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BN Indians: Young community servants show the future is in good hands

Aditi Sharma founded the Inclusive Education Coalition (IEC) when she was a senior at Normal Community High School. She is now a student at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana.

She said the history curriculum particularly caught her attention when she realized the peaceful side of the civil rights movement dominated the narrative.

“You don’t get the real truth that this movement wasn’t always just a peaceful movement,” Sharma said. “That a lot of the change that’s been brought about, has been brought about in a way that people don’t really like to hear.”

She also noticed that the health curriculum was exclusive to LGBTQ+ people and abstinence-based, and that the English class readings were mostly written by white men.

“I believe education is the first step to fostering empathy,” Sharma said. “So that’s what pushed me to create this group.”

Bloomington’s More is a senior at Normal Community High School. She also advocates for inclusion as co-chair of the NCHS Not in our School group. She also started the volunteer youth group Little Free Pantry. More said she heard about a similar pantry in Arkansas and started her own when she learned about 100 kids in McLean Country go to bed hungry every night.

“And it struck a chord with me,” More said. “I couldn’t imagine people in our town going to bed hungry. So, I ended up trying to do something about it.

More said because of her privilege, she assumed hunger was not an issue in McLean County.

“I couldn’t imagine people in our town going to bed hungry. So, I ended up trying to do something about it.”

Raji More, Normal Community High School student

“So to hear that they were concerned about that, and that it was a huge priority for them to get food for a day, was interesting to me and concerning to me,” More said.

Dhruv Rebba is also a senior at Normal Community High School. As WGLT reported in October, he won the National 4-H Council’s 2022 4-H Youth in Action Award for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) for creating several projects. that advance technological learning opportunities for children and the quality of life opportunities for citizens in crisis. This includes founding the nonprofit Universal Help, which digitized and provided textbooks, internet access and technology to schools in rural India.

Rebba also set up a robotics club at Grove Elementary School to increase STEM-based learning opportunities for young children. He told WGLT student reporter Jordan Mead that robotics can be expensive and the club is making it more accessible to younger students. “And a lot of the students I’ve taught are now on robotics teams competitively, and that’s pretty cool to see,” Rebba said.

Bloomington’s Isha Gollapudi is a sophomore at Normal Community. She is a firm believer in community service, with art as her favorite tool.

“Art is a universal language,” Gollapudi explained. “I may not be able to understand what everyone has to say, but when you see a job you understand the message behind it. And it’s extremely impactful.

Like More, Gollapudi is part of the Little Free Pantry, even ruling it for a year. Through the Bloomington-Normal Art Circle, she also participates in “Chairs 4 Change,” where community members paint chairs and other furniture to be auctioned off by Recycling Furniture for Families.

“Just having art around you really brightens people’s moods,” Gollapudi said. “So I like to paint more upbeat or happier things, especially when they go to places like charities. Because I think it’s going to brighten up the mood around everyone there.

Gollapudi is so committed to the power of art that she gave it a 10-minute run on the TED-X Normal stage last year.

“So even though I only look like I’m 14,” she said towards the end of her speech, “the journey that art has taken me and the knowledge that I acquired thanks to him, almost make me feel like I’m 743 years old. Thank you.”

Inspiration struck in sixth grade. His works were part of student selections chosen by local artist Julie Meulemans to be exhibited at her Normal gallery downtown. One piece sold for $20.

“And at the time, it was huge,” recalls Gollapudi. “I was like, ‘I can make money from this.’ Then I realized that I could help people with that too.That kind of started for me.

Sparkling plea

Aditi Sharma said the anti-immigration rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election was the initial fuel that sparked her advocacy for inclusion. But she added that her parents initially pushed for a low profile because they and she were immigrants.

“So maybe I should keep quiet, shut up, not make trouble, just do what my parents came here to do.” It was to help me get a better education and a better job,” Sharma said.

It didn’t last long.

“But I couldn’t sit while I watched all these things happen to people in my community and people in other communities,” said Sharma, who became a US citizen at 14.

Sharma made a point of thanking her parents for instilling in her the generosity and empathy towards the struggles of others that have become her core values. “Because we as immigrants moved here and we struggled a lot,” she said.

Sharma said unlike many South Asians who come to Bloomington-Normal for work, her family has no built-in class privilege. And seeing his parents struggle at first was an eye opener.

“I recognize that this is something that so many families in America go through. And so that has a lot to do with my desire to want to make this change,” Sharma said.

Dhruv Rebba said the founding of Universal Help was at least partly spurred by visiting the rural area where his father grew up in India.

“That’s when I was like, ‘OK, that’s a really big difference in living standards, and basic luxuries just aren’t available there. For example, reliable digital access for school supplies and things like that,” Rebba said.

His non-profit organization is helping to digitize these rural schools with computers, projectors, a digital curriculum, and “uninterruptible power supply to meet electricity needs. Because there are power cuts quite often in this part of India,” Rebba said.

He has also contributed to natural disaster relief in West Bengal after Cyclone Yaas of 2021, running a COVID-19 isolation center to combat the Delta Variant in India, and through grassroots projects such as recycling and composting in McLean County.

“Our mission is to improve the quality of life for people around the world in innovative ways,” said Rebba.

In addition to founding and directing the Little Free Pantry in Bloomington-Normal, Raji More is co-chair of the NCHS Not in our School Group and sits on the city’s Not in our School Steering Committee. Others said they were planning protests and vigils and fighting for inclusivity and equality.

Like Sharma, More credits her parents for being willing to serve Bloomington-Normal, teaching her to be kind to everyone and treat everyone the same.

“Part of that meant that I saw that some people weren’t able to have similar opportunities, and those opportunities included getting food. And I was like, ‘Let’s make sure they have access to food too,'” More said.

Plus was also moved to act as a witness for the division. Between people, between ideas. She touts the restorative circles she uses in Not in our School, where people can express ideas without being combative. And she strives to minimize the labeling of people.

“That’s part of why I do my projects…to really include people. Some people aren’t included and don’t have the same opportunities as me, and I strive to include people,” More said.

“Rooted in Who You Are”

Isha Gollapudi thinks his desire to serve is at least partly cultural, citing the Indian holiday Holi, a festival of colors, and Diwali – the five-day festival of lights.

“When you’re brought up with the idea that all these big parties are about giving back to others, it’s kind of ingrained in who you are,” Gollapudi said.

She said it was no different from Christmas in some ways.

“Because it’s fun to get presents, but seeing your brother’s face when he opens a present you gave him…I think it’s so much better,” Gollapudi said.

Gollapudi adds that she has equated community service with a way of life that will continue into adulthood, with climate change now on her service radar.

Dhruv Rebba said that not only would he serve until adulthood, but he was just beginning.

“Many of the projects we have started locally and in India are relatively long-term projects. So I will definitely keep doing this for a long time,” Rebba said.

Like many youngsters, Aditi Sharma is under some parental pressure to pursue a lucrative career. But she said her passion for social justice and activism comes first.

“Whatever I end up doing after my four years of undergrad, I know I’m always going to want to be part of any community, no matter where I live. This service is at the core of my being,” Sharma said.

Raji More said she loves Bloomington-Normal so much that she hopes to attend college in town, continue her community service and advocate for inclusivity. She cites Camille Taylor and Mary Aplington of Not in our Town as mentors.

“So many community members, I’m so grateful to be in their presence,” More said. “So it’s mostly the people of Bloomington-Normal that keep me wanting to be here.”

ABOUT THE SERIES

Why we did it

Bloomington-Normal has more East Indians than any other southern Illinois metropolitan community. First-generation Indian immigrants and their children shaped Bloomington-Normal in more or less significant ways, and it deserves our attention. The WGLT Newsroom aimed to measure this impact in an 8-part series of human-centered stories.

how we did it

The Bloomington-Normal Indian community is not a monolith – socio-economically, politically, culturally – and this series aims to reflect that. The WGLT newsroom interviewed over 30 people from a variety of backgrounds. We recognize that these sources do not represent all Indians in Bloomington-Normal. They represent themselves and we appreciate their willingness to share their story.

Feedback

We want to know what you think of the series and what future features we should consider. You can message our newsroom at WGLT.org/Contact.

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Non profit living

Myron Tarkanian Obituary (2022) – Pasadena, CA

May 13, 1940 – February 12, 2022 Myron George Tarkanian was born May 13, 1940 in Euclid Ohio to Armenian immigrants George and Rose Tarkanian, survivors of the Armenian Genocide. Myron was the third of three children, 10 years younger than his brother Jerry and 13 years younger than his sister Alice. George and Rose operated a small grocery store 7 blocks from Lake Erie during the middle of the Depression and the start of World War II. George, a generous and caring man, died of tuberculosis in 1940, six months after Myron was born. Rose remarried Vahan Derderian, whom Myron considered her father. Together, they all embarked on a cross-country road trip, intending to move to Fresno, California, but stopped in Pasadena to visit friends and relatives. Rose fell in love with the San Gabriel Mountains, often saying that Pasadena “reminds her of the old country”. With the exception of a few years early in his coaching career, Myron has never left the San Gabriel Valley. Pasadena was his home for the duration of his childhood and his workhouse for most of his life. A graduate of Longfellow Elementary, Wilson Middle School, and Pasadena High School, Myron grew up as a budding athlete and developed many lifelong friends, including his best friend, Harvey Hyde, whom he met in 3rd grade. Myron adored his mother Rose. She died in 1964. Vahan died in 1966. Myron’s brother Jerry, a Hall of Fame basketball coach and legendary sports personality, died on February 11, 2015. Myron’s sister Alice, known for his extraordinary loyalty to his older and younger brothers, died. on September 19, 2015. Myron attended the University of Redlands, where he earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree, and developed many close friendships that lasted a lifetime. He played football, earned a degree in education, and graduated as a teacher. Most importantly, Myron met the love of his life, Anna Fagerlin, who became his wife of 59 years. After graduating from the UofR, they got married. Together they had 4 children, Bill, the eldest, and Rose, Jane and Kendra. Myron was hired as head football coach at Moreno Valley High School right out of college, creating winning teams at the newly created school, and was named head football coach at Mt. San Jacinto College , launching their football program. In 1967, he left to become an assistant football coach at the University of Hawaii, where he and his family lived for a year. In 1968, Myron returned to Pasadena to become co-head football coach at Pasadena City College, along with his childhood friend, Harvey Hyde. Together they built a Junior College football dynasty that lasted nearly three decades, although Myron quit football to focus on his family, health and business 8 years later. He has the distinction of being the head coach of the last undefeated team (10-0-1) and the CCP National Championship in 1974. He continued to teach physical education and coach other sports ( men’s and women’s tennis and men’s and women’s football) for five years. decades, retiring in 2004 as the most winning coach in CPC track and field history, including conference titles in men’s tennis in 1992 and 1998, and men’s soccer in 1999, 2000 and 2001 He was inducted into the CCP Sports Hall of Fame in 2018, joining his famous brother, Jerry Tarkanian. During his five decades at the PCC, Myron developed many friendships with colleagues, players and students that have stood the test of time. Family was Myron’s highest priority and greatest source of pride. Her four children are all college graduates with graduate degrees. His daughters, Rose, Jane and Kendra, became accomplished educators like their father. Bill became a lawyer and is currently the director of a non-profit behavioral health organization, LA CADA. Myron and Anna were present for their 4 children at all their games, recitals and school activities. Rose, Jane and Kendra collectively had 8 grandchildren, and the children and grandchildren were the pride of Myron and Anna’s life. Summers included family reunions and long vacations. Anna Tarkanian, like her husband, was also a career educator. They lived in the same house in Arcadia, California for 50 years. They were the epitome of a happy, loving marriage and successful parenting. Myron was diagnosed with heart disease in his mid-thirties and survived a battle with cancer in his early sixties. In response, he hiked several miles a day, ran marathons, and became a vegetarian. He always saw himself as living on borrowed time, and in the last years of his life, Myron expressed a sense of deep gratitude for being husband, father, brother, uncle, grandfather, the coach and friend adored and respected by all who knew him. . He is survived by his beloved wife Anna, his children Bill, Rose, Jane and Kendra; sons-in-law, Clark Longhurst, Randy Wilson and Dave McGrath; and grandchildren, Randirose Wilson, Annalee Longhurst, Chris Wilson, Myron Longhurst, Kennan Wilson, Charlotte McGrath, Tark McGrath and Georgia Longhurst. A memorial service and celebration of life will be held Saturday, March 5 at 2:30 p.m. at the south end of the Rose Bowl in Pasadena. At the request of the family, a donation in lieu of flowers to LA CADA’s Myron Tarkanian Legacy Fund is appreciated. Go to LACADA.com.

