said.

“Amen,” they said.

For those who meet regularly at the shrine, losing Mary’s Kitchen is more than losing access to food and possessions. The camaraderie and support from Suess, volunteers and others gives them hope and meaning.

“I come here more for the community than the food, even though the food is pretty good,” said Starla Acosta, who has lived in her car for about five years, the same time she comes to Mary’s Kitchen.

Acosta met his close friend Ron at Mary’s Kitchen. She calls him her little brother.

Ron, who declined to give her last name, said Mary’s Kitchen helps all kinds of people. For many, it helps support them as they go through a difficult time in life.

Since Ron was injured at work two years ago, he’s been a regular visitor to Mary’s Kitchen. He has a job now, but he keeps coming to see his friends.

Ron said he couldn’t sleep the night he heard about the potential closure of Mary’s Kitchen.

“It would be a tragedy,” he said.

Support our coverage by becoming a digital subscriber.

read more
Non profit living

More Nursing Homes and Seniors’ Homes are Closing Their Doors Due to the Impact of COVID

The nursing home operated by Alaris Health on John F. Kennedy Boulevard in Guttenberg was old. Built long before there were concerns about isolating large numbers of residents to stop a virus that could spread like wildfire, it was small and could hold up to four people per room.

And now it’s closed.

The long-term coronavirus pandemic has claimed the lives of more than 7,800 long-term care residents in New Jersey.

It also had a big impact on nursing homes.

Since March 2020, three state care facilities have closed, according to state data, highlighting not only changes COVID has brought to standards of care, experts say, but also growing financial instability in the state. nationwide industry. In each of the previous two years before the deadly virus hit, there has been only one nursing home closure in New Jersey, according to the state Department of Health.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has put increased financial pressure on nursing homes and assisted living providers who already operate on very low margins,” said James McCracken, President and CEO LeadingAge New Jersey, the statewide association of nonprofit elderly care organizations.

Nationally, industry officials predict long-term care providers could lose $ 94 billion in the pandemic and warn that more than 1,800 facilities could eventually close their doors.

The closures in New Jersey, meanwhile, also suggest that the financial pressures felt by long-term care facilities due to COVID may have made nonprofits such as those represented by LeadingAge particularly vulnerable.

Medicaid, a joint federal and state program that helps pay nursing home fees, serves as a safety net for people with limited incomes and resources. But the reimbursement rate in New Jersey remains far too low, critics lament. At the same time, not all for-profit nursing homes will accept Medicaid or may limit the services and beds provided to Medicaid patients, unlike nonprofit organizations.

“Faith-based and mission-oriented organizations are particularly affected because they traditionally care for those in need, regardless of their ability to pay,” McCracken said of the financial crisis caused by the pandemic.

One of the facilities that closed in the state this year – the Armenian Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Emerson – was operated on a non-profit basis. The Villa at Florham Park, an assisted living facility and also a non-profit organization, is also closing. The establishment, which has already relocated all of its residents, has submitted a closure plan to the state, according to a spokesperson for the Ministry of Health.

More recently, the St. Francis Residential Community in Denville, a non-profit independent living facility for seniors operated by The Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother, also said it was closing for financial reasons, although it was not have not linked their problems to COVID. The closure will displace 75 people who live there, including 10 nuns of another order, the Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Conception of the Mother of God. They did not respond to requests for comment.

The Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother, owners of the property since 1895, said in a statement that as the buildings and infrastructure on campus aged, “it has become increasingly difficult to fund maintenance and operations. renovations necessary to maintain the financial viability of the community. “

Although they have not yet filed a notice of intent regarding the closure with the Ministry of Community Affairs, which is authorizing the installation, they have withheld the Springpoint, a non-profit organization that operates 27 retirement homes, to help with the closure and find suitable housing for current residents.

A Springpoint spokeswoman said they had has created a limited number of leases at one of their facilities, The Oaks in Denville, which will be made available to residents of St. Francis and the sisters who live there, based on financial need.

St. Francis Residential Community, an independent living facility in Denville that houses 75 residents and plans to close.Google Street View

McCracken said a more robust reimbursement system is needed to support providers who care for the most vulnerable.

“Nonprofit providers are resident-focused and I am saddened when faith-based organizations close because they cannot afford to continue their ministries,” he said.

