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Canadian army

Lindholm traded to Bruins by Ducks for Moore, Vaakanainen

Hampus Lindholm was traded to the Boston Bruins by the Anaheim Ducks on Saturday for defensemen John Moore and Urho Vaakanainen and three NHL draft picks.

Anaheim received a first-round pick in the 2022 NHL Draft, a second-round pick in the 2023 NHL Draft, and a second-round pick in the 2024 NHL Draft.

The Bruins also received defenseman Kodie Curran. The 32-year-old hasn’t played in the NHL; he has 16 points (one goal, 15 assists) in 37 games with San Diego of the American Hockey League this season.

“Hampus has been an integral part of the Ducks for years, which we appreciate and respect,” Anaheim general manager Pat Verbeek said. “Having said that, we are very happy with our comeback. As I have said since arriving in Anaheim (hired Feb. 3), our goal is to continue to build a team that can compete for the Stanley Cup over the long term. and assets that match the age range of our existing young talent prepare us well for the future.”

Lindholm, a 28-year-old defenseman, is in the final season of a six-year contract he signed with the Ducks on Oct. 27, 2016, and could become an unrestricted free agent after the season.

[RELATED: NHL Trade Tracker]

Lindholm has 22 points (five goals, 17 assists) in 61 games this season and sat out Friday in a 3-0 loss to the Florida Panthers.

“If you go to Hampus right now, he’s focused on the practice he’s doing,” Ducks coach Dallas Eakins said Friday. “He’s an amazing kid in the way he can think through things. He’s not shaken by anything. He wants to win tonight, all of those things. I’d like to give you something dramatic that it’s been really hard for him, but he’s a strong kid mentally. He’s good.

“He’s taken the approach that he’s just going to worry about his day, what’s ahead of him and what he can control, and go about it that way. He’s good. I’m really proud of him.”

Selected by Anaheim in the first round (6th overall) of the 2012 NHL Draft, Lindholm scored 222 points (57 goals, 165 assists) in 582 regular season games and 21 points (four goals, 17 assists) in 21 Stanley Cups . Elimination games.

The Ducks (27-26-11) are seven points behind the Vegas Golden Knights for the second wild card in the Western Conference playoffs.

Moore, 31, has one assist in seven games this season and hasn’t played since Jan. 12. He has one season left on a five-year contract he signed with the Bruins on July 1, 2018 and can become an unrestricted free agent after the next season.

Selected by the Columbus Blue Jackets in the first round (21st overall) of the 2009 NHL Draft, Moore scored 118 points (38 goals, 80 assists) in 544 regular season games with the Bruins, Devils, Coyotes of Arizona and New York. Rangers and Blue Jackets, and four assists in 49 playoff games.

Vaakanainen, 23, has four assists in 15 games this season and six assists in 31 NHL games. He is in the final season of his entry-level contract and can become a restricted free agent after the season.

The Bruins (38-19-5) finished fourth in the Atlantic Division, nine points behind the No. 1 Florida Panthers, and held the first wild card in the Eastern Conference playoffs. Boston has won 11 of its last 14 games (11-2-1).

On Saturday, Anaheim also traded forward Nicolas Deslauriers to the Minnesota Wild for a third-round pick in the 2023 NHL Draft.

Deslauriers has 10 points (five goals, five assists) in 61 games this season; he scored 82 points (41 goals, 41 assists) in 486 regular season games with the Ducks, Montreal Canadiens and Buffalo Sabers.

The 31-year-old forward is in the final season of a two-year contract he signed with the Ducks on Feb. 15, 2020 and could become an unrestricted free agent after the season.

The Ducks traded their defenseman Josh Manson to the Colorado Avalanche on Monday for defenseman Drew Helleson’s prospect and a second-round pick in the 2023 draft.

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Non profit living

BN Indians: Young community servants show the future is in good hands

Aditi Sharma founded the Inclusive Education Coalition (IEC) when she was a senior at Normal Community High School. She is now a student at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana.

She said the history curriculum particularly caught her attention when she realized the peaceful side of the civil rights movement dominated the narrative.

“You don’t get the real truth that this movement wasn’t always just a peaceful movement,” Sharma said. “That a lot of the change that’s been brought about, has been brought about in a way that people don’t really like to hear.”

She also noticed that the health curriculum was exclusive to LGBTQ+ people and abstinence-based, and that the English class readings were mostly written by white men.

“I believe education is the first step to fostering empathy,” Sharma said. “So that’s what pushed me to create this group.”

Bloomington’s More is a senior at Normal Community High School. She also advocates for inclusion as co-chair of the NCHS Not in our School group. She also started the volunteer youth group Little Free Pantry. More said she heard about a similar pantry in Arkansas and started her own when she learned about 100 kids in McLean Country go to bed hungry every night.

“And it struck a chord with me,” More said. “I couldn’t imagine people in our town going to bed hungry. So, I ended up trying to do something about it.

More said because of her privilege, she assumed hunger was not an issue in McLean County.

“I couldn’t imagine people in our town going to bed hungry. So, I ended up trying to do something about it.”

Raji More, Normal Community High School student

“So to hear that they were concerned about that, and that it was a huge priority for them to get food for a day, was interesting to me and concerning to me,” More said.

Dhruv Rebba is also a senior at Normal Community High School. As WGLT reported in October, he won the National 4-H Council’s 2022 4-H Youth in Action Award for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) for creating several projects. that advance technological learning opportunities for children and the quality of life opportunities for citizens in crisis. This includes founding the nonprofit Universal Help, which digitized and provided textbooks, internet access and technology to schools in rural India.

Rebba also set up a robotics club at Grove Elementary School to increase STEM-based learning opportunities for young children. He told WGLT student reporter Jordan Mead that robotics can be expensive and the club is making it more accessible to younger students. “And a lot of the students I’ve taught are now on robotics teams competitively, and that’s pretty cool to see,” Rebba said.

Bloomington’s Isha Gollapudi is a sophomore at Normal Community. She is a firm believer in community service, with art as her favorite tool.

“Art is a universal language,” Gollapudi explained. “I may not be able to understand what everyone has to say, but when you see a job you understand the message behind it. And it’s extremely impactful.

Like More, Gollapudi is part of the Little Free Pantry, even ruling it for a year. Through the Bloomington-Normal Art Circle, she also participates in “Chairs 4 Change,” where community members paint chairs and other furniture to be auctioned off by Recycling Furniture for Families.

“Just having art around you really brightens people’s moods,” Gollapudi said. “So I like to paint more upbeat or happier things, especially when they go to places like charities. Because I think it’s going to brighten up the mood around everyone there.

Gollapudi is so committed to the power of art that she gave it a 10-minute run on the TED-X Normal stage last year.

“So even though I only look like I’m 14,” she said towards the end of her speech, “the journey that art has taken me and the knowledge that I acquired thanks to him, almost make me feel like I’m 743 years old. Thank you.”

Inspiration struck in sixth grade. His works were part of student selections chosen by local artist Julie Meulemans to be exhibited at her Normal gallery downtown. One piece sold for $20.

“And at the time, it was huge,” recalls Gollapudi. “I was like, ‘I can make money from this.’ Then I realized that I could help people with that too.That kind of started for me.

Sparkling plea

Aditi Sharma said the anti-immigration rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election was the initial fuel that sparked her advocacy for inclusion. But she added that her parents initially pushed for a low profile because they and she were immigrants.

“So maybe I should keep quiet, shut up, not make trouble, just do what my parents came here to do.” It was to help me get a better education and a better job,” Sharma said.

It didn’t last long.

“But I couldn’t sit while I watched all these things happen to people in my community and people in other communities,” said Sharma, who became a US citizen at 14.

Sharma made a point of thanking her parents for instilling in her the generosity and empathy towards the struggles of others that have become her core values. “Because we as immigrants moved here and we struggled a lot,” she said.

Sharma said unlike many South Asians who come to Bloomington-Normal for work, her family has no built-in class privilege. And seeing his parents struggle at first was an eye opener.

“I recognize that this is something that so many families in America go through. And so that has a lot to do with my desire to want to make this change,” Sharma said.

Dhruv Rebba said the founding of Universal Help was at least partly spurred by visiting the rural area where his father grew up in India.

“That’s when I was like, ‘OK, that’s a really big difference in living standards, and basic luxuries just aren’t available there. For example, reliable digital access for school supplies and things like that,” Rebba said.

His non-profit organization is helping to digitize these rural schools with computers, projectors, a digital curriculum, and “uninterruptible power supply to meet electricity needs. Because there are power cuts quite often in this part of India,” Rebba said.

He has also contributed to natural disaster relief in West Bengal after Cyclone Yaas of 2021, running a COVID-19 isolation center to combat the Delta Variant in India, and through grassroots projects such as recycling and composting in McLean County.

“Our mission is to improve the quality of life for people around the world in innovative ways,” said Rebba.

In addition to founding and directing the Little Free Pantry in Bloomington-Normal, Raji More is co-chair of the NCHS Not in our School Group and sits on the city’s Not in our School Steering Committee. Others said they were planning protests and vigils and fighting for inclusivity and equality.

Like Sharma, More credits her parents for being willing to serve Bloomington-Normal, teaching her to be kind to everyone and treat everyone the same.

“Part of that meant that I saw that some people weren’t able to have similar opportunities, and those opportunities included getting food. And I was like, ‘Let’s make sure they have access to food too,'” More said.

Plus was also moved to act as a witness for the division. Between people, between ideas. She touts the restorative circles she uses in Not in our School, where people can express ideas without being combative. And she strives to minimize the labeling of people.

“That’s part of why I do my projects…to really include people. Some people aren’t included and don’t have the same opportunities as me, and I strive to include people,” More said.

“Rooted in Who You Are”

Isha Gollapudi thinks his desire to serve is at least partly cultural, citing the Indian holiday Holi, a festival of colors, and Diwali – the five-day festival of lights.

“When you’re brought up with the idea that all these big parties are about giving back to others, it’s kind of ingrained in who you are,” Gollapudi said.

She said it was no different from Christmas in some ways.

“Because it’s fun to get presents, but seeing your brother’s face when he opens a present you gave him…I think it’s so much better,” Gollapudi said.

Gollapudi adds that she has equated community service with a way of life that will continue into adulthood, with climate change now on her service radar.

Dhruv Rebba said that not only would he serve until adulthood, but he was just beginning.

“Many of the projects we have started locally and in India are relatively long-term projects. So I will definitely keep doing this for a long time,” Rebba said.

Like many youngsters, Aditi Sharma is under some parental pressure to pursue a lucrative career. But she said her passion for social justice and activism comes first.

“Whatever I end up doing after my four years of undergrad, I know I’m always going to want to be part of any community, no matter where I live. This service is at the core of my being,” Sharma said.

Raji More said she loves Bloomington-Normal so much that she hopes to attend college in town, continue her community service and advocate for inclusivity. She cites Camille Taylor and Mary Aplington of Not in our Town as mentors.

“So many community members, I’m so grateful to be in their presence,” More said. “So it’s mostly the people of Bloomington-Normal that keep me wanting to be here.”

ABOUT THE SERIES

Why we did it

Bloomington-Normal has more East Indians than any other southern Illinois metropolitan community. First-generation Indian immigrants and their children shaped Bloomington-Normal in more or less significant ways, and it deserves our attention. The WGLT Newsroom aimed to measure this impact in an 8-part series of human-centered stories.

how we did it

The Bloomington-Normal Indian community is not a monolith – socio-economically, politically, culturally – and this series aims to reflect that. The WGLT newsroom interviewed over 30 people from a variety of backgrounds. We recognize that these sources do not represent all Indians in Bloomington-Normal. They represent themselves and we appreciate their willingness to share their story.

Feedback

We want to know what you think of the series and what future features we should consider. You can message our newsroom at WGLT.org/Contact.

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Non profit living

“It’s a sanctuary”: the magic of quiet, economical and anti-allergic “passive” houses | Living ethically and green

Jhe first night Stephanie Silva spent in her new Brooklyn apartment was exceptionally quiet. It was the same the next morning and the next day. The 32-year-old New Yorker had forgotten the last time she managed to mute the city of 8.2 million.

“It’s like a sanctuary,” Silva says, but as soon as she opens the windows facing the street, bustling outside noise fills her living room. Once she closed the windows, the difference was immediately noticeable. “Since moving here, my anxiety has gone away,” Silva says, referring to the affordable 10-story apartment in Ocean Hill, part of Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. But what sets this 67-unit building apart from the rest of the city’s housing is its “passive” element.

A passive building is designed to consume a minimum of energy. To be efficient in heating and cooling, the space is sealed with airtight insulation – like a vacuum bottle – so that it can retain heat during the winter while keeping it out during the summer. . Homes, schools, offices, and other buildings built to Passive House standards typically use thicker, higher-performance windows, such as triple-glazed models, which have three layers of glass. Another key step is to use the energy recovery process in the building’s heating, ventilation and air conditioning system. Known as the ERV, the ventilator, by means of two fans, acts as the lungs of the building, drawing in clean, fresh, filtered air and expelling stale air.

Resident Manager Rich Morris opens a window in the Harry T Nance Apartments laundry room. The windows meet passive house standards.

In New York and other cities, passive design is becoming a popular option for new apartment buildings and homes, and it’s easy to see why: people love living there.

“I didn’t suffer an allergy attack like I usually would,” said Silva, who suffers from dust and seasons allergies. “The building clears the air and I can sleep through the night.”

Continuous air exchange, coupled with super-insulated construction, means no more smell of what the downstairs neighbors are cooking, no more traffic noise in the living room, and no more click-clack from old radiators. Each room in Silva’s three-bedroom apartment has its own heating and cooling unit, allowing his family to heat one room at a time instead of the entire house. “My daughter hates the heat, while I like my bedroom to be nice and warm,” Silva says. “I love that each room has its own separate temperature.”

Solar panels are embedded in the roofs of many passive buildings, including two in the Bronx developed by Bronx Pro Group, which specializes in affordable housing.

“When you walk into a passive house, the average person probably doesn’t notice a difference,” said Justin Stein, senior vice president of the Bronx Pro Group.

“Other than being quieter, it looks like any other apartment,” Stein said.

Large blue-gray ventilation systems are installed on a roof, with the city skyline in the background.
Energy-efficient heating, cooling and ventilation systems benefit residents’ well-being, but also their wallets, say passive building advocates.

The invisible health effects of cleaner air will help tenants in the long run, but the benefit of lower electric bills will be felt immediately. The annual energy demand of passive houses is estimated to be more than 70% lower than that of traditionally insulated buildings with the same parameters. Silva, who lives with her three-year-old son and her fiancé, paid her first utility bill in December, which came to $57. In his old two-bedroom apartment, charges averaged $135 a month: $60 for gas and $75 for electricity.

“I’m not that grumpy,” Silva says as she reflects on the impact lower housing costs have had on her personality. “I was living paycheck to paycheck in my last apartment and now I can buy something nice because I can afford it. Before, all the money I had left had to be used for expenses for the following month.

It took eight months from the day Silva applied for the city’s affordable housing lottery to the day she was able to move into her new home developed by RiseBoro, a Brooklyn-based nonprofit. In 2014, RiseBoro developed New York State’s first-ever affordable multi-family apartment building certified to Passive House standards. Today there are more than 30 affordable apartment buildings in New York City built to passive standards, including this first RiseBoro project in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

A trio of images shows a blue vertical pipe, a close-up image of an air vent grille, and a copper-colored air vent cap.
Passive building air ventilation systems are designed to efficiently supply fresh air while exhausting stale air.

“When you move from an older affordable home to a more efficient one, there’s a huge shift in attitude,” said Satpal Kaur, an architect who has been designing efficient buildings for more than 15 years. Kaur helped deliver the Bushwick Building while in the office of Chris Benedict, one of the leading architects in the field of sustainable design. From keeping your feet cold while working from home, to sitting by a window and not feeling the cold peeking through the glass, to reducing noise pollution and energy costs – for Kaur, the benefits of living in an affordable Passive House are conveniences that every person deserves.

“If we made it standard practice, comfort would be for everyone,” Kaur says.

Dozens of affordable passive developments are currently under construction in the five boroughs. Building a passive house usually costs about 5-10% more than a conventional house. The construction of a multi-family passive building can be approximately 3% more than a comparable non-passive building. Renovating an older building to passive standards is one of the most effective ways to reduce heat concentration and emissions from the existing housing stock.

These renovations and new construction projects can contribute to the city’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from buildings by 40% by 2030. Energy-efficient design decisions – such as moving away from gas for electricity – will also help reduce residents’ bills, Kaur said. When developers adopt passive design standards, “not only are you changing the life of the building,” Kaur said, “you’re changing the lives of the people in it.”

Close-up image of a white multi-story building facade with angular rectangular panels around its windows.
Knickerbocker Commons in Bushwick, Brooklyn is the first all-affordable-unit apartment building to be built and certified to Passive House standards in New York State. The building’s facade optimizes light and shade, contributing to energy costs that are only 20% of the average size of a New York building.

In New York, as in many places across the country, summer temperatures are highest in densely built-up areas. Adequate and efficient cooling is a priority.

New York City buildings are good at providing – and retaining – heat to keep residents warm during the winter. The challenge for homeowners is how to keep residents cool when temperatures rise and buildings heat up, says Ryan Cassidy, director of sustainability and construction at RiseBoro. He thinks that like tenants’ current right to heat, in the next 5 to 10 years New York City will likely develop a cooling policy for buildings.

Currently, the city’s building stock is responsible for 71% of New York’s greenhouse carbon emissions. The recent decision to ban gas heaters, cookers and water heaters in all new buildings may push traditional developers to follow Passive House standards.

Aramis Rosa, a slender dark-haired, bespectacled man in light gray jeans and a long-sleeved black t-shirt, sits for a portrait in his renovated attic, with three narrow windows behind him.
Aramis Rosa poses for a portrait in the attic master bedroom. An air circulation tube is visible on the wall below the windows. Photographed January 8. 2022, Staten Island, NY.

Aramis Rosa is one of the owners who does just that. In March 2020, he purchased a five-bedroom, two-story home in Staten Island with an attic and basement. An electrician, he was fixing sockets at Kaur when they started talking about architecture and how Kaur designs buildings.

“I remember he said, ‘Hey, would you mind sending me the cut sheets?'” Kaur recalled. She emailed the information and a few months later, when he returned to fix her doorbell: “He told me he had done everything, and I was completely blown away.”

Rosa applied what Kaur taught her to remodel her new family home. The boiler, the first to leave, was replaced by an ERV. Then he installed energy efficient windows, separate units in each room and solar panels on the roof, who was eligible for state tax refunds.

When it comes to insulation, working with spray foam was a turning point for Rosa. “That has got to be the best thing I’ve done, to go with spray foam insulation,” Rosa said. “Because of the amount of heat it is able to retain, now in winter, you can feel the difference as soon as you walk into the house.”

A triptych image shows Aramis Rose's two-story house, a detailed close-up of the white foam insulation sprayed into the walls, and a close-up image of Rosa's hands.
Left: Aramis Rosa used passive design elements to renovate his family’s new home. In the middle: spray foam insulation in the walls of the house reduces heating and cooling costs. Right: Rosa did most of the renovations herself.

A chemical compound that expands in seconds when applied, spray foam leaves virtually no air gaps, unlike traditional fiberglass insulation. Rosa is the fifth owner of the 1938 house and the first to do such a spectacular renovation on his own.

“I feel like when you hire someone, they’re there to do the job and then go home. They might not consider the person living there long-term,” Rosa said. “Even though it took us a little longer to be home, the fact that I’m doing it for my family means I’m not skipping any corners because I’ll be the one living here.”

In a city known for its sensory overload — whether it’s the roar of new construction, the funk of curbside trash, or the howls of the century-old subway system — being able to tune out can be a luxury. But the promise of passive architecture is that it doesn’t have to be – it can be as easy as coming home.

Canadian army

Creative goaltender Emile Francis introduced the trapper glove to the NHL

New York Rangers coach Emile Francis shouts after the Rangers score against the Philadelphia Flyers in the second period of an NHL hockey game in Philadelphia in April 1974.Brian Horton/Associated Press

Championships are wonderful but they are not everything.

Emile Francis never won the Stanley Cup in his professional hockey life as a player, coach and manager, but the short man who introduced the goaltender’s trapper glove remains a giant for his accomplishments and his personality. Mr Francis died on Saturday at the age of 95.

The high point of his five-decade hockey career came as the National Hockey League grew from a modest group of six teams to a business enterprise three times the size of the mid-1960s through the mid-1960s. 1970. Taking over the New York Rangers operation that had languished in the depths of the standings for two decades, Mr. Francis built a formidable team that couldn’t quite overcome more powerful teams in Montreal, Boston and Chicago.

Nicknamed “The Cat” for his speed at playing junior hockey, Mr. Francis was a goaltender who, at 5-foot-7 and no more than 155 pounds, was undersized even by the standards of the time. Even as a boy growing up in North Battleford, Saskatchewan, he made up for that with a sharp, creative mind.

“I was always a little guy, so I had to rely on my wits – and no one was going to cheat me on anything,” Mr. Francis recalled in an interview with this reporter in 2003. “Sister Mary Berchmans taught me that at École du Couvent de l’Enfant-Jésus primary school in North Battleford, I was in front of goal in an hour-long game against Connaught School for the Championship of elementary schools. Whenever I had the chance, I would throw the puck over the boards in the snow, which was okay by the rules at the time.

“We won 1-0 but Connaught didn’t want to give us the trophy because of my tactics. When we told Sister Mary about it, she took me to Connaught School in a taxi, stormed into the principal, who was also their hockey coach, and demanded the trophy. We took it back and Sister Mary declared school holidays.

Emile Francis was born September 13, 1926 in North Battleford. His teenage years were heavily affected by World War II, but the quirks of his age, the war’s effect on the NHL, and his eligibility to serve kept him away from the battlefields.

“American hockey teams needed players so badly during World War II that they recruited teenagers,” Francis said. “I was barely past my 17th birthday and I was playing one goal for the Philadelphia Falcons, then the Washington Lions, of the Amateur Hockey League East.”

Nicknamed “The Cat” for his speed at playing junior hockey, Mr. Francis was a goaltender who, at 5-foot-7 and no more than 155 pounds, was undersized even by the standards of the time.Harry Harris/Associated Press

He joined the Canadian army when he was old enough, but the war ended before he could go overseas and he was discharged in 1945. year of junior hockey eligibility, so I joined the Moose Jaw Canucks.

Moose Jaw went undefeated in the 1945-46 Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League campaign before being eliminated in the Memorial Cup playoffs. Mr. Francis was so impressive that he split the following season between the senior Regina Capitals and the NHL’s Chicago Black Hawks, where he resisted authority to make a goaltending innovation that was as important than the introduction of facial protection by Jacques Plante a decade later.

“I created the first trapper,” he said. “Until then, the two goalkeeper gloves were basically identical, blockers with just a little strap between the thumb and fingers. If you actually tried to catch the puck in your palm, it would knock hell out of your hand. So I took a George McQuinn style baseball mitt – he was a first baseman for the St. Louis Browns – and sewed it onto a regular hockey glove. No one said anything about it until my first NHL game with the Chicago Black Hawks. We are about to begin when King Clancy, who referees the game, is called to the bench by Jack Adams, the Detroit coach. Adams says something, points at me and Clancy skates towards my net.

“’Let me see this glove,’ Clancy said. He looks at my trapper and says, “It’s illegal. You cannot use it.

“’Well,’ I said, ‘you don’t have a game because it’s the only glove I have!’ I had it there. The teams have only dressed one goalkeeper and it would be foolish to bring the emergency goalkeeper down from the stands while the starter is fully healthy. Clancy lets me use the glove, but orders me to bring it to league president Clarence Campbell this weekend when we’re in Montreal so he can rule on it. Campbell endorsed it, and trappers soon became standard equipment.

In the end, Mr. Francis was unable to measure up to NHL standards over the long term. With only six teams in the league with a goaltender each, there wasn’t much of a major league future for someone who was only a Top 10. After a few seasons with the Black Hawks, he was distributed to the New York Rangers, for whom he appeared only sparingly.

“You look at my NHL career line and it’s not much: 95 games, 31-52-11 and a 3.75 goals-against-average,” Francis said. “But every year I’ve played 50 to 70 games, plus playoffs, for American Hockey League teams in New Haven, Cincinnati and Cleveland, and around the old Western Pro Hockey League. for Vancouver, Saskatoon, Seattle, Victoria and Spokane.”

Mr. Francis, however, accumulated a wealth of knowledge about coaching and team management, augmenting his hockey experience with summers as player-manager of the North Battleford semi-pro baseball team. The sport was immensely popular in his home province in the 1950s.

“Every summer I played baseball in Saskatchewan,” Francis said. “For a time the Bentley family got me to join them at Delisle, but the people of North Battleford thought my military background made me a good leader and organizer, so I became player-manager of the North Battleford Beavers . It was good baseball! Some of the best ballplayers around were NHL players like Max and Doug Bentley, Bert Olmstead at Scepter and Gordie Howe at Saskatoon.

“Our rosters were full of great black baseball players because the black leagues had disbanded and organized baseball was slow to integrate. Championship matches were great, but the really serious competition was in tournaments because finishing in the money was what kept your team from going bust.

After retiring from hockey in 1960, Mr. Francis was hired by the Rangers to coach their junior team in Guelph, Ontario. Two years later he was appointed assistant general manager in New York and in 1964 he was promoted to general manager. Early in his tenure on Nov. 22, 1964, he was the center of attention in one of the most bizarre incidents in the NHL. During a home game at the old Madison Square Garden against Detroit, Mr. Francis accosted the goal judge who signaled a Red Wings count and found himself surrounded by hostile fans.