Published by Pasadena Star-News on March 2, 2022.

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Non profit living

Prosecutor says racism drove men to hunt and kill Ahmaud Arbery: live updates

Credit…Nicole Craine for The New York Times

Three white men were convicted in November of the murder of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old black man, after suspecting him of carrying out a series of break-ins in their South Georgia neighborhood. The men were sentenced to life in prison in January and now face federal hate crime charges.

Here’s what we know about the circumstances of Mr. Arbery’s death.

Ahmaud Arbery, a former high school football player, lived with his mother outside of the small town of Brunswick, Georgia. He had spent some time in college but seemed to be on a drift in his twenties, testing various careers, working on his rapping skills and living with his mother. He also suffered from a mental illness that caused him auditory hallucinations.

On Sunday, February 23, 2020, shortly before 1 p.m., Mr. Arbery was running in a suburban neighborhood called Satilla Shores, when a man standing in his front yard saw him pass, according to a police report. The man, Gregory McMichael, said he thought Mr Arbery looked like a man suspected of several burglaries in the area and called Travis McMichael, his son.

According to the police report, the men grabbed a .357 Magnum handgun and a shotgun, got into a pickup truck and chased Mr. Arbery, trying unsuccessfully to cut him. A third man, William Bryan, also joined the chase in a second truck, according to the report and other documents.

In a recording of a 911 call, which appears to have been made moments before the chase began, a neighbor told a dispatcher that a black man was inside a house under construction on the block of the McMichaels.

During the chase, the McMichaels shouted, “Stop, stop, we want to talk to you,” according to Gregory McMichael’s account in the police report. They then pulled up to Mr. Arbery and Travis McMichael got out of the truck with the shotgun.

Gregory McMichael “said the unidentified man began violently attacking Travis and the two men then began fighting over the shotgun, at which point Travis fired a shot, then a second later , there was a second shot,” the report said.

Mr. Arbery was unarmed.

Shortly after the shooting, Brunswick Circuit Court Attorney Jackie Johnson recused herself because Gregory McMichael had worked in her office.

The case was sent to George E. Barnhill, the district attorney for Waycross, Georgia, who later recused himself after Mr Arbery’s mother argued he had a conflict because her son was working also for the District Attorney of Brunswick.

But before dropping the case, Mr Barnhill wrote a letter to the Glynn County Police Department. In the letter, he argued there was not sufficient probable cause to arrest Mr Arbery’s pursuers.

Mr. Barnhill noted that the McMichaels were legally carrying their firearms under Georgia’s open carry law. He said they were within their rights to pursue what he called “a burglary suspect” and cited a state law that says, “A private person may arrest a violator if the offense is committed in his presence or to his immediate knowledge”. This so-called Citizens’ Arrest Act was largely dismantled in response to the Arbery case.

Mr Barnhill also argued that if Mr Arbery attacked Travis McMichael, Mr McMichael was “authorized to use deadly force to protect himself” under Georgia law.

Anger over the murder and the lack of consequences for the McMichaels grew when a graphic video surfaced showing the shooting on a suburban road.

The cellphone video, shot by Mr Bryan, is about half a minute long. It shows Mr. Arbery running along a shaded two-lane residential road when he comes across a white truck, with Travis McMichael standing next to the open driver’s side door with a shotgun. Gregory McMichael is in the bed of the pickup with a handgun.

Mr. Arbery runs around the truck and briefly disappears from view. Muffled screams can be heard before Mr. Arbery emerges, fighting with Travis McMichael outside the truck as three shotgun blasts ring out.

Mr. Arbery tries to run but staggers and falls to the sidewalk after a few steps.

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History organization

Opinion: Florida’s ‘don’t say gay’ bill is cruel and dangerous

As leaders of two LGBTQ organizations, we have been amazed at the progress we have made over the past decade. But it’s also clear that the increased visibility of our community has caused a backlash. According to the American Civil Liberties Union, more than 100 anti-LGBTQ bills, the majority of which target transgender and non-binary youth, are currently pending in state legislatures across the country.
One of the most extreme examples is a bill in Florida known as the “Don’t Say Gay” bill. It states that school districts “may not encourage discussion of sexual orientation or gender identity in the elementary grades or in a manner that is not appropriate for the age or development of students.” The language, which is vague and could apply to K-12 classrooms across Florida, could be used to prohibit open discussions about LGBTQ people and issues.
If passed, it would effectively erase entire chapters of history, literature and critical health information from schools – and silence LGBTQ students and those with LGBTQ parents or family members. . It’s just one of many divisive and dehumanizing bills in Florida that use LGBTQ youth as political pawns to limit conversations about gender and sexual identity.
Let’s be clear: the Don’t Say Gay Bill will do real and lasting harm. All students should learn about the significant contributions of the LGBTQ community to United States history and culture. Landmark events, ranging from the Stonewall riots to Supreme Court rulings in cases such as Obergefell v. Hodges and Bostock v. Clayton County, should be included in any comprehensive lesson plan on modern history and the civil rights movements.

LGBTQ students deserve to see their own history and experiences reflected in their education, just like their peers. Learning about LGBTQ civil rights heroes like Marsha P. Johnson, Harvey Milk, and Bayard Rustin can inspire LGBTQ students, make them proud of who they are, and help them envision a better future.

Research from the Trevor Project found that LGBTQ students who learned about LGBTQ issues or people in the classroom at school were 23% less likely to attempt suicide in the past year. Conversely, when LGBTQ topics are taboo, this stigma is often internalized and can negatively impact a student’s mental health and self-esteem.
Learning about the LGBTQ community can also foster peer acceptance and contribute to a positive school climate, which is still much needed. Tragically, a majority of LGBTQ youth in middle school and high school said they had been bullied in person or electronically in the past year — and those who did were three times more likely to attempt to commit suicide.
And given that only 1 in 3 young LGBTQ people find their home to be LGBTQ, it is all the more important to ensure that schools – the place where young people spend a significant part of their waking hours – are as welcoming as possible.
At a time when 42% of LGBTQ youth, including more than half of transgender and non-binary youth, have seriously considered attempting suicide in the past year, according to a national survey conducted by The Trevor Project, fostering an environment Affirmative schooling is more critical than ever. That’s why lawmakers should expand support systems for LGBTQ students and encourage teachers to create safe and inclusive learning environments, without fueling stigma and shame.

Scaring LGBTQ students from discussing their identity, community or family at school is as cruel as it is dangerous.

If you or someone you know needs help or support, The Trevor Project’s trained crisis counselors are available 24/7 at 1-866-488-7386, via chat at TheTrevorProject.org/Get-Helpor by texting START to 678678.
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History organization

5 landmarks to know, to see 2022

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February is Black History Month, when crowds flock to the National Civil Rights Museum and the Stax Museum of American Soul Music. But other lesser-known places are also worth a visit, for those who wish to contemplate the city’s invaluable contributions to politics and culture. Here are five such locations:

mason temple

With nearly 8,000 seats, the Church of God in Christ’s “world headquarters” building opened in 1945 as “the largest gathering place in Memphis as well as the largest church owned and operated by of African Americans in the United States,” according to the Tennessee Encyclopedia.

Named for COGIC’s founding bishop, Charles H. Mason, the brick-and-stone monument to black religious freedom and Pentecostal expression at 930 Mason St. has become an indelible part of one of the most dramatic civil rights stories of the century when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. gave his “I’ve been to the top of the mountain” speech there on April 3, 1968 – the day before he was assassinated on a balcony of the Lorraine Motel .

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Protesters sing Amazing Grace at the Mason Temple in South Memphis

Hundreds of protesters gather to sing Amazing Grace at Mason Temple in South Memphis, the site of MLK’s final speech

Memphis Trade Call

BLACK HISTORY MONTH IN MEMPHIS: Stax Museum seeks to pass on record label’s legacy with Black History Month programming

Ida B. Wells Square

Dedicated amid the pandemic on July 16, 2021, the Ida B. Wells statue was an overdue addition to a Memphis statue landscape that already included WC Handy, EH Crump, Johnny Cash and Elvis (to name a few). to name a few).

Sculpted by Andrea Lugar of Eads, the statue stands on the corner of Beale and Fourth streets near the historic Beale Street Baptist Church, a congregation of freed slaves that housed the office of the Memphis Free Speech and Headlight, the newspaper who published some of Wells’ crusading anti-lynching investigations, including a famous 1892 op-ed that a white mob used as an excuse to trash the newspaper’s office six days later.

MEMPHIS HISTORY: Ida B. Wells statue unveiled in downtown Memphis

“Some people don’t want our stories, our realities, our perspectives told, heard, or acknowledged,” said Michelle Duster, president of the Ida B. Wells Foundation of Chicago and Wells’ great-granddaughter. “But between all of us present today, in the spirit of Ida B. Wells, we will not be silenced.”

WDIA

Located at 1070 on the AM dial and still a powerful voice in Memphis, WDIA in 1949 became the first radio station in the United States aimed entirely at black audiences.

Employing influential and famous disc jockeys such as BB King, Rufus Thomas, Jean “The Queen” Steinberg and Nat D. Williams over the years, WDIA (now based at a resort in Southeast Memphis and owned by iHeart Media ) originally aired from offices on Union Avenue.

USA CIVIL RIGHTS TRAIL IN MEMPHIS: Beale Street Historic District, WDIA radio station building added to US Civil Rights Trail

A historical marker on Union about half a block east of Main Street commemorates the longtime downtown home of the so-called “Goodwill Station”.

Sion Christian Cemetery

Apparently founded in the 1870s by United Sons of Zion, a fraternal or “benevolent” organization, this 15-acre site in the 1400 block of South Parkway East is the oldest cemetery in Memphis dedicated to African Americans in the area. and is said to have contained nearly 30,000 graves, including those of yellow fever victims; important merchants, doctors and politicians; and some of the lynching victims Ida B. Wells spoke about – see #2 above.

Although listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990, the cemetery was neglected and overgrown until 2005, when the nonprofit Zion Community Project was established to help restore and to maintain the site.

Statuette of Larry Finch

This life-size bronze tribute to shooting guard-turned-coach Tiger, who remains perhaps the most beloved figure in University of Memphis basketball history, was unveiled just three months after the statue was Ida B. Wells.

Located outside the Laurie-Walton Family Basketball Center on the school’s South Campus, the statue captures No. 21 in his Memphis Statue University uniform, halfway through, en route to (presumably) two of his 1,869 career points as a Tiger.

BY MARK GIANNOTTO: At Larry Finch Plaza, Memphis basketball’s past glory embraces the potential of the present

The leader of the Tiger team that coach Gene Bartow took to the NCAA championship game against UCLA in 1973, Finch was a proud product of the Orange Mound neighborhood and Melrose High School. He was embraced in his prime by seemingly the entire Memphis community, but that wasn’t enough to protect him during his controversial final years as a coach, which ended in his forced resignation in 1997.

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International headquarters

John Vinocur, foreign correspondent and editor, dies at 81

Mr. Vinocur may have seemed unstable, but few contemporaries questioned the depth of his reporting, his access to the most reliable sources and his insight. His magazine article which won the prestigious Polk Award began as follows:

“Paraguay works like this: a man parks his car and to prevent it from being stolen, he ties it to a rope tied around his waist. The man is arrested walking the streets and charged with public ridicule. He insulted the national dignity, which, officially, has been restored and exalted over the last 30 years by El Excelentisimo, the President of the Republic, Don Alfredo Stroessner, General of the Army, First Magistrate of the country. Beaten, robbed, belittled, the man ends up bribing his release from prison. He finds his automobile on a used car lot and informs the dealer. “It’s a break for you,” says the dealer. “You know the real mileage.”

John Eli Vinocur was born May 17, 1940 in Queens, the son of Harry Vinocur, a journalist and historian who wrote under the pen name John Stuart, and Helen (Segal) Vinocur, who ran the heiress’ family philanthropy office. Rosenwald. Ascoli, who mainly dealt with child protection.

After graduating from Forest Hills High School, he earned a bachelor’s degree in history from Oberlin College in Ohio in 1961, where an English teacher encouraged him to pursue a career in journalism.