Her concern was echoed by Laurie Facciarossa Brewer, the New Jersey long-term care ombudsman, who questions whether faith-based institutions and other nonprofits are having a harder time weathering the effects of the health emergency. public COVID-19, including reduction of occupancy rates.

“At least one national study has shown that nonprofit long-term care facilities are more effective at controlling COVID-19 infections,” she said. “This may suggest that these facilities had better staff ratios and provided more nursing hours, a key indicator of quality in a long-term care facility and the most important tool to combat the spread of the infection.”

The loss of such organizations, said Facciarossa Brewer, “is bad news for people in need of nursing home care in New Jersey.”

Andrew Aronson, president and CEO of the Health Care Association of New Jersey, which represents long-term care facilities in the state, said the pandemic has caused an economic crisis on all long-term care providers, “regardless of the ownership structure”.

Nationally, a recent survey by the American Health Care Association and the National Center for Assisted Living, representing more than 14,000 nursing homes, assisted living communities and other long-term care facilities across the country , revealed that most homes in living communities are now operating at a loss.

This survey indicated that only a quarter of nursing homes and assisted living communities were confident they could last a year or more, citing increased expenses or lost income. There are also fewer inhabitants.

“Even though cases of COVID in long-term care are at historically low levels, providers are struggling to recover from the economic crisis the pandemic has brought about,” said Mark Parkinson, President and CEO from the Association. “Too many facilities operate on tight budgets simply because policy makers have not committed the appropriate resources, and this can have devastating consequences.”

CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES: Live map tracker | Newsletter | Home page

To ensure the stability of the long-term care industry, Aronson said lawmakers and officials must provide short-term economic support and address the chronic underfunding of Medicaid, which only covers about 70% of the cost of caring for a patient in a retirement home.

The problem, however, goes beyond Medicaid funding.

The isolation requirements of sick and infected residents in nursing homes that were never designed to contain a virus like COVID have demonstrated the inadequacies of many older facilities that may no longer be economically viable.

The Alaris Health nursing home in Guttenberg, which looked after nearly 100 residents, was a relatively small facility. Approved for 108 beds, it had an average of 91 residents during the pandemic. But the retirement home, built in the 1960s, also needed modernization. Many of its rooms were set up for up to three and four people, and officials said it was difficult to isolate patients with COVID-19.

Even before the pandemic, the nursing facility had ongoing work issues and union officials complained that their members were working with expired contracts, many of those who had been sick on the job with the coronavirus ended up over later responsible for thousands of medical bills. Its operators had also considered a plan to demolish the facility and replace it with a 15-story residential building overlooking the Manhattan skyline.

In the aftermath of the pandemic, Alaris Health announced last year that it would close the nursing home and began moving residents to other facilities. According to the state’s health department, it closed in January.

__

Local journalism needs your support. Subscribe to nj.com/supporter.

Ted Sherman can be reached at [email protected]. Follow him on twitter @TedShermanSL.

read more
Non profit living

$ 99 million in rental assistance for returned Floridians

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) – About $ 99 million in unspent rental assistance to help Floridians living in affordable housing has been returned to the state after the agency overseeing the program struggled to shell out the money.

The Florida Housing Finance Corporation, which was established by the Florida legislature to help develop and support affordable housing, received $ 120 million in federal rent assistance funding last year as part of the CARES law. Florida used the money to create a coronavirus relief fund, intended to help tenants catch up on rent who live on properties that FHFC finances and have lost jobs or income due to the pandemic.

Taylore Maxey, press secretary for the non-profit organization, said she has distributed around $ 13.2 million to help tenants in 373 multi-family developments across the state. In total, FHFC said it received 786 requests for assistance but only 521 were approved. And about $ 99 million has been returned to the Department of Economic Opportunity to be reallocated to other pandemic programs.

“There’s no way to water it down: this strategy has been underused,” said Trey Price, executive director of the FHFC. “But all that considered, I think we did a good job with the time constraints we were facing and the resources given to us.”

Nonprofits that have tried to help affordable housing residents take advantage of rent assistance and push back eviction notices, including the Miami Workers Center and the Community Justice Project, said the problem is that some landlords will not participate in rent relief programs because of the requirements. they place on the owners.