“We end up in a fight,” Mr. Francis recalled. “I’m outnumbered three-to-one and these guys are hammering me good, tearing my face open, when Vic Hadfield sees what’s going on from the ice. He jumps onto the boards, steps over the Plexiglas, and half the team follows him. They save me and give these guys a lick. The league fined us all, but what really freaked me out was that the three guys sued me for a million dollars, and after the case dragged through the courts, they got $80,000.

Mr Francis took over the coaching reins at Rangers in 1966, resigning twice but returning behind the bench after Bernie Geoffrion and Larry Popein were unable to last more than half a season. As Rangers coach, Mr. Francis posted an impressive record of 342-209-103.

“Rangers were also lost players when I joined them, but we produced good young players like Rod Gilbert, Jean Ratelle and Brad Park, acquired goalkeeper Ed Giacomin from the minors, made good trades and became strong contenders. . We never won the Stanley Cup but we came close, especially in 1972 when everything was in place until Ratelle broke his ankle. We led the Bruins to six games in the final; I know we would have beaten them with Ratelle in there.

“Managing and coaching Rangers was aggravating because the Madison Square Garden corporation owned the team and treated it like an afterthought,” he once said, recalling they had to play playoff games on the road because the circus had priority for the April dates. The ice cream in the garden was also terrible.

“I blew my peak in 1975 when one of our best defensemen, Dale Rolfe, skated on a spot where the ice had worn out and suffered a terrible broken leg, ended his his career immediately. “I’ve seen better ice on the highways in Saskatchewan,” I told reporters, and I meant it. Bill Jennings, the Rangers chairman, didn’t like it when I said what I thought, which might have something to do with my dismissal in 1976.”

Mr. Francis was soon hired to be general manager of the St. Louis Blues, where his seven-year tenure included a struggle to keep the team financially solvent. He moved on to a six-year run as chairman and general manager of the Hartford Whalers before retiring in 1989. Neither the Blues nor the Whalers could match the winning consistency of the Rangers, and Mr Francis is denied the glory of a Stanley Cup title. .

“Of course I had my disappointments,” Mr. Francis said, “like playing all those years in the minors and never winning the Stanley Cup, but all the while I had the best time of my life. life.”

He was enshrined as a builder in the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1982. For his contributions to hockey in the United States, he was awarded the Lester Patrick Trophy and the International Wayne Gretzky Award. He was a longtime member of the Hockey Hall of Fame Veterans Committee and became an exceptional storyteller and ambassador for the game.

He and his wife, Emma, ​​who died in 2020 after 68 years of marriage, had two sons: Bob, who had a brief playing and coaching career in the NHL, and Rick. He leaves his two sons.

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International headquarters

The program for the 37th Santa Barbara International Film Festival announced

The 37th Santa Barbara International Film Festival, which runs from March 2-12, 2022, announced its schedule and unveiled its poster on Thursday, February 10 at the Sullivan Goss Gallery in Santa Barbara.

The festival provides a key platform for artists on the Oscars campaign trail, and 2022 is no exception. All of the actors receiving SBIFF Awards as part of one-night celebrity tribute programs have been nominated for Oscars this year. The list includes Kristen Stewart (American Riviera Award on Friday, March 4), Will Smith and Aunjanue Ellis (Outstanding Performers of the Year Award, Sunday, March 6), Benedict Cumberbatch (Cinema Vanguard Award, Wednesday, March 9), and Nicole Kidman and Javier Bardem (Maltin Modern Masters Award, Thursday March 10). SBIFF Director Roger Durling will announce the final individual tribute honored for the Montecito Award in the coming weeks.

This year’s opening night movie, The Phantom of the Open, is a British comedy that stars Mark Rylance as Maurice Flitcroft. Flitcroft became famous for playing major golf tournaments such as the British Open, despite being a terrible novice golfer. The film, which received a warm reception when it premiered at the London BFI Film Festival, seems like the kind of feel-good comedy we could all use right now. Sally Hawkins, who delivered a memorable performance in spencer as Lady Diana’s favorite maid, Maggie, plays Jean, Flitcroft’s patient wife.

The closing film of the festival, Dionne Warwick: Don’t do me again, tells the story of the great New Jersey gospel choir singer’s rise to international stardom as the definitive interpreter of the songs of Burt Bacharach. Warwick, a social media sensation thanks to his dry wit on Twitter, will be on hand for the screening.


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Other major festival news include the appointment of eminent film critic Claudia Puig as director of programming. There will be a 10th anniversary screening of Silver Linings Playbook with a discussion with director David O. Russell and a retrospective of films by Gregory Nava, the groundbreaking author who wrote and directed The North (1983), Selena (1997) and the TV series American family (2002-2004). American family star Edward James Olmos will be on hand to pay tribute to Nava.

In his remarks, Durling took the opportunity to highlight the passing of several people who had an impact on the festival. The 10th anniversary of the tragic death of oceanographer and documentary filmmaker Mike deGruy was February 4. Russ Spencer, a Santa Barbara filmmaker and former Independent staff member who died in 2019, is remembered as the person who successfully advocated for the inclusion of local filmmakers in the festival. Most recently, Nadine Turner, the host of the longtime festival headquarters at the Santa Barbara Hotel, died in 2021, as did Barbara Boris, the artist responsible for many years of SBIFF’s posters.

The poster design unveiled for this year’s festival features a blue-saturated beachscape by Hank Pitcher, who was there to witness the unveiling and offer some insight into his perception of what makes SBIFF special. Pitcher compared the experience of walking on the beach and looking at the ocean to the moments immediately after the lights go down in a movie theater. These two public acts “reveal us as we live our dreams and our desires,” Pitcher said.

Despite the county’s decision to lift its indoor mask mandate on Feb. 16, Durling said the festival would continue to require attendees to remain fully masked at all tributes, panels and screenings. For more information and to order tickets, visit sbiff.org.


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Canadian army

Benjamin DOLISZNEY Obituary (2022) – St. Catharines, ON

BENJAMIN WALTER DOLISZNY QC Benjamin Walter Doliszny died peacefully at his home in St. Catharines, Ontario on January 30, 2022, in his 99th year. Although loved and will be missed, Ben lived a full life and we want to share and celebrate his remarkable story. At the age of 6, Ben crossed the Atlantic from his native Ukraine as an unaccompanied minor to become a resident of one of Toronto’s immigrant neighborhoods. He held summer jobs that shaped his sense of self, including: serving as a kitchen boy at the Bigwin Inn; milking cows as a farm laborer on a dairy farm outside of Toronto; and, bagging groceries. He was an avid football player (and former student) at several Canadian universities. Despite a few false starts, he eventually became an excellent lawyer known for his honesty and wise advice. Throughout his adventures, Ben has focused on his family and his beloved Ukrainian community. He was a generous, fun-loving storyteller with an encyclopedic memory of interesting events that marked his life, especially his early years in Ukraine and Toronto. Ben was born on April 3, 1923 in Yabloniv, then part of Poland, now Ukraine. After immigrating to Canada, her family settled in the Junction Triangle neighborhood of Toronto. Here he attended Perth Avenue Elementary School and Bloor Collegiate Institute. He quickly developed his love and affinity for the Ukrainian Catholic Church and embraced its Ukrainian heritage. Ben loved his new life as a Canadian and took advantage of everything it had to offer, remaining a proud Ukrainian Canadian all his life! During his youth, Ben attended the Ukrainian school “Prosvita” and engaged in Ukrainian dance, youth choirs and theater groups. Gentle Ben, as he was known, was a 6’4′ mighty man with a soft heart (unless you pitted him on the grill). He was a natural athlete, playing baseball, basketball, hockey and football on numerous high school, community (1942 Toronto Oakwood Indians) and college teams (1947-1948 University of Toronto Varsity Blues’ Football team, 1949 -1952 Queen’s University Golden Gaels Football). He played competitive squash and handball and was a keen golfer. Ben was a longtime member of the St. Catharines Golf and Country Club. After his playing days were over, he enjoyed watching all the televised sporting events, especially CFL football. Ben loved to dance and, as a young man, frequented Toronto’s many dance pavilions, including the Palais Royale, Palace Pier and Sunnyside Pavilion. When he regaled us with big band stories, seeing Duke Ellington, you could almost hear the band playing. Ben loved to read and began each day by scanning the sports and obituaries sections of the Globe and Mail and the St. Catharines Standard. Even late in life, he remained curious and interested in the wider world. Upon his discharge from the Royal Canadian Army in 1946, Ben enrolled in law at the University of Toronto, where his interest in academics took precedence over his love of football. It was also that year, at a conference of young Ukrainian Catholics in Winnipeg, that Ben’s life changed when he met Mary Wityk, a nurse in training who was to become his wife. With Mary as his partner, motivation and guide, he enrolled at Queen’s University and then Dalhousie University where he successfully completed his law degree. After being called to the bar of Nova Scotia and Ontario in 1955, he and Mary moved to St. Catharines, Ontario, where he practiced law for 36 years. He became a Queen’s Counsel in 1973 and later sat in Small Claims Court. Between 1956 and 1959, Ben and Mary welcomed 3 children – Bonnie, Kathie and Gregory, who would become the center of their lives. Through Ukrainian pursuits such as Saturday School (Ridna Shkola), Plast dance and scouting, music lessons, sports, and road trips to Florida, their family thrived in St. Catharines. In 1979, Mary opened a boutique, Ukrainian Treasures, and Ben became an honorary salesperson and ambassador of Ukrainian culture. He took every opportunity to educate shop visitors about Ukrainian culture, history, religion and politics. Ben was a loving and supportive husband and father, a devoted dido to his grandchildren, and a respected and admired uncle, friend and colleague. His wisdom, advice and counsel were sought by many. Ben has worked tirelessly for the Ukrainian community. He has held various positions at the international, national, provincial and local levels. He was a member of the Executive Council of the Ukrainian World Congress, national president of the Ukrainian Catholic Council of Canada (1968-1971), long-term president of the St. Catharines branch of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, active member and legal adviser for Sts. Cyril and Methodius of the Ukrainian Catholic Church of St. Catharines, president of the Ukrainian Catholic Fellowship of St. Catharines, as well as a member of the organization’s national executive. Ben was President of the Ukrainian Professionals and Businessmen’s Club (Niagara Region) and a member of the Ukrainian seniors’ organization, Myrhorod. He was the secretary of Branch 427 of the Ukrainian National Association for many years. He was a founding member of the St. Catharines Folk Art’s Council and served on the board for over 10 years. For these many contributions, Ben was awarded the Shevchenko Medal which is the highest form of recognition bestowed by the Ukrainian Canadian Congress. Ben was not only a committed advocate for all things Ukrainian, he was also very involved in local, municipal and provincial community organizations, as well as various charities and service organizations and clubs in the area of St. Catharines and Niagara. He was a longtime member of the Knights of Columbus. In recognition of his contributions to the community, Ben was awarded the Ontario Medal for Good Citizenship in 1979 and the Queen’s Jubilee Medal in 2003. Ben was predeceased by his beloved wife of 57 years, Mary ( Wityk) in 2007. He is fondly remembered by his beloved children, Bonnie, Kathie (Stephen Archer) and Greg (Julie) and; adoring grandchildren, Melana (Erik Reiersen) and Thomas Tysowsky, Elizabeth, Benjamin and Anya Archer and Matthew (Marianne Holovach) and Luke (Gabrielle) Doliszny; sisters-in-law Ludmilla Wityk and Judy Farrell; nieces and nephews, Michael (Kim) Kuchar, Jeanne (Philip Sissons, deceased) Kuchar, Laryssa (Yuri) Tarnowecky, Michael (Christine) Wityk, Sean (Kelli Adams) Wityk, Tim Wityk, David Wityk; and grandnieces and nephews. Ben was also predeceased by his parents, his sister Patricia Kuchar, his brothers-in-law John and Peter Wityk and his nephew, Peter Kuchar. The family would like to sincerely thank Ben’s caregiver, Joan Longos, the Linhaven Adult Day Program staff and the many personal support workers for their care and compassion. Visitation will be Thursday, March 24, 2022 from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. with Panachyda at 7:00 p.m. in Sts. Cyril and Methodius Church. A Memorial Mass with ashes present will be held at Sts. Cyril and Methodius Church on Friday, March 25, 2022 at 10:00 a.m. Interment will follow at Victoria Lawn Cemetery. All guests must present proof of dual Covid-19 vaccinations to attend the tour, including photo ID as per current Ontario mandates. If desired, memorial donations can be made to the Ukrainian Canadian Congress or a charity of your choice. Ben’s online memories and stories can be shared at CCBSCares.ca

Published by The Globe and Mail from February 5 to 9, 2022.

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Non profit living

We are evolving so you can thrive at Oak Hills Living Center | News, Sports, Jobs

Oak Hills Living Center exists to support our family, friends and neighbors who can no longer take care of themselves. The community established Highland Manor in 1958 when long term care was needed in New Ulm. In 1995 the community saw that the building needed major repairs and came together to rename and build our current home and in 2003 when the community needed income based housing you again supported this mission .

More than 20 years have passed since our last request for a major community contribution. Our community of seniors is growing and it is our duty to meet the increased demand. For some of you, you may not know that Oak Hills Living Center is a community-owned, not-for-profit, independent, long-term care and assisted living facility. Oak Hills is ownerless, community owned, and governed by a board of directors made up of community members. Our current Board of Directors includes Chris Jensen, Jay Vancura, Dr. Joan Krikava, Barb Dietz, Betsy Pieser, Danielle Marti, Michelle Markgraf, Judi Nelson and James Unke.

For the past six years, Oak Hills Assisted Living has tracked referrals, admissions, and discharges. We had noticed that the studios were no longer desirable for the community. Shortly before 2015 our apartments were always full with a waiting list. The needs of the community were changing and we had more and more requests for larger living spaces and memory care. Unfortunately, our paid private apartments were all studio apartments and we did not have a secure area to care for residents with memory loss. A market study confirmed our observations; however, we did not anticipate how much the need for care would increase. By 2050, people aged 80 to 84 in Brown County would increase by 48% and people aged 85 and over by 34%.

In 2019, the state informed our industry of upcoming assisted living licensing changes that will take effect August 1, 2021. Strategic planning was in the process of developing a plan for how we would respond to the needs of our growing senior population, as well as planning and preparing to meet the new licensing change for assisted living. Then came the pandemic and we were forced to redirect our efforts. We were hoping that the state would push back the deadline because of the pandemic; however, the state has held firm to licensing changes which have required us to continue to explore options to renovate and/or expand our assisted living facility. We have planned different scenarios, renovate, expand or do nothing. Doing nothing meant the future of Oak Hills Living Center was not guaranteed. Where would our friends and neighbors go when they could no longer care for themselves if Oak Hills Living Center ceased to exist?

We need to renovate our existing assisted living facility so people in our community have more options than a 425 square foot apartment. We need to offer additional services with these larger spaces so that we can reserve our qualified nursing home beds for those who need them most. Residents requiring memory care should be in a safe and secure environment where they are free to roam.

Concerns about staffing are valid. There isn’t an organization that isn’t looking for employees. When fully staffed, we have approximately 275 employees in Oak Hills. Currently we have a handful of positions open, however, we do not have temporary contract staff working in our building. How did we do this? Our Board and management have developed a plan to increase the salaries of our direct care staff in October.

The expansion will require 20 to 25 additional employees. We understand this is worrying given the number of vacancies in so many places. We are confident that by investing in our organization and our community, we will be able to fill these additional positions. Generating interest in healthcare and supporting those who want to enter the field is a priority for Oak Hills. Our scholarship program pays tuition fees for individuals pursuing a variety of healthcare careers. The person brings us the tuition statement and we pay it directly to the college or university. We also have a program, OnTrack, which trains practical nurses and many may not be aware that care homes are required to pay tuition for those being trained for their first CNA role. We are committed to developing and supporting our people.

At Oak Hills, we care about people and believe that every life has value. The expansion will cost $13 million and we need to raise at least $2.5 million from the community. While staff and board members may change, the one constant is you. You will always own Oak Hills, it is the home of the community. We need your support.

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International headquarters

Chicago Fire plans new training facility at former CHA site

The Chicago Fire football team plans to build a practice facility on land that was once one of the Chicago Housing Authority’s largest public housing developments.

The Major League Soccer team, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot and Housing Authority CEO announced Thursday that they have begun discussions about developing 30 acres of vacant land on Chicago’s Near West Side. The site would house a headquarters and training center for firefighters, they said.

Under a long-term lease, the Fire would develop the multimillion-dollar facility and provide community benefits and investment, officials said. This would include investments in nearby public housing sites, job creation for community members and recreational opportunities for young people.

The property was once the site of ABLA homes, which once housed nearly 17,000 people in 3,600 units, WTTW Chicago reported.

The proposal will be discussed at community meetings over the coming weeks.

“In neighborhoods across the city, football brings people together, fostering a strong sense of history and community while showing immense passion for the game,” said Chicago Fire FC President Ishwara Glassman Chrein. “We look forward to introducing the project to the local community, hearing their feedback and creating new opportunities for Near West Side residents to enjoy the game.”

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Canadian army

A long journey sees Shelton and Thompson reunite on the Canadian women’s hockey team

Ella Shelton was preparing to find out if she made the Olympic team, and her computer wouldn’t open the fateful video call. Naturally, she started to panic.

The 24-year-old finally tuned in from her phone and picked up the one thing she needed to hear.

“The first word that came out of [head coach Troy Ryan]The mouth of was congratulations,” she told CBC Sports. “And I kind of burst into tears there.

Although Shelton is among the youngest players on Team Canada, the moment is long overdue. Shelton’s mother tells the story of young Ella showing the women’s team on TV during the Salt Lake City Games, when she first saw high-level hockey as a possibility for herself.

“I just went, ‘I’m going to play that day!'” relayed Shelton. “And then I left.”

WATCH | Reactions to the Women’s Olympic Hockey Team announcement:

Reactions to Hockey Canada Women’s Olympic Team Announcement

CBC Sports’ Jacqueline Doorey is joined by CBC Olympic hockey reporter Kenzie Lalonde to break down the Canadian Olympic women’s hockey roster announcement and what to expect from the Beijing 2022 women’s hockey tournament. 5:55

Young Ella may have been prescient, but it was her work ethic and willingness to learn that got Shelton to this point.

The 5ft 8in defender grew up on a farm and credits this for fostering her team mentality. She sees many parallels between hockey and working on the farm, where even low profile jobs need to be done and add value to the whole thing.

Shelton is proud of her physical game; she likes to win battles in the corner and stop her opponents. She is also patient with the puck and uses her impressive shot more frequently.

Matt Desrosiers, who trained her at Clarkson University, describes Shelton as a “very modest person” and says you constantly had to make her realize how good she was.

Once she gained confidence, she became a dependable player in all situations ― a “Swiss army knife of defense,” as Desrosiers put it.

Teammate Claire Thompson, who spent most of her minor hockey days playing center, was never shy about jumping into the race. She switched to defense permanently before her 11th year, after her father saw the potential in her skills.

Claire Thompson (42) has thrived as a defender of the game for Canada while being handed important top-four minutes. (John E. Sokolowski/USA TODAY Sports/Reuters)

Princeton coach Cara Morey signed Thompson as a forward and has a simple answer as to what it took for the 23-year-old to become a world-class defender.

“She had to work on her defense,” Morey said with a laugh. “She had to work on stick placement, one-on-one play, her forward-back pivot.”

Rivals to blue line pairing

Shelton and Thompson played for rival clubs as teenagers, but found themselves defensively with the provincial team. The two even scored their first points for Team Ontario on the same play, giving assists on a wacky goal thanks to a weird bounce off the glass. Shelton remembers the duo celebrating the milestone as a result.

“We were super excited about it,” she said. “Just above the moon.”

That genuine fun remains evident in Thompson’s game, Morey says.

“Claire has the most exceptional way of balancing competitive energy with positive fun,” she explained. “When you watch her play, she has so much joy.”

Neither Thompson nor Shelton made the U18 national team, and Thompson didn’t earn another Hockey Canada call-up until four years later. During this period, Morey says, Thompson accepted the possibility that wearing the maple leaf might not be in the cards. Instead of focusing on long-term results, she focused on becoming the best player she could be at the moment.

“She was able to be confident because it didn’t matter where the chips fell in the end,” Morey said.

With Canada, Thompson thrived as a playmaking defender, to whom he entrusted important top-four minutes.

“Claire has a really unique ability to be able to break the puck down the middle in all situations,” Morey said. “She can read space, and she’s not afraid to attack the seams.”

Four years after their experience with Team Ontario, Thompson and Shelton made their senior debuts in a two-game series at the end of 2019. They didn’t have another chance until August’s world championship.

Thompson thinks the extended break was beneficial, looking back.

“It gave me the opportunity to really improve my strength and power in the gym,” she said. “We were able to train every day without worrying that we were a bit too tired for a game.”

After a steady but rapid rise, both players expect Beijing to help them win.

“I’m really excited to be in the village, to meet other athletes, to be part of Team Canada at the Olympics,” said Thompson.

“I think everything is going to be amazing.”

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International headquarters

Unifrax moves its headquarters to Dallas, changing its name | Business premises






Unifrax has changed its name and will move its headquarters to Dallas.


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Unifrax plans to move its headquarters from the city of Tonawanda to Dallas, but the company said it does not expect the change to result in immediate local job cuts.

The company announced the move on Monday, along with announcing it was changing its name to Alkegen.

The newly renamed company will continue to have manufacturing operations in Tonawanda. And Tonawanda will serve as the headquarters for Alkegen’s thermal insulation and emissions control activities.

“No changes are expected in the short term for jobs in Tonawanda,” said company spokeswoman Deb Myers.

“Just as we were with Unifrax, as Alkegen we are committed to Buffalo and plan to maintain a significant presence here for the long term,” she said.

The change in name and headquarters stems from Unifrax’s acquisition of Lydall, a manufacturer of specialty filtration materials with a worldwide presence. The $1.3 billion deal was completed last October, with John Dandolph, chairman and chief executive of Unifrax, leading the combined company in those same roles.

Alkegen will locate the headquarters of its filtration and battery business in Dallas, as well as its corporate headquarters.

“The decision to base our business, filtration and battery teams in Dallas demonstrates our commitment to growing the business and making Alkegen a global leader focused on advanced technologies,” said Dandolph.

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Canadian army

COVID-19 vaccine targeting multiple variants needed: expert

OTTAWA – Health Canada’s chief medical adviser says variant-specific vaccines can be approved faster than general vaccines first issued to fight COVID-19, but one targeting the Omicron strain likely won’t be ready in time to help with the last wave.

Dr Supriya Sharma said what is really needed are vaccines that can potentially stop more than one variant at a time, including those to come.

Omicron became the dominant variant in Canada in just over two weeks, and the Public Health Agency of Canada said Friday that it will now be responsible for more than 90% of all COVID-19 cases.

Studies suggest that two doses of the existing mRNA vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna are not effective in preventing Omicron infection.

However, several studies suggest that vaccines are excellent for keeping symptoms mild, preventing hospitalizations, shortening stays and reducing the standard of care for those admitted to hospital. Fewer vaccinated Omicron patients, for example, require mechanical ventilation.

Both Pfizer and Moderna are working on new versions of their vaccines that specifically target the Omicron variant.

Moderna hopes to have its product tested early this year. Pfizer said it could have 100 million doses ready as early as March, and Canada has contracts for boosters from both companies that would also include vaccines for variants.

But Sharma said even with the accelerated vaccine variant review process, it’s “probably not” fast enough.

“By then, from what we know of the Omicron wave, it may well be over,” she said. “And then the question is always, ‘is there another variant coming up?’

The solution, she said, likely lies in vaccines that can target more than one variant at a time.

The World Health Organization’s COVID-19 vaccine technical committee said the same on Jan. 11, noting that Omicron is the fifth variant of concern in two years and “probably won’t be the last.”

Booster shots that increase antibody development have become the immediate response to Omicron for many governments, including Canada.

Dr. Srinivas Murthy, a British Columbia pediatrician and co-chair of the WHO’s clinical research committee on COVID-19, told The Canadian Press that boosters are not a viable long-term option.

“Boosting your exit from a pandemic is inevitably going to shoot you in the foot in the sense that you’re going to have a future variant that’s going to emerge that’s going to cause problems,” he said. “He’s going to escape your shots, and then you’re going to have to figure it out.”

Omicron does not entirely avoid existing vaccines, but a future variant might, he said. Much of the problem stems from the fact that the original vaccines train the body’s immune system to recognize what’s called the spike protein found on the surface of a virus, and that spike protein undergoes a significant mutation. .

Think of the mutated spike protein as a bit of a disguise that makes it harder for the immune system to recognize the virus and mount a defense to kill it.

Omicron has over 50 mutations, and at least 36 are on the spike protein.

Multivalent vaccines that use the spike protein of more than one variant, or that target the genetic components of a virus rather than the spike protein, may be the ones that could offer protection against both this pandemic and against the next new emerging coronavirus.

“It’s a pan-coronavirus, where it’s looking at big, broad neutralizing responses and you don’t have to update it every season and so on,” Murthy said. “It’s been the holy grail of influenza vaccinology for several decades. We haven’t gotten there yet, because influenza is a bit tricky, but we think it’s doable for coronavirus, in particular.”

The US military has a version heading into phase 2 trials that can attach several advanced proteins. A vaccine with the specific spike proteins of the five COVID-19 variants of concern would likely be more effective, even against future variants, as they all share some of the same mutations and what one might miss another can catch. .

Moderna is working on multivalent vaccine trials using combinations of the original virus’ spike proteins and one of the variants, or two of the variants together. It is unclear when they would be ready for use.