He worked for The Port Chester (NY) Item and The Long Island Star-Journal and Agence France-Presse in Paris before joining the Associated Press.

His marriages with Martine Weill in 1960 and Elisabeth Schmidt in 1966 ended in divorce. He married Harriet Berglund in 1985.

She survives him, as do his sons, James and Nicholas, from his marriage to Mrs. Berglund; two daughters, Alexandra and Danielle, from his marriage to Mrs. Schmidt; Mrs. Schaap; and seven grandchildren.

Alex Traub contributed reporting.

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Canadian army

Benjamin DOLISZNEY Obituary (2022) – St. Catharines, ON

BENJAMIN WALTER DOLISZNY QC Benjamin Walter Doliszny died peacefully at his home in St. Catharines, Ontario on January 30, 2022, in his 99th year. Although loved and will be missed, Ben lived a full life and we want to share and celebrate his remarkable story. At the age of 6, Ben crossed the Atlantic from his native Ukraine as an unaccompanied minor to become a resident of one of Toronto’s immigrant neighborhoods. He held summer jobs that shaped his sense of self, including: serving as a kitchen boy at the Bigwin Inn; milking cows as a farm laborer on a dairy farm outside of Toronto; and, bagging groceries. He was an avid football player (and former student) at several Canadian universities. Despite a few false starts, he eventually became an excellent lawyer known for his honesty and wise advice. Throughout his adventures, Ben has focused on his family and his beloved Ukrainian community. He was a generous, fun-loving storyteller with an encyclopedic memory of interesting events that marked his life, especially his early years in Ukraine and Toronto. Ben was born on April 3, 1923 in Yabloniv, then part of Poland, now Ukraine. After immigrating to Canada, her family settled in the Junction Triangle neighborhood of Toronto. Here he attended Perth Avenue Elementary School and Bloor Collegiate Institute. He quickly developed his love and affinity for the Ukrainian Catholic Church and embraced its Ukrainian heritage. Ben loved his new life as a Canadian and took advantage of everything it had to offer, remaining a proud Ukrainian Canadian all his life! During his youth, Ben attended the Ukrainian school “Prosvita” and engaged in Ukrainian dance, youth choirs and theater groups. Gentle Ben, as he was known, was a 6’4′ mighty man with a soft heart (unless you pitted him on the grill). He was a natural athlete, playing baseball, basketball, hockey and football on numerous high school, community (1942 Toronto Oakwood Indians) and college teams (1947-1948 University of Toronto Varsity Blues’ Football team, 1949 -1952 Queen’s University Golden Gaels Football). He played competitive squash and handball and was a keen golfer. Ben was a longtime member of the St. Catharines Golf and Country Club. After his playing days were over, he enjoyed watching all the televised sporting events, especially CFL football. Ben loved to dance and, as a young man, frequented Toronto’s many dance pavilions, including the Palais Royale, Palace Pier and Sunnyside Pavilion. When he regaled us with big band stories, seeing Duke Ellington, you could almost hear the band playing. Ben loved to read and began each day by scanning the sports and obituaries sections of the Globe and Mail and the St. Catharines Standard. Even late in life, he remained curious and interested in the wider world. Upon his discharge from the Royal Canadian Army in 1946, Ben enrolled in law at the University of Toronto, where his interest in academics took precedence over his love of football. It was also that year, at a conference of young Ukrainian Catholics in Winnipeg, that Ben’s life changed when he met Mary Wityk, a nurse in training who was to become his wife. With Mary as his partner, motivation and guide, he enrolled at Queen’s University and then Dalhousie University where he successfully completed his law degree. After being called to the bar of Nova Scotia and Ontario in 1955, he and Mary moved to St. Catharines, Ontario, where he practiced law for 36 years. He became a Queen’s Counsel in 1973 and later sat in Small Claims Court. Between 1956 and 1959, Ben and Mary welcomed 3 children – Bonnie, Kathie and Gregory, who would become the center of their lives. Through Ukrainian pursuits such as Saturday School (Ridna Shkola), Plast dance and scouting, music lessons, sports, and road trips to Florida, their family thrived in St. Catharines. In 1979, Mary opened a boutique, Ukrainian Treasures, and Ben became an honorary salesperson and ambassador of Ukrainian culture. He took every opportunity to educate shop visitors about Ukrainian culture, history, religion and politics. Ben was a loving and supportive husband and father, a devoted dido to his grandchildren, and a respected and admired uncle, friend and colleague. His wisdom, advice and counsel were sought by many. Ben has worked tirelessly for the Ukrainian community. He has held various positions at the international, national, provincial and local levels. He was a member of the Executive Council of the Ukrainian World Congress, national president of the Ukrainian Catholic Council of Canada (1968-1971), long-term president of the St. Catharines branch of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, active member and legal adviser for Sts. Cyril and Methodius of the Ukrainian Catholic Church of St. Catharines, president of the Ukrainian Catholic Fellowship of St. Catharines, as well as a member of the organization’s national executive. Ben was President of the Ukrainian Professionals and Businessmen’s Club (Niagara Region) and a member of the Ukrainian seniors’ organization, Myrhorod. He was the secretary of Branch 427 of the Ukrainian National Association for many years. He was a founding member of the St. Catharines Folk Art’s Council and served on the board for over 10 years. For these many contributions, Ben was awarded the Shevchenko Medal which is the highest form of recognition bestowed by the Ukrainian Canadian Congress. Ben was not only a committed advocate for all things Ukrainian, he was also very involved in local, municipal and provincial community organizations, as well as various charities and service organizations and clubs in the area of St. Catharines and Niagara. He was a longtime member of the Knights of Columbus. In recognition of his contributions to the community, Ben was awarded the Ontario Medal for Good Citizenship in 1979 and the Queen’s Jubilee Medal in 2003. Ben was predeceased by his beloved wife of 57 years, Mary ( Wityk) in 2007. He is fondly remembered by his beloved children, Bonnie, Kathie (Stephen Archer) and Greg (Julie) and; adoring grandchildren, Melana (Erik Reiersen) and Thomas Tysowsky, Elizabeth, Benjamin and Anya Archer and Matthew (Marianne Holovach) and Luke (Gabrielle) Doliszny; sisters-in-law Ludmilla Wityk and Judy Farrell; nieces and nephews, Michael (Kim) Kuchar, Jeanne (Philip Sissons, deceased) Kuchar, Laryssa (Yuri) Tarnowecky, Michael (Christine) Wityk, Sean (Kelli Adams) Wityk, Tim Wityk, David Wityk; and grandnieces and nephews. Ben was also predeceased by his parents, his sister Patricia Kuchar, his brothers-in-law John and Peter Wityk and his nephew, Peter Kuchar. The family would like to sincerely thank Ben’s caregiver, Joan Longos, the Linhaven Adult Day Program staff and the many personal support workers for their care and compassion. Visitation will be Thursday, March 24, 2022 from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. with Panachyda at 7:00 p.m. in Sts. Cyril and Methodius Church. A Memorial Mass with ashes present will be held at Sts. Cyril and Methodius Church on Friday, March 25, 2022 at 10:00 a.m. Interment will follow at Victoria Lawn Cemetery. All guests must present proof of dual Covid-19 vaccinations to attend the tour, including photo ID as per current Ontario mandates. If desired, memorial donations can be made to the Ukrainian Canadian Congress or a charity of your choice. Ben’s online memories and stories can be shared at CCBSCares.ca

Published by The Globe and Mail from February 5 to 9, 2022.

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Non profit living

A sober living house that closes its doors after decades of service | News

After providing homes for thousands of people with no place to go for more than 20 years, Griffin’s Gate in east Bakersfield will soon be closing.

The understated residential house, which the nonprofit Casa de Amigos has operated on a historic property on Monterey Street since 1999, will close on Friday. Its founders say providing the service has become unaffordable as funding has dried up.

“It’s a little bittersweet,” said Jack Hendrix, who founded Griffin’s Gate with his adopted son Pepe after retiring as a teacher at East Bakersfield High School. “That was the difficult part of the decision to close the doors because there were still people who needed this place, but we can’t provide it anymore just because we don’t have the money. “

Griffin’s Gate served as a place of refuge for people with addiction and mental health issues, parolees, and people who needed medical attention after a hospital stay but lacked a place to receive this care. The association has used contracts with organizations like Kern Behavioral Health and Kern Medical Center to stay afloat, but organizers now say those contracts are no longer available.

At a time when homelessness appears to be at its peak in Kern County history, the community is losing one of the few places ready to welcome people.

“We have helped a lot of people in the community,” said Pepe. “I am sad that we are closing. I really like this kind of work.

One of the people Griffin’s Gate has helped is Hal Joyner. Around 2002, he was addicted to methamphetamine and on his way to jail. Instead, he ended up staying on the Monterey Street estate for three years as he got his life back on track.

He now occupies the position of house manager, a position which will expire at the end of the year.

“I made a lot of good friends,” he said. “I am still friends with a lot of them. I watched the changes he made in people’s lives.

Reyes Gamino, one of the last residents of the house, reflected on his stay at Griffin’s Gate on Monday afternoon.

“I feel good here,” he said. “I’m still pretty young and I don’t like to be a burden on anyone. Here I can still live a semi-normal life.

Gamino first stayed on the property in 2019 after being hospitalized with complications from congenital heart disease. After leaving the county, he returned after his ex-wife died of coronavirus last month.

He is now looking for a place to live with his children and will be allowed to stay on the property until he is successful.

“To find real hearts like that is difficult,” he said of the Griffin’s Gate operators. “It’s more of a house than anything else.”

The home is known for much more than its work with the homeless and disadvantaged. Built in the late 1800s by a major Italian immigrant, it is known as one of the oldest houses in Kern County.

Hendrix plans to rent the house to tenants until he decides to sell the property. He said he started the house to provide him with an activity when he retired, and since he wasn’t golfing it was the right thing to do.

It’s been over 20 years since the doors to this historic home were opened for charity, and after such a long time it can be hard to know what to do next.

“People were like, ‘Why are you wasting your time with these people? They’ll never do anything, ”Hendrix said. “I have always been an optimist. I felt like people needed a chance sometimes. They needed a place to rise.

He described the closure as frustrating and fondly recalled the time he spent leading the operation.

“Over the years,” he added, “we’ve had a lot of people come and see if we’re still here and tell us they’re grateful to have a place to be.”

You can reach Sam Morgen at 661-395-7415. You can also follow him on Twitter @smorgenTBC.


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Canadian army

Brandon soldier helped feed an army in Iqaluit

A Brandon serviceman returns home today after spending the past two months on a mission in Iqaluit, where he helped produce clean drinking water for the city during its drinking water supply crisis.

Cpl. Yannick Gagnon, a cook with the 4th Engineer Support Regiment of the Canadian Armed Forces, said he got the call he would send to Nunavut on a Sunday in October and was on a plane at 5 a.m. the following Tuesday morning to travel to Iqaluit as part of Operation LENTUS.

“You don’t know when [the calls] are going to happen because they’re usually just a disaster like Iqaluit was with the water situation, ”said Gagnon.

He arrived in Nunavut on October 26 and will be leaving the city today. He was originally scheduled to leave town on November 17, but was delayed until potable water was established in the community in early December.

Gagnon served as a kitchen officer while deployed, tasked with providing meals to troops on rotation in and out of town.

His service came with significant challenges.

“When you’re in such a small community like this, you can’t take advantage of the economy. I can’t go take a government credit card and buy groceries to feed 35 people, ”said Gagnon.

To feed the troops, Gagnon would liaise with a major in Ottawa, Yellowknife and 8 Wing in Trenton, Ont., Establishing weekly ration orders, and food would be flown into the area once a week. It was an act of logistical juggling that became even more complicated due to the unforeseen flooding in British Columbia.

“I definitely had to dig a lot into my back pocket to adapt and overcome logistical situations that were out of my control,” said Gagnon. “The overall logistics of receiving rations, which is all the food here, is something I’ve never had to do in my career. I wasn’t 100% sure what was going to happen and then had to adapt and overcome each time I got a ration order.

Gagnon’s days started at 6 a.m. and ended at 6 p.m. for the duration of his deployment.

“In the end, for my part, by trade, I am a cook, but my number one job is the morale and esprit de corps of the troops,” said Gagnon. “Cooking is your second job; the morale and esprit de corps of the troops is your number one priority.