To participate in the FHFC program, for example, landlords had to waive late fees and agree not to increase the rent until January 2021, while also pledging not to turn down lease renewals for late tenants. rent or report them to the credit bureaus. They also had to agree not to initiate new eviction requests and to suspend ongoing evictions for a period of time.

However, Price said he believed the biggest obstacle to disbursing the funds was that tenants had to pay 30% of their household income in rent to be eligible, a prerequisite which was later removed.

He said a separate program run by the non-profit organization, in which FHFC contracted with 119 local government housing offices to distribute rent assistance, was much more successful. According to figures provided by the association, $ 98.3 million in rent assistance and $ 18.1 million in mortgage relief were spent as part of this strategy.

Price said FHFC returned the unspent money before the deadline set by the CARES Act, which required all funding to be used by December 31, 2020 or returned to the federal government. Former President Trump ultimately extended that until the end of 2021 when he unexpectedly signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act in December.

He waited to sign the $ 900 billion COVID relief plan until December 27, just days before many provisions of the CARES Act expired, including federal unemployment and the paycheck protection program. . The moratorium on deportations from the country was also about to end.

Price said the uncertainty over whether or not Trump would sign an extension put the Florida Housing Finance Corporation in a difficult position.

“There was a real question of whether President Trump was going to sign or veto this bill,” Price said. “At this point, we needed to start moving (the unspent money) to the state of Florida. You don’t just snap your fingers and move $ 99 million. There was a bit of a rush. “

Christina Pushaw, spokesperson for Gov. Ron DeSantis, said the decision was made to “pull out” the unused money because this bill awaiting Trump’s signature contained $ 25 billion in aid to the government. dedicated rental, including $ 1.4 billion for Florida. Pushaw said the money returned by the Florida Housing Finance Corporation had been reallocated “to support the state’s ongoing pandemic response spending,” but couldn’t say exactly what it was being used for.

But it’s unclear why the governor’s office was confident he would receive this money, given Trump’s reluctance to sign the Consolidated Appropriations Act, which passed both the House and the Senate with bipartisan support. Pushaw did not immediately respond when asked for further details.

In a video posted to Twitter, Trump at the time called the bill a “disgrace” and called on lawmakers to “get rid of unnecessary and unnecessary pieces of this legislation and send me an appropriate bill.” , referring to the provisions of the 5,593 -page legislation allocating money to foreign aid, environmental projects and the arts and humanities.

“It’s called the COVID Relief Bill, but it has almost nothing to do with COVID,” Trump said, toppling lawmakers and even some of his own aides, who were in tense negotiations over the package. for months. Trump was also unhappy that the bill only included $ 600 stimulus payments for Americans and said he wanted to issue checks for $ 2,000.

However, Capitol Hill residents were quick to point out that some of the unrelated projects that received funding were programs that Trump included in his 2021 fiscal budget. His critics also ignored that Steven Mnuchin, Trump’s secretary of the Treasury, was the one who negotiated the figure of $ 600.

read more
Non profit living

Summerville teenager helps community members escape homelessness | New

SUMMERVILLE – One of the most obvious priorities in helping someone get out of homelessness is finding a place for them to live.

But what happens when they move into a space with nothing but a crate full of clothes and rent money?

“The difference between having a bed or not really changes all day long,” said John Michael Stagliano, 18, a lifelong Summerville resident.

Stagliano is also the founder of Home Again, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing furniture and household items to families leaving behind their old conditions and moving into new homes.

It all started with Stagliano volunteering at a Summerville homeless shelter, where he learned that residents’ needs don’t end with just leaving the shelter.

Over the past five years, Home Again has supplied the homes of nearly 500 people and helped raise thousands of dollars for local shelters.

Stagliano managed to accomplish all of this before graduating from high school.

“You can always do something to help someone else,” he said.

While acquiring something as simple as furniture may seem small to some people, it has been life changing for those who have benefited from Home Again. Connie Ross, one of these recent furniture recipients, said the organization’s help took a lot of stress away.

“Because I had nothing,” she said. “Not even a chair to sit on.”

Do something right

Ross now has two jobs – one at a local fast food restaurant and another for a cleaning service. She recently moved into a new apartment after being homeless for over a year. Between November and this summer, she was living at Hope’s House, the homeless women’s shelter at Dorchester County Community Outreach.