Sharma said that while vaccines don’t work as well against the variants as they do against the original virus, to her “they’re still miraculous.”

“To have a vaccine that was developed so quickly, that still has, through multiple ΓǪ variants with boosters, up to 70, 80% efficacy against serious illnesses, conditions, hospitalizations and deaths” , she said. “It’s miraculous for a new vaccine against a new virus.”

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on January 16, 2022.

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Canadian army

“A life full of adventures”: the Métis community mourns the loss of Saskatchewan. Louis Roy, WWII Veteran

One of the oldest Métis veterans of the Second World War died Tuesday at the age of 101 in a long-term care home in northern Saskatchewan.

Louis Roy leaves in his family the memory of a kind man who paved the way for his 10 children and his many grandchildren.

“He was just a very respected man. He lived a fulfilling life full of adventures and experienced so much wisdom,” his granddaughter Glenda Burnouf said.

Roy was born on August 2, 1920 in Île-à-la-Croix. His first language was Cree. His father died when he was 12, so the family moved to Beauval in 1932. Roy attended boarding school at Île-à-la-Croix.

He enlisted in the Canadian army in February 1942 at the age of 21, according to a biography prepared by his daughter Julie Roy.

He underwent basic and advanced training where he learned to drive and other skills such as map reading, weaponry and communication.

“It really formed the basis of his life and professional skills to come,” Burnouf said.

He served in the infantry in Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Italy and England until his discharge in October 1945.

Métis Nation-Saskatchewan Veterans Affairs Minister Mervin Tex Bouvier is from the same area as Roy and says he was a role model in the community.

“Everyone knew Louis Roy because it’s like a family from Green Lake to La Loche,” Bouvier said. “He was highly respected by his peers and his people.”

Bouvier says the area does not have a Legion branch presence and MN-S plans to assist in the proper recognition of Roy and other Métis veterans who have contributed to the fabric of the community.

“I really want to look at cemeteries and recognize who they were and where they served,” Bouvier said.

Manitoba Metis Federation President David Chartrand also acknowledged Roy’s death.

“Louis was one of many brave Métis citizens drafted to serve in the Canadian Armed Forces against the evils of the world, while facing discrimination at home,” Chartrand said.

Roy was the first Métis veteran to receive a $20,000 recognition payment from Ottawa in 2019 for the way he was treated after returning from fighting.

Burnouf said that after the war Roy earned his living as a trapper, hunter and fisherman. He married, founded a home near Beauval and raised 10 children.

At 43, he began a career as a carpenter. He worked for the Department of Northern Services and the school division until his retirement at age 65.

In 2005, at the age of 85, Roy downsized and built himself a one-bedroom house on the banks of the Beaver River. He lived there alone until he was 100 years old.

She says it’s nice to see her grandfather recognized for his contributions.

“He took it upon himself to provide for his family and learn a career and now the recognition is coming, which I’m very grateful for,” Burnouf said.

She says she can see some of her noble traits and values ​​in her children and grandchildren.

“It’s good to see that he lives in all of us.”

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International headquarters

Brazilian companies hear the siren call of US stock exchanges

SAO PAULO, Dec.22 (Reuters) – Pharmaceutical company Blau Farmaceutica SA, which listed its shares on the Brazilian B3 stock exchange (B3SA3.SA) in April, opened its first U.S. plasma bank and may consider relocating its headquarters social and its stock market listing in the United States.

The company (BLAU3.SA), which is currently headquartered in the state of Sao Paulo in Brazil and, until now, was mainly focused on activities in Latin America, intends to open 10 plasma backs to the United States in addition to its new location in Florida. . Once the expansion is complete, Blau may consider moving its headquarters to the United States.

In an interview with Reuters, Blau CFO Douglas Rodrigues said international investors, unlike those in Brazil, are used to the business models of pharmaceutical companies, including those engaged in plasma-based medicine.

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Blau is one of several Brazilian companies considering relocating to the United States and listing on a U.S. stock exchange, a trend fueled by the desire for greater access to investors, lower taxes. on corporations, more flexible regulation for controlling shareholders and better dynamics in capital markets.

This change shows how the success of U.S.-listed tech startups – including digital lender Nubank (NU.N) – has spurred Brazilian companies’ interest in other industries, ranging from retail to cosmetics, for moving from their legal domicile, primarily to the United States. but also to other places like Great Britain, Ireland and the Netherlands.

Banco Inter SA (BIDI3.SA), backed by SoftBank, web service provider Locaweb (LWSA3.SA), retailer Lojas Americanas (LAME3.SA) and cosmetics manufacturer Natura & Co (NTCO3.SA) are among the companies that have announced such measures. .

Brazilian company JBS SA (JBSS3.SA), the world’s largest meat processor, also announced that it will continue with a U.S. listing of its international operations next year.

On Tuesday, the Brazilian aircraft manufacturer Embraer SA (EMBR3.SA) unveiled an agreement with the ad hoc company Zanite to list its subsidiary of electric flying taxis on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Embraer’s shares have skyrocketed on the news. Read more

The exit of Brazilian companies represents a growing risk for B3, which begins to look for ways to contain it, as well as for local fund managers who may find their investment universe small.

Lawyers, bankers and executives, however, expect the trend to continue for the time being, although they stress that it will be largely limited to companies with significant operations abroad. They don’t expect a corporate scramble for exits.

“Some Brazilian companies want access to a larger and more diverse investor base,” said Alessandro Zema, Morgan Stanley’s operations manager in Brazil.

They also want to take advantage of the generally higher valuations abroad.

Shares of Natura & Co, which has announced plans to trade its main B3 listing on the NYSE, are trading at a price / earnings multiple of around 29, compared to 41.5 for rival L’Oréal SA (OREP .PA).

Banco Inter, which was first listed on B3 in 2018, is trading at just over 12 times its book value, about half that of rival Nubank, which debuted on the NYSE this month- this. Read more

Companies listed outside of Brazil look for markets with more comparable companies as well as higher valuations, said Jean Marcel Arakawa, corporate lawyer at Mattos Filho in Sao Paulo, citing asset managers Patria Investment Ltd (PAX .O) and Vinci Partners Investments Ltd. (VINP.O) as examples.

Tech companies often decide to re-register as venture capitalists tend to prefer to supplement funding rounds using overseas holding companies. Another reason is to encourage founders or controlling shareholders to stay at the helm by allowing them to hold shares with special and higher voting rights.

For example, 3G Capital’s founding partners, including tycoon Jorge Paulo Lemann, will remain powerful players at Americanas SA (AMER3.SA) after the retailer’s merger with Lojas Americanas and listing in the United States. Banco Inter’s controlling shareholders, the Menin family, will occupy a position similar to digital banking.

NEW RULES

Until recently, Brazilian companies could not locally list receipts for their shares listed abroad through Brazilian Certificates of Deposit (BDR). Some have decided to ditch the local exchange, causing B3 to lose the initial public offerings and trading fees to the NYSE and Nasdaq exchanges.

Brazil’s securities industry watchdog CVM has changed this listing rule, prompting companies like Nubank and investment broker XP Inc to list their BDRs on B3. These BDRs recorded huge volumes of transactions when they started out.

“We try to meet the demands of businesses as they change,” said Flavia Mouta Fernandes, director of regulation at B3.

Brazil has also attempted to relax regulations governing the ownership of controlling shareholders of majority voting shares, although Fabiano Milane, corporate lawyer at Stocche Forbes in Sao Paulo, said local regulations are still not not equivalent to those of other countries.

“Companies already listed cannot use super-voting, and extraordinary voting rights are temporary,” said Milane.

Frustration over the perceived lack of predictability in the Brazilian legal system is another reason large companies choose to redomiciate, says Luis Semeghini Souza, lawyer and founding partner of Souza, Mello e Torres in Sao Paulo.

Some bankers, however, are skeptical that the current business migration will become a long-term trend.

“I think the universe of companies that could move represents maybe 5% of the companies in B3, mainly those that have or intend to have significant activities abroad”, said Roderick Greenlees, manager global investment bank at Itau BBA.

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Reporting by Tatiana Bautzer and Carolina Mandl Editing by Paul Simao

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“The time is right” for COVID-19 vaccines, recalls, experts in retirement homes and care – News

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With the omicron COVID-19 variant in 73% of coronavirus cases and on the rise, the country is three weeks away from an increase that could potentially overwhelm the healthcare system. That’s why “now is the time” to get vaccinated – or get vaccinated – against the virus, to enter winter with maximum protection, public health and long-term care experts said Tuesday. .

The long-term care industry aims to vaccinate – or provide booster shots – to all eligible residents and staff by the end of 2021, said David Gifford, chief medical officer of the American Health Care Association / National Center for Assisted Living. . Gifford hosted a virtual town hall on Tuesday co-hosted by LeadingAge and AARP, to answer questions about the virus and vaccines for those who work or live in long-term care facilities.

Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary Admiral Rachel Levine, MD, has recommended diaper protection through vaccination, booster shots and masking to help contain the spread of COVID-19 and its variants.

“We never imagined the pandemic would last this long,” Levine said, adding that the aging service industry’s response to the pandemic has come at the cost of “great personal sacrifice.”

“But there is hope,” she said. “Unlike 2020, last winter, we have the power to protect ourselves.

Fully vaccinated and stimulated individuals have a 10-fold lower rate of obtaining COVID-19, showing that existing vaccines work against omicron, Levine said. The country averages over a million recalls a day, she said, but cases are doubling every two or three days as the omicron spreads across the country.

Natural immunity is not enough to protect individuals against omicron, Levine added.

“The boosters offer people optimal protection against this new variant,” she said. “Do not wait.”

Rogerson Communities President and CEO Walter Ramos, JD said the education provided by the Boston-based seniors’ residence nonprofit in 2020 has helped him achieve a rate of 90% vaccination in its communities. The organization is also approaching a 90% recall rate, he added.

Bringing in experts who “looked like the people who live and work in the facilities we manage and own”, as well as those who speak multiple languages ​​and understand the culture of each community, was important to build confidence in vaccines and reminders. . Ramos said.

“We take the time to meet people where they are,” he said. “I cannot stress enough how important it is for them to have a comfort level to receive the boosters.”

Rogerson has worked with pharmacies and local vendors to provide on-site vaccination clinics or off-site vaccine access to mobile residents and staff, Ramos said.

Levine said she is supporting an effort to get booster shots in the arms of all eligible people by the end of this year, to provide maximum protection for the coming winter. She referred to President Biden’s speech on Tuesday afternoon on the White House’s efforts to step up its fight against COVID-19, including increasing access to free tests, increasing the capacity of hospitals and working to obtain more shots.

“Now is the time,” Levine said. “We can’t give up because COVID-19 doesn’t stop.

“Staying one step ahead of the virus and protecting communities against COVID-19 with safe and effective vaccines and boosters is critical, especially in the context of the evolution of the virus and the new variant. omicron, ”she added.


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Mel Lastman “had a connection and a love affair with the people of Toronto”

Hundreds of people gathered in a chapel in North York with Lastman’s family after his death to pay their respects to the beloved former mayor on Thursday

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Toronto’s first megalopolis mayor and prominent businessman Mel Lastman was known to those around him as a colorful and at times scandalous politician who loved his family and his city. From creating a unified Metro Toronto area to participating in eye-catching TV commercials, Lastman knew how to make an impact.

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On December 11, the former mayor of North York and Toronto passed away at the age of 88. Hundreds of people gathered at Benjamin’s Park Memorial Chapel in North York with Lastman’s family after his death to pay their respects to the beloved former mayor. Many notable names were in attendance, including Premier Doug Ford, Ontario Long-Term Care Minister Rod Phillips, former Toronto Mayor David Miller and Mayor John Tory.

In a statement posted to social media, Tory, who served as Co-Chair of Lastman’s Campaigns for Mayor of Toronto, said he was “a kind, generous man with a larger-than-life personality who always wanted to do the job. good thing for people.

Lastman’s impressive career in city administration spanned more than three decades. He was the third mayor of North York and the 62nd mayor of Toronto – the first to follow the 1998 merger of Metro Toronto.

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  1. Former Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman gets in the mood at Toronto Police Chief Julian Fantino's farewell dinner at the Royal York Hotel

    Outspoken former Toronto mayor Mel Lastman dies aged 88, PM says

  2. Former Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman Remembers As Larger Than Life

As mayor of North York and the then newly formed megalopolis, Lastman was favored by his constituents for his efficiency at city hall and his promise to keep property taxes low. He was instrumental in the development of the Yonge and Sheppard area, including the creation of the Sheppard Subway Line and downtown North York, which became a bustling business hub and home to Mel Lastman Square .

“He was a great mayor and touched many lives,” tweeted Premier Ford, adding that Lastman was “a true leader and builder.”

Paul Godfrey, a former city politician and longtime friend of Lastman, said Lastman was “the king of the citation.”

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“He wasn’t afraid to call a spade a spade,” said Godfrey, president of Postmedia Network, owner of the National Post. The media knew that if they put a microphone in front of him he would say something worth printing.

Lastman did not shy away from the controversy. After the January 1999 blizzard, the former mayor caught the nation’s attention when he called on the Canadian military to help clear the 118 centimeters of snow that had immobilized the city. While the move was frowned upon by some, Godfrey said “they cleaned the streets faster than anyone else.”

Ontario Premier Doug Ford arrives for the funeral of former Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman on December 13, 2021.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford arrives for the funeral of former Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman on December 13, 2021. Photo by Jack Boland / Postmedia

While he was known in public to be loud and confident, Godfrey said that in private, Lastman was shy, calm and not so outgoing. Most importantly, he said the former mayor was devoted to his constituents.

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“Mel Lastman had a connection and a love affair with the people of Toronto,” Godfrey said. “And the grassroots Toronto public loved Mel because he was telling the truth.”

Brampton Mayor Patrick Brown tweeted: “I am so sorry to hear of the passing of Mel Lastman. I got to know him while I was serving at the provincial level. He had extensive knowledge of Toronto, Ontario and Canada. He leaves behind a very impressive legacy of the construction of the city. Condolences to his family and friends. “

Prior to entering politics, Lastman was one of Toronto’s foremost businessmen, Godfrey said. He first made a name for himself following the ice cream trucks through town. When they stopped to deliver ice to someone for their cooler, Lastman would then go up to the door and try to sell them a fridge.

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“He probably knew that if he promoted his brand, which was Mel Lastman, he would become a household name,” Godfrey said.

Postmedia president Paul Godfrey was among those mourned at Mel Lastman's funeral on December 13, 2021.
Postmedia president Paul Godfrey was among those mourned at Mel Lastman’s funeral on December 13, 2021. Photo by Jack Boland / Postmedia

In 1955, Lastman opened Bad Boy Furniture, which he eventually transformed into a chain of stores located in the Toronto area. In a publicity stunt for his business, Lastman traveled to the Arctic to “sell an Eskimo a refrigerator.” In the 90s, Blayne, Lastman’s son, relaunched the channel. The duo created a television commercial that became memorable in Ontario for their last line: “Who’s better than Bad Boy?” Nooooonbody! ”

At Lastman’s memorial service, Godfrey said most of the moving speeches were made by the sons of the former mayor. Dale Lastman spoke about the impact that the death of his mother, Marilyn, in January 2020 had on his father.

“As Dale said, ‘My father died of a broken heart,’” Godfrey said.

While Godfrey has said the memorial service is on the move, it did not serve as a final goodbye to the iconic mayor of the megalopolis.

“Mel will live in the hearts of all of us for many years to come,” he said.

Lastman is survived by his sons Blayne and Dale, six grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

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JPMorgan on hiring wave as it targets pan-European consumer bank

A sign outside the offices of JP Morgan Chase & Co. is visible in New York, United States on March 29, 2021. REUTERS / Brendan McDermid

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LONDON, Dec. 14 (Reuters) – Chase, JPMorgan’s UK retail bank (JPM.N), plans to hire hundreds more next year to boost its workforce above 1,000 in order to help roll out investment, savings and consumer credit products, the company’s boss told Reuters.

The fledgling bank – the first overseas consumer bank for US giant JPMorgan – has already processed hundreds of millions of pounds of purchases across more than a million transactions, fueled by spending insanity as it approaches. Christmas, the bank said.

The business is a test for the lender as CEO Jamie Dimon plans to expand his massive U.S. retail banking franchise globally through a digital platform.

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Sanoke Viswanathan, head of international consumer activities at JPMorgan, said the company has hired 200 people since launching in September to increase its workforce to 800, and plans to hire hundreds more next year as ‘it was expanding its range of products.

JPMorgan plans to replicate the Chase model in other continental European markets over the next several years, he said.

“We had a plan and we are definitely ahead,” Viswanathan said. “We want to be present in all major European markets over time, everything is fine. The idea is to be pan-European.”

In Great Britain, the bank plans to expand in investment and savings services by integrating its acquired digital wealth manager Nutmeg, before embarking on consumer loans.

Creating new services will help him turn a profit over time, but Chase is expected to experience losses for several years in the meantime, Viswanathan said.

The new hires will span the entire company, including its headquarters in London and customer support centers in Edinburgh and Manila in the Philippines.

Viswanathan declined to release Chase’s customer numbers, but said registrations exceeded internal expectations and reaffirmed plans for expansion.

JPMorgan was ready to launch a UK retail bank if needed rather than slowing its growth, Viswanathan added. Banks are currently required to manage any retail bank with £ 25 billion or more in deposits on a stand-alone basis, although this rule is under review.

“We will deal with the consequences if we have to,” Viswanathan said. “The UK bank was not created to help fund investment banking. This is a real foray into long-term retail banking.”

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Reporting by Iain Withers; edited by Rachel Armstrong and Jason Neely

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Schafer: The fruits of Honeywell’s long-standing dedication to the quantum computer are now visible


“Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago,” is a quote from Warren Buffett so famous that consumers continue to search for the perfect holiday gift. can easily find a T-shirt or mug with it.

It’s great if someone feels inspired by this to plant a tree next spring, but Buffett has made a reputation as an investor. He was talking about the value of long-term thinking – how, with patience, a small investment can turn into a huge return.

We keep citing this not because it’s another Buffett gem, but because business executives so easily overlook this lesson.

Things that take a long time to happen aren’t inherently better, but breakthrough products, enduring brands, and major market share don’t just happen in a quarter or two.

This is what is so interesting about Honeywell’s adventure in quantum computing. They are getting it, or at least enough people have done it in its recent history to support its development.

Honeywell International announced in the summer that it would separate its quantum computing unit and merge it with a company in the UK, creating a company controlled by Honeywell called Quantinuum. This new company will hopefully attract investors interested in the emerging quantum computing market. This merger has just ended.

Honeywell International isn’t exactly the same previously Minneapolis-based Honeywell company that older Minnesota residents may remember. But there’s a lot of the old Honeywell DNA in Honeywell International.

The quantum computing business started here in Golden Valley. It wasn’t the kind of business that someone with a short-term thinking, whether it’s next quarter or next year, would even try to try. This company started over ten years ago and Quantinuum has just launched its first commercial product.

As for the potential, the numbers on the potential size of the market suggest something over $ 1 trillion.

And maybe there’s something more to learn about the long horizons of Honeywell’s IT project: how to appreciate the value of corporate legacy.

In a story told by Honeywell over 10 years ago, a new leader of a small business incubator project assessed the knowledge available to Honeywell: advanced capabilities in optics, lasers, cryogenics, ultra-high environments. -empty and, of course, over a century of experience with controls.

Honeywell staff scientists have pointed out that with this portfolio of knowledge and technology, the company could build a quantum computer, said the executive who heads the quantum computing business.

Companies use different approaches to develop quantum computers, but they all promise to be much faster than traditional computers. How it works is beyond my comprehension, except that quantum computing goes beyond traditional computing use of binary bits, represented by a 0 or 1, which store information.

In quantum computing, building blocks are “qubits” that are not binary and can exist in multiple states at the same time.

Some leaders in the segment are completely unknown, such as Rigetti & Co. or Xanadu Quantum Technologies of Canada, which raised $ 100 million this year.

Yet the list of known leaders also includes Microsoft Corp., International Business Machines Corp. (IBM) and Honeywell, founded in 1975, 1911 and 1885 respectively.

It has been more than two decades since Minnesota lost the headquarters of Honeywell, then one of the state’s top business leaders, when it was acquired by AlliedSignal. The head office was first consolidated into the home of AlliedSignal in New Jersey, with Honeywell International now based in North Carolina.

The name Honeywell comes from a founder on the company’s family tree, but William R. Sweatt and his descendants are entrepreneurs who deserve credit for developing Honeywell in Minnesota.

The Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Co. was a control company, particularly for regulating heat in homes. Before this type of technology, when homeowners got cold they put more fuel in the stove or furnace and when they got too hot they had to stop adding fuel. Automation that made life so much easier.

Honeywell expanded into other lines of business and at one point became a major player in the US mainframe industry.

This was around the time when the American computer industry was known as IBM and BUNCH, an acronym that referred to IBM’s top five competitors.

The “U” stood for Univac, with a strong presence here in the Twin Cities, and the “C” was for Control Data Corp., based most of its life in Bloomington and possibly IBM’s only real rival during this period. The “H” was for Honeywell, based in Minneapolis.

The rise of this high-tech industry here in Minnesota is a big part of the transformation of the state’s economy. Personal income in Minnesota went from lagging Midwestern neighbors like Wisconsin in the 1940s to overtaking them in the 1960s.

This mainframe era did not last that long and Honeywell left the company completely.

It would be stretching the truth beyond breaking point to suggest that Honeywell’s quantum computing business grew out of the roots of Honeywell’s computing business. Yet it has grown from Honeywell’s vast pool of know-how and broad technology portfolio.

Honeywell now owns 54% of Quantinuum, ready to raise a lot of capital to pursue what appears to be a great opportunity.

Booming profitability remains a long way off and might never happen, but the Honeywell team deserve a lot of credit for taking the first big step.

This happened when they realized that with time and money, maybe they could build a revolutionary machine, and then decided to give it a try.


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Olathe-based Garmin moves to the New York Stock Exchange

NEW YORK – Olathe-based Garmin ushered in a new era on Wall Street on Tuesday morning.

Company executives were there to ring the opening bell on the New York Stock Exchange, symbolizing the company’s exit from NASDAQ. The transfer to the New York Stock Exchange comes today 21 years after Garmin’s IPO. The company initially went public on December 8, 2000.

The company employs 15,000 people in Olathe, along with thousands more in 34 countries around the world. It focuses on GPS navigation and wearable technology in the automotive, aviation, marine, outdoor and fitness markets.

“Garmin is thrilled to join the NYSE alongside many of the world’s most established and trusted companies,” said Cliff Pemble, President and CEO of Garmin. “Garmin occupies a unique position both as a well-respected consumer brand and as a strong industrial player. We believe this move complements our strong brand and will deliver significant, long-term value to our shareholders. “

The company is also reinvesting in Johnson County. He confirmed in October that he had purchased the property where the Great Mall of the Great Plains once stood. The property spans 193 acres on the northwest corner of 151st Street and Highway 169 in Olathe, and is less than two miles from Garmin’s international headquarters.


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New Catawba College graduate Madison Kluge leads Salisbury towards sustainability goals – Salisbury Post

By Natalie Anderson
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SALISBURY – Newly graduated Madison Kluge from Catawba College became the city’s first sustainability coordinator earlier this year, and she stepped up to help transform the goals of a more sustainable lifestyle into reality.

Kluge, 21, graduated from Catawba College earlier this year with a degree in environment and sustainability. She began an internship with the Salisbury Public Works Department in February before assuming a full-time role as Sustainability Coordinator in May. In 2020, she also completed an internship at Bread Riot, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting local farmers and providing access to locally produced food. Kluge said she was still a volunteer for Bread Riot.

Also during his stay in Catawba, Kluge did an internship at the school’s Environmental Center for over two years. She said her teachers helped guide her to the position she currently holds, which suits her well as she enjoys coordinating and collaborating with multiple groups.

Kluge, from Maryland, said she was living in Mocksville when her sister decided to attend Catawba College, which resulted in several trips to Salisbury with the option to explore while her sister was in class.

“I fell in love with the city, the culture it has here, the possibility of growth and the good people,” Kluge said.

Much of his work now requires him to strengthen relationships with city, county, and nonprofit organizations, in addition to strengthening environmental education and awareness of sustainable living.

Kluge is working with city staff to help draft the Forward 2040 plan, which aims to frame priorities and decisions over the next 20 years as Salisbury. In addition to this, Kluge is responsible for working on the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals of Salisbury City Council.

“I help steer the city towards a sustainable mindset,” Kluge said. “And put the goals they have in mind into perspective and make them come true.”

In March, board members adopted a set of goals for 2021 following a goal setting retreat in February. Among the priorities for the city’s infrastructure and human capital was the focus on reducing waste and promoting efficiency as well as improving infrastructure to promote foot and bicycle transport. In addition, council members have indicated that they want to support public transit for neighboring communities and explore alternative modes of transportation.

Also this year, the city used an amount of $ 818,000 Volkswagen Public transportation / facility shuttle program gdiatribe from the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality to purchase two electric buses for Salisbury Transit. Kluge said finding and applying for such grants is another part of his job. She is currently working to obtain a community subsidy for waste reduction from the NCDEQ.

Kluge told Salisbury that much of the thinking “towards sustainability” is already in place among residents and staff, which is part of what attracts him to the position. She said she is often pushed by older residents and colleagues who want to see Salisbury flourish with things such as increased use of electric vehicles and improved air quality.

“It is really my colleagues and community members who inspire me to help Salisbury follow this green vision,” she said.

Although her role falls under the Public Works Department, Kluge said she often works with communications and planning staff.