Seeing the troops come in to eat after spending countless hours pumping water in temperatures dropping below -40 ° C gave him a little more energy to wake up each morning and push himself to create the best hearty meals possible for them. Gagnon would feed about 30 people per meal and make sure fresh bread and hot soup were available from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

The unforeseen circumstances that arose throughout their time in Iqaluit only demonstrated the resilience of the troops and residents of the city. Gagnon said it was amazing to see the troops at work, spending up to 16 hours a day bringing clean drinking water to the community.

“They would be absolutely beaten, but they know why they are here and that pushes them to be able to produce water.”

Gagnon’s feeding plan for the troops is affected by the water crisis. He had a 15,000-liter tank in the kitchen and had to boil anything that came through the back of the house.

“I just had to boil anything all the time. Imagine doing the dishes: I had to boil the water, then I would have a sink that I would pour water in all the time and that would be my cold water. And then I would have more water that was constantly boiled so that we knew the water was safe enough to use to properly clean the dishes.

He had time to explore the city and at the end of the operation some troops called him the “Operation Guide”. He earned this nickname because of how he got to know Iqaluit during the nearly two months he was there.

“It was a great experience,” said Gagnon. “It probably doesn’t sound like what you would expect. It is the most diverse, cultured, and smallest little community I have ever seen in my life. “

One of the most memorable experiences was participating in a Remembrance Day ceremony outside in freezing temperatures. The soldiers wore toques, gloves and several layers of clothing as they marched with the Iqaluit RCMP Detachment.

“If you’ve ever seen the RCMP in their parade uniforms, they can’t wear toques. They’re just wearing a top hat… so you just watched their ears turn an icy red, ”said Gagnon. “It has been a great experience to be able to relax a bit from the day-to-day operations of trying to produce water through the filtration systems so that we can recognize our dead who served before us.”

Gagnon’s father served in the Canadian Forces and was posted to CFB Shilo when Gagnon was eight years old. He then graduated from Neelin High School.

He first joined the military in January 2014 and completed his basic training in St. John, Quebec.

“I wasn’t originally born in Brandon, but this is my home. When someone asks me where the house is, I tell them it’s Brandon, Manitoba, ”said Gagnon.

»[email protected]

»Twitter: @The_ChelseaKemp

Chelsea Kemp, Local Journalism Initiative reporter, Brandon Sun


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History organization

10 questions with Penn State Homecoming 2022 executive director Tim Nevil

Although junior Tim Nevil was appointed Executive Director of Penn State Homecoming in 2022 a little over a month ago, he already has plenty of ideas to help strengthen the organization in the months to come.

Also a member of THON, Nevil is extremely busy on campus and tries to stay as active as possible in both organizations. Despite his busy schedule, we found time to sit down with Nevil and chat about Penn State Homecoming, his favorite flavor of Creamery, and more.

Advanced state: What made you want to get involved with Penn State Homecoming?

Tim Nevil: When I got to Penn State I wasn’t sure much, but I knew I wanted to get involved on campus. Thanks to my involvement in another organization, I met several people strongly involved in Homecoming. They encouraged me to consider the organization. I came from high school with a relatively large homecoming for its size. I really liked the mission and goals of Penn State Homecomings to put the community and the ideals of the university at the forefront of what it does.

So, in my first year, I decided to apply for a captain position. After being a DJ captain, I decided to be a director in Homecoming. I held the position of Director of Distribution Management last year, which allowed me to see the organization and its events as a whole.

OS: As the Executive Director of Penn State Homecoming, what are some of your roles and responsibilities?

TN: My main role is to oversee the executive committee and help with decision making and planning of events and projects. I also act as the primary liaison between the organization and student / academic leadership.

OS: What are some of your goals or visions for Penn State Homecoming 2022?

TN: My primary goal and vision for Homecoming 2022 is to provide a welcoming and inclusive environment for all members of our Penn State community. I hope to create a space where students, faculty and alumni can celebrate and learn about the rich tradition and history of our university while working to improve for the future to create a home in the state. for everyone.

In addition, I want to continue working to put diversity, equity and inclusion at the forefront of our efforts. This can be achieved by providing a platform to share the countless stories of the under-represented but endlessly impactful Penn Staters.

OS: What’s your favorite part of Homecoming weekend?

TN: I think picking a favorite event throughout Homecoming week is super difficult, especially knowing how countless directors and captains work throughout the year to make any event such a success. Still, I love the parade because it’s an amazing way to wrap up our series of amazing weeklong events.

OS: What has been the most rewarding part of my involvement with Homecoming?

TN: To see the hard work of all the Captains and Directors pay off during the week, and also seeing so many people in the community come together to celebrate our university is so special and rewarding to me.

OS: Are you involved in anything else at Penn State?

TN: I am currently also involved in THON as the Chief Safety Captain on the Rules and Regulations Events Safety Committee. In between, most of my time is chewed up. But, I have to say, I really found a home on campus thanks to these two amazing organizations.

OS: What is your favorite place on campus to study?

TN: I don’t know if I really have a favorite place to study. I am rather nomadic when it comes to studying the spots. It’s definitely a place with friends to break up the monotony.

Operating system : If you could choose any flavor of Creamery ice cream to eat for the rest of your life, which one would you choose and why?

TN: Cookie dough. I mean, who doesn’t love a good cookie dough ice cream, especially when it’s Creamery ice cream?

OS: If you could take any Penn Stater past or present to lunch, who would it be and why?

TN: Guion Bluford, because having lunch with someone who’s been in space would be an amazing experience. Hearing Guion’s stories of breaking down racial barriers in American space exploration would be a humbling and rewarding opportunity. His work has truly left an endless legacy on our country and our university.

OS: If you could be any dinosaur, which one would you be and why?

TN: Velociraptor. Why? I do not really know. To be honest, I did a Buzzfeed quiz once – and by once, I mean Monday – and it said I was a velociraptor.

Ryen is an early childhood education student from “just outside of Philly” – or to be exact, 23.0 miles outside of Philly. She loves all things Penn State and was a great Penn State girl before she could walk. Send him pictures of puppies, or hate mail to [email protected]


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History organization

BG enriches its rich sporting history | News, Sports, Jobs

Bright sun rays on good news:

Sport can generate pride, in school and in the community, and Bishop Guilfoyle Catholic High School has enjoyed a strong sense of pride for decades.

The Marauders added their fourth Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association soccer championship last week to go with seven women’s basketball championships and the two Pennsylvania Catholic Interscholastic Athletic Association titles won by the boys’ basketball team. from BG in 1967 and 1970.

The latest football title came via a 21-14 victory over Redbank Valley last Thursday at Hersheypark Stadium.

Credit goes to Head Coach Justin Wheeler, his coaching staff, BG support staff and, of course, the Marauders players.

The Mirror will feature a tribute section in this weekend’s edition (December 18-19).

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Meghan Sinisi of Altoona is representing Pennsylvania this week in the Miss America pageant.

A 2013 graduate from Altoona Area High School, Sinisi is only the second Altoona native to win Miss Pennsylvania honors, joining Jill Shaffer Swanson, who was crowned in 1981.

Residents are invited to a “Watch the party” at 8pm tonight at the Buccinese Club in Altoona to support Sinisi in what is the 100th anniversary of the competition.

The show will air live on Peacock, NBC Universal’s streaming service. The contest ends with a week of appearances and activities.

Sinisi has brought a lot of positive publicity to Altoona, and we wish him good luck.

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The Blair Central Recreation and Parks Commission made a good choice in selecting former Mayor of Altoona and former Recreation Commission member Bill Schirf with his Respected Citizen’s Award at his classic community dinner on the 26th. February.

Schirf has always had the city and its recreation programs at heart and has contributed to about 40 community organizations over the past 50 years, according to Mike Hofer, executive director of Blair Rec.

The dinner, which is accompanied by an auction, has always been the organization’s biggest fundraiser.

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Last month, a bridge on Route 1008 over Chest Creek in East Carroll Township, Cambria County was named after Pfc. Kenneth John Ivory, a native of Chest Springs who was killed during the Vietnam War.

Ivory was 19 when he was killed in action on October 18, 1966 in Thua Thien Province during the Vietnam War.

A 1965 graduate of Bishop Carroll High School, the Chest Springs native enlisted in the military in March 1966 and was a member of A Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division.

We salute Ivory for his service, VFW District 26 for his role and Senator Wayne Langerholc Jr., R-Cambria, who is also chair of the Senate Transportation Committee.

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To all the community organizations that mobilize at this time of year to raise funds and offer food and gifts to the less fortunate around us, we salute you.

The latest news today and more in your inbox


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History organization

Paws & Claus Animal Photoshoots With Santa Claus Donates Profits To Animal Rescue Organization – WDVM25 & DCW50

Mount begins the homestand with an OT loss to American; third consecutive defeat for the climbers

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Oakton Women’s Basketball defeats Fairfax 48-25

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Fairfax Boys’ Basketball defeats Oakton 54-44

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Madison’s boy’s basketball survives late comeback, defeats West Springfield 64-61

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Madison’s football heads to Norfolk and makes the Class 6 final on Saturday

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Shepherd sends football team to NCAA Division II semi-finals in Michigan

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Ernie McCook addresses the Shepherd crowd as they send a team to Big Rapids, MI

Sports /

Shepherd Athletics VP Chauncey Winbush opens up about community love for League football

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Highlights of High School Women’s Basketball Capital Invitational

Sports /

Scott Turner impressed with Antonio Gibson’s production on winning streak

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GW Men’s Basketball defeats Coppin State 75-62

Sports /

Maryland’s No.8 women’s basketball overcomes tough first half to defeat Purdue

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Canadian army

Eighty Years Ago: Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor – Kills a Moose Jaw Sailor

A Japanese carrier-based strike force launched a surprise attack on the United States Navy and American bases in Hawaii at 8 a.m. on Sunday, December 7, 1941.

Moose Jaw man killed aboard USS Arizona

Many residents of Moose Jaw traveled to Hawaii and visited the memorial to the fallen men aboard the USS Arizona. One of the men was US Navy Firefighter Second Class Roger J. Bergin of Moose Jaw.

He was the son of Frederick Austin Bergin and Marian Bickel Bergin and was born in 1916 in North Dakota. The family moved to Moose Jaw in 1918, but during the hard times of the 1930s, his father often traveled to Deepwater, North Dakota for work.

From American Naval Records, Roger is listed as Canadian and Hometown, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada

Roger’s body has never been found. He is buried in the hull of the USS Arizona

Roger 2

Roger Joseph Bergin, Second Class Firefighter # 3115165, United States Navy

Naval attacks

The British and US navies rarely announced naval losses at the time they were suffered. News of the losses took months to reach reports.

On Saturday, December 13, 1941, the Moose Jaw Times Herald carried an article in the Canadian Press, circulated via Reuters, on the naval losses according to a Japanese statement from Tokyo. The Japanese claimed to have sunk the 32,600-ton battleship Arizona at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese also claimed responsibility for the sinking of the US battleships Oklahoma and West Virginia in the same action.

The issued statement also “… confirmed that a large British destroyer was sunk in the same battle in which the British battleship Prince of Wales and the Battle Cruiser Repulse were sent deep into Malaysia.

“A British torpedo boat, a gunboat and three merchant ships were reportedly destroyed Thursday in an attack on the British crown colony of Hong Kong.”

The Japanese navy was moving quickly to consolidate the captured territory.

Details of Moose Jaw man killed at Pearl Harbor

Information on the death of former Moose Jaw resident Roger Joseph Bergin did not appear in the Moose Jaw Times Herald until February 5, 1942, almost two months later. The story is as follows:

“Roger J. Bergin of City killed at Pearl Harbor

“AF Bergin notified by the Department of the United States Navy of the death of his son on December 7, 1941

“AF Bergin, of that town (Moose Jaw) received an official message from the Department of the Navy in Washington DC that his son, Roger Joseph Bergin, United States Navy Firefighter Second Class, was killed while ‘he was in service in the Pacific. region, December 7, 1941.

“Roger Bergin was born in the United States and arrived in Moose Jaw with his parents in 1917, when he was only one year old. He attended St. Agnes Separate School and completed high school near Detroit, Michigan, where he went to live with his grandfather seven years ago. He enlisted in the United States Navy on October 4, 1940.