Before getting a place in the shelter, she had also spent a year living in her car while recovering from drug addiction. She said she still remembers the rainy nights sitting alone in her car, including during the pandemic, which compounded the isolation.

“I’ve had a few nights of crying, but not a lot,” Ross said. “You just have to find your inner strength.”

She became homeless after leaving a space where she lived with others. Ross learned that someone loaded furniture and other items in his name and damaged his credit.

This caused him to spend most of the pandemic in his car.

Summerville sees need for affordable housing options but struggles to find a place

“I had to pay off a lot of debt,” she said.

She was able to keep both of her jobs and save money, enough to eventually afford her own place.

The shelter did not allow women to buy anything because everything was given. “It was a breath of fresh air,” she said.

When Ross was finally able to find a place to stay, she hooked up with Home Again. Stagliano and his team gave him a bed, lamps, crockery, toiletries, a TV and more.

She said that as a black woman it felt good to see someone willing to help her. When looking for apartments after fixing her credit, she said there were times she could see that property managers were disappointed when they found out about her race.

With Stagliano being so young and doing so much volunteer work in the community, it was inspiring, she said.

“He’s doing something right,” she said. “And I think people should support him in any way they can.”

Who gets help

Home Again recipients ranged from people like Ross to entire families and local veterans. Stagliano said what he expects the most in his job is to see the change in personalities in people when they get help.

He remembers helping a veteran who slept on his apartment floor for at least a week.

When they visited him after delivering the furniture, he noticed that he was more social with his neighbors and happier overall. He said he had the same level of excitement when he saw two children jump on the beds his team brought them.






Back home

John Michael Stagliano (left) prepares to prepare a bed for veteran Timothy Hall on June 19, 2021. Stagliano founded Home Again, which helps provide furniture and household items to families emerging from homelessness and moving to new accommodation. Brad Nettles / Staff




It was a sense of accomplishment that Stagliano knew well from having spent much of his childhood volunteering.

Volunteering and giving back to the community is something the Stagliano family know well.

In addition to Home Again, John Michael’s sister Katie founded and runs Katie’s Krops. This is another Summerville nonprofit that creates community gardens to support food drives to end hunger.

This organization was formed after Katie grew a 40-pound cabbage when she was in third grade. John Michael was 4 at the time.

Cabbage then fed nearly 300 people and propelled Katie towards the launch of Katie’s Krops. The nonprofit now spans 31 states across the United States with dozens of community gardens.

Summerville's Katie's Krops reflects on more than a decade of national community garden work

“I think it was just meant to be,” Katie said. “The entire Summerville community as a whole, they have been amazing.”

Years later, while preparing meals at a Summerville homeless men’s shelter called Home of Hope, John Michael began helping residents of the shelter obtain furniture. He and his family would solicit the community for donations. After joining the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center and supporting homeless veterans, Home Again was born.

“It really changes lives and helps bring families together,” Katie said. “I couldn’t be prouder to be his sister.”

Without this giant cabbage, the family is not sure the two nonprofits would have taken off. But, they said the enthusiasm for supporting the community would have always been there.

“It’s kind of who we are as a family,” said Stacy Stagliano, mother of John Michael and Katie.

She said she never imagined that any of her children would oversee the organizations. With Home Again, she said she was surprised because John Michael has always been her shy child.

“They just see the possibilities,” Stacy said.

Without the support of the community, she said nonprofits would never have had the impact they are having now.

John Michael agrees.

“I couldn’t do it on my own,” he said.

During the height of the pandemic, Home Again was not receiving many calls. John Michael’s best guess was that, unfortunately, few families were getting out of homelessness.






Back home

John Michael Stagliano (center) and his father, John Stagliano, unload furniture with the help of veteran Timothy Hall on June 19, 2021. John Michael founded Home Again, which helps provide furniture and household items to families who emerging from homelessness and transitioning to new housing. Hall needed a bed and furniture. Brad Nettles / Staff




But recently with vaccines there has been a noticeable increase in awareness. Community support is therefore always welcome and necessary, he said.

Along with Ross, she said she was not only grateful to Home Again, but also to the community of Summerville in general for supporting her so much.

She can’t wait for her turn to do the same for someone else.

To support the association, go to Home Again Facebook page or send an email to [email protected]

Summerville's non-profit community garden Katie's Krops opens its first outdoor classroom

read more