Current projects include a new Sustainability Salisbury newsletter, the first edition of which will be launched in January. This newsletter will provide more information and education for a sustainable lifestyle in Salisbury. She is also working to roll out more sustainability education through social media apps like TikTok and Instagram.

Other initiatives Kluge is working on include increasing awareness of waste, recycling, composting and waste prevention during the holiday season, promoting city and county parks, and working with neighboring schools to implement more sustainability-oriented programs. In 2022, the city will launch a nature city challenge in the spring on the occasion of Earth Day. City Nature Challenge is an event that takes place across the country, where local residents take photos and make observations of nature in their area and support the city’s naturalists.

Among its long-term goals is establishing a more robust internship program where students from Catawba, for example, can intern with the city to conduct research on sustainability, which is beneficial to the community. both for the city and students interested in careers related to sustainable development.

Eventually, Kluge said she would like to see the city’s composting program expanded to accept more types of waste. Creating a carbon inventory to assess how much carbon the city sees is another long-term goal that requires a lot of training that it is currently undergoing.

Additionally, another goal is to work with businesses to create a business alliance and neighborhood alliance with established sustainability goals, including increased recycling and waste reduction initiatives.

Kluge suggests that city residents take advantage of the free compost available at the Grants Creek Composting Facility, located at 1955 Grubb Ferry Road. Residents can pick up the compost generated from the previous year’s yard waste on Friday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, contact [email protected] or call 704-638-5260.

Contact reporter Natalie Anderson at 704-797-4246.


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Amid climate talk, an actor’s call to action unfolds on stage

Actor Fehinti Balogun knows that theater can mobilize people towards climate action, because that’s what he has done for him.

In 2017, while preparing for a role in “Myth,” a climate parable, he started reading books about climate change and became alarmed at the unusually hot summer he was experiencing in England. The play itself called on him and the other actors to repeat the same mundane lines over and over, to the point of absurdity, as their surroundings terrifically fractured around them – the ridged walls of oil, the stove on fire, the freezer oozing water.

The whole experience changed her life, Balogun said. Suddenly, nothing seemed more important than tackling the global crisis. Not even land the head of a West End production (a long coveted dream) of “The Importance of Being Serious”. His growing anxiety made him feel like he was experiencing a real version of the “Myth” in which society repeated the same old scenario even as the planet fell into chaos.

“Knowing everything I’ve done made me angry with the world for doing nothing,” Balogun, 26, (“Dune”, “I can destroy you”) said in a telephone interview. “I didn’t understand how we weren’t upset.”

That sense of urgency is what he said he hopes to convey to audiences on “Can I Live?” », A new play he wrote, performed and created with the Complicité theater company. A filmed version of the play, which also features supporting actors and musicians and was originally intended as a live performance, was screened on Monday as part of COP26, the United Nations climate meeting. in Glasgow. The resulting artwork is as innovative as any play to emerge during the Covid-19 era: initially it seems like just an intimate Zoom session with Balogun, but evolves into an explosive mix. spoken word, animation, hip-hop and dialogue.

The hour-long production, which the Barbican Center has made available to stream on its website until November 12, combines scientific facts about how the greenhouse effect works with the story of Balogun’s own journey into the climate movement. He also emphasizes the gap between the predominantly white environmental groups he has joined and the experiences of his predominantly black friends and family.

Throughout the show, Balogun answers phone calls from family members about issues seemingly unrelated to the centerpiece of the room, asking when he is getting married or why he left a bag in the hallway. at home. Although at first it seems like they interrupt Balogun’s main narrative of ‘shows, shows, shows’ as he sings at one point, their interjections hammer home one of his central ideas: if the movement is unwilling to prioritize someone like his Nigerian grandmother, he misses the point. Climate action, in other words, is for ordinary people with everyday concerns.

“The aim is to make popular activism accessible and to represent people of color and people of the working class,” he said. To that end, he interweaves his own story with that of Nigerian writer and activist Ken Saro-Wiwa, who campaigned against destructive oil extraction on behalf of his Ogoni people. “Very often we don’t talk about the Global South,” Balogun said. “We are not talking about the communities that have been fighting this fight for years.

Although Balogun is the only theater artist on the official COP26 program, he is certainly not the first playwright to tackle climate themes. Climate Change Theater Action, an initiative of the nonprofit Arctic Cycle, was created to encourage theatrical creation that could draw more attention to COP21, the United Nations climate meeting in 2015 that culminated in to the historic Paris Agreement. (The theater group has never been officially affiliated with any of the annual COP meetings.)

Since its creation, the group has produced 200 works which have been performed in front of 40,000 people in 30 countries, said its co-founder, Chantal Bilodeau. The organization commissions plays on environmental themes, remunerates the authors and then provides the scripts free of charge to theater companies, schools or any other group that wishes to stage readings or productions.

The first year, Bilodeau said, they ended up with “a lot of depressing parts.” Now they’re trying to steer playwrights away from dystopia and toward visions of a liveable future, and encourage those who direct the works to pair them with programming that helps audiences better understand the issues.

Lanxing Fu, co-director of the nonprofit Superhero Clubhouse in New York City, devotes some of her time to those who will be most affected by a warmer planet: the next generation. Through Superhero Clubhouse’s Big Green Theater after-school program, run in conjunction with the Bushwick Starr and the Astoria Performing Arts Center, students at Brooklyn and Queens public elementary schools are learning about climate issues and writing plays in response to what ‘they learn.

More than a decade after the program began, Fu said that what is most striking about the student’s plays is how young writers instinctively understand a fundamental truth about the climate that escapes many. adults: to find long term solutions, we will need to work together.

“A huge element of climate resilience is in the community we build and the way we come together,” she said. “It is always very present in their stories; it’s often part of how something resolves.

Queens-based TV playwright and screenwriter Dorothy Fortenberry also spends a lot of time reflecting on children’s roles in the movement. His play “The Lotus Paradox,” which premieres in January at the Warehouse Theater in Greenville, SC, asks: What happens when children are constantly being told that it is their job to? save the world ? Like much of Fortenberry’s work on television (she is a writer on “The Handmaid’s Tale”), “The Lotus Paradox ”includes the subject of climate change without making it the singular center of the story.

“If you make a story about anything, anywhere, and you not having climate change in it is a science fiction story, ”she said. “You made the choice to make the story less realistic than it otherwise would have been.”

It is a feeling also shared by Anaïs Mitchell, musician and author of the musical “Hadestown, ” which reopened on Broadway in September. In his account of Greek mythology, Hades is portrayed in the song as a greedy “oil and coal king” who fuels his industrialized underworld hell with the “fossils of the dead”. Above the ground, the main characters, Orpheus and Eurydice, suffer from food shortages and brutal weather that is “either scorching heat or freezing cold”, a framing inspired by the headlines on climate refugees.

It’s worth fighting intentionally with climate narratives in theater, not only because they make plays more believable, Mitchell said, but also because theater might just be one of the best tools for dealing with such themes. . Like Orpheus trying to put things right with a song that shows “how the world could be, despite what it is”, Mitchell sees theater as a powerful tool to help us imagine our path to a better future.

“The theater is able to open our hearts and our eyes to an alternative reality to the one we live in,” she said.

This is why Balogun – although he notices it more than once in “Can I Live? “ that he is “not a scientist” – said he believed he had an equally crucial role to play as any climatologist. “Scientists are begging artists and theater makers to help get this message across,” he said. “And there is a need for it more than ever. “


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Anita Anand Bets She Will Succeed Where A Lot Of Men Have Failed

In the weeks following the September 20 election, how many Liberal MPs, one wonders, got down on their knees at bedtime to offer this prayer to the Almighty:

“Dear Lord, I will do whatever you like, serve in any capacity you choose, but please, I beg you, don’t let him make me Minister of National Defense.”

Once a plum on the ministerial tree, classified in prestige with Finance and External Affairs (now foreign), Defense has experienced a miserable period. It has become Cabinet’s worst job, its major problems overtaking any cabinet minister trying to solve them. Defense is not only the crazy price when the Prime Minister shifts the portfolios, it is a landmine for any minister who dreams of one day being Prime Minister.

Last week, Justin Trudeau handed over the landmine to Anita Anand, a 54-year-old business lawyer from Oakville, who was first elected in 2019. She earned her “promotion” thanks to her performance in as Minister of Public Services and Supply. , in what capacity she was responsible for the supply of COVID-19 vaccines for Canada. She replaced Harjit Sajjan, who became the lightning rod of the opposition and moved on to international development.

Anand now faces the same assortment of issues that had frustrated Sajjan. The starting point is the absence of a clear mission or purpose for the Canadian Armed Forces, a mission that the men and women of the military, navy and air force can accept and be motivated to do. by, and that the public understands and supports.

For several decades after World War II, Canada was known for its international peacekeeping. Our “Blue Berets” have distinguished themselves for their service in Cyprus, Somalia, Rwanda, the Balkans, East Timor and Eritrea, among other global hot spots.

As the focus on peacekeeping operations fades, the Canadian Forces are asking themselves: is their primary objective to participate in relief missions in countries like Haiti, to support firefighters in British Columbia, patrolling Canada’s coasts and airlines, or cleaning up mess left in long-term care homes by incompetent managers and negligent provincial overseers?

Confusion or fragmentation of the mission is reflected in military procurement programs which are infamous for poor planning, stupid decision-making, endless delays, and huge cost overruns. Why, for heaven’s sake, did the Defense Department buy four rusty and obsolete diesel submarines from Britain? Destined for the scrapyard of the Royal Navy, they were of no use in Canada on the rare occasions when they were actually seaworthy.

The department paid $ 750 million for the four submarines. As one British MP exclaimed at the time, “Why were Canadians dumb enough to buy them?” … It’s either incompetence on the part of Canadians or simple MOD (Defense Department) salesmen here in Britain.

Then there is the saga of the “new” fighter planes. New, perhaps, in 1997, when the Liberal Chrétien government began the process of purchasing F-35 Lightning II “stealth” fighters from Lockheed Martin, based in the United States. Still fairly new in 2010 when the Harper Conservative government ordered 65 of the controversial F-35s. Not new in 2021 when after 24 years of review, reassessment and re-examination by three administrations, one cancellation and now a reopened competition – with no final decision yet in sight.

Not the least and most immediate, Anand should deal with firmness and determination with the issue that has stuck his nine immediate predecessors (all male) since 1998, when the issue first surfaced – sexual misconduct seen in all. army ranks. Somehow, it must address the pervasive culture of boys who will be boys and establish a credible and effective procedure for handling complaints and administering discipline, a procedure that all stakeholders can agree to. .

Trudeau is betting that a strong, capable woman can succeed where male ministers have failed. Anand is betting that the potential career reward is worth the risk she takes.

Cambridge resident Geoffrey Stevens is an author and former Ottawa columnist and editor of The Globe and Mail and Maclean’s. Her new book, “Flore! A Woman in a Men’s World, ”co-authored with the late Flora MacDonald, has just been released. His column appears on Mondays. He accepts comments at [email protected]


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Big names have their headquarters in the Bluegrass

By Lorie Hailey

Kevin Bazner is CEO of A&W Restaurants. Its head office is located on the Coldstream Research Campus in Lexington.

(KY. CENTRAL MARKET REVIEW) – Central Kentucky has a highly skilled workforce, a culture of innovation, and the infrastructure to support entrepreneurs and established businesses. Located at the crossroads of highways 75 and 64, the region is less than a day’s drive from two-thirds of the country’s population. Combined with the allure of horses and bourbon, it’s no wonder that the region is home to over 70 corporate headquarters from various industries that are essential to the country and the global business climate.

Here is an overview of some of the companies headquartered here:

A&W Restaurants

A&W Restaurants has more than 900 locations in the United States and Asia. The 102-year-old company has been headquartered in Lexington since it was acquired by its franchise associations 10 years ago. A&W has offices and a test kitchen located on the UK’s Coldstream research campus, and also operates three prototype restaurants in central Kentucky.

The pandemic has caused a major disruption in the restaurant industry, but A&W has seen great success in 2020, said Kevin Bazner, CEO of the company. In 2020, A&W saw a comparative increase in sales of 9% and its autonomous drive-thru model saw a 14% increase. A&W has also experienced nine consecutive years of positive growth, including near double-digit comparative sales growth over the past two years.

A&W continues to grow. In the first quarter of 2021, the company signed development agreements with two new operators and three current franchise partners engaged in additional locations. Its sales in the first quarter were up 22% from 2020, when comp sales increased by more than 20% from the first quarter of 2019.

About 400 people are employed at the headquarters of luxury mattress manufacturer Tempur Sealy International in Lexington.

Tempur Sealy

Tempur Sealy is also located in Coldstream. The company designs and manufactures premium bedding products, including the Tempur-Pedic and Sealy brands, which have been ranked No. 1 and No. 2 of the top-selling mattress brands in the United States, according to the listing. of Furniture Today’s Top 20 American Bedding Producers. .

In August 2021, Tempur Sealy completed the acquisition of Dreams, the UK’s leading specialist bed retailer. The acquisition of Dreams is expected to nearly double Tempur Sealy’s sales through its international segment and increase the company’s annualized global sales through its direct channel to over $ 1 billion.

Tempur Sealy has added four manufacturing plants in North America in the past year. Its fourth plant, announced in June 2021, will be a state-of-the-art plant in Crawfordsville, Indiana, slated to be the largest Tempur Sealy plant in the world.

Thoroughbred aeronautical maintenance

Thoroughbred aeronautical maintenance opened its new headquarters at Lexington Blue Grass Airport in August 2021. The new location consolidates TAM’s existing presence at the airport, where it has operated since 2018, when it acquired Mustang Aviation. TAM maintains and services all inbound and outbound commercial flights to Lexington, currently employing 18 people. Company executives expect the new operation to add 10 positions over the next 12 months, with an employment target of 65 full-time staff within three years. Jobs created by this project include aircraft technicians, sheet metal specialists, avionics and administrative positions. TAM recently partnered with Bluegrass Community and Technical College to capitalize on its apprenticeship program and create a local talent pool.

TAM has additional locations in Richmond and the Big Sandy Regional Airport in Martin County, which opened in 2017. TAM also has a facility at the Huntington Tri-State Airport in West Virginia and facilities on duty in Danville and Somerset.

Founded in 1988 as Thoroughbred Helicopters, TAM has grown to include aircraft maintenance, from small Cessna planes to business jets, and helicopter helicopters to an Airbus AS365 N3 medium utility helicopter. TAM provides installation, repair and inspection of avionics, aircraft painting, interiors, airframe repair and other services for government aircraft and law enforcement agencies , as well as for corporate and private aircraft.

In 2017, TAM was awarded two five-year contracts with the US Department of Agriculture to modernize and maintain two Airbus H120 utility helicopters, as well as contracts with many other federal, state and local government agencies in Kentucky and surrounding states. .

Lexmark

Lexmark celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2021. The global imaging solutions company was formed from part of IBM’s operations in 1991 and today employs more than 1,600 people at its Lexington headquarters.

Gray Construction is a global company specializing in engineering, design, construction, smart manufacturing and equipment manufacturing.

Lexmark started out as a printing company and has evolved over the years to meet the needs of the industry. It now provides a full suite of cloud-based services to provide remote service management, print job management, document accounting and scan management functionality to ensure users are always able print and scan documents.

The company was recognized in 2021 by industry analysts as a global leader in print security.

“The adoption of cloud-based technologies and solutions continues to increase, with many CIOs taking a cloud-first approach,” said Brock Saladin, senior vice president and chief commercial officer of Lexmark. “The pandemic has accelerated this trend as cloud-based solutions provide an efficient, secure and cost-effective way to connect remote and hybrid workforce in post-pandemic business environments. “

Rubicon

Rubicon, a software platform that provides intelligent waste management and recycling solutions to businesses and governments around the world, opened its global headquarters in downtown Lexington in the summer of 2021. The location expands the company’s existing footprint in the state and joins the company’s other board of directors. in New York City, which remained in business throughout the last year as the majority of Rubicon’s workforce shifted to remote operations, a significant portion of which continues to be based in the region Metro Atlanta.

The Kentucky-based company helps customers run their businesses more efficiently by streamlining their waste management and recycling operations, and contributes to the growth of its major carrier partners, many of whom are small family businesses. By using technology to drive environmental innovation, Rubicon is helping transform businesses into more sustainable businesses and neighborhoods into greener, smarter places to live and work.

Rubicon officials said the company is positioning itself through its headquarters to expand its central role as a driver of economic opportunity in the state. Rubicon also intends to support research and manufacturing opportunities related to waste.

Founded in 1980 and headquartered in Nicholasville, Ky., Alltech is a leading global biotechnology company with a mission to improve the health and performance of people, animals and plants through natural nutrition and scientific innovation.

Alltech

Irish biochemist Pearse Lyons saw an opportunity to apply his yeast fermentation expertise to the challenges of animal nutrition, and his dream came true when he founded Alltech in 1980 with just $ 10,000. The company, headquartered in Nicholasville, now has a team of more than 6,000 people around the world who share this vision to support and nourish the world’s plants, animals and humans. The company is now run by Mark Lyons, son of the late scientist.

Alltech strives to improve the quality of plants, feed and food through nutrition and scientific innovation, especially yeast technology. His team is committed to helping plants and animals reach their full potential while supporting growers through increased efficiency, profitability and sustainability.

In March 2021, Alltech launched a subsidiary called Acutia which focuses on human health. Alltech applies its 40 years of scientific innovation and nutrition experience to produce high-quality supplements that improve daily nutrition and improve long-term well-being.

“Acutia is a natural extension of our activity, allowing us to directly support people in their quest for better well-being. At a time when we are all deeply aware of the importance of our health, this launch is particularly significant, ”said Mark Lyons.

Some of the other companies headquartered in central Kentucky include:

  • The Allen Co., road construction and paving
  • Alliance Coal, coal mining services
  • Appalachian regional health, hospital system
  • Lubricants, automotive oils and chemicals Apollo
  • ArchVision, software development
  • Asphalt Institute, professional association of petroleum asphalt
  • Burkmann Industries, animal feed
  • Columbia Gas Kentucky, natural gas distribution
  • Corrisoft, electronic surveillance software
  • CSI Group, Consulting Services and Automation
  • Delta Natural Gas, natural gas
  • East Kentucky Power Cooperative, power generation
  • Fazoli’s Restaurant Group, catering franchise
  • Florida Tile, manufacture and distribution of porcelain / ceramic tiles
  • Friesian Horse Association of North America, equine association
  • Frogdice, video game creator
  • Wales, public safety equipment and uniforms
  • General Rubber and Plastics Co., industrial distribution
  • Global information systems, software development to track pipelines
  • Gray Construction, a design-build company
  • Heartland Automation, mobile robots and custom automation equipment
  • Innovative mattress solutions, mattress retailer
  • Intech Contracting, painting and repair of bridges
  • Kinetic Technologies, Equine and Companion Animal Health
  • Minova USA, mine roof stabilization
  • MosquitoMate, Mosquito control and prevention R&D
  • Mountain Enterprises, highway construction and paving
  • Nally & Gibson, asphalt and paving materials
  • Phoenix Transportation Services, Trucking
  • Rhino Resource Partners, coal
  • RJ Corman rail group, rail services
  • Self Refind, drug treatment clinics
  • SIS Holding Co., provider of technological solutions
  • United States Dressage Federation, non-profit equine association
  • The pony clubs of the United States, equine club
  • Valvoline, lubricants and automotive services
  • Vasco Ltd., logistics supply chain service
  • The Walker Co., road contractor, asphalt producer
  • Xact Communications, telecommunications
  • The Zenith Co., restaurateur

Click here for more information on Kentucky businesses.


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IT News Online – Bedrock accelerates its growth with the relocation of its headquarters and its international presence

To accommodate the growth, Bedrock Analytics moved its corporate headquarters to a new location in Oakland, California and opened a new office in Mexico City.

OAKLAND, CA / ACCESSWIRE / October 26, 2021 / Bedrock analysis, the leading data analytics and AI platform for CPG manufacturers, is pleased to announce the opening and relocation of its headquarters in Oakland, Calif., as well as its new Mexico office.

The company’s main office has been moved from its previous location in Oakland, which has become an emerging and competitive tech capital in the post-COVID economy. Most recently, Oakland was ranked # 4 in the Top Ten list America’s Fastest Growing Startup Cities: Q3 2021. Bedrock’s new headquarters in downtown Oakland occupies an entire floor of an eleven-story building and has enough space to grow the business into its next phase of growth.

“We decided to create a company that would level the playing field between small and large consumer goods companies so that every company could have a chance to fight for storage space and market share.”

said Will Salcido, Co-Founder and CEO of Bedrock Analytics. “We needed the extra space as we have doubled our workforce in the past 4 months. The unique Outsider Pure Grain Bedrock DNA is at home in Oakland.”

Headquarters in Oakland, California

Bedrock’s office in Mexico City is located in a renovated estate in the center of the capital’s Polanco district. International expansion was a natural part of Bedrock’s evolution to accommodate growth by acquiring top talent and expanding their global footprint.

The information company is firmly committed to providing excellent customer support, with an average fast response time of 2 minutes to customer questions regarding data or the Bedrock platform. The industry average is 24 hours. Responses come from full-time employees who have previously held CPG positions, ensuring they provide valuable answers and insights backed by their experience.

Bedrock is committed to building and developing a unique team of experts who strive for excellence and thrive in a rapidly changing environment with personalized customer service and courage. He will remain focused on finding this talent around the world.

“Our international expansion is part of our long term strategy,” said Salcido. “It’s been a tough 18 months with the pandemic, but we’re coming out of it in a much stronger position by expanding our footprint and capabilities. We, with our growing customer base across 160 product categories, are helping transform the way the CPG industry is retailing using technology to increase bottom line. “

Bedrock office in Mexico

To learn more about Bedrock Analytics, visit bedrockanalytics.com.

About Bedrock Analytics

Bedrock is an automated storytelling-driven data analytics and AI company that helps salespeople in consumer goods companies humanize data so they can make more compelling sales presentations. Bedrock uses AI, informed by years of subject matter expertise, to integrate multiple data sources, harmonize data, and then inform the most important information in automated sales pitches. Fortune 10 CPG small business sales teams use Bedrock to discover insights, automate sales platforms, and drive more revenue. Tell your best story to bedrockanalytics.com

CONTACT:

Kate campbell
York IE
[email protected]

THE SOURCE: Bedrock analysis

See the source version on accesswire.com:
https://www.accesswire.com/669586/Bedrock-Accelerates-Growth-With-Relocation-of-Headquarters-Along-With-International-Presence


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Non profit living

Berghoff is passionate about supporting seniors |

FORT WAYNE —Sherri Berghoff is clear when she shares her philosophy of life.

“Be better today than yesterday and better tomorrow than today,” said Berghoff.

Berghoff is currently focused on growing his three businesses and a nonprofit organization from scratch: One Purpose Senior Healthcare; Single-use services for the elderly; Single objective marketing; and One Purpose Senior Adventures nonprofit.

“I’ve been working in the healthcare industry for about 18 years now,” Berghoff said.

“I was looking to redefine who I was and what I wanted to be and I started working in the healthcare industry and fell in love with long term care. “

When setting up his three new businesses and his non-profit organization, Berghoff said, “An opportunity presented itself and I just had a few ideas on how I might turn those opportunities into certain businesses. So I took the leap of faith the first part of June and I jumped and started three for-profit businesses and one non-profit organization.

“My goal with these three for-profit companies is to end up getting them to where they operate successfully and make money so that I can really focus on the nonprofits, because that’s where my heart is really in, ”she added.

Berghoff’s nonprofit, One Purpose Senior Adventures, works to make the wishes of seniors in need come true. The seed that led to the creation of the organization was sown about five years ago.

“My mom lives in southern Tennessee. She was 78 at the time … At least once a year, I made a point of spending time with my mother. And normally when I went to visit, we would go shopping, go out to eat, that sort of thing. But on that visit, I asked her, “Mom, what would you like to do while I’m here this time?” And she said, “Well, we don’t have to do it this time, but I saw pictures you posted, taking your kids’ zipline and I would love to try that.”

Berghoff said she told her mother there would be no wait until next time and, thanks to Google, was able to find a place nearby and the mother-daughter duo went to do of the zip line the next day.

It started an annual tradition, and subsequent adventures included whitewater rafting, attending Dollywood’s opening day, and a hot air balloon ride.

Bergoff also took his father zipline after seeing photos posted on social media that showed Berghoff and his mother on their adventures.

“So at 82 I took my dad’s zipline for the very first time,” she said.

Checking things off his mother’s to-do list, Berghoff figured there were other seniors who had things on their to-do list that they had never been able to do due to calendar or finances.

“Through our non-profit agency, our focus will be on fulfilling some of the bucket list wishes for individuals – primarily focused on low-income people living in a long-term care facility. And he doesn’t have to be adventurous. It doesn’t have to be ziplining and whitewater rafting. But whatever it is, it’s on their bucket list, ”Berghoff said.

Berghoff went on to describe his three businesses.

One Purpose Senior Healthcare aims to provide personalized healthcare coordination for the elderly.

“Basically, this is an attempt to improve communication between all providers involved in the care of an individual,” Berghoff explained.

Berghoff said that while working in healthcare, she found there was a lot of disconnection between providers and her business attempts to involve everyone involved in the care of an elderly person in communication. of what was going on with that person.

One Purpose Senior Services provides consulting services to healthcare organizations.

One Purpose Marketing offers services such as sales coaching, sales training, website design, logo design, branding, and social media management.

Berghoff said her passion for serving the elderly likely stemmed from the relationship she had with her grandmother.

“It was such a special relationship… It was such a positive experience in my life… It was like a way of honoring him,” she said.