“To mourn his loss, Roger Bergin leaves his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. AF Bergin, four brothers, Kenneth and Marvin with the Canadian Army overseas; Leroy and Frederick at the parental home there, a sister, Evelyn, resides in Ontario.

His brother Kenneth was captured by the Germans in 1944 and sent to a POW camp. He was freed by the Russians and returned to Great Britain via Odessa.

The 1940 Henderson Yearbook Roger J. Bergin’s father, AF Bergin, as a homeowner at 1224 Coteau Street West, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan.

roger 3

USS Arizona

Additional information

On May 15, 1945, the Globe and Mail newspaper printed the US Navy casualty list for December 7, 1941 and April 15, 1942. It included 3 Canadians:

Bergin, Roger Joseph, firefighter, second class; the father lives Momentum. Jawbone, Saskatchewan – Killed on December 7, 1941.

Ellis, Francis Arnold Jr., Journeyman Electrician, Third Class: Father lives in Winnipeg

Lang, Earl Willard, radioman, second class; the father lives Simpson, Saskatchewan

Petty Officer Second Class Earl Willard Lang, # 3286168 was born in Simpson, Saskatchewan and enlisted in Minnesota. He was declared missing and declared dead on December 8, 1941 following the attack on Pearl Harbor.


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History organization

From pandemic to endemic: this is how we could get back to normal | US News

First of all, the bad news. With unpredictable epidemics still occurring around the world and variants like Omicron raising questions about the contagiousness of the virus, we are still in a pandemic.

The good news: While it’s difficult to predict the exact time, most scientists agree that the Covid-19 pandemic will end and the virus will become endemic. This means that the virus will probably never be completely eliminated, but as more people get vaccinated and become exposed to it, infections will eventually occur at a consistently low rate and fewer people will become seriously ill. An area with high vaccination and booster rates is likely to experience endemicity sooner than an area with lower rates.

What does this transition look like?

Concretely, there will be an announcement. The World Health Organization and local health agencies will officially declare the global pandemic over, a designation based on certain biological and statistical credentials: the contagiousness of the virus, the death rate and the power to overwhelm hospitals, for n ‘ to name a few.

In some places, like the United States and other wealthy countries with easy access to vaccines and antiviral treatments, endemicity could look a lot like the present day: people emerging from despair, diners crowding into rooms. restaurants and vaccination cards verified with decreasing rigor. But there could also be other, more profound societal changes.

To understand how daily life will change if Covid-19 becomes rampant, we can turn to history for a useful (albeit imperfect) guide.

A change in mentalities and behaviors

People generally respond to epidemics with fear and panic, both individually and as a society. According to Charles Kenny, director of the Center for Global Development and author of The Plague Cycle, these reactions reliably take shape in some now recognizable ways: closing borders, sequestering the sick and withdrawing from society.

Until the advent of modern medicine, all people could do was hope (and pray) that epidemics would go away on their own. When it became clear that a disease was inescapable – or endemic – societies often made strides to reframe disease as an integral part of life. This could also become the case with Covid-19.

Kenny’s book offers potential insight. In 17th century Japanese cities, attitudes to smallpox changed as the disease became endemic; by then, most people had been exposed as a child and subsequently recovered. Once people accept “that everyone is going to get smallpox,” Kenny says, they ritualized and normalized it as a milestone in childhood, making it a part of “the story of growing up.” .

It is too early to say how this process of normalization vis-à-vis the Covid will unfold. However, if infections become a normal part of the winter months, they may simply be absorbed into what is called cold and flu season. Much like smallpox in Japanese cities, this change will be reflected in the language and everyday expectations of people. Already, some are starting to use the term “Covid season”.

Effective medical interventions also make it easier for societies to come to terms with the idea of ​​coexisting with disease. “My parents were terrified [of polio]”says Nancy Tomes, professor of history at Stony Brook University and author of The Gospel of Germs.. Tomes, on the other hand, was part of “the generation that went to local high school and got the lump of sugar,” referring to a common dispensing method for an orally administered polio vaccine.

“We stopped worrying about polio after that,” Tomes says.

Although Covid remains widespread, the advent of effective vaccines has quickly changed the extent of its threat. In March, when only 9.2% of Americans were fully immunized, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention relaxed its social distancing guidelines to allow people with the immunity to congregate indoors. And on Thanksgiving, Joe Biden said the United States was “back” from pandemic hibernation – despite the nearly 100,000 new cases of Covid-19 still confirmed every day.

Finger pointing and misinformation

Unfortunately, history suggests that some negative behaviors related to the pandemic tend to persist after a disease becomes endemic or is eliminated. One of them is the disproportionate targeting of groups perceived as “outsiders” within mainstream society. When the pandemic subsides, Kenny says, the social restrictions that are likely to remain “are those that affect minority groups.”

Imposed in 1987, the xenophobic and homophobic travel ban imposed on HIV-positive people in the United States lasted 22 years. And today, people wrongly associated with Covid, such as those in Asia or Africa, are still harassed and excluded despite the full understanding that the coronavirus does not discern race.

A propensity for disinformation and conspiracy theories has also been associated with epidemics – “a shit show,” Tomes says, with a legacy “stretching back to every epidemic we have written records of.” Some of these falsehoods prove to be lasting. “There are still people who don’t believe that HIV causes AIDS,” she says.

During pandemics, groups of people also become susceptible to developing extreme opinions on topics that elicit strong opinions – like vaccination and personal freedom – that they did not initially have. Even after a pandemic is over, this phenomenon of “group polarization” can remain “in the background,” says Steven Taylor, professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia and author of The Psychology of Pandemics. . This polarization is likely to “wake up again when something similar happens” in the future.

Know what we can’t know (yet)

It is important to note that the return to normalcy will not occur uniformly across the world. Once people in rich countries become endemic, those in the south of the planet could continue to fight the coronavirus for a long time, as has been the case with a host of tropical diseases that have been all but forgotten in places like the United States.

Like all infectious diseases that have plagued the world before it, Sars-CoV-2 will hopefully fade into distant memory, for better or for worse. This oversight can bring relief, growth and recovery, but it could also leave us woefully unprepared for the next pandemic. The 1918 flu taught us that masking and social distancing can reduce deaths, Kenny says – a lesson we relearned too late in 2020.


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Canadian army

Longtime Canadian Ranger Retires – 100 Mile House Free Press

When Robert Cockram visited the recruiting post on a whim in 1966, he didn’t expect him to lead a life in the military.

Fifty-five years later, Cockram retired from the Canadian Armed Forces – with four bars and the distinction of being one of the oldest members of the Canadian Ranger Patrol. He had been a member of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery.

“It was interesting. It never got boring,” said Cockram, 71. “I retired as captain, long in the tooth.”

His military journey began at age 18, and an officer at a recruiting station in southern Saskatchewan suggested he join a military college. He chose the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario, where he graduated with honors and a major in history.

As a member of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, he held positions with the Fourth Canadian Artillery Regiment, the Second Canadian Artillery Regiment and a volunteer position with the Canadian Airborne Regiment in Edmonton, where Cockram said that he was able to “jump planes and enter strange places.”

He remembers a training operation in Churchill, Manitoba. where they “lived in the snow banks” for several days to acclimatize to the cold. Cockram was then redeployed overseas to Germany for two years, working with self-propelled artillery pieces. Thanks to then Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, his unit was redeployed to southern Germany, far from the border.

“In Germany, when you had free time, you just jumped in the vehicle and went on tours. I’ve been to Switzerland a few times and skied there, it was just down the road where we were based, ”said Cockram. “We took a great trip to London and got to see other parts of Europe.”

Over the following decades, Cockram worked across the country as an administrator and instructor before finally being posted to Royal Roads University in Victoria, when it was still a military college. . As he neared retirement age, Cockram decided to move to Lone Butte, where he had owned a property for several years.

READ MORE: Let’s not forget: Remembrance Day ceremonies held at 100 Mile House

It turns out, however, that retirement was not in the cards: a year and a half later, a call was made to form a Canadian Ranger patrol.

“I thought I would go see what it is and now I’m one of the old guys from the Ranger Patrol,” Cockram said. “I’ve been in the Ranger Patrol for 27 years now and people look at you and say ‘what? “Are you in the army ?!” And I say “yes, the Canadian Rangers do not have a mandatory retirement age. “

At first, the Rangers only had three pieces of equipment: a baseball cap, an armband, and a rifle. For additional gear, he said they had to search military surplus stores for raincoats and other gear. They were also largely on their own and established their own training and patrolling schedules. Cockram said they used to meet for shooting practice at the 100 Mile High School shooting range, where they used to “get by”.

Rangers needed to know their area and provide support in a crisis. Before the South Cariboo Search and Rescue Society was formed, Cockram said the Rangers would search for the missing. Cockram recalled “beating the bush” near 108 Mile Ranch looking for a missing eight-year-old, only to have the child show up safe and sound away from where they were looking.

Eventually the decision was made to tie the Rangers to the Canadian military reserves and is now run more like the military. With it came a lot more equipment and organization. By then, Cockram was already well on his way to becoming one of the force’s oldest serving officers.

“They give you a medal for 12 years of service, then a bar every 10 years thereafter. I’ve held on so far because I said, ‘I want that fourth bar, no one else is going to wear it because no one else has been there for so long,’ Cockram said, but added: “I look forward to my free time.”


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100 Thousand House


Robert Cockram began his military career in 1966 and only recently retired from the Canadian Ranger Patrol South Cariboo. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

Robert Cockram began his military career in 1966 and recently retired from the Canadian Ranger Patrol South Cariboo.  (Photo by Patrick Davies - 100 Mile Free Press)

Robert Cockram began his military career in 1966 and only recently retired from the Canadian Ranger Patrol South Cariboo. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)



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Non profit living

Saint-Louis high school students demonstrate against gun violence in honor of 19-year-old

ST. LOUIS – Hundreds of students from Cardinal Ritter College Prep High School marched against gun violence on Wednesday in honor of 19-year-old Isis Mahr.

Mahr was murdered in a quadruple shooting in St. Louis in October after returning from work at an elderly care facility. Her father said she had a heart of gold.

“My daughter was very dynamic. She gave a lot to the community during the 19 years that she lived on this land, that God gave her to me and to my family ”, declared her father Atif Mahr.

Mahr was a remarkable graduate of Cardinal Ritter College Prep in 2020. Her family said she was a part of the soccer team and naturally a person who loved and cared for everyone around her.

She volunteered in the community and was studying to be a nurse. Friends and family of Isis have said the march and the gathering mean the world.

“I am grateful for the support. It’s a beautiful day, ”said his father. “It took away the heartache and pain to have this march in her honor to stop the violence and stop the killings and put down the guns. I can say as a parent that the community has spoken about my daughter and said that it is is enough. “


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Source: Twins and Buxton agree on a $ 100 million 7-year contract

The Minnesota Twins and center fielder Byron Buxton agreed to a seven-year, $ 100 million contract on Sunday, according to a person familiar with the matter.

The person spoke on condition of anonymity to The Associated Press as the contract was not yet finalized and awaiting a physical examination.

Buxton posted an aerial photo of Target Field on his Instagram account with a heart emoji caption. The light-footed, big-swinging Buxton was only under the team’s control for one more season, raising the possibility of a trade to stem the toll of his loss as a free agent.

Despite a few hiccups along the way in the negotiations, which were complicated by Buxton’s injury history which significantly limited his availability for the Twins, the 27-year-old never wanted to leave the organization he has. joined right after high school in rural Georgia as the second overall pick in the 2012 Draft.

Buxton has only played more than 92 games once in his seven major league seasons. It was in 2017, when he played 140 games and won a Gold Glove award.

Glimpses of his game-changing and worth-admitting skills have broadened over the past three years as he blossomed with the bat to match his longtime senior job with the glove.

Last year, Buxton won at bat with 23 doubles, 19 homers and a 0.306 average in just 235 at-bat. He had a 0.647 slugging percentage that would have led the majors if he had had a qualifying number of home plate appearances.

However, these bursts of domination kept getting interrupted, often due to bad luck. Buxton suffered a sprained right hip in May. Then in mid-June, in his third game only after returning from the first injury, Buxton was hit with a hand throw and his left little finger was broken. He didn’t return to the major leagues until the end of August.

It was his 11th time on the injured list since his debut with the Twins in 2015 and the 15th time in 10 seasons as a pro.