“I feel like if I’m living my own mission, which, I say, is to be better today than I was yesterday and better tomorrow than I am today, my only hope is that people are not afraid to step out of their comfort zone and really go for the things they want. I think if there is anything I could say to anyone, it’s not to be afraid. And I think that is holding us back. So often in our lives the fear of what other people will think or the fear of failure or, I think, fear in general just holds us back and I’m inspired by the women who have been in my life and I don’t. can only hope that I can be half of what these women have done for me for someone else.


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Initially, surgeons attached a pig kidney to a human – and it worked

Surgeons in New York have successfully attached a kidney grown on a genetically engineered pig to a human patient and found the organ to be functioning normally, a scientific breakthrough that could one day produce a vast new supply of organs for them. critically ill patients.

Although many questions remain unanswered about the long-term consequences of the transplant, which involved a brain-dead patient followed for only 54 hours, experts in the field have said the procedure represents a milestone.

“We need to know more about organ longevity,” said Dr Dorry Segev, professor of transplant surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine who was not involved in the research. Nonetheless, he said: “It’s a huge breakthrough. This is a big, big problem.

Researchers have long sought to grow organs in pigs suitable for transplantation into humans. A constant flow of organs – which could eventually include hearts, lungs and livers – would offer a lifeline to the more than 100,000 Americans currently on transplant waiting lists, including the 90,240 who need of a kidney. Twelve people on waiting lists die every day.

An even greater number of Americans with kidney failure – more than half a million – depend on grueling dialysis treatments to survive. Largely because of the scarcity of human organs, the vast majority of dialysis patients are not eligible for transplants, which are reserved for people most likely to thrive after the procedure.

The operation, performed at NYU Langone Health, was first reported by USA Today on Tuesday. The research has not yet been peer reviewed or published in a medical journal.

The transplanted kidney was obtained from a pig genetically engineered to grow an organ unlikely to be rejected by the human body. In a close approximation of an actual transplant procedure, the kidney was attached to a person who had suffered brain death and was kept on a ventilator.

The kidney, attached to the blood vessels in the upper leg outside the abdomen, began to function normally, producing urine and creatinine waste “almost immediately,” according to Dr. Robert Montgomery, director of the NYU Langone Transplant Institute, which performed the procedure in September.

Although the organ has not been implanted in the body, problems with so-called xenotransplants – from animals like primates and pigs – usually occur at the interface of the human blood supply and organ, where human blood circulates through porcine vessels, the experts said.

The fact that the organ is working outside the body is a strong indication that it will work in the body, said Dr Montgomery.

“It was better than we expected, I think,” he said. “It looked like any transplant I have ever done from a living donor. Many kidneys of people who have died do not work right away and take days or weeks to start. It worked immediately.

Last year, 39,717 residents of the United States received organ transplants, the majority of them – 23,401 – receiving kidneys, according to the United Network for Organ Sharing, a nonprofit that coordinates the country’s organ procurement efforts.

Genetically modified pigs “could potentially be a sustainable and renewable source of organs – the sun and the wind of organ availability,” said Dr Montgomery.

Reactions to the news among transplant experts ranged from cautious optimism to wild outpouring, though all agreed that the procedure represented a sea change. The prospect of raising pigs to harvest their organs for humans is sure to raise questions about animal welfare and exploitation, although around 100 million pigs are already killed in the United States each. year to feed.

While some surgeons have speculated that it may be a few months before kidneys from genetically modified pigs are transplanted into living humans, others have said there is still a lot of work to be done. .

“This is truly a leading edge translational surgery and transplant that is on the verge of being able to be done in living humans,” said Dr Amy Friedman, former transplant surgeon and chief medical officer of LiveOnNY, the organ procurement organization for the greater New York City area.

The group was involved in the selection and identification of the brain dead patient receiving the experimental procedure. The patient was a registered organ donor, and because the organs were not suitable for transplantation, the patient’s family agreed to allow research to test the experimental transplant procedure.

Dr Friedman said she is also considering using hearts, livers and other organs grown in pigs. “It’s really mind-boggling to think of how many transplants we could offer,” she said, adding: “You have to raise the pigs, of course.”

Other experts were more reserved, saying they wanted to see if the results were reproducible and review the data collected by NYU Langone.

“There is no doubt that this is a feat, in that it is difficult to do and you have to overcome a lot of obstacles,” said Dr. Jay A. Fishman, Associate Director from the Massachusetts General Hospital Transplant Center.

“Whether this particular study advances the field will depend on what data they’ve collected and shared, or whether it’s a step just to show they can do it,” said Dr. Fishman. He urged humility “about what we know”.

There are still many hurdles to overcome before organs from genetically modified pigs can be used on living humans, said Dr David Klassen, chief medical officer of the United Network for Organ Sharing.

While he called the surgery a “watershed moment,” he warned that long-term organ rejection occurs even when the donor’s kidney is well adapted and “even when you are not trying to cross the barriers of the organs. species “.

The kidney has functions in addition to removing toxins from the blood. And there are concerns about pig viruses infecting recipients, said Dr Klassen: “It’s a complicated area, and to imagine that we know all the things that are going to happen and all the problems that are going to arise is naive.

Xenotransplantation, the process of grafting or transplanting organs or tissues between different species, has a long history. Efforts to use animal blood and skin in humans date back hundreds of years.

In the 1960s, kidneys from chimpanzees were transplanted into a small number of human patients. Most died soon after; the longest lifespan of a patient was nine months. In 1983, a baboon heart was transplanted into a baby girl known as Baby Faye. She died 20 days later.

Pigs offered advantages over primates for organ harvesting: they are easier to rear, mature faster, and reach adult human size in six months. Pig heart valves are commonly transplanted into humans and some diabetic patients have received pig pancreas cells. Pig skin has also been used as a temporary graft for burn patients.

The combination of two new technologies – gene editing and cloning – has produced genetically modified pork organs. Pig hearts and kidneys have been successfully transplanted into monkeys and baboons, but safety concerns have prevented their use in humans.

“So far, the field has been stuck at the preclinical primate stage, as moving from a primate to a living human is seen as a big leap,” Dr. Montgomery said.

The kidney used in the new procedure was obtained by removing a pig gene that encodes a sugar molecule that elicits an aggressive human rejection response. Pork has been genetically modified by Revivicor and approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use as a source of human therapy.

Dr Montgomery and his team also transplanted the pig’s thymus, a gland involved in the immune system, in an attempt to prevent immune reactions to the kidney.

After attaching the kidney to the blood vessels in the upper leg, surgeons covered it with a protective shield so that they could observe it and take tissue samples during the 54-hour study period. . Urine and creatinine levels were normal, Dr Montgomery and colleagues found, and no sign of rejection was detected for more than two days of observation.

“There did not appear to be any incompatibility between the pig kidney and the human that would render it inoperative,” said Dr Montgomery. “There was no immediate rejection of the kidney.”

Long-term prospects are still unknown, he admitted. But “it allowed us to answer a very important question: is there something going to happen when we go from a primate to a human that is going to be disastrous? “


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October 18 Business Files | News, Sports, Jobs

Avera scores highest among ‘most hardwired’ healthcare systems

Avera once again achieved the highest level of recognition as a Tier 10 organization in the 2021 Most Wired Digital Health Survey conducted by the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME).

The CHIME Digital Health Most Wired program conducts an annual survey to assess the effectiveness with which healthcare organizations are applying basic and advanced technologies in their clinical and business programs to improve health and care in their communities.

This is the third year that Avera has been named as a Tier 10 organization, reaching the highest level for acute and ambulatory care, with previous elite designations including Top 10 and “Advanced.” This is the 22nd time that Avera has been on the most connected list.

“Avera’s history of Most Wired awards as well as our latest designation as Level 10 demonstrate that we are an industry leader.” said Bruk Kammerman, chief information officer of Avera. “Avera fosters a strong culture of innovation, combining the latest technologies with medical expertise for the benefit of our patients. “

A total of 36,674 organizations were represented in the 2021 Digital Health Most Wired program, which includes four separate surveys: acute care, outpatient, long-term care, and international acute care. The surveys assessed the adoption, integration and impact of technologies in healthcare organizations at all stages of development, from early development to industry leadership.

Each participating organization received a personalized benchmarking report, overall score, and scores for individual levels in eight segments:

Infrastructure

Security

Business / disaster recovery

Administrative / supply chain

Data analysis / management

Interoperability / population health

Patient involvement

Clinical quality / safety

Participants also received certification based on their overall performance, with level 10 being the highest.

“The digital transformation of healthcare has accelerated to an unprecedented level since 2020, and the coming years will bring a wave of innovations that will empower healthcare consumers and amaze the industry” said CHIME President and CEO Russell P. Branzell. “The Digital Health Most Wired program recognizes outstanding digital leaders who paved the way for this impending revolution in healthcare. Their pioneering commitment to rapid transformation set an example for the entire industry on how to pursue a leadership vision with determination, brilliant planning and courage to overcome any challenge.

In addition to the CHIME Most Wired designation, Avera Health has many accomplishments including being named one of the Top 15 Health Systems by IBM Watson Health as well as numerous 5-star ratings through the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

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NKY Montessori Academy begins its 54th year with a new name, Crescent Ridge Academy, and a new branding

Northern Kentucky Montessori Academy has gone beyond its name and space and begins the first step of the next chapter in the organization’s 54-year history with a new name and brand identity.

Crescent Ridge Academy is the new name of the non-profit organization that includes Montessori education for children and Montessori teacher training for adults.

“In 2019, the Northern Kentucky Montessori Academy partnered with the Greater Cincinnati Center for Montessori Education to provide Montessori education and instruction to children and adults,” said school principal Lisa Dieso.

“When these two organizations merged into one, names were often swapped and confusing for our community, so we made the decision to participate in a brand study and ultimately a new name and brand identity. “

Crescent Ridge Academy has developed a new website and logo to reflect the changes in the organization.

“In our current space, our listings are at maximum capacity and we have started working with our Board of Directors to develop a plan to meet our long-term needs,” said Lisa Dieso.

Lisa Dieso

Crescent Ridge Academy is currently the only accredited Montessori school in northern Kentucky and one of only three in Kentucky.

The new name and logo are simplistic but full of meaning. A crescent moon symbolizes opportunity and imagination. The word ridge connects to the geographic location of the school, and Montessori describes the nature of the organization.

The new name is accompanied by a new logo, mascot and website that work together to identify as a hotbed of opportunity, imagination and growth for all learners. The crest appears like an open book. With the trees at the top, it represents growth and an organization rooted in lifelong learning.

Crescent Ridge Academy welcomes children between the ages of two and twelve and has over 100 registrants. The teacher training program provides quality education for people who wish to become certified Montessori teachers. It is affiliated with the American Montessori Society and accredited by the Montessori Accreditation Council for teacher education.

For more information, visit https://crescentridgeacademy.org/.


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Canadian army

George Fagan obituary (2021) – Chelmsford, MA

CHELMSFORD

George A. Fagan, 96, a resident of Chelmsford for nearly 60 years, passed away peacefully on Sunday October 3, 2021 at D’Youville Life and Wellness Community, Lowell, surrounded by his loving family. Beloved husband of the late Beatrice (Everett) Fagan with whom he shared 52 years of marriage until his death in 2005.

George was born in Houghton-le-Spring, England on August 9, 1925, the son of the late James and Anne (Atkinson) Fagan. The son of a coal miner, George grew up in the north-east of England, in the coal village of New Silksworth. He graduated from 2nd in his class and got a scholarship to Durham University where he studied physics and mathematics. His university studies were interrupted while he was proudly serving as an officer in the British Army during World War II (the 161st British Infantry and later the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers of the British Territorial Army). After the war he finished his studies in Durham and obtained an honors degree in physics. George was a proud but low-key member of Mensa International and had an IQ above the 98th percentile.

In 1953, George married the love of his life, Beatrice Everett. He first worked for Imperial Chemicals, Inc (ICI – later ICI DuPont) in England. Seeking new opportunities beyond post-war England, George, Beatrice and their first son, David, immigrated to Ontario, Canada in 1956. His second son, Kevin, was born in Canada in 1956 George landed a professional position with Gelman and Associates of Ontario. , Canada while serving as a Reserve Officer in the Canadian Army. His new position allowed him to work with computers in their infancy and to develop expertise in the then emerging field of information technology. In 1958, George accepted a consultancy assignment with MITER, a so-called nonprofit “think tank” in Bedford, Massachusetts, to develop approaches to integrate computer and radar technology to strengthen American air defenses in order to counter the increase in Soviet power. threat of cold war. His daughter Joanne was born in 1960 and his third son Peter was born in 1961. In 1962 George accepted a permanent position with MITER and the family moved to Chelmsford.

George’s career at MITER included managing and contributing to numerous information technology projects for the U.S. government and its allies, with an emphasis on command, control, communications, and intelligence systems ( C3I). George moved his family to Washington DC in 1966, to help start the MITER office and operations in Washington DC. George was naturalized as a US citizen in November 1968. In 1969 a fourth son, Keith, was born. Later that year, George took an assignment with MITER to support NATO at his headquarters and moved the family to Brussels, Belgium. Returning to Chelmsford in 1972, George remained at MITER to provide systems engineering support to the US Air Force until his retirement in 1990. George traveled frequently throughout his career in Europe, including long-term assignments in Italy, Turkey, Norway and Germany.

After his retirement, George taught systems engineering part-time with Learning Tree International, enjoyed his family, especially his grandchildren, and studied and learned languages ​​such as French, German, Italian and a little Russian. George enjoyed reading novels in various languages ​​and learning new technologies. George loved spending time with his family and friends and welcomed them all to his home where he lived independently until 2020. With George, the door was always open and the kettle was still on.

George leaves behind 3 children: Kevin J. Fagan and his wife Pamela J. (Gibson) Fagan of Centerville, VA; Joanne (Fagan) Salomaa and her husband William C. Salomaa of Chelmsford, MA; and Peter T. Fagan and partner Julie Connolly of Chelmsford, MA and Hudson, NH. George also leaves behind his sister, Kathryn (Fagan) Nunn of Bath, England. George leaves behind 5 grandchildren: Drew D. Fagan of Arlington, VA; Alexander C. Fagan and his wife Nicole (Woodward) Fagan of Salt Lake City, UT; Timothy C. Salomaa from Costa Mesa, California; Elizabeth G. Salomaa of Sarasota, Florida; and David E. Salomaa of Chelmsford, MA. George also leaves Christopher Connolly, Elizabeth Connolly and his daughter, Camryn, Daniel Connolly and KelliAnne Connolly, all of Hudson, NH.

George was predeceased by his wife, Beatrice (Everett) Fagan (1932 – 2005) and by his sons David J. Fagan (1955 – 1977) and Keith B. Fagan (1969 -2013).

Visiting hours will be Tuesday October 12 from 6 to 8 p.m. at BLAKE CHELMSFORD FUNERAL HOME, 24 Worthen Street, CHELMSFORD. His Christian Burial Mass will be celebrated Wednesday at 11 a.m. at St. Mary’s Parish, 25 North Rd., CHELMSFORD. PLEASE VISIT THE CHURCH. At the request of the family, masks are compulsory. Interment to follow at Pine Ridge Cemetery, CHELMSFORD. Memorial donations can be made in George’s name to the Lewy Body Dementia Association (lbda.org) or the Cancer Center at Lowell General Hospital. For directions and online condolences, please visit CHELMSFORDFUNERALHOME.COM.

View George A. Fagan Memorial Online

Posted by Lowell Sun on October 10, 2021.


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Boeing headquarters in Chicago in limbo as priorities shift

A pedestrian walks past the Boeing World Headquarters office building in Chicago on April 26, 2006.

Joshua Lott / Reuters

Twenty years ago, just days before the 9/11 attacks on the United States crippled the aerospace industry, Boeing Co moved its headquarters from its historic Seattle manufacturing center to an elegant skyscraper in Chicago downtown.

The move was at the heart of Boeing’s plan to forge a new identity as a diverse global juggernaut, removing top executives from day-to-day operations in distant business units and closer to Wall Street and its major customers.

Two decades later, amid another industry crisis, Boeing’s corporate hub is in limbo.

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A new generation of primarily coastal-based senior managers are dealing with industrial certification and safety issues across its key divisions and the lingering fallout from the 737 Max and coronavirus crises. At the same time, the tax incentives offered to Boeing by Chicago and Illinois run out at the end of the year.

Once a symbol of a new Boeing, the vision of a corporate epicenter rising above its building blocks is at odds with the imperative to reclaim engineering dominance and mend customer relationships. and federal regulators.

General manager Dave Calhoun, for example, spent the start of the year at the Boeing plant in South Carolina dealing with production-related flaws that hampered the program, people familiar with the matter said.

Other senior executives, like new CFO Brian West, are also based primarily on the east coast of the United States and silence has settled on the exclusive but functional top floor, although the pandemic has also been a major factor. , people said.

“It’s a ghost town,” added one of the people.

The corporate headquarters – a 36-story, $ 200 million riverside skyscraper – stands at the crossroads of a cost-cutting campaign that has seen Boeing part with real estate, including its corporate headquarters in commercial planes in Seattle.

Several people close to the company say cost cuts and a more practical corporate culture have raised questions about Boeing’s long-term future in the city, and in turn about the general direction Boeing has taken. ‘intention to take as he tries to regain his pace.

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Boeing, however, insists that major operations are still taking place there and rejects any suggestion that the giant could leave its base in the Midwest. “Chicago is strategically important to Boeing’s US and global operations,” a spokesperson said.

“As with other companies, we have adapted to hybrid ways of working in the midst of the global pandemic to engage with our employees, customers and other stakeholders.”

Boeing and its employees have invested nearly $ 50 million to support Chicago communities in recent years, Boeing said.

Despite the new focus, others warn leaving town would risk a local firestorm and stay away from Boeing’s immediate priorities amid a host of industrial and regulatory issues.

NEUTRAL LOCATION

Boeing left its Seattle home after 85 years after merging in 1997 with St. Louis-based rival McDonnell Douglas – a move that angered mechanics and core engineers.

Boeing was looking for a post-merger headquarters in a neutral location separate from these existing divisional power centers.

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But some critics saw Boeing’s move in Chicago as a symbol of a company that valued short-term profits and shareholder returns rather than long-term dominance of engineering – a repeated accusation after the 737 crashes. Max who killed 346 people in 2018 and 2019.

“It started as a way to signal that they would make future investments regardless of any inherited loyalty,” said Richard Aboulafia, analyst at Teal Group. “For some, it has just become a way of indicating that they will not make any future investments.”

EXPIRING INCENTIVES

Chicago, Cook County and Illinois have given Boeing more than $ 60 million in tax and other incentives over 20 years to move. Those credits have expired or will expire at the end of the year, although Boeing will receive funds for 2021 next year, the spokesperson said.

The incentives, which were temporarily swept aside by a trade feud with Airbus in Europe over mutual claims of unfair support, forced Boeing to keep 500 full-time employees in the office.

Boeing reported 513 full-time employees in Chicago for 2020, a city spokesperson said.

Boeing also employs thousands of people in Chicago and the Metro East region in southern Illinois near St. Louis, a state spokesperson said.

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But last year’s analysis by the Better Government Association, which reviews Illinois state rulings, found that Boeing had not hit the 500-employee mark in at least four years.

“The figures reported by the company to the state and the city differ, have never been audited and in some years have not met the public target,” he said.

The indirect impact of Boeing employees in the Chicago area had been valued at $ 4.3 billion over 20 years, Pam McDonough, former director of the Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs, said in an article. on LinkedIn last year.

“These big projects are complicated and strategic, but translate into huge financial and civic benefits. “

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Global Stent Market Report 2021-2028

Pune, India, Oct 04, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – The global stents market is expected to experience healthy growth owing to the increasing prevalence of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease. Key market insights were shared by Fortune Business Insights in its report titled “Stent market size, global share and trend by type (coronary stent, stent, ureteral stent, esophageal stent), by product (dual therapy stents, bioresorbable vascular scaffolds, biotech stents), by material (non-degradable, degradable), by design (coil , helical spiral), by end user (hospitals, specialized clinics) and geographic forecasts until 2026 ”. The report offers a comprehensive analysis of the market and provides key insights into the major factors that will influence the market.

A stent is a small tube, made of plastic or metal. which is placed in a clamped coronary artery to keep it open. It is used in a procedure called angioplasty, which is performed to open blocked arteries and restore blood flow. A stent is placed in the affected artery immediately after angioplasty to keep it open. The tube is coated with medication so that it lasts a long time and prevents the blocked artery from closing.

Request a sample copy of the research report:

https://www.fortunebusinessinsights.com/enquiry/request-sample-pdf/stents-market-100672

Faster recovery rates to boost the market

Stent treatments for coronary heart disease have been proven to have a faster recovery rate than conventional coronary bypass procedures. This bodes well for the global stent market as it will increase the rate of stent adoption. Additionally, stenting treatments are much less invasive than bypass grafts, which can help patients transition to such procedures more easily. In addition to this, there is an increasing prevalence of coronary heart disease. For example, recent figures revealed by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention show that 735,000 Americans are diagnosed with heart disease. This is expected to significantly increase the size of the global stents market during the forecast period.

Multiple benefits to encourage adoption

The global stent market is expected to increase as the growing awareness of the many benefits of stenting will increase adoption rates. For example, stenting can reduce conditions associated with heart disease such as chest pain and fatigue. Plus, stenting even improves kidney function. Thus, the procedure is known to dramatically improve the lives of patients, which bodes well for the global stent market.

Click here to learn about the short and long term impact of COVID-19 on this market.

Please visit: https://www.fortunebusinessinsights.com/industry-reports/stents-market-100672

High cost of stents may hamper market growth

Coronary stents cost 6 times more in the United States than in Europe, according to a 2018 study published in Health Affairs. Thus, the high cost of the treatment is expected to negatively impact the global stent market as a large part of the population might not be able to afford the treatment.

In addition, stenting carries some risks. For example, after the procedure is completed and the stent is placed, scar tissue may form inside the stent which would require another surgery. A person can also have an allergic reaction to the stent, which may again require medical attention. These factors may hamper the growth of the global stents market.

North America will occupy a leading position in the market

Among the regions, North America is expected to hold dominance and share of the global stents market during the forecast period. This is due to the growing number of heart disease patients and the presence of important market players investing in the research and development of innovative products. Asia-Pacific is also expected to significantly contribute to the expansion of the global stent market due to the increasing incidence of heart disease and the development of affordable stent treatments, especially in India.

Do you have a question ? Ask our experts:

https://www.fortunebusinessinsights.com/enquiry/queries/stents-market-100672

Increase research and innovation to stimulate competition

Competition in the global stent market is expected to intensify as market players seek to gain a competitive advantage through increased investments in research and the launch of innovative products. For example, in 2017, US-based Elixir Medical Corporation launched Desolve Absorbable Stent, along with the drug-eluting metal stent Dynamix, to continue its innovations in adaptive remodeling.

Some of the major players in the global stent market as identified by Fortune Business Insights include Boston Scientific Corporation, Terumo Corporation, Cardinal Health, Abbott, BD, Biosensors International Group, and a few others.

SECONDARY RESEARCH IS CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:

  • Details such as revenue, market share, strategies, growth rate, products and their pricing by region / country for all major companies
  • Details regarding prevalence, incidence, number of patients, distribution of patients, average price of treatment, etc.
  • Number of end-user installations by region / country and average annual spend or device purchases by type of end-user installations
  • Number of procedures and average price of procedures
  • Replacement rate and pricing of capital goods
  • Market dynamics versus target market – Drivers, constraints, trends and opportunities
  • Market and technology trends, new product developments, product pipeline.

Get your personalized research report:

https://www.fortunebusinessinsights.com/enquiry/customization/stents-market-100672

About Us:

Fortune Business Insights ™ delivers expert business analysis and accurate data, helping organizations of all sizes make timely decisions. We tailor innovative solutions to our clients, helping them meet the specific challenges of their businesses. Our goal is to provide our clients with comprehensive market information, giving them a granular overview of the market in which they operate.

Our reports contain a unique blend of tangible information and qualitative analysis to help companies achieve sustainable growth. Our team of experienced analysts and consultants use cutting-edge research tools and techniques to compile comprehensive market research, interspersed with relevant data.

At Fortune Business Insights ™, we aim to highlight the most lucrative growth opportunities for our clients. We therefore offer recommendations allowing them to navigate more easily in technological and market-related developments. Our consulting services are designed to help organizations identify hidden opportunities and understand dominant competitive challenges.

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Parents of shooting victims hope New Haven collaboration will reduce violence – NBC Connecticut

New Haven partners with CT Against Gun Violence (CAGV) to fight violence in the city.

The non-profit organization will engage community members and guide the city’s new violence prevention office.

The CAGV says it will be holding community listening sessions soon to discuss ways to prevent gun violence, in particular preventing it, intervening and also focusing on the after-effects.

The announcement was made at the Healing Botanical Garden in Elm City on Friday.

There, bricks commemorate the lives lost in New Haven to gun violence.

“It’s sad. My heart goes out to all of these moms,” said Pamela Jaynez, who doesn’t want to keep adding names to a path she helped create.

“Ten more bricks are being laid tomorrow and it’s not even for September and October. We go back to the months of June and July for which these are asked. “

Jaynez took NBC Connecticut to see his son’s brick.

Walter Jaynes Sr. would have turned 44 in June. He was killed in 1997.

“He’s been gone longer than he’s lived… It was six days before his 20th birthday when he was murdered.

The grieving mother is hoping New Haven’s collaboration with CAGV will have an impact, a step she believes is in the right direction to stop this growing path of deadly gun violence.

“I had no idea going to this funeral, that one day I would be one of those front row relatives,” said Thomas Daniels, who has the same background as Jaynez.

Her son Thomas was killed in 2009.

“These young murderers don’t know the effect they have on families, and the long-term effects, because for the last two or three years, I’ve just started to live. I just started living, ”said Daniels, who started the Fathers Cry Too group to help others experience what he has.

As New Haven searches for creative ways to fight violence, Daniels hopes all Connecticut communities come together to make a difference.

“It is no longer a black against black crime. Gun violence is everywhere. Death knows no boundaries.

A push for change – a Jaynez says she will never stop doing while her son watches over her.

“Every time I come here and start talking about my son, the chime (starts ringing) and I know he says to me, ‘Yeah, mom, yeah. “”


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Evening briefing: Freeland keeps cabinet concerts

Tonight’s Evening Brief is brought to you by iPoliticsINTEL. Daily Watch INTEL Briefs are a concise rundown of the day’s committee meetings in the House and Senate – delivered to your inbox each morning. Learn more.

Good evening to you.

It was said today that Parliament would return before the end of the fall. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has also said his cabinet will be sworn in next month. As to who will attend, all we know at this point is that Chrystia Freeland will remain Minister of Finance and Deputy Prime Minister. The cabinet will have an equal number of women and men around the table, what Trudeau has called a “basic starting point”, and there will also be an “appropriate regional distribution”.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland, who will remain Minister of Finance and Deputy Prime Minister. (Sean Kilpatrick / The Canadian Press)

In his first full press conference since last Monday’s federal election, Trudeau said the government’s top priorities are to: continue to sign child care agreements with the provinces; the introduction of 10 days of paid sick leave in federally regulated workplaces; make housing more affordable; work on indigenous reconciliation; and fight against climate change.

It comes like Members of Parliament arrive on the Hill and begin their orientation, and Kevin Vuong is preparing to sit in the House as an independent.

Now that the federal election is over, negotiations to bring Ontario into Ottawa’s child care plan can resume – and sources on both sides say they are headed in the right direction. Charlie Pinkerton has more.

In response to a reporter’s question, Trudeau said he would decide whether or not to ban Chinese tech giant Huawei from Canada’s telecommunications network in the coming weeks. He has largely dodged the case for the two and a half years that Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor have been detained in China. Aidan Chamandy has more.

Meanwhile, at the United Nations General Assembly, the two recently released detainees were at the center of a verbal fight between Canada and China today. Foreign Minister Marc Garneau told officials around the world that Canada is applying both Canadian and international law in response to the US request for extradition of Huawei leader Meng Wanzhou, while the two Michaels were paying a “heavy price” for Canada’s commitment to the rule of law. “We continue to oppose the way these two citizens were treated,” he said, adding that Canada “will never forget this experience.” More information on this in Global News.

Jessica Lovell / Metroland

On COVID-19, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) is now recommend that seniors in long-term care homes, retirement homes and assisted living facilities receive vaccine boosters. Given their day-to-day interactions with staff and other residents, their age, and other pre-existing underlying medical conditions, this is a population that is at increased risk for serious illness from the virus. NACI cited the time that has elapsed since this population received their initial injections, as well as the weakening of the immune response that can occur with age when recommending going beyond the two doses. regular.

In Quebec, Minister of Health Christian Dubé announced that public health officials in the province recommend that people in these care settings receive a third dose. CBC News reports.

Still in Quebec, major-general. Fortin was in court today to demand his reinstatement as head of federal vaccine deployment. As CBC News reports, the government says that role no longer exists.

Process Nerd: Do the Greens even need an interim leader?

Comings and goings: lawyer McMillan adds communications staff

Net Zero: Industry Groups Oppose Federal Clean Fuel Standard

The Sprout: Ontario farm charged after deadly COVID outbreak

In other titles:

Elizabeth May has been proposed as potential interim leader of the struggling Green Party (CP)
Canadians Unhappy But Not Angry With Federal Election Result: Poll (CP)
Science Table Says Ontario’s 4th Wave Has ‘Flattened’ And Releases ‘A Wide Range’ Of Case Projections (Global)
Albertans die from COVID-19 at more than three times the average Canadian rate (SRC)
BC data shows dramatic increase in COVID-19 cases among school-aged children (Global)
Travelers to Prince Edward Island will be tested for COVID-19 at its borders starting Thursday (CP)
A “potential anomaly” with the ballot boxes leads to a recount in the riding of Châteauguay — Lacolle (CP)
Don’t Stop Federal COVID-19 Benefits, Companies Say As Expiration Approaches (Global)

Internationally:

South of the border, General Mark Milley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, today warned that Al Qaeda terrorists in Afghanistan could threaten the United States in as little as 12 months. In an appearance before Congress to answer questions about last month’s withdrawal, he said the Taliban, which now controls Afghanistan, is still a terrorist organization with links to al Qaeda.

General Mark Milley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (Photo: Matthew Moeller, US Army)

As the Associated Press reports, he called the 20-year war in Afghanistan a “strategic failure” and said his preference would have been to keep several thousand troops in the country to prevent a collapse of the Afghan government and subsequent takeover by the Taliban. In his testimony, the US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin admitted that the collapse of the Afghan army that international troops had spent two decades bringing about “Took us all by surprise”.

Meanwhile, Milley also defended his decision during the last days of Donald Trump’s presidency to call on China to reassure officials that the former president was not going to attack.

“Rebuild better, blah blah blah. Green economy, blah blah blah. Net zero by 2050, blah blah blah. At conference in Milan today, sacred words and inaction, she also urged people not to give up hope, saying change is “not only possible, but urgently needed”.

In other international titles:

US government will run out of cash by Oct. 18, treasury secretary says (CNN)
WHO horrified by sexual exploitation by aid workers in DR Congo (BBC)
Dutch police arrest politician over alleged plot to assassinate prime minister (BBC)
‘Capital Gazette’ gunman sentenced to several life sentences, plus 345 years (NPR)
PM Haiti: Elections, referendum scheduled for next year (PA)
Greece, France tout European defense autonomy with warship deal (Al Jazeera)
Sudan: five members of the security forces killed in a raid on an ISIL cell (Al Jazeera)

In Notice:

Andrew Fleming: Trudeau wins a minority with a majority in British Columbia
James Cohen: This government must work with other parties to end snow washing

The kicker:

Photo: @ Kyr0Nagib / Twitter

Michael Kovrig has been a very busy man since his return to Canadian soil. Since the weekend, he has had his hair cut, a COVID-19 vaccine, and urged others to do so as well. As the National Post reports, he also discovered he was a bit of a celebrity.

Good night.

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Powell meets a changing economy: fewer workers, higher prices

WASHINGTON – Restaurant owners and hoteliers are struggling to fill jobs. Delays in the supply chain drive up prices for small businesses. Unemployed Americans unable to find work even with record high job vacancies.

These and other disruptions to the U.S. economy – the aftermath of the viral pandemic that erupted 18 months ago – appear likely to last, a group of nonprofit business owners and executives said on Friday. to Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell.

The business challenges, outlined during a “Fed Listens” virtual panel discussion, highlight the ways the COVID-19 epidemic and its delta variant continue to transform the U.S. economy. Some event attendees said their business plans are still evolving. Others have complained of sluggish sales and fluctuating fortunes after the pandemic eased this summer, then escalated over the past two months.

A d

“We are living in truly unique times,” said Powell at the end of the discussion. “I’ve never seen these kinds of supply chain issues, I’ve never seen an economy that combines drastic labor shortages with a lot of unemployed … So it’s an economy that evolving very quickly, it will be very different from the one (before).

The Fed chairman asked Cheetie Kumar, a restaurant owner in Raleigh, North Carolina, why she is having such a hard time finding workers. Powell’s question goes to the heart of the Fed’s mandate to maximize employment, as many people who worked before the pandemic have lost their jobs and are no longer looking for them. When – or if – these people resume their job search will help determine when the Fed can conclude that the economy has reached the peak of jobs.

Kumar told Powell that many of his former employees have decided to quit the restaurant industry for good.

A d

“I think a lot of people wanted to change their lives, and we lost a lot of people in different industries,” she said. “I think half of our people have decided to go back to school.”

Kumar said her restaurant now pays a minimum of $ 18 an hour, and she added that higher wages are likely a long-term change for the restaurant industry.

“We can’t get by and pay people $ 13 an hour and expect them to stay with us for years and years,” Kumar said. “It just won’t happen.”

Loren Nalewanski, vice president of Marriott Select Brands, said his business was losing out to similar challenges as many former employees, especially housekeepers, left for other jobs that recently raised wages. Even the recent cut to a federal unemployment supplement of $ 300 per week, he said, has not led to an increase in the number of job seekers.

A d

“People have left the industry and unfortunately they are finding other things to do,” Nalewanski said. “Other industries that may not have paid that much … are (now) paying a lot more.”

Jill Rizika, president of Towards Employment, a non-profit workforce development organization in Cleveland, said she sees the stark disconnect every day between companies posting millions of job vacancies. and those struggling to find work and escape poverty. About 60% of the people her organization helps find jobs have criminal records, she said, and 65% have only high school diplomas. Many parents, especially mothers, are still unable to return to full-time work.

“They tried to work but because of the epidemics, the children are being sent home from daycare or school, which makes their schedules unmanageable,” said Rizika. “Where the digital divide comes in: a young mother tried remote working but didn’t have enough broadband to make it work.

A d

Small businesses are also grappling with rising costs, with little relief in sight, some participants said. The Fed has accelerated its plans to start withdrawing its low interest rate policies, in part because of concerns about rising inflation.

Larry Andrews, chairman of Massachusetts Growth Capital, a state agency that supports small businesses, said that during a recent tour of the state, a cafe owner told him that the price of a case of eggs had skyrocketed since the pandemic. Another restaurant owner said a jug of cooking oil went from $ 17 to $ 50 – “if you can get it.”

“The speed and intensity of this slowdown – and the speed of the recovery in many areas – is unprecedented in modern times,” said Powell in prepared remarks at the start of the event. “The business plans have been reworked, the outlook has been revised and the future continues to be tainted with uncertainties.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


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“Belfast” Wins Audience Award at Toronto International Film Festival

The idea of ​​decreased immunity has gained momentum in recent weeks, with some countries using it to justify rolling out third-dose COVID-19 vaccine boosters to their populations. But immunologists say the concept has been largely misunderstood.

While the antibodies – proteins created after infection or vaccination that help prevent future invasions of the pathogen – stabilize over time, experts say this is believed to happen.

And that doesn’t mean we aren’t protected against COVID-19.

Jennifer Gommerman, an immunologist at the University of Toronto, said the term “waning immunity” has given people a false understanding of how the immune system works.

“Waning has this connotation that something is wrong and there isn’t,” she said. “It’s completely normal for the immune system to trigger a response where a ton of antibodies are made and a lot of immune cells are developed. And for now, that sort of thing is taking over.

“But it has to twitch, or you wouldn’t have room for subsequent immune responses.”

Antibody levels rise in the “primary response” phase after vaccination or infection, “when your immune system is loaded and ready to attack,” said Steven Kerfoot, associate professor of immunology at Western University. .

They then decrease from this “emergency phase”, he added. But the memory of the pathogen and the body’s ability to respond to it remains.

Kerfoot said that B cells, which make antibodies, and T cells, which limit the virus’s ability to cause serious damage, continue to work together to prevent serious illness long after a vaccine is given. Although T cells cannot recognize the virus directly, they determine which cells are infected and kill them quickly.

Recent studies have suggested that the T cell response is still robust several months after a COVID-19 vaccination.

“You could get a minor infection… (but) all of those cells are still there, which is why we are still seeing very stable efficacy when it comes to preventing serious illness,” Kerfoot said.

A pre-printed study published this week by Public Health England suggested that the protection against hospitalization and death remains much higher than the protection against infection, even in the elderly.

So the concept of declining immunity depends on whether you measure protection against infection or against serious illness, Kerfoot said.

Ontario reported 43 cases of hospitalizations among those fully vaccinated on Friday, compared to 256 hospitalized unvaccinated infections. There were a total of 795 new cases in the province that day, 582 among those who were not fully vaccinated or whose vaccination status was unknown.

British Columbia, meanwhile, has seen 53 fully vaccinated COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the past two weeks, compared to 318 unvaccinated patients.

“You will hear people say that vaccines are not designed to protect infections, they are designed to prevent serious illness,” Kerfoot said. “I wouldn’t necessarily say it’s the vaccine that’s designed to do either… that’s exactly how the immune system works.”

Moderna this week released actual data suggesting that its vaccine was 96 percent effective in preventing hospitalization, even in the midst of the more transmissible Delta variant, and 87 percent effective in preventing infection – down by compared to the 94 percent efficacy seen in the latest clinical trials. year.

Moderna CEO Stéphane Bancel said the drop “illustrates the impact of declining immunity and supports the need for a booster to maintain high levels of protection.”

Pfizer-BioNTech backed the same with its own data, and a U.S.-based Food and Drug Administration advisory group voted on Friday to approve third doses for people aged 65 and over or above. risk of serious illness.

However, the panel rejected boosters for the general population, saying the drug company provided little safety data on the additional jabs.

Gommerman said the efficacy data presented by Moderna does not indicate the need for a third dose.

“The fact that it protects 87% against infection is amazing,” she said. “Most vaccines can’t achieve this.”

Bancel said Moderna’s research, which has yet to be peer-reviewed, suggests that a booster dose may also prolong the duration of the immune response by increasing levels of neutralizing antibodies.

But Dr. Sumon Chakrabarti, an infectious disease specialist in Mississauga, Ont., Said looking only at the antibody response is misleading and could be falsely used to justify an endless number of callbacks.

Israel, which has opened third doses to its citizens, recently talked about administering fourth doses in the near future.

“This idea of ​​declining immunity is being exploited and it’s really worrying to see,” Chakrabarti said. “There’s this idea that antibodies mean immunity, and it’s true … but the background level of immunity, enduring T cells, hasn’t been emphasized enough.”

While some experts argue that boosters for the general population are premature, they agree that some people would benefit from a third jab.

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization has recommended boosters for those who are immunocompromised, who do not develop a robust immune response from a series of two doses.

Other experts have argued that long-term care residents, who were a priority when the rollout began last December, may also soon need a third dose. The English study suggests that immunity may decrease in older groups, but not much, if at all, in those under 65.

Chakrabarti said a decrease in protection among older populations may be due more to “overlapping factors” including their generally weaker immune systems and life situations for people in long-term care. .

“These are the people most at risk of hospitalization,” he said. “Could (the time that has passed after their doses) play a role? Yeah maybe. “

While we still don’t know the duration of the immune response to the COVID-19 vaccination, Gommerman said immune cells typically continue to live in the bone marrow and produce small amounts of antibodies for “decades.”

“And they can be quickly mobilized if they encounter a pathogen,” she said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on September 19, 2021.

Melissa Couto Zuber, The Canadian Press


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Residents of the third quarter worry about gentrification, think it could lead to a loss of culture and history

THIRD ROOM – Residents who live in the historic Third Quarter said this is changing.

A quick drive around the neighborhood will reveal new developments in the form of luxury townhouses and vacant lots. According to Assata Richards, a third generation resident, this is the demolition of affordable housing for those who live in the neighborhood.

Richards said without affordable housing, longtime residents are displaced, which she says will result in the loss of the rich history and cultural heritage of predominantly African-American neighborhoods.

“My parents met in this block, in this street (rue des Emancipations). And when I see these institutions disappear, it breaks my heart, ”said Richards.

Richards said his family moved to the neighborhood in the 1950s and called him from home.

The changes in the neighborhood prompted her to become a founding member of the board of directors of the Economic Development Council of Emancipation.

A d

She said the organization is focused on combating gentrification and preventing it.

“Specifically, the displacement of African American residents and the history and culture of the neighborhood,” Richards said.

Dr. DZ Cofield, senior pastor of Good Hope Missionary Baptist Church in Third Ward, leads a congregation of over 2,500 people.

He tells KPRC that he has seen the effects of gentrification with his own eyes.

“Some of our older members chose to sell, and in some ways I understand. If you paid $ 100,000 for a house 50 years ago and someone offers you 900,000, and you’re already struggling with taxes or whatever, it’s like – I’m maybe be older but i’m not stupid. I will sell, ”said Dr Cofield.

One of the most notable aspects of gentrification, according to locals, is development.

For this reason, community organizations have formed the Emancipation Community Development or ECDP partnership to reduce displacement.

A d

A report from the ECDP Strategic Implementation Framework shows that investors owned 37% of the vacant land in the third quarter.

Bill Fulton, director of the Kinder Institute for Urban Research at Rice University, conducted a separate study identifying neighborhoods at risk of gentrification.

According to the study, gentrification often eliminates affordable housing options, deep-rooted social networks and long-standing conveniences.

Land prices will also increase, just as they are in Third Ward.

“So if you want to develop a new building in the third quarter, what happens is that it has to be basically high-end townhouses so that the developer can make their money. So what we see before actual gentrification is often land speculation and the price of land going up dramatically, ”Fulton said.

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Fulton said the development is raising property taxes and longtime homeowners are struggling to pay their bills or maintain their homes, but he believes there may be a solution.

“Create a property tax system where long-term owners in places like this pay less in taxes,” he said. “There are property tax exemptions and reductions for all kinds of things, right? There is certainly a way to do this for long-time residents of gentrifying neighborhoods. “

Affordable housing for tenants is also needed.

According to an ECDP report, 27% of households in Third Ward paid more than half of their income in rent in 2017, which is comparable to 25% for the city of Houston, but is likely due to the high percentage of housing. community. households benefiting from a 25% housing allowance.

The report also pointed out that the median household income in Third Ward was $ 23,325, less than half that of the city of Houston, which is $ 47,493.

A d

Libby Viera-Bland, neighborhood development project manager at Project Row Houses, said organizations that provide affordable housing or are essential in keeping residents in communities.

“We have built affordable housing over the past decade in half an hour,” said Viera-Bland.

She said that so far, the organization has built 80 affordable housing units and is building 12 more units this year.

Richards believes that providing affordable housing will help residents of the community stay in their beloved neighborhood, but also preserve the history of the neighborhood, which is why she said she continues to fight for Third Ward.

“This community enabled me to obtain a doctorate. as a single mother. It has enabled me to achieve all of my aspirations as a first generation student, so I know what this community is all about, ”said Richards.

Copyright 2021 by KPRC Click2Houston – All rights reserved.


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Military will likely need more help with natural disaster response, DND says

With wildfires and flooding raging across the country this summer, hundreds of members of the Canadian Armed Forces have been called in to help with provincial emergencies – but they will likely need help to keep it going. do, a spokesperson for the Department of National Defense told iPolitics this week..

“WWe expect requests for assistance to increase, depending on the availability of provincial emergency resources, ”the spokesperson said in an email response. “This is consistent with the increase in the frequency and severity of natural disasters, both at home and abroad.”

Provincial emergency management organizations are the first to respond, but they can call in the military if they are overwhelmed.

“WWe expect that the need for Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) support for missions (Operation Lentus) will continue to increase at a constant rate in the medium to long term, which will result in an increased need for resources, ”he said. declared the spokesperson.

Operation Lentus is the CAF’s mission to respond to natural disasters.

While the military expects more deployments to require more resources, it is difficult to know when and how.

As the nature of the missions (of Operation Lentus) is unpredictable, there is no way to say exactly how or when this might impact our resources, ”the spokesperson said. “CAF’s requests for assistance are not predictable and therefore no amount is planned or set aside in advance. “

The cost of disaster relief has fluctuated wildly since 2013, according to figures provided to iPolitics by the Department of National Defense (DND).

In fiscal year 2017-18, thousands of troops and hundreds of vehicles were sent across the country to help six provinces deal with ice storms, floods and wildfires, according to a ministry. breakdown. DND spent $ 14 million on incremental costs, which are costs attributable to a specific mission.

In fiscal year 2014-2015, however, natural disaster relief cost the ministry just under $ 150,000.

While DND cannot predict with certainty how much future deployments will cost, it anticipates “more cyclical events,” the spokesperson said. These include the seasons of fires and floods, said Jonathan Vance, former Chief of the Defense Staff, speaking to the House Defense Committee in 2018.

The CAF plans for cyclical events, such as floods and forest fires, including such things as forecasting critical areas and assessing capacity gaps, ”the spokesperson said.

This planning includes “the identification, preparation and pre-positioning of Forces, facilitators and reserves (who) would be required to respond to fire, flood, natural disaster and the routing of goods.” humanitarian aid ”, as well as“ computer simulations, planning conferences, teleconferences, tabletop exercises, field simulations, etc. “Said the spokesperson.

The use of the military for more and more natural disasters is a source of concern, said Lt. Gen. Wayne Eyre, acting chief of staff, talk to the canadian press Last year. If this continues to be commonplace, which the ministry said it expects, it could hamper the military’s combat readiness, Eyre said.

Despite the expected increase and four deployments to date in 2021, the CAF is still ready to fight, the spokesperson said..

Although the increase in natural disasters has had an impact on the number of missions (Operation Lentus) performed by the CAF, it has not yet affected our combat readiness, ”they said.

“Mincentives are always in place to ensure that CAF support on the international stage, both for combat and non-combat missions, never suffers, ”the spokesperson said.

“This includes relying more heavily on the Reserve Force for domestic operations, at times, or working with federal and provincial partners to ensure the most efficient use of CAF resources here at home. “

The more frequent use of reserves has not changed the structure of the reserve forces, “nor the way they train or are employed, but simply the frequency with which they are called,” said the spokesperson.

The military response to more natural disasters is also of concern to Adam MacDonald, member of the International Council of Canada, who wrote a test on the subject for the Institute of the Conference of Defense Associations.

There is a “growing trend for the military (increasingly responding to national and) localized environmental disasters, which are expected to increase, given climate change,” he told iPolitics.

MacDonald worries “that this is already built into what the military was going to do in the future, without really thinking politically about whether or not we want the military to do it,” he said. declared.

As climate change continues to cause large-scale natural disasters and the military expects the military to continue to assist, MacDonald has suggested two solutions, without explicitly arguing for either. ‘other.

The first is that army reserves play a more active role in emergency management.

“I don’t think it’s realistic for a number of reasons,” he said. “Number 1 is that the reserve is a force of volunteers,” and volunteers might not want to fight fires or other disasters.

The second is that reserves are trained to do the same job as regular forces, so playing a more active role in emergency management could take time compared to training to replace regular forces when deployed overseas. , did he declare.

The other option is to create a new department, similar to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in the United States, which is explicitly responsible for responding to disasters.

“This is the question, ‘do we need to build capacity and expertise to (deal with) the increasing likelihood of natural disasters and other national problems? ”Said MacDonald.

“This is where the FEMA structure could work, but it could be a bit difficult, given that each province has their own emergency management organization, so there could be (battles) over who is in charge. enough to.”

Helping provinces deal with natural disasters is a core function of the CAF, as defined in the 2017 Defense Ministry report. policy document, “Strong, secure and committed”.

The use of CAF members to help provinces is increasingly common, says analysis by military experts Christian Leuprecht and Peter Kasurak for the Center for International Governance Innovation.

From 1996 to 2006, the CAF was deployed on 12 weather-related missions. Between 2007 and 2016, this number rose to 20.

From 2017 to 2019 alone, the CAF was mobilized for 15 missions.

In a mission last year dubbed Operation Laser, the CAF even helped long-term care homes in Quebec and Ontario that were overwhelmed by COVID. Other than this effort, the CAF has only been deployed to the provinces once: to help Newfoundland and Labrador weather a major snowstorm in January 2020.

In 2021, the army has so far been deployed in Manitoba, Ontario and British Columbia to fight forest fires, and in the Yukon to help protect against flooding.

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Canadian army

Smoke from wildfires in the west causes air pollution across the country

July 20 (Reuters) – Raging wildfires across the western United States and Canada, including a two-week “monster” fire in Oregon, spewed smoke and soot on Tuesday which blew eastward and caused harmful air pollution to New York City.

In 13 western states, more than 80 large active wildfires have charred nearly 1.3 million acres (526,090 hectares) of vegetation desiccated by drought in recent weeks, an area larger than the Delaware, according to the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) in Boise, Idaho.

Several hundred more fires have burned in western and central Canada. They included 86 classified as uncontrollable on Tuesday in British Columbia alone, which led authorities to declare a state of emergency.

The jet stream and other transcontinental air currents carried smoke and ash thousands of kilometers. Residents of remote towns felt the contamination of the air in their eyes, noses and lungs.

In New York City, where a gray haze enveloped the Manhattan skyline, the Air Quality Index (AQI) for fine particles reached 170, a level considered harmful even to healthy people and nine times higher than World Health Organization exposure recommendations. Philadelphia reached 172.

Other northeastern cities, including Boston and Hartford, Connecticut, had readings in the unhealthy zone above 150. Residents were advised to wear face masks outdoors to limit exposure.

Smoke from Canadian wildfires in Manitoba and Ontario in the United States likely pushed the AQI in Detroit and Cleveland above 125, considered unhealthy for sensitive people, the NIFC meteorologist said, Nick Nauslar. Smoke from forest fires from the western provinces of Canada has reached east to Ontario, triggering broad government air quality warnings.

In the western United States, parts of Idaho and Montana suffered unhealthy levels of air pollution from 40 nearby large fires and smoke from the Bootleg fire in southern Oregon, currently the largest in the United States.

Heavy exposure to smoke from wildfires has been linked to long-term respiratory consequences for firefighters, including a significantly elevated risk of developing asthma, according to a University of Alberta study released this week. week.

The general population also faces serious health effects.