Some of Buxton’s past shoulder problems stemmed from a total style of diving for balls and crashing against the walls that the twins tried to reduce, but the finger broke – much like concussion, wrist sprains and the broken toe that preceded – could hardly have been prevented.

“He’s so tough, and he’s ready to literally play just about anything. He wouldn’t have to be able to walk for him to come out and say, “I can’t play. Words never leave his mouth. It would literally have to be taken out of the field to get it out of the field. It’s just who he is as a guy and as a competitor, ”manager Rocco Baldelli said last summer.

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Military housing collapses after years of neglect

It was once described as the ‘crown jewel’ of army barracks when it was evacuated by the British after the War of Independence and is believed to be the country’s flagship military camp.

But it collapsed like many other military installations after years of neglect by successive governments.

While some funds have been allocated for upgrades, many fear it is too little, too late.

The images of the Curragh in its splendor and what it looks like today say a thousand words.

They were obtained by Independent Senator Gerard Craughwell and provided to the Irish Examiner to highlight the situation.

The Curragh was once a self-sufficient town with many facilities. But as Mr Craughwell explained, it must now be regarded without a doubt as “Ireland’s most abandoned town” and he maintains that it is “an international embarrassment”.

Mr. Craughwell should know: he is a former member of the Defense Forces.

The Curragh was once a self-sufficient town with many amenities, but now it has to be considered without a doubt “Ireland’s most abandoned town”.

“It was handed over by the British in perfect condition when Ireland gained independence. But it has been reduced to its current state of neglect due to a lack of investment and respect for serving members of the Defense Forces, ”he said.

“It is meant to be a center of excellence for all defense training as it is the training center for the defense forces and provides education to visiting Irish and international military personnel. As a military college, it should be worthy of university status. “

However, he pointed out that although foreign military personnel attend for training purposes, the accommodations there are so poor that they are usually lodged in a local hotel.

“How does that compare to military colleges such as Warminster in England or the Bundeswehr Command and Staff College in Germany?”

“How does the Cadet Training College compare to West Point (US) or Sandhurst (England)? ”

The buildings are not suitable and require immediate investment.

“How come the gardaí can have a state-of-the-art college and housing in Templemore,” the senator asked.

He maintains that it is no wonder that Defense Forces personnel facing such conditions vote with their feet and leave the country’s military.

“Ireland, with its vast experience in peacekeeping, should be at the forefront of military training in Europe.

“The Military College should be a fully accredited third level college and the accommodations and facilities at The Curragh should be the envy of military personnel around the world.

“There is an opportunity to turn the Military College into a Defense cash cow, but there doesn’t seem to be anyone up for the challenge,” Craughwell said.

“There is nothing in the Curragh camp that would make a young woman or a young man want to go.

Neighborhoods beyond human habitation

“The few old family housing that remain are on the whole beyond human habitation and, in any case, are not available because the Ministry of Defense stopped providing family housing to soldiers on duty there. has several years. ”

Mr Craughwell asked why the remaining buildings were not treated as “a national treasure” and added another equally important note.

“Young soldiers at the bottom of the civil service salary scale must compete in the open housing market while contemporaries in other countries enjoy accommodation and medical care for themselves and their families.” .

“Just imagine what the provision of housing for serving soldiers would do to local rental prices as the number of competitors for rental housing declines,” Mr. Craughwell said.

Housing at The Curragh once housed many families throughout a community.
Housing at The Curragh once housed many families throughout a community.

Labor Senator Mark Wall, who lives near the camp, claimed there were 43 abandoned buildings there.

He said it is extremely difficult for enlisted staff, who are poorly paid, to obtain scarce and very expensive rental accommodation anywhere near the camp.

“There are also reports of the lack of adequate showers for staff on duty in the camp and this needs to be addressed urgently,” he said.

Mr Wall pointed out that in December 2018 it was announced that a new high school was going to be built in the camp, but that project did not progress.

He also said that another major problem exists at military bases as there is no suitable accommodation for families.

In response to a question from the Dáil on this issue, Defense Minister Simon Coveney said a policy was introduced in the 1990s to end the provision of married quarters to serving staff.

“It is not intended to reverse this long-standing policy,” Coveney added.

Poor housing and pressure on rents impact troops

Many accommodations in Defense Force facilities are rated so poor that they are categorized as “insufficient” by military authorities who do not charge people to stay in these rooms.

This is the case with some of the remaining accommodations at The Curragh.

According to PDForra, which represents the enlisted personnel, there are six barracks at The Curragh with a total of 869 beds. Among these, 760 are “transit beds” reserved for those who come there for internship. The remaining 109 are used by people who “live” on the base.

In Block A, there are 50 rooms classified by the army as unsanitary.

Plunkett Barracks has 100 beds in its combined G and H blocks, of which 50 beds are also considered substandard. McDermott Barracks has 40 closed beds and Block Ceannt the same number.

PDForra Chairman Mark Keane said one of the best accommodation facilities is Finner Camp in County Donegal.

“They don’t have a lot of people living there. They have housing available and it is of a fairly good standard, ”said Mr. Keane.

PDForra chairman Mark Keane said accommodation was
PDForra chairman Mark Keane said accommodation was “poor” at Cathal Brugha and McKee barracks in Dublin. Photo: Don MacMonagle

Unfortunately for Finner-based troops, they are routinely dispatched to perform duties in barracks in Dublin where the same cannot be said.

Mr Keane said accommodation was “poor” at the Cathal Brugha and McKee barracks in Dublin.

He added that the photo also isn’t very good at Sarsfield Barracks in Limerick, Renmore Barracks in Galway and St Stephen’s Barracks in Kilkenny.

“Some of these rooms are also substandard,” Keane added.

It would also not be uncommon to have four to six people sharing a room.

There aren’t enough beds for cash-strapped soldiers looking to live in Collins Barracks, Cork, and currently there are four people on the waiting list for a bed there. In recent years, rents in the city have increased significantly.

The Air Corps is currently seeing a number of works being undertaken to modernize the accommodation available at its headquarters in Baldonnel.

This work included rewiring, plumbing, etc. There are 38 rooms with 78 beds in total with up to three per room. The apprentices’ accommodation has been recently renovated.

It has been well documented how many young sailors have slept on ships because they cannot afford rents in the Cork Harbor area near the naval service base on Haulbowline Island.

Rents in places like Cobh, Carrigaline, Ringaskiddy and Monkstown would in the vast majority of cases be well beyond their reach.

The island’s ‘Victorian Blocks’ are being renovated and, when completed, over 160 beds will be made available.

The 'Victorian Blocks' at Haulbowline Naval Base in County Cork are being refurbished, eventually providing over 160 beds.  Photo: Denis Minihane.
The ‘Victorian Blocks’ at Haulbowline Naval Base in County Cork are being refurbished, eventually providing over 160 beds. Photo: Denis Minihane.

Mr Keane said that if the Defense Forces are to be successful in attracting new entrants and retaining personnel, the provision of decent quality housing must be the cornerstone of this retention and recruitment policy in all three branches. of the Defense Forces.

“If we are to attract new entrants to the Defense Forces, we must be proactive in providing the same accommodation services and standards currently provided by companies currently recruiting,” said Mr. Keane.

Following the last budget, Defense Minister Simon Coveney said capital funding for the Defense Forces next year will be € 141 million.

He said this will allow the continued replacement and renewal of essential military equipment and will allow continued investment in facilities.

Mr Coveney said a significant number of defense infrastructure projects will also be advanced under the Defense Force Built Infrastructure Program.

These will include the provision of a new cadet school at The Curragh, a new military medical facility at Casement Airfield, Baldonnel, and allow accommodation facilities to be upgraded at various military sites across the country. such as Collins Barracks, Cork; McKee Barracks, Dublin and the naval base on Haulbowline Island.

However, he did not specify how much of the 141 million euros would be spent on improving housing.


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Avalanche signs head coach Jared Bednar for 2 more years – CBS Denver

DENVER (CBS4)– The Colorado Avalanche has signed head coach Jared Bednar for a two-year contract extension that will keep him with the club until the 2023-24 season.

(Credit: CBS)

“Jared has established himself as one of the best coaches in the NHL,” said Avalanche executive vice president and general manager Joe Sakic. “He is a great leader who has the complete confidence of our players and staff. Under his leadership, our team has continued to make great progress and improve every year. We know he is the right person. to help us take that next step and compete for a Stanley Cup. ”

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In his sixth season as Colorado head coach, Bednar is 191-154-40 and is two wins away from equaling Bob Hartley as the most successful coach in history. of the Avalanche. Overall, Bednar’s 191 wins only drag Michel Bergeron (265) and Hartley (193) into Quebec / Colorado franchise history. The 385 games led by Bednar are the most important in Avalanche history and the second in franchise history behind Bergeron (634).

READ MORE: Denver lawyer files civil action in Kyle Rittenhouse shooting

The Avs have qualified for the playoffs in each of the past four seasons, which ranks as the third longest streak of playoff appearances in franchise history. Bednar has guided Colorado to a 24-18-1 record in 43 career playoff games, the second-best playoff winning percentage (0.558) among active head coaches.

(Credit: CBS)

“I am grateful and excited to have the opportunity to continue to lead this team and build on what we have achieved so far,” said Jared Bednar. “We know we haven’t reached our ultimate goal yet, but we are confident in the squad we have and we will continue to work hard to get there. I would like to thank Stan and Josh Kroenke, Joe Sakic and the entire Avalanche organization for their continued trust in me. My family and I love Colorado and are thrilled to be a part of this wonderful community.

NO MORE NEWS: 3 students gunned down in parking lot at Hinkley High School in Aurora

In the 2020-21 season, Bednar led the Avalanche to the Presidents’ Trophy and the Honda West Division Championship. Colorado’s first overall result came just four years after finishing last overall in Bednar’s first season in 2016-17. The Avs became the first NHL team to go from worst to first in four seasons or less since the Bruins in 1970-71.


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Canadian army

PPCLI has strong ties to Moosomin

Every year on Remembrance Day, soldiers from the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) march through Moosomin to honor the sacrifices veterans have made for this country.

The PPCLI is one of three Canadian Army Regular Force infantry regiments of the Canadian Armed Forces.

Two of its members from Shilo, MB, Captain Zain Daudi and Warrant Officer Christopher Gillis, spoke about the connection between their force and Moosomin.

“We come every year because Major Mullin is a historic member of our regiment,” said Warrant Officer Gillis.

“In 1917, thanks to his incredibly heroic actions, he received the Victoria Cross, which is the highest honor for bravery in the Commonwealth and in Canada. So every year for Remembrance Day, we attach a guard to Moosomin, to honor his sacrifice and make sure that the family members who are still there, remember him and honor what he did ”, explains Warrant Officer Gillis.

Sergeant Harry Mullin, 25, single-handedly captured a German pillbox that had withstood heavy bombardment and caused heavy casualties, delaying the attack.

Mullin rushed past a sniper post, destroying it with grenades, fired at two gunners, and forced the other 10 to surrender. His clothes were riddled with bullets, but he never wavered.

After the war, he returned to Moosomin. He was appointed Sergeant-at-Arms to the Saskatchewan Legislature in 1934.

In January 1918, Sergeant Mullin was informed that he had been awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on October 30, 1917, in Passchendaele, Belgium.

17 Saskatchewan soldiers received the Victoria Cross. Sergeant Harry Mullin is Moosomin’s third local Victoria Cross recipient.

The other two are Lieutenant Robert Grierson Combe, who owned a store in Moosomin before World War I, and received his Victoria Cross posthumously, and Company Sergeant Major Osborn, who farmed near Wapella and received the Victoria Cross posthumously for sacrificing his life to save his comrades.

“Mullin is a historic member of the battalion, he represents and exemplifies many of the values ​​we hold, which are calm, professional and obviously the courage he has shown,” said Captain Daudi.

“The Victoria Cross is the highest honor you can receive and it is usually awarded for bravery, it is the most remarkable act of bravery. In Major Mullin’s case, he suppressed and cared for smallpox. This act itself shows his contempt for his own personal safety, in order to accomplish the greater mission at hand and the bravery he has displayed.

Remembrance Day

personal meaning for Gillis

Warrant Officer Gillis says that every member of the regiment attends a parade somewhere on Remembrance Day.

“It is incumbent on us as leaders to ensure that our young soldiers continue to join the force, it is important for them to understand what Remembrance Day means.