The Bootleg Fire burns through vegetation near Paisley, Oregon, USA, July 20, 2021. REUTERS / David Ryder

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“Exposure to smoke from wildfires (…) increases susceptibility to respiratory infections, including COVID, increases the severity of these infections and makes recovery more difficult,” the Federal Councilor said by email. Margaret Key Air Resources.

THE “MONSTER” FIRE ENTERING THE 3RD WEEK

The forest fires themselves posed a more direct risk to life and property.

The Bootleg Fire has blackened 388,600 acres (157,260 hectares) of dry brush and wood in and around the Fremont-Winema National Forest, about 250 miles south of Portland, since July 6. Only three other forest fires in Oregon in the past century have burned more territory.

As of Tuesday, an army of some 2,200 people had succeeded in digging containment lines around 30% of the outskirts of the blaze, as the blaze spread further east and north.

Incident commander Rob Allen said in his daily report that the dry fuels in the fire area “will continue to burn and smoke for weeks.”

“Fighting this fire is a marathon, not a sprint,” Allen wrote. “We’re in there for as long as it takes to contain this monster safely.”

At least 67 houses were destroyed and 3,400 others were listed as threatened, with around 2,100 people ordered to evacuate or to be ready to flee at any time.

Western conflagrations, marking a heavier-than-normal start to the wildfire season, coincided with record heat that has ravaged much of the region in recent weeks and left hundreds dead.

Scientists said the increasing frequency and intensity of forest fires is largely attributable to prolonged drought and increased episodes of excessive heat that are symptomatic of climate change.

The Bootleg fire is so large that it sometimes generated its own climate – towering clouds of pyrocumulus of condensed moisture sucked through the fire’s smoke column from the burnt vegetation and of the surrounding air. These clouds can create thunderstorms and strong winds capable of starting new fires and spreading flames.

Reporting by Peter Szekely in New York and Steve Gorman in Los Angeles; additional reporting by Nia Williams in Calgary; Editing by Cynthia Osterman

Our standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Secrets Alone Won’t Save Us: Providing a ‘Decision Advantage’ on Climate Security

When I was a CIA officer, one thing I could share with my family was a museum tour at Langley headquarters. Visitors would marvel at the cover-up devices and exclaim at stories of derring-do in the name of gathering hidden information. When we got to the Analysis Branch, however, they pretended to be interested. The printed copies of the reports weren’t as interesting as the robotic spy fish exhibit.

The theft of secrets has always captured the public imagination of the intelligence profession, for good reason. Secrets were the claim to fame of the CIA’s predecessor, the Office of Strategic Services. Prior to D-Day, it was “Wild Bill” Donovan’s placement of spies in European ports and behind enemy lines that gathered the information needed to support a successful invasion. As President Dwight Eisenhower said of the Office of Strategic Services: “If (he) had done nothing else, intelligence gathered alone before D-Day would justify its existence.

Of course, the security and intelligence landscape has changed dramatically since Eisenhower’s time. More often than not, “going behind enemy lines” means connecting to a computer, not jumping out of a plane. The risks facing the United States are more complex, involving not only a mix of state and non-state actors, but also systemic factors such as climate change, which the Chief Intelligence Officer ‘s 2021 Global Trends report identified as one of the few trends “setting the parameters” of our future world. This world is a world in which temperatures and sea levels are rising dramatically, and weather conditions are becoming more and more unpredictable and extreme. It is likely that millions of people will be displaced and forced to migrate, tensions will increase within and between states as water and food insecurity increases, and governments will find it increasingly difficult to manage aggravating risks as climatic risks intersect with other stressors. There is not a single current US national security concern that will not be affected in some way by the climate crisis.

What does a security landscape shaped by climate change mean to the way the US intelligence community does business? For some, this suggests a return to first principles. Doubling down on what my family has always found most intriguing about the CIA museum – the collection of secrets – as a way to distinguish the intelligence community from the private sector and the open source world. As Joshua Rovner argued, “the comparative advantage of secret agencies is secret information.” Of course, collecting secrets about governments’ climate policy plans and intentions can be important. Special Climate Envoy John Kerry lamented the lack of climate fundraising at a conference earlier this year. He argued that if climate change is truly an existential threat, then the US intelligence community should do as much effort to collect information on the positions of US adversaries on climate negotiations as it does to pinpoint their positions on nuclear agreements.

Secrets, however, are not enough. To achieve the goal of consistently providing a strategic advantage to the United States, the intelligence community must have the ability to put these secrets into context – analyze and communicate how they intersect with other risk information. for the national security of the United States. The trick is not to give up secrets or try to duplicate what the private sector or academia is doing, but rather to marry clandestine collection with other information from all sources. This is of course not a new concept in intelligence studies. Academics and practitioners have spilled gallons of ink debating the best ways to integrate open source information. The founder of the analyst profession in the United States, Sherman Kent, argued that integrating data and consulting with outside experts was essential to a strong profession. Most of the analysts I have known in my career prided themselves on their in-depth contextual knowledge of the regions they covered – history, academic experts, local news sources, arts and culture.

However, bringing a climate lens to intelligence isn’t as simple as bringing in just one more unclassified source. It’s different because of the type of information to integrate, the skills needed to do it, and the systemic nature of the risk. First of all, it’s hard science in addition to social science. This requires a “climate-savvy” workforce with scientific knowledge. This does not mean creating large teams within the intelligence community that do climate science. This means that intelligence officers are able to regularly understand and integrate climate models and analyzes into their work.

What does it look like in practice? It can be as simple as using references like Climate Central’s “Surging Seas” tool or regularly consulting primary sources and scientific literature. It also means leveraging more complex tools and practices. Advances in machine learning and computing power are leading to new modeling tools that can provide a wealth of relevant information to intelligence analysts. One example is the use of “ensemble assessments”, which are repeated runs of the same climate model, adjusting the starting point conditions each time. Such sets allow scientists to more clearly show a range of potential regional climate trends – important information that analysts need to incorporate into their work when assessing possible future economic, political and conflict scenarios in different parts of the world. Another example is that of “high resolution” climate models, which, thanks to advances in the power of supercomputers, can better represent atmospheric processes on a small scale. These models allow greater precision in risk assessments.

Moving forward, building on existing climate modeling approaches and tools is probably not enough for the intelligence community to truly address climate security risks. As Alice Hill, a former climate adviser to the National Security Council, recently detailed, planners across the United States are desperate for more localized climate data so they can craft better adaptation responses. Intelligence analysts need this kind of information as well, but in regions around the world. For example, although scientists believe Africa will face some of the greatest risks from climate change, accurate climate data on the continent is lacking, inhibiting useful predictive modeling of climate impacts. Without more localized and robust predictive climate models for Africa, intelligence analysts will not have the information they need to answer the kinds of questions they are sure to receive from policymakers in the years to come: the continent’s conflict zones? In which geographic areas will climate impacts and extremist groups overlap to increase security risks? Will US competitors’ infrastructure support offers to African countries withstand extreme events caused by rising temperatures?

While there are opportunities for the intelligence community to partner with the private sector to develop such capabilities, the first stop should be with US government scientists. Congress has given the intelligence community some tools to achieve this by creating the Climate Security Advisory Council, designed to link US government science and intelligence agencies, and the National Academies Climate Security Roundtable, a mechanism that enables actors in the climate science to provide information. to the intelligence community. Both meetings provide a platform for the community to use to encourage and shape the development of new modeling approaches that meet their specific needs. Moreover, intelligence agencies should use these groupings to pursue truly interdisciplinary analytical reports that marry climate science with social sciences. An example of this type of analysis can be seen in a series of reports and story maps published in recent months by the Woodwell Climate Center and the Council on Strategic Risks, detailing how climate change will shape security risks in strategic regions. of the globe.

Fully realizing this type of approach within the intelligence community – a large government bureaucracy – is not easy. I have already described the ways in which new resources, new leadership and new institutional structures can help. To his credit, the Biden administration has taken many steps to make it happen, as evidenced by the Executive Order on Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad. Equally important, however, are the less immediately tangible changes in organizational culture and mindset. Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines acknowledged these challenges in a recent interview,

Climate is an urgent crisis, but it is very difficult for various institutional reasons to integrate it into your daily work in a fully successful way i.e. it is much easier to focus on climate negotiations or on what states do in their policies.

She went on to say however that she was starting to see changes, noting that she had been amazed by,

to what extent, in addition to focusing on China and all of our top threats that we talk about in our annual threat hearings, we [in the intelligence community] came to the conclusion that … investing in science and technology and the tools that allow us to be better at what we do, our institutions, our partnerships, our resilience, our ability to integrate that expertise, is what is really important at this critical moment in our history.

Time will tell if this recognition from the leaders of the intelligence community results in long-term change. If so, maybe one day a future president will sing the praises of the director the same way Ike did of “Wild Bill” Donovan and the Office of Strategic Services. As article after article on this month’s record temperatures around the world points out, the climate will only get worse. And the United States can only navigate this hotter world with an intelligence community that collects foreign secrets, but also has the full range of information, tools, and talent it needs to analyze. these challenges.

Erin Sikorsky is Deputy Director of the Center for Climate and Security and Director of the International Military Council on Climate and Security. Previously, she was Deputy Director of the National Intelligence Council’s Strategic Futures Group in the United States, where she co-authored the quadrennial Global Trends report and led the US intelligence community’s environmental and climate security analysis.

Image: US Air Force (Photo by Master Sgt Elijaih Tiggs)


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International investors are key to delivering housing today and into the future

The Irish home buying and letting market needs more supply. This offer must meet the multiple demands that Irish society needs in the decades to come. Homeownership should be accessible to those who aspire to it, so it is right that the first-time home market is supported as part of government policy. The provision of adequate social housing is essential to underpin any claim of an equality-minded society. In addition, a deep and diverse private rental market is needed to meet the needs of a mobile workforce.

Regardless of your perspective on the problem, delivering a larger supply faster is the way to alleviate the current pressures. Supply requires investment and the good news is that there is enough capital available in Ireland and abroad to finance the 35,000 to 40,000 housing units we need each year to meet the shortage. current. To denigrate the investors behind this capital is to divert attention from the fight against more fundamental blockers that inhibit supply.

The international investment community is very keen to support the building of a vibrant and affordable housing sector in Ireland. Before the 2008 real estate crash, the market was financed almost exclusively by national banks, and then almost exclusively by debt. It is a welcome development in the market that we now have access to a more diverse pool of capital from investors such as foreign pension funds who are well positioned to finance this phase of the construction of Ireland.

Long term goal

With long investment horizons often extending beyond 20 years, pension funds focus more on return on capital than on return on capital. They may already be buying Irish sovereign bonds with an annual interest return or ‘coupon’ close to 0%, which means they are happy to get into less liquid real estate investments at just 3-4%. annual return. Attractive low-rate capital costs are available to the industry and with the right safeguards in place we can ensure that the capital serves the broadest purposes for the country’s needs.

Likewise, these investors understand that investing in real estate is a societal issue, not just a financial one, and they respond positively to sound policy on taxation, tenant rights and transparent governance. This investor profile is very different from the caricature of the “cuckoo” fund often accused of evicting first-time buyers or trapping tenants.

To date, these investors have been mainly active in the “multi-family” sector, which means that they buy blocks of apartments built exclusively to be rented out indefinitely and not for sale.

There is a significant and growing need for pure rental stock in Ireland, where we are lagging behind our European peers. Ireland has been very successful in attracting European headquarters of global companies and with them thousands of jobs with local talent and employees from abroad. For foreign employees who can reside in Dublin for periods of six months to three years without wanting to buy a house for the long term, high quality, professionally maintained rental apartments are essential. The supply of rental apartments to this cohort does not necessarily have to come at the cost of crowding out first-time buyers, but again, the answer to this problem is more supply, not less efficient capital.

Financing the future

Another development of relevance to the debate when considering the role of international investors in the Irish market is the worrying contraction of the Irish banking market. With the exit of Ulster Bank and KBC from the Irish banking sector, this will further exhaust the nationally available financing options for the wider economy, including property developers. International capital can step in to fill the void left behind to manage the pipeline of real estate developments until completion.

Bottlenecks to accelerating supply include the slowness with which planning is assigned to developers and low thresholds for forensic review, even when that planning is successful. Delays in confirming connection certificates for site services such as water and electricity are blocking the start of construction on the house. There are other bottlenecks to the development of the Irish residential pipeline, such as the shortage of construction workers and supply chain shortages linked to Brexit and Covid-19, but they will not be resolved until ‘There will not be a clear horizon for faster housing development which is currently paralyzed by an interrupted planning process.

These issues need to be addressed through the government’s fledgling policy initiative on Housing for All due to be released later this month and the terms of reference of the soon-to-be-launched Housing Commission. With sensible policy safeguards in place to protect tenants and first-time buyers, international investors can provide an attractive source of capital to help tackle Ireland’s chronic housing shortage for decades to come.

Myles Clarke is Managing Director of CBRE Ireland


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Non profit living

Voto Latino fights Latinos’ reluctance to vaccinate against COVID

Maria Teresa Kumar, President and CEO of Voto Latino, a nonprofit organization for the Latin American community, was confused when her own mother told her she would not be getting the COVID-19 vaccine. It took two months for Kumar to convince his mother, who works in the health sector and had been vaccinated, her and her children, all her life, to make an appointment. What had held her mother back were the videos she had watched imparting false accounts, especially one that showed a man pretending to be a pharmacist, warning in Spanish not to be vaccinated, Kumar recalls, “because it was a technology never introduced to humans before. “

The spread of misinformation and misinformation surrounding the COVID-19 vaccine is common among a range of U.S. populations, including within the Latino community. In an April survey by Voto Latino, 40% of Latinos said they had received material saying the vaccine was not working. In order to urgently overcome this, especially as the Delta variant spreads, Voto Latino uses his behavioral learnings to fight far-right disinformation during elections to rally people to get shot, as he did so to register them to vote in 2020. For the organization, it is essential to maintain a large and influential electoral bloc healthy and confident in the government so that it continues to exercise its right to vote in the to come up.

Although the number is improving, the uptake of the vaccine by Latinos has been 1.2 times less than among whites in the majority of states. This is the case with other ethnic groups, such as blacks, with whom Latinos share some of the same barriers to access, such as frontline work that prevents employees from taking time off or lack of care. adequate health. Additionally, like the black community, Latinos have had their own dark experiences of being subjected to medical racism by the US government, including a history of forced sterilization of women in Los Angeles and Puerto Rico.

Misinformation around the COVID-19 vaccine compounds already existing fears. Some messages mistakenly claim that the vaccine is not scientifically reliable, and others that it causes infertility. More outlandish claims include that it contains a microchip or that it transforms you in zombie. Part of the reason these myths are so common among the Hispanic community is that Facebook doesn’t crack down on disinformation in Spanish to the same extent as it does in English. Once the information arrives on WhatsApp, it can then spread virally without any control. Of those who said they saw “harmful” information about the vaccine, 53% said it had been on Facebook and 43% on messaging apps.

The promoters of this disinformation are often individuals or groups who create digital content based on talking points from far-right cable news, radio shows or politicians, says Ameer Patel, vice president of programs. by Voto Latino. These bad actors can then receive donations from the followers, which not only fund the wide dissemination of lies, but can allow them to make a living from the practice. “One of the things we’re really seeing is there’s this great appetite to fund the flow of misinformation and disinformation,” he says. When a particular message resonates with a certain community, they tap more into that idea; for example, the myth of infertility has been particularly powerful among young Latinos, Patel says, perhaps because of popular family or religious beliefs.

With the CDC is already reporting that Latinos are 2 times more likely to be infected with the virus than whites, and 2.3 times more likely to die, Voto Latino has decided to help fight false narratives by implementing the Latino anti-disinformation laboratory with the Media Matters association. Although Voto Latino focuses on voting, Kumar says a healthy community that trusts government is essential for democracy, calling misinformation about vaccines “the most morbid form of voter suppression.” She adds, “If you don’t trust your government to take care of you and keep your family healthy with a vaccine, what’s the possibility that you can convince someone to vote?

The group is also in a privileged position to deliver its conclusions on the fight against far-right disinformation during the 2020 campaign. During this cycle, bad actors aimed to suppress the vote among certain blocs, and Voto Latino retaliated with strategies that ended up registering 426,964 voters, a record for the organization. They ran explanatory ads to educate people about the registration process, used peer-to-peer texting where volunteers sent personalized texts to people from local numbers, and encouraged people to contact likewise their friends and family. The idea was that receiving messages from people like them, whom they could relate to, would be more compelling than receiving impersonal, generic memos.

Now, the group is adopting similar behavioral techniques for the immunization campaign, with an ad campaign focusing on messages from people like them, rather than an unknown healthcare professional, for example. One of the two best-tested ads features a sixth-grade teacher expressing feelings of returning to school safe after being immunized, which Kumar says touches both educational and economic reasoning. The other features a woman who admits to being scared at first, “because it was new”, but who eventually received the photo and said it felt liberating. Importantly, both also point out that shooting is free, which a lot of people either don’t know or are told otherwise. Overall, the message is “optimistic but practical” and focuses on getting back to normal. As with his electoral strategy, Voto Latino does not laugh at any idea, however absurd it may be. “If you make fun of someone for their beliefs, they tend to turn around because they don’t mean they’re wrong,” Kumar says. “It’s the worst way to chat with someone.”

Voto Latino targets the 28% of people who said they were hesitant about the vaccine, rather than those “who are at the bottom of the rabbit hole” and more difficult to convince (again, a strategy similar to the election ). “We are entering the nooks and crannies of people’s internet,” Kumar says, referring to the targeting technique of showing their ads to people who have previously watched disinformation videos. They are currently running the ads on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

So far, they’ve been effective in calling for action: According to Google results, released last week, people who saw the ads were 54 times more likely to search for ‘get a covid vaccine’ than those who did not; and there was an overall spike in that search term of 7,171% in Florida, 5,856% in Texas, and 4,330% in California, the three states with the largest Latin American populations. And vaccination is increasing: As of July 4, 34% of people who had started their vaccination in the previous 14 days were Latin American, even though they represent only 17% of the population. Kumar says she believes the same methods could be used on other hesitant population groups, such as older whites and immigrant enclaves.

Success so far suggests that simply showing people care – to “give them love, attention and information in a non-judgmental way” – is a strategy. effective persuasion, both to promote vaccines and to maintain an active growing political voice in the long term. With her mother, what ultimately worked was the personal message of “Why wouldn’t someone want you to be healthy?” Why wouldn’t someone want you to see your grandchildren? “

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Non profit living

More Nursing Homes and Seniors’ Homes are Closing Their Doors Due to the Impact of COVID

The nursing home operated by Alaris Health on John F. Kennedy Boulevard in Guttenberg was old. Built long before there were concerns about isolating large numbers of residents to stop a virus that could spread like wildfire, it was small and could hold up to four people per room.

And now it’s closed.

The long-term coronavirus pandemic has claimed the lives of more than 7,800 long-term care residents in New Jersey.

It also had a big impact on nursing homes.

Since March 2020, three state care facilities have closed, according to state data, highlighting not only changes COVID has brought to standards of care, experts say, but also growing financial instability in the state. nationwide industry. In each of the previous two years before the deadly virus hit, there has been only one nursing home closure in New Jersey, according to the state Department of Health.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has put increased financial pressure on nursing homes and assisted living providers who already operate on very low margins,” said James McCracken, President and CEO LeadingAge New Jersey, the statewide association of nonprofit elderly care organizations.

Nationally, industry officials predict long-term care providers could lose $ 94 billion in the pandemic and warn that more than 1,800 facilities could eventually close their doors.

The closures in New Jersey, meanwhile, also suggest that the financial pressures felt by long-term care facilities due to COVID may have made nonprofits such as those represented by LeadingAge particularly vulnerable.

Medicaid, a joint federal and state program that helps pay nursing home fees, serves as a safety net for people with limited incomes and resources. But the reimbursement rate in New Jersey remains far too low, critics lament. At the same time, not all for-profit nursing homes will accept Medicaid or may limit the services and beds provided to Medicaid patients, unlike nonprofit organizations.

“Faith-based and mission-oriented organizations are particularly affected because they traditionally care for those in need, regardless of their ability to pay,” McCracken said of the financial crisis caused by the pandemic.

One of the facilities that closed in the state this year – the Armenian Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Emerson – was operated on a non-profit basis. The Villa at Florham Park, an assisted living facility and also a non-profit organization, is also closing. The establishment, which has already relocated all of its residents, has submitted a closure plan to the state, according to a spokesperson for the Ministry of Health.

More recently, the St. Francis Residential Community in Denville, a non-profit independent living facility for seniors operated by The Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother, also said it was closing for financial reasons, although it was not have not linked their problems to COVID. The closure will displace 75 people who live there, including 10 nuns of another order, the Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Conception of the Mother of God. They did not respond to requests for comment.

The Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother, owners of the property since 1895, said in a statement that as the buildings and infrastructure on campus aged, “it has become increasingly difficult to fund maintenance and operations. renovations necessary to maintain the financial viability of the community. “

Although they have not yet filed a notice of intent regarding the closure with the Ministry of Community Affairs, which is authorizing the installation, they have withheld the Springpoint, a non-profit organization that operates 27 retirement homes, to help with the closure and find suitable housing for current residents.

A Springpoint spokeswoman said they had has created a limited number of leases at one of their facilities, The Oaks in Denville, which will be made available to residents of St. Francis and the sisters who live there, based on financial need.

St. Francis Residential Community, an independent living facility in Denville that houses 75 residents and plans to close.Google Street View

McCracken said a more robust reimbursement system is needed to support providers who care for the most vulnerable.

“Nonprofit providers are resident-focused and I am saddened when faith-based organizations close because they cannot afford to continue their ministries,” he said.

Her concern was echoed by Laurie Facciarossa Brewer, the New Jersey long-term care ombudsman, who questions whether faith-based institutions and other nonprofits are having a harder time weathering the effects of the health emergency. public COVID-19, including reduction of occupancy rates.

“At least one national study has shown that nonprofit long-term care facilities are more effective at controlling COVID-19 infections,” she said. “This may suggest that these facilities had better staff ratios and provided more nursing hours, a key indicator of quality in a long-term care facility and the most important tool to combat the spread of the infection.”

The loss of such organizations, said Facciarossa Brewer, “is bad news for people in need of nursing home care in New Jersey.”

Andrew Aronson, president and CEO of the Health Care Association of New Jersey, which represents long-term care facilities in the state, said the pandemic has caused an economic crisis on all long-term care providers, “regardless of the ownership structure”.

Nationally, a recent survey by the American Health Care Association and the National Center for Assisted Living, representing more than 14,000 nursing homes, assisted living communities and other long-term care facilities across the country , revealed that most homes in living communities are now operating at a loss.

This survey indicated that only a quarter of nursing homes and assisted living communities were confident they could last a year or more, citing increased expenses or lost income. There are also fewer inhabitants.

“Even though cases of COVID in long-term care are at historically low levels, providers are struggling to recover from the economic crisis the pandemic has brought about,” said Mark Parkinson, President and CEO from the Association. “Too many facilities operate on tight budgets simply because policy makers have not committed the appropriate resources, and this can have devastating consequences.”

CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES: Live map tracker | Newsletter | Home page

To ensure the stability of the long-term care industry, Aronson said lawmakers and officials must provide short-term economic support and address the chronic underfunding of Medicaid, which only covers about 70% of the cost of caring for a patient in a retirement home.

The problem, however, goes beyond Medicaid funding.

The isolation requirements of sick and infected residents in nursing homes that were never designed to contain a virus like COVID have demonstrated the inadequacies of many older facilities that may no longer be economically viable.

The Alaris Health nursing home in Guttenberg, which looked after nearly 100 residents, was a relatively small facility. Approved for 108 beds, it had an average of 91 residents during the pandemic. But the retirement home, built in the 1960s, also needed modernization. Many of its rooms were set up for up to three and four people, and officials said it was difficult to isolate patients with COVID-19.

Even before the pandemic, the nursing facility had ongoing work issues and union officials complained that their members were working with expired contracts, many of those who had been sick on the job with the coronavirus ended up over later responsible for thousands of medical bills. Its operators had also considered a plan to demolish the facility and replace it with a 15-story residential building overlooking the Manhattan skyline.

In the aftermath of the pandemic, Alaris Health announced last year that it would close the nursing home and began moving residents to other facilities. According to the state’s health department, it closed in January.

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Ted Sherman can be reached at [email protected]. Follow him on twitter @TedShermanSL.

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History organization

Why Haiti is still in despair after $ 13 billion in foreign aid

The streets of Haiti had been crowded for months with angry protesters who burned tires, stormed banks and robbed stores. Gangs, sometimes with the tacit permission of the police, have kidnapped nuns, fruit sellers and even schoolgirls for ransom.

And then on Wednesday, the country sank deeper into turmoil, when a convoy of armed men brazenly rumbled to the home of the president, Jovenel Moïse, in the middle of the night and shot him dead.

Almost every time Haitians think their situation cannot get worse, it seems the nation takes another disturbing turn and is now on the brink of a political vacuum, with no president, no parliament, or no functioning Supreme Court.

The country’s quagmire has for decades placed it at the top of the list of nations, like Afghanistan and Somalia, which have captured the world’s imaginations for their level of desperation. In the shadow of the richest country in the world, people wonder: how could this happen in Haiti?

Haiti’s troubled history runs deep into its roots as a former slave colony of France which gained independence in 1804 after defeating Napoleon’s forces, and then suffered more than two decades of a brutal dictatorship, which ended in 1986.

Then, after a powerful earthquake that devastated the country in 2010, an influx of foreign aid and peacekeepers only aggravated the woes and instability of the country.