“I myself am an Afghanistan veteran, I have been there twice and lost several friends during this deployment. For me personally, Remembrance Day is an extremely important day. Our last causal in Afghanistan was a good friend of mine and I make sure his memory comes back every year. I can talk about him, I make sure his mother knows that we still care about him, that we always remember and honor his sacrifice even though it has been 10 years since he died, ”said Warrant Officer Gillis .

He says Remembrance Day for every battalion member is a day of reflection and a day to honor those who are not here with us today.

“Each year, members of the battalion view Remembrance Day not as a celebration, but rather as a day of honor. Honor the people who joined the military by bearing and accepting the cost that was greater than themselves, who ultimately paid the sacrifice for it. ”

“We have to be seen remembering the veterans, because there are still families who have empty places at the table all over the country, where their husbands, mothers, daughters and sons once sat. You know, it is important for them and for them that we are seen in public because they are the ones who matter not only for the sacrifices that have disappeared, but for the families who still live.

For 19 years, Warrant Officer Gillis continued to dedicate his service around the world. In July of this year, he was deployed to CFB Shilo to serve.

“For me, as a warrant officer, part of my role is the protection of our customs and traditions in the military, one of our most important and sacred customs is Remembrance today. The solemn act of remembrance itself. Just be seen and be there.

“What I take away from 20 years in the military is that it is so important to make sure that my young soldiers understand what they got into, in terms of our heritage and our reputation, and that includes to remember and honor all of our fallen soldiers, not just in the regiment, but throughout the Canadian Armed Forces.

“For me personally, it’s a day to remember 14 of my friends who were killed in Afghanistan, and then all of our dead in Korea, Libya and other places in the world.”

Gillis says he had a relative who fought in the Korean War and that he also had an uncle who fought in WWI and WWII.

A day to honor

Captain Daudi says Remembrance Day is a day that all Canadians should honor and not just those Canadians who have a direct connection to this day.

“Everyone who fought in WWI and WWII, those soldiers who came before us, laid the groundwork for us to live the lives we have today. Relatively speaking and looking at where we are now, we are blessed, ”he said.

“Today every Canadian soldier has huge shoes to fill up to the standard set by these brave soldiers. It is important to remember them, it is important to honor them because it is the sacrifices they made that give us the quality of life we ​​enjoy today.

Additionally, Gillis explains why the day is important for people who may not have a direct connection to soldiers lost in the past.

“At the end of the day, they’re Canadian, we’re all Canadians. We are all here today and our way of life is due to the sacrifices they made. World War II was one of the greatest evils in human history. Show me throughout our dark history which is darker than Nazi Germany and these men and women have stood up for the occasion. It is often said that people do not stand up for the occasion, but you look at all these people and it is clear that people have risen for the occasion at a time that was crazy and unknown.

“For me, at the end of the day, whether Canadians have a personal connection or think they don’t have a personal connection, they do it because they are Canadians. Our way of life is due to the greatness that came before us.

As a first generation Canadian, Captain Daudi talks about what the day means to him.

“Remembrance Day for me honors those who have come before us. As first generation Canadians, my parents immigrated to Canada decades ago. They were from Pakistan and India and understood the context of the life I have had the privilege of living in Canada. The opportunities that have been offered to me through their personal sacrifices, it is important for me to honor these people simply because of the privileges that I have acquired on a personal level. So beyond the individual but as a collective, these veterans have done a lot for us. I believe it is important for us to respect that and honor that in the future. ”

Captain Daudi has served in the military since 2018 and has been deployed nationally to Canada. He explains what prompted him to become a soldier.

“It goes back to Canada Day in 2003, when I was about 10 years old. I was in downtown Toronto with my dad, younger brother and uncle. We were just walking around the neighborhood enjoying the parade and all the festivities, and there were a few guys sitting along the sidewalk. They looked at our group there and told us to go back to our country, and at the age of 10 it really struck me. I didn’t know what he meant by that because I always thought Canada was my country and I asked my dad about it later. His response was that there are people out there who are just plain ignorant.

For me that comment, as a 10 year old, stuck with me for a long time and I think that’s what influenced me to join the military because I always felt I had to do something. thing. My parents did not come from a good situation when they immigrated to this country, but they managed to build something and build a good life for me and my brothers as well. I always thought I had to give back and there is no better way than to serve in the forces, in my opinion.

Commenting on Captain Daudi’s experience with racism at a young age, Warrant Officer Gillis talks about the unity the military offers.

“One of the things I like about the military is our unifying concept of our uniforms. We are all united by the fact that we are Patricia and we all have the same flag. I just think it’s really cool and one of my favorite services.

Warrant Officer Gillis explains why he decided to enlist in the military.

“I joined the military in December 2002, but before that, just around the time of September 11, I remember working part-time at a gas station.”

“At that time, while I was working at the gas station, a few guys I was going to high school with who had just finished college came to the store and they were so condescending to me. I was just like someone couldn’t talk to me like that, so I enlisted.

Warrant Officer Gillis says that throughout his deployments over his 19 years of service, he looks back and has no regrets about joining the military.

Visits will continue

Since the battalion was transferred to Shilo, PPCLI soldiers have marched to Moosomin every year. Both members say the visits will continue each year in honor of Sergeant Mullin and in honor of all Canadian soldiers.


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International headquarters

American teacher Keishia Thorpe wins 2021 million dollar Global Teacher Prize – News

Jeremiah Thoronka from Sierra Leone wins Chegg.org Global Student Prize 2021



Posted: Wed, 10 Nov 2021, 11:15 PM

Last update: Wed 10 Nov 2021, 11:45 PM

American teacher Keishia Thorpe, who opened up university education to low-income, first-generation American students, immigrants and refugees, was named the recipient of the 2021 Varkey Foundation Global Teachers’ Award held on Wednesday at Unesco headquarters in Paris. .

Now in its seventh year, the million dollar prize is the largest prize of its kind and is organized in partnership with Unesco.

Keishia, an English teacher at International High School Langley Park, Bladensburg, Maryland, was selected from over 8,000 nominations and nominations for the Global Teacher Prize from 121 countries around the world.

Meanwhile, Jeremiah Thoronka, a student from Sierra Leone, who invented a device that uses the kinetic energy of traffic and pedestrians to generate clean energy, has been named the winner of the Chegg.org Global Student Prize. 2021.

French actress Isabelle Huppert announced that Keishia was the winner of the Global Teacher Prize and actor Hugh Jackman announced that Jeremiah was the winner of the first Global Student Prize.

Jeremiah, 21, is the first recipient of this new $ 100,000 sister prize of the Global Teacher Prize which is awarded to an outstanding student who has made a real impact on learning, the lives of their peers and society at- of the.

Together, the Global Teacher Prize and the Global Student Prize tell inspiring stories from both sides of the education sector.

Keishia teaches English to grade 12 students at International High School Langley Park in Maryland. 100 percent of its students learn English and 95 percent identify as low income.

Keishia has completely redesigned the English department’s curriculum to make it culturally relevant to its students who are first generation Americans, immigrants or refugees primarily from Africa, the Middle East, the Caribbean and South America. South and central.

As a result of her interventions, her students showed a 40 percent increase in their reading, which helped the school meet its growth rate against target with a 10 percent increase in reading. WIDA scores for 2019-2020 and highest in the school district for ELLs.

Keishia spends a tremendous amount of time encouraging her high school students to apply to college, helping them with their applications, and helping them get fully funded scholarships.

Between the period of 2018 and 2019 alone, she helped her students earn more than $ 6.7 million in scholarships at 11 different colleges, nearly 100 of which were tuition-free.

Jeremiah, meanwhile, was born amid the fighting of the civil war in Sierra Leone and raised with his single mother in a slum for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the capital Freetown. He had to burn charcoal and wood for light and heat.

Jeremy saw with his own eyes how, in addition to the photochemical smog that trivializes respiratory problems, his young contemporaries fell behind in their homework for lack of decent lighting.

Thus, life-threatening disadvantages and difficulties fueled Jeremiah’s passion for renewable energy and advocating for climate change. At 17, while studying at African Leadership University in Rwanda, he started a start-up called Optim Energy that turns vibrations from vehicles and pedestrians on the roads into an electric current.

Optim Energy has successfully carried out a pilot program in the districts of Jeremiah, Makawo in the northern part of Sierra Leone and Kuntoluh in the east of Freetown. With just two devices, the start-up provided free electricity to 150 homes with around 1,500 citizens, as well as 15 schools attended by more than 9,000 students.

Congratulating the winners, Sunny Varkey, Founder of the Varkey Foundation, said: “Congratulations to Keishia for winning the Global Teacher Prize 2021 and to Jeremiah for becoming the very first winner of the Chegg.org Global Student Prize. Their incredible stories show the vital role education plays in meeting the great challenges of today and tomorrow.

Stefania Giannini, Assistant Director-General for Education at Unesco, also congratulated the couple.

“Unesco was proud to host the World Teachers’ Prize this year at our headquarters in Paris. Inspirational teachers and amazing students deserve to be recognized for their commitment to education amid today’s learning crisis. Now more than ever, we must honor and support our teachers and students as they seek to rebuild a better world in the aftermath of Covid, “she said.

Actor and humanitarian Hugh Jackman emphasized the importance of listening to the voices of students.

“Students everywhere are fighting for their future. They are part of a generation that is on the front lines of the greatest challenges of our time, from climate change to global inequalities. So we need to listen to their voices and bring their stories to light.

To every dedicated student around the world who works hard to build a better future, we thank you for all you do while continuing your education, ”he said.

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Congratulating Jeremiah, Jackman added, “You have made a huge difference for your community and beyond. I’m sure you will now use this amazing platform to make an even bigger impact.”


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Non profit living

See Danny Pintauro from “Who’s the Boss?” Now – Better life

Danny Pintauro literally grew up on TV. For eight years he starred in Who is the boss as Jonathan Bower, the son of single mother Angela (Judith Lumiere), whose world changes when a new governess (Tony Danza) and her daughter (Alyssa Milano) move in. The multi-camera sitcom was a smash hit and aired on ABC from 1984 to 1992. By the time it ended, 16-year-old Pintauro was a true teenage idol, appearing regularly on the covers of Bop and teen beat alongside people like Kirk cameron and Michael j fox. Then he moved away from Hollywood and a full-time acting career. To find out why Pintauro left the company and what he does today, read on.

RELATED: 13 Child Actors From The 90s Who Left Hollywood And Why.

Ron Galella, Ltd./Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images

Before Who is the boss, Pintauro got his first credit on the soap opera As the world turns, followed by his film debut in the 1983s Cujo. And during the course of the sitcom, he held a few other jobs, including two TV movies.

When Who is the boss passed away, Pintauro took a break from his acting career to finish high school, then study theater at Stanford University. After graduating he tried to get back into the game and performed on stage in a few productions. However, he didn’t find the screen success he once had, and a tabloid story complicated matters further.

Danny Pintauro in 1997
Ron Galella, Ltd./Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images

In 1997, the National investigator called the young actor to tell him they would air an article publicly denouncing him as gay. Pintauro said Weekly metro two years later, it wasn’t as traumatic as some might assume since he was already open about his sexuality in his personal life.

“Most people think it was a terrible, terrible experience,” he told the outlet. “It wasn’t. It might have been if I wasn’t expecting it. If they hadn’t been nice enough to call me and ask me if I wanted to be a part of it. But as a actor, I have to say I totally expected it sooner or later because I wasn’t hiding it. I wasn’t in the closet. I knew it was going to happen.

Pintauro said he called his former co-star and close friend Judith Light for advice. “And his advice was, ‘If they write a story about you whether you like it or not, as much as they quote you correctly,” “the actor explained. “So I cooperated with the Applicant. And the article was really great. It was sincere. It was interesting. It was smart. What people don’t realize about these magazines is that if you cooperate, they’ll make a good story. They will do it well. If you don’t cooperate, they’ll come after you. “

And Pintauro certainly has no regrets today. On this year’s Spirit Day, a celebration of the LGBTQ + community, he posted a TikTok that begins: “You know, it always makes me smile when someone tells me I inspired them to come out of the closet. It’s something I can be proud of for the rest of my life. “

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Danny Pintauro in 2019
Bobby Bank / Getty Images

In a 2015 appearance on Oprah winfrey‘s Oprah: Where are they now, Pintauro has revealed his HIV status. He was diagnosed in 2003.