Haiti’s failures did not happen in a vacuum; they have been aided by the international community, which has injected $ 13 billion in aid into the country over the past decade. But instead of the nation-building that money was supposed to achieve, Haiti’s institutions have hollowed out even more in recent years.

When the president let Parliament’s term expire last year, he left Haiti with 11 elected representatives – Mr. Moïse and 10 senators – for its population of 11 million, drawing strong condemnation but little repercussions from from Washington. For a year and a half, until his assassination, Mr. Moïse increasingly ruled by decree.

Haiti is less of a failed state than what one analyst has called an “aid state” – which lives by relying on billions of dollars from the international community. Foreign governments were unwilling to turn off the taps, fearing they would let Haiti fail.

But the money served as a complicated lifeline – leaving the government with little incentive to carry out the institutional reforms needed to rebuild the country, as it bets that whenever the situation gets worse, international governments will open their coffers, according to Haitian analysts and activists. .

The aid has supported the country and its leaders, providing vital services and supplies in a country in desperate need of large amounts of humanitarian aid. But it also allowed corruption, violence and political paralysis to go unchecked.

Although they deny it, Haitian politicians, including the government, have traditionally relied on gangs to influence elections in their favor and expand their political reach. In the last three years of Mr. Moïse’s tenure, more than a dozen massacres perpetrated by gangs linked to the government and police forces have killed more than 400 people in anti-government neighborhoods and displaced 1.5 million of people, yet no one was held responsible for the crimes.

When a political or human rights scandal erupts, the US government issues convictions similar to paper tigers.

Instead of embracing the long road of reforms and creating a system that works, supports Haitian civil society leaders, the United States has supported strong men and tied the nation’s fate to them. Many Haitians have repeatedly denounced US support for Mr. Moïse but said they had little power to stop him.

“Since 2018, we have been calling for accountability,” said Emmanuela Douyon, a Haitian political expert who testified before the US Congress earlier this year, urging Washington to change its foreign policy and its approach to assisting Haiti.

“We need the international community to stop imposing what it thinks is correct and instead think about the long term and stability,” Ms. Douyon said in an interview.

The United States must make aid to Haiti conditional on the cleansing and reform of the country’s institutions by its leaders, Douyon and other analysts said. And powerful figures must be held accountable for the violence and corruption that permeates all aspects of the country.

“There will be a lot of calls for international intervention and for the sending of troops, but it is important that we take a step back and see how the international intervention has contributed to this situation,” said Jake Johnston, researcher associated with the Center for Economic and Policy. Research Washington, which coined the term “state aid”.

“Billions of dollars have already been spent on what is called nation-building in Haiti, which has only contributed to the erosion of the state and the politicization of these institutions,” he said. Mr Johnston said. “Saying now that we need to do more, well, that won’t work. “

The assassination of Mr. Moïse on Wednesday marked a new chapter in the country’s violent decade. The assassins who raided Mr. Moïse’s compound killed a president who came to power in 2016, winning the election with just around 600,000 votes. Only 18% of voters voted, and there were numerous accusations of fraud.

Still, the United States backed the unpopular and controversial leader, backing Mr. Moïse amid calls for his ouster in 2019 when it was discovered that international aid to the government had disappeared.

Mr Moïse insisted in February that he would stay one more year as president because he had been barred from holding the post for so long while accusations of electoral fraud came under scrutiny. investigation. Despite demands from civil society leaders to step down, Washington backed him up. Critics said his retention in office was unconstitutional and anger spilled over into the streets, plunging the capital Port-au-Prince into more uncertainty and violence.

Another American nation-building failure was played out thousands of miles from Haiti, Afghanistan, where the United States tried for 20 years to wrest control of the country from the Taliban before leaving the country. country. The Afghan army either abandoned its bases or surrendered en masse to the Taliban as the United States withdrew its troops. There, the international community has provided more than $ 2 trillion in aid since 2001.

The nation-building exercises that the United States and its international partners have undertaken in Haiti and around the world have done little to create functioning states, instead creating a system where dubious actors with little national support – like M. Moïse – are supported. , the easiest way to achieve short term stability.

In Afghanistan, the United States has relied on warlords and strongmen to achieve its objectives, who often politicize and undermine institutions, leaving a vacuum when they are inevitably assassinated or overthrown.

Civil society leaders in Haiti and Afghanistan have both urged the United States to help these countries strengthen their institutions and ensure the rule of law, creating democratic systems that outlast any political leader. and ensure long-term stability.

With continued support from the United States, Mr. Moïse had become increasingly autocratic, passing an anti-terrorism law late last year so broad it could be used against his opposition.

Earlier this year, he said he would draft a new constitution, giving broad powers to the military and allowing future presidents to run for a second consecutive term. He has scheduled a referendum on the constitution and a national election for September, despite warnings that holding an election amid so much violence would suppress voter turnout and bring to power the same politicians who helped provoke the struggles. from Haiti. Yet the United States supported Mr. Moïse’s plans.

“It is difficult to see the present moment as an opportunity because it will probably create more chaos,” said Alexandra Filippova, senior lawyer at the Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti, an organization that provides legal representation to victims. of human rights. abuses.

“If the United States and other international partners really want to help Haiti,” added Ms. Filippova, “they must listen to Haitian civil society and take the difficult road: build a real foundation for democracy.


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History organization

Continuity is the key to success | Business

Like most of us, park administrators have had to rotate in their roles as volunteers for the organization and in their roles as businessmen. Board meetings were spent in person remotely, budgets had to be adjusted and the group had to roll with terms of reference coming and going.

Last month, five directors who served during this tumultuous time were awaiting reappointments and several candidates competed for these positions. Galveston City Council actually re-elected these trustees – Spencer Priest, Will Wright, David Jacoby, Steven Creitz and Jason Worthen. They will join directors Maureen Patton, David Collins, Marty Fluke and Jason Hardcastle.

The list of officers also remains the same. Priest is president, Wright is vice president, and Jacoby will serve another term as secretary. This continuity of leadership, especially as the organization emerges from a pandemic, will help make the park’s board of directors a more effective organization.

The council’s work did not stop during the pandemic. In fact, the administrators and staff of the park’s board of directors have been successful in developing long-term strategic and sustainability plans and securing funding for major improvements and projects, to name a few. .

Now that it looks like Galveston and the rest of the country are heading towards a next normal and the tourism industry is experiencing a strong rebound, the park council has a lot of work to do. The administrators in place can move forward with the institutional knowledge necessary to make prudent decisions with the residents and visitors of the island in mind.

At a recent meeting to formally appoint directors and elect officers, Patton stressed that continuity of leadership on the board is an important trait.

“This group knows the history and has the experience and understanding of what the organization has done and plans to do,” said Patton. “It is important to keep the leaders in place on local boards and committees. I also see it at the national level.

At last month’s city council meeting to nominate trustees, Galveston Mayor Craig Brown praised Priest for his hard work and dedication to the organization, especially during the pandemic.

“I know Spencer has a demanding schedule in the hospitality industry,” Brown said. “As a former administrator myself, I know how much time spends on the park board, and I commend Spencer for his dedication. “

Meetings of the park board are usually held at 1:30 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of the month at 601 23rd St. in Galveston.

Mary beth bassett is the director of public relations for the Galveston Island Convention and Visitors Bureau and the park board of directors.


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Non profit living

Elderly residents will be relocated as Eventide plans to sell historic Moorhead building

Eventide Senior Living Communities announced on Wednesday, July 7 that the Fairmont store located at 801 2nd Ave. N. will close its doors. The nonprofit intended to vacate the building as part of its long-term plan, but a pipe leak that caused extensive water damage has accelerated that timeline.

“We had known for some time that the Eventide Fairmont building would ultimately not allow us to meet the needs of our residents,” Eventide President and CEO Jon Riewer said in a statement. “With the recent water damage, we have had to carefully consider the future of the Fairmont and how it aligns with our mission to better serve seniors. “

Eventide purchased the Fairmont building in 1994, said Carrie Carney, spokesperson for Eventide. It was previously the Fairmont Creamery Company, which closed in 1980. The building opened in 1924 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

It’s unclear what the next step is for the building, but Eventide said it will work to sell the Fairmont building to a local developer with experience in preserving historic buildings.

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“We are grateful for the time we have spent at Eventide Fairmont and the fact that it has enabled us to serve many residents over the years and are confident that the new owner will take a special interest in the next chapter of the building. Fairmont Creamery, ”said Riewer. “The sale of the Fairmont allows our organization to focus on further growth and investment on our Eighth Street campus in Moorhead, which will best serve the seniors in our community today and in the future.

Eventide determined that it could not reconfigure the building’s layout to meet residential needs, particularly in the eastern addition. Other reasons for shutting down the facility include the lack of a commercial kitchen, limited areas that could be used for common areas, and a lack of amenities. Most apartments do not have kitchens and Eventide cannot renovate the building to meet regulations required by Minnesota law, the organization said.

“The investment required to make these changes goes far beyond what makes financial or programmatic sense,” Riewer said. “The needs and wants of today’s seniors continue to evolve and it is our responsibility to meet them.

Eventide plans to move the 53 residents of the Fairmont out of the building over the next 90 days. The organization has said it will not close the facility or transfer ownership of the location until all residents have new homes.

Some will be able to move to Eventide’s Linden Apartments in Moorhead, and the organization is working with other senior communities to find housing for residents, Carney said.

The 17 memory care residents will be moving to the Linden Apartments, which recently opened a memory care addition there, Carney said.

Staff will be permitted to work at other Eventide locations in the Fargo-Moorhead area. No deadline for leaving the building has been set, Carney said.

In addition to its Moorhead locations, Eventide has facilities in North Dakota at Fargo, West Fargo, Jamestown and Devils Lake.

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International headquarters

Apollo Impact will acquire approx. 67% stake in the RDM Group,

Transaction followed by a public delisting offer for the RDM group

RDM, leader in the circular economy, represents Apollo’s first investment from its Impact platform

NEW YORK, July 05, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Apollo Global Management, Inc. (NYSE: APO) (together with its consolidated subsidiaries, “Apollo” or the “Company”) announced today that certain funds managed by its affiliated companies (the “Apollo Funds”) have entered into definitive agreements to acquire a majority stake in Reno De Medici SpA (“RDM”, or the “Company” or “the Issuer” (BIT: RM / BME: RDM), a leading producer of recycled cardboard in Europe.

Apollo Funds will acquire approx. 67% stake in RDM of the two main shareholders of the Company, Cascades inc. (TSX: CAS) and the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec at a price of 1.45 EUR per share (without adjustment, except as detailed below), i.e. a participation of 24% premium to the 90-day volume-weighted average. The transaction, which is subject to the customary closing conditions detailed below, is expected to close by the third quarter of 2021. Upon closing, Apollo will launch a mandatory takeover bid for the remaining shares, in the aim to withdraw the Company.

RDM is the leading producer of coated recycled cardboard in Italy, France and the Iberian Peninsula, and the second largest producer in Europe. With 100% of products made from recycled materials, RDM plays a central role in increasing sustainability and contributing to a circular economy by minimizing waste, emissions and consumption of raw materials and water. This year, the RDM group acquired factories in Spain, which just closed last week, and agreed to acquire factories in the Netherlands which, at closing, will expand its operations to nine factories and five specialized centers of cutting and laminating across Europe and the United States. Apollo expects the RDM Group to continue to benefit from increasing changes in consumer preferences and EU-wide regulations supporting the use of sustainable recycled fibers.

“Already one of the main European leaders in recycled cardboard, RDM is well positioned for continued growth as more companies replace plastics with sustainable packaging. We see RDM as a proven platform for inorganic growth and look forward to working with Michele and the leadership team as they evolve the business for greater positive environmental impact, ”said Marc Becker, Partner principal and co-leader of Apollo Impact. “As an inaugural investment led by the Apollo Impact platform, RDM reflects our strategy of finding good companies where we believe we can generate financial and impact performance to increase their beneficial effects on society and the planet. “

“We are delighted to be working with Apollo throughout this next phase of growth for RDM. Over the past five years, our exceptional team has made significant progress in scaling our platform and optimizing our operations across Europe ”said Michele Bianchi, CEO of RDM Group . “Looking ahead, we are also excited about Apollo’s shared commitment to the circular economy, of which we are both contributors and beneficiaries. We look forward to building on our ambitious Sustainable Development Goals to shape a better future for all of our stakeholders. “

Andrea Moneta, Apollo Senior Advisor for Italy, added: “RDM highlights the important role Italy plays in building a more sustainable global economy and Apollo’s commitment to working with the best companies , Italian entrepreneurs and management teams to support their long-term growth.

About the operation

Rimini BidCo Srl (“Rimini”), a newly formed company owned by the Apollo Funds, and the two principal shareholders of RDM, Cascades Inc. and the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec, have entered into sale and purchase agreements which provide for the purchase by Rimini of a total of 251,974,385 RDM ordinary shares, corresponding to approximately 67% of its share capital, at a price of EUR 1.45 per share, this price will not be subject to ” adjustments, except in the event of potential impairment losses (such as possible dividends, returns of capital or other similar distributions of profits or assets to sellers or, to the extent applicable, other potential leaks, better identified in share purchase agreements), provided that RDM’s 2020 dividend that was paid to shareholders in May 2021 will not be considered a leak (the “Price Per Share”).

The completion of the transaction (the “Closing”) is subject to the fulfillment of certain conditions precedent, as better described in the share purchase agreements, concerning, among other things: (i) obtaining the necessary antitrust authorizations , and (ii) the absence of orders in force by any competent government authority prohibiting the transaction. The closing is expected to take place in the third quarter of 2021.

As indicated above, at the Closing, Rimini will hold 251,974,385 Shares, i.e. approximately 67% of the Issuer’s share capital and, therefore, in accordance with Articles 106, paragraph 1 and 109 of the TUF, will be required to launch a compulsory takeover bid. (the “Mandatory Offer”) on all remaining RDM shares at the highest Price Per Share paid to one of the sellers.

The subject of the Binding Offer is the delisting of the Issuer. In the event that the delisting should not be carried out following and as a result of the Mandatory Offer, the delisting may also be carried out by a merger of the Issuer with Rimini or another company controlled by the Apollo Funds.

Rimini will finance the transaction, including any potential refinancing of the Issuer’s existing debt, through a combination of its own cash resources and fully committed debt financing from leading international banks.

Finally, it is specified that there are 241,114 convertible savings shares of the Issuer not listed on a regulated market which, in accordance with the provisions of the Articles of Association of the Issuer, are convertible into ordinary shares at the request of the holders concerned in February. and September of each year. In the event of the launch of the Mandatory Offer, the Mandatory Offer will also include all ordinary shares resulting from the conversion of the aforementioned convertible savings shares (insofar as these shares are converted before the expiration of the Mandatory Offer) .

Allen & Overy and Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison acted as legal advisers for Apollo. Jones Day acted as legal advisor and Rothschild & Co. acted as financial advisor to Cascades Inc. Latham & Watkins acted as legal advisor for the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec.

About Apollo Impact

Launched in 2020, the Apollo Impact platform draws on the expertise of the firm’s main private equity franchise. Apollo Impact seeks to differentiate itself in the market by seeking large-scale impact through opportunities in late-stage companies in five key areas: economic opportunity; education; health, safety and well-being; industry 4.0; and climate and sustainability. Apollo has a long history of ESG screening and engagement spanning over a decade. The platform is led by co-directors Marc Becker and Joanna Reiss and Impact president Lisa Hall. Earlier this year, the firm announced the creation of the Apollo Impact Advisory Board, made up of 12 diverse professionals with expertise and experience in impact investing and / or the platform’s strategic focus areas.

About Apollo
Apollo is a high growth global alternative asset manager. We seek to provide our clients with excess return at every step of the risk-return spectrum, from investment grade to private equity, by focusing on three business strategies: return, hybrid and opportunistic. Through our investing activity on our fully integrated platform, we meet the retirement income and financial performance needs of our clients, and we deliver innovative capital solutions to businesses. Our patient, creative and knowledgeable approach to investing aligns our clients, the companies we invest in, our employees and the communities we impact on, to expand opportunities and drive positive results. As of March 31, 2021, Apollo had approximately $ 461 billion in assets under management. For more information, please visit www.apollo.com.

About the RDM Group
The RDM group is the second European producer of recycled coated board, the largest in Italy, France and the Iberian Peninsula. The group is currently listed on the Star segment of Borsa Italiana SpA and the Madrid Stock Exchange. The RDM group’s headquarters are in Milan but it has a strategic international presence thanks to its manufacturing plants, sheet metal centers and a sales network active in 70 countries. The RDM group’s product portfolio mainly consists of recycled cardboard, used primarily for packaging and folding boxes in all major product sectors.

Apollo contact details

For investors
Peter Mintzberg, Head of Investor Relations
Global management of Apollo, Inc.
+1 (212) 822-0528
[email protected]

For the media
Joanna Rose, Global Head of Corporate Communications
Global management of Apollo, Inc.
+1 (212) 822-0491
[email protected]


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History organization

Gordon to leave Fox Sports booth for daily role at Hendrick

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina – Jeff Gordon will be leaving the Fox Sports booth to take on a daily role at Hendrick Motorsports as Vice President and Second Line Manager of Majority Owner Rick Hendrick’s team.

Wednesday’s announcement positions the four-time champion and Hall of Famer to one day succeed Hendrick, 71, atop NASCAR’s most successful organization.

Gordon will officially begin the executive leadership role in early 2022.

“Jeff and I have been talking about this for many years and I think it’s a natural evolution for him and our business,” said Hendrick. “He understands our culture, our values ​​and the importance we place on our people and our partnerships. I couldn’t be more excited to work hand in hand with him and cement together the future of Hendrick Motorsports. “

Gordon joined Hendrick Motorsports for the last Cup race of the 1992 season and launched one of the greatest careers in NASCAR history. He won 93 races – third on the all-time list – and four Cup titles before retiring in 2015.

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He joined the Fox Sports booth the following year, but maintained an active role with the team as Hendrick’s only partner in organizing the championship on 13 occasions. Gordon became a shareholder of Hendrick in 1999 and was listed as a part-owner of the No. 48 car when it was created in 2001 for seven-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson.

“I can’t express what Hendrick Motorsports means to me,” Gordon said. “This is my home and the people here are my family. I have never lost my passion for organization, for our sport and for the simple challenge of running and winning at the highest level.

Gordon has also been active in bringing Kyle Larson into the Hendrick organization this year following Larson’s most-season-long NASCAR suspension for uttering a racial slur during a virtual race. Larson has been on the winning streak in four consecutive Cup races and leads the Cup series with four wins on points. The Hendrick drivers have won six consecutive races since the May 16 victory at Dover by Alex Bowman, who took over the No.48 this season after Johnson’s switch to IndyCar.

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“I have always been impressed by his commercial instinct. At some level, he’s been involved in every major decision we’ve made over the past two decades, and his influence has grown steadily since he quit driving, ”said Hendrick, who is also CEO of Hendrick Automotive Group, on Gordon.

As Vice President and Co-Owner, Gordon will work with the team on a daily basis, focusing on the organization’s competition and marketing groups. He will report to Rick Hendrick and will work alongside President Marshall Carlson and Chief Executive Officer Jeff Andrews.

Gordon will also join Hendrick on the NASCAR Team Owners Council and serve as Hendrick Motorsports’ seat on the sanctioning body’s diversity, equity and inclusion committee.

“Being a part of the competition is where I’m happiest and I feel I can make the biggest contribution to the team’s continued and long-term success,” said Gordon. “Rick and I have a common vision, which is based on the values ​​he instilled, the culture he built and our desire to be the best in all categories, on and off the track.

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Hendrick Motorsports becomes the first NASCAR team to share their long-term succession plan. The group of owners of the best teams in the Cup are not young: Roger Penske is 84, Joe Gibbs is 80, Jack Roush is 79 and Richard Childress is 75.

Hendrick will be 72 in July; Gordon will be 50 in August.

“I love to run and compete, and Jeff is the only person I know who hates losing as much as I do,” said Hendrick. “I am feeling great physically and have no plans to go anywhere anytime soon, which is exactly why now is the right time.”

Last month, Hendrick overtook Petty Enterprises as the most successful team in NASCAR history when Larson claimed the 269th Cup victory for HMS. He has since won two more points races to bring the total to 271 wins.

Gordon will continue to work as a Fox broadcaster until the end of the year.

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Non profit living

Collaboration Expands Quality Addiction Treatment Services at University of Miami and Across Ohio

DOWNTOWN, Minn .– (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – The nonprofit Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation provides addiction care, as well as recovery, family and educational services to Ohio residents, including students at the University of Miami, with its RecoveryGo ™ telehealth solutions, which are now available to anyone living in the state. A long-standing collaboration with The Haven at College, which has been providing services to the University of Miami since 2018, has helped facilitate Hazelden Betty Ford’s expansion in Buckeye State.

“Our virtual ambulatory care and other telehealth resources and services are proving to be effective and convenient, and have allowed us to expand access and reach more people as addiction problems skyrocket amid the crisis. pandemic, ”said Hazelden Betty Ford, President and CEO Mark Mishek. “Ohio has been at the center of the drug addiction epidemic, and we are grateful for the opportunity to collaborate with the University of Miami and other partners to help bring healing and hope to more. individuals, families and communities. ”

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is the nation’s largest nonprofit provider of addiction treatment, mental health care, recovery resources, and related prevention and education services, with sites across the country , extensive telehealth solutions and a growing network of collaborators across healthcare.

The Haven at College is a member of the Hazelden Betty Ford Patient Care Network and has provided outpatient drug treatment and recovery support services to students at the University of Miami in Oxford, Ohio, for over two years. Now refocusing resources in her home state of California, The Haven at College worked with officials at the University of Miami to ease the transition to Hazelden Betty Ford’s clinical services and ensure that students encountered no lack of access to professional help.

“It was really important for us to have a smooth transition with a quality treatment provider, and no one is better at substance abuse treatment than Hazelden Betty Ford, so we’re thrilled,” said Sharon Weber, co-founder of The Haven at University. In addition to her high-quality, evidence-based treatment services, Hazelden Betty Ford also provides extensive recovery, family and educational services, meaning Miami students and student service professionals will have access to even more resources than before. ”

Hazelden Betty Ford’s Intensive Outpatient and Insurance-Eligible Virtual Drug Treatment Services are now available for the first time not only to University of Miami students, but also to people from all corners of the world. Ohio, including rural underserved areas.

“No matter where you live in Ohio, if you have commercial health insurance and a computer, you and your family are now eligible to participate in therapy without traveling,” said Laura Adams , Hazelden Betty Ford’s Senior Director of Outreach for Ohio.

Designed to replicate her on-site patient care experience, Hazelden Betty Ford’s Virtual Substance Use Disorder Treatment Services combine group therapy and one-on-one counseling sessions via encrypted law-compliant video technology for more of security. To access Hazelden Betty Ford’s treatment previously, Ohio residents had to go to a facility in another state. Now they can access it directly from their homes.

Other RecoveryGo ™ resources and services now available in Ohio and nationwide include a free one-day virtual family program, available in English and Spanish; a virtual program for children; and many digital recovery support tools, such as mobile apps, podcasts, and an online peer community. In addition, Hazelden Betty Ford prevention experts seek to increase their support for Ohio’s school systems by expanding their services to graduate students; and its professional training consultants, already active in Ohio, are available to collaborate with more treatment centers, hospitals, health systems and recovery organizations, as well as public health leaders. from Ohio who want to implement virtual care and other evidence-based behavioral health solutions.

“By providing more opportunities for quality treatment and ongoing support, and working with others in Ohio who are also committed to reducing the negative impact of addiction, we can bring hope and healing to people.” underserved rural areas and others statewide, ”said James Ahlman, executive director of the East Hazelden Betty Ford region.

An industry leader and long-time provider of telehealth solutions, Hazelden Betty Ford moved all of its “outpatients” nationwide at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, to a robust virtual platform that includes a effective virtual drug testing system and other best practices to ensure the highest levels of confidentiality, security and quality. A year later, Hazelden Betty Ford has now provided virtual ambulatory care to thousands of people across the United States.

First results from the Butler Research Center show that Hazelden Betty Ford’s Virtual Intensive Outpatient (IOP) treatment is working well, with patients discharged “against medical advice” at a significantly lower rate than previous IOP patients on site – a good indicator of positive results in the field. long term results. Based on preliminary results at 1 and 3 months, Hazelden Betty Ford also observed little or no difference between on-site and virtual IOP patients with respect to: reported cravings, mental health symptoms, sobriety, confidence in sobriety, attendance and quality of life support group.

“Virtual drug addiction care is here to stay,” Ahlman said. “More than a stopgap solution during the pandemic, telehealth fills important gaps in the behavioral health care system, allowing many patients to take a first step that they would otherwise have delayed and dramatically expanding access. If these preliminary results hold up for the long term, virtual care is expected to create new transformative opportunities for the thousands of people in Ohio and millions across the country struggling with substance use.

See www.RecoveryGo.org or call 1-800-I-DO-CARE for more details and resources.

About the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is a force of healing and hope for individuals, families and communities affected by addiction to alcohol and other drugs. As the nation’s leading nonprofit provider of comprehensive inpatient and outpatient drug treatment and concomitant mental health care for adults and youth, the Foundation has 17 locations across the country, with extensive solutions. on-site and telehealth and a network of collaborators across health care. With a legacy that began in 1949 and included the founding in 1982 of the Betty Ford Center, the Foundation today also includes a Graduate School of Addiction Studies, a Publishing Division, a Center for Addiction Research, recovery advocacy and thought leadership, professional and medical training programs. , school-based prevention resources and a specialized program for children growing up in families struggling with addictions. Learn more about www.HazeldenBettyFord.org and on Twitter.

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