“I went for a regular check-up,” he said. “You know, as a responsible gay man, you get tested for HIV every six months… And you kind of waited two weeks with pins and needles, or at least I did, because that I was just terrified of contracting HIV. “

He said he believed he contracted it because he had used drugs and therefore was less concerned about safe sex.

“On meth, you have no limits, you feel invincible,” he told Winfrey. “You feel incredibly elated when it comes to your sexuality, and everything looks and feels arousing to you.”

Daniel Pintauro in 2016
Gregg Felsen / Getty Images for the Desert AIDS project

Although he felt compelled to back down right before Winfrey’s interview, Pintauro said that ultimately being upfront about his status made his life better.

“Before, it was difficult to walk in the street without someone recognizing me, and it was initially because I was on Who is the boss?. Then it was, ‘He was on Who is the boss? and he’s gay. Now it was going to be, ‘He was on Who is the boss?, he’s gay, and he’s another one of those HIV-positive guys, “” the 45-year-old said. People in 2021. “It was a little terrifying, but it didn’t really make me guess because I’m much happier as a person with no secrets.”

And Pintauro didn’t just tell the world he’s HIV positive. After the interview aired, he collaborated on the HIV Equal social media campaign for the “Beacon of Light” tour, which aimed to reduce the stigma associated with the disease, as reported. People. The campaign involved in-depth discussions between Pintauro and HIV and AIDS experts about living with the disease.

In 2016, Pintauro received the Arts and Activism Award from the Steve Chase Humanitarian Awards, which raises funds for the Desert Aids Project charity based in Palm Springs, California.

“I am proud to say tonight, in front of this welcoming, passionate and alluring crowd, that this award, in many ways, completes a huge circle of life and reinforces the fact that I made the right decisions,” he said. he declared when he accepted, the Desert sun reported.

Pintauro touched on a few areas after graduating from college, including the entertainment industry in a behind-the-camera capacity. In addition to working as a casting assistant, production coordinator and agent assistant, according to his LinkedIn, he managed a restaurant and worked at Whole Foods.

He is now a veterinary technician and pharmacy technician at the Texas nonprofit shelter, Austin Pets Alive.

“There is something of a wonder around animals,” Katera Berent, the shelter’s communications and events manager, told Austin360 in 2019. “You can feel the love he feels for every cat and dog he takes care of.”

The Who is the boss? The star told the outlet that he believes his job at the clinic is his true calling.

“As a very young child, that’s literally what I wanted to do when I grew up. Even though I was on TV, every summer I worked at this vet practice near my home in Los Angeles and cleaned the kennels or whatever they left is me doing it, ”he said. “I liked it.”

Pintauro did not lose the acting virus, however. He posts videos of himself performing monologues on TikTok and last year collaborated with several other former child stars for a web series called The quarantine group. And he has a sense of humor about his sitcom past; In a live musical parody titled Who is Da Boss?, Pintauro played a version of himself at the age of six.

He has shared his life in Austin with her husband for seven years, Wil tabares.

RELATED: Former Star Children Who Are Actually Geniuses.



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Non profit living

Zena empowers women living in poverty in Uganda

OXFORD, UK – Zena, a non-profit organization with a deep and lasting impact on women living in poverty in Uganda, works in several parts of Uganda, including Kamuli, one of the most poor people of the country.

Women in Uganda

Due to pervasive gender inequality in Uganda, women are treated like second-class citizens. Women are marginalized in many ways, whether due to lack of access to education, political under-representation or the violation of harmful cultural practices such as female genital mutilation and marriage. of children. Although overall poverty has declined over the years, the poverty rate is still high in Uganda, rising to 21.4% in 2016. Notably, high poverty rates have a disproportionate impact on women.

In an interview with The Borgen Project, Loren Thomas and Caragh Bennet, co-founders of Zena, point out that the women they work with “are not beneficiaries but benefactors”. Entrepreneurship women are enrolled in The Zena Launchpad program, where they gain confidence, education and community, while simultaneously gaining a learning / employment opportunity to create jewelry for the community. Zena brand. This work allows women to save to start their own business and escape poverty.

Origin story

Thomas and Bennet met in Uganda while volunteering on a gap year after high school. After active discussions on best practices in aid, Thomas’ experience in developing a social enterprise program for women, and Bennet’s research thesis in Uganda, they agreed that “women entrepreneurs needed debt-free capital ”. From there was born the idea of ​​Zena.

Zena has two bodies that go together. One is the Zena Launchpad where the focus is on social impact. The other is the product line, The Zena Brand, which focuses on creating unique jewelry. The quality and style of Zena’s products make the brand popular, featured in Vogue Italia, Marie Claire and Harper’s Bazaar.

Hybrid model

What makes Zena unique is that it is not a traditional charity. Zena is partly nonprofit because she works with donors who invest in women, wishing to have an impact rather than getting a capital reward. At the same time, Zena is a social enterprise as women gain access to stable employment and acquire skills and earned capital for their business ideas.

Thomas explains: “The hybrid model Zena Launchpad allows women to access start-up capital without loans and without handouts. This is extremely important in fostering a sense of agency, as it “allows them to start businesses from a real place of strength and trust, knowing that they have fully earned this opportunity themselves”.

The model in practice

The selection process is simple: the participants / potential members of the program are women living in poverty in Uganda with viable business ideas. Women are an eclectic mix of backgrounds, all “from a variety of religions, tribes and even different countries,” says Thomas. Some were once refugees, others were abused, but all women come into Zena and find not only a new livelihood, but a new community of support. Women end up becoming clients of each other and looking after each other’s children.

Once selected for the jewelry apprenticeship program, women receive education and training in business and literacy. Each member is assigned a unique contract based on their business idea and the amount they need to save to start the business. Zena supports achievable goals so that women graduate and the next cohort can then be enrolled.

But, Zena doesn’t stop there. Bennet and Thomas intentionally decided to use only recycled and locally sourced waste to make their products, believing in the power of the fashion industry to do good not only for workers but also for the environment.

Education

Education in Zena is extremely important. The program takes a holistic approach through three areas of learning: classroom instruction, work experience, and personal development through mentoring. Zena sees literacy as crucial in changing the lives of women living in poverty in Uganda alongside formal business education and leadership training. Women gain “project management experience and communication skills” while working and discussing important topics, such as violence, family planning and mental health in a supportive environment.

Bennet and Thomas are continually looking for a way to improve their program. They are now planning a course on social media and smartphones after noticing during the COVID-19 pandemic that a lack of computer literacy can be a barrier to success.

Combat gender inequalities

In Uganda, there is a significant gender disparity in human capital wealth, with women accounting for only 39%, while men accounting for 61%. What is more, girls and women of lower socioeconomic status are the most affected by gender inequality. Therefore, the Zena Launchpad program, active since 2016, deliberately focuses on creating future women entrepreneurs by empowering women living in poverty.

The Zena team believes that these women will then also become leaders in their communities, defending and supporting other women. Some of Zena’s graduates now only hire women at their startups, and a graduate called Susan is going one step further, focusing on hiring single mothers. Thomas says that another graduate, Eva, “is currently working to run for local government to better advocate for women in her community.”

The empowerment and social awareness gained through the model has a clear impact on the community, not just the women in the official program. This belief in solidarity is something Bennet and Thomas stand for, with weekly team bonding sessions mandatory for all Zena members, regardless of the role of the participant, from security personnel to board members. .

An exemplary model

In her first five years, Zena supported the development of 31 women entrepreneurs, with 19 graduating from her program. This impact means that 200 people are lifted out of poverty, 90 children receive an education and 17 women are literate.

Zena’s founders are now looking to expand their program to help more women living in poverty in Uganda, believing the success of their model is proof of its potential for replication around the world. Zena, a community power-driven nonprofit, is one to watch for the future and be inspired by today.

– Hope Browne
Photo: Courtesy of Zena


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Rick Jones obituary | TV for children

Actor Rick Jones, who died at age 84 from cancer, rose to prominence in the 1960s and 1970s as a children’s television host – most notably on Play School and Fingerbobs – when his musical talents took hold. been discovered by the BBC. He later became the frontman of country rock band Meal Ticket.

In 1964, he sang and strummed the guitar at the Royal Court Theater, London, in Spoon River, a stage performance based on poems by Edgar Lee Masters about the people of a small town in Illinois. Donald Sutherland and Betsy Blair starred, and although Jones was initially annoyed that he couldn’t show off his acting and verse reading skills, he began to enjoy singing American folk songs in front of theaters. attic.

One evening, producer Joy Whitby, who was preparing a new under-five TV show, Play School, went backstage to ask her to join the show. Although he viewed the BBC as “a notoriously stingy payer,” he saw the opportunity for financial stability for his family, especially with repeated episodes daily, doubling his fees.

Jones spent a decade (1964-1973) as the host of the weekday morning show, known for its “home” windows opening up the outside world to its young viewers. He sang, told stories, and dressed for 447 episodes – with only Carol Chell, Brian Cant, Julie Stevens, Chloe Ashcroft, Johnny Ball, and Sarah Long appearing in more.

He single-handedly made a huge impression on this audience as the presenter of the 1972 series Fingerbobs. Released in the Watch with Mother Lunchtime Slot Machine, Fingerbobs was designed by Michael and Joanne Cole and featured the adventures of Fingermouse and his friends, including Scampi the Fish, Gulliver the Seagull and Flash the Turtle.

One of 13 episodes of Fingerbobs, the 1972 series presented by Rick Jones, who used his gloved hands to create characters including Fingermouse, Scampi the Fish and Gulliver the Seagull

Under the guise of “Yoffy,” Jones used his gloved hands to create these and other animals like paper finger puppets, also performing songs about them – and his own character: “Yoffy holds up a finger and a mouse is there / Puts his hands together and a seagull takes to the air / Yoffy raises a finger and a lobster soars / Yoffy folds another and a turtle head appears.

Jones lost weight while filming the shows, which only lasted 13 episodes but were repeated for 12 years. “It was such a hard job to squeeze under tables with your fingers in the buttocks of little animals,” he told Garry Vaux, author of Legends of Kids TV (2009). “We finally designed a system of slings on the runners so I could sneak madly in there desperately trying to remember which character to stick which entrance to which tail.”

He was fired by the BBC when an overzealous fan, perhaps influenced by his hippie look – sparse locks, beard and bald head – mailed him two cannabis spliffs to the company’s address, well that Jones suggested that drugs were part of the culture. at the time, adding that the BBC studios were also then a hotbed of illicit sex.

Then he focused on music with country rock band Meal Ticket. He played keyboards, alternated as lead singer with Willy Finlayson and, along with Dave Pierce, wrote many of the band’s songs while they performed on the London pub circuit and released the Code of the Road albums ( 1977), Three Times a Day (1977) and to go (1978).

The BBC commissioned Jones and Pierce to write You’d Better Believe It, Babe, which Meal Ticket interpreted as the theme of the award-winning fantastic time travel The Flipside of Dominick Hide (1980) and its sequel, Another Flip for Dominick ( 1982).

Jones was born to British parents, Agnes (née Hannon) and Frederick Jones, in London, Ontario; his parents had moved to Canada and his father served in the Canadian Army. Leaving London Central High School, he began his professional life as a forester and nickel miner.

Moving to Britain in 1957, Jones trained at the Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art, London, where Terence Stamp was a friend and contemporary, then performed for three years with the Library Theater repertoire company. of Manchester (1959-62). During a hiatus in 1961 he toured the United States with Theater Outlook in productions including Coriolanus and later made his London West End debut in Fiorello (Piccadilly theater, 1962).

One of his first television appearances came as Mercutio in an ITV adaptation of Romeo and Juliet starring Jane Asher. As a resident folk singer at the Pickwick Club in London, which was popular with celebrities, he has previously performed to the Beatles.

On television, Jones also sang in Jackanory in 1966 and appeared singing and presenting in Whoosh! (1968) and editions of Play Away between 1972 and 1974, as well as episodes of The Saint (1967) and Dr Finlay’s Casebook (1969).

His vocal work included character dubbing in the French children’s series Belle et Sébastien (1967-68), about a boy and his dog, as well as foreign porn films, and he wrote the English theme song for another program. produced in France, Aeronauts (1967-70).

Jones moved to the United States in 1981, when his musical Captain Crash vs the Zzorg Women Chapters 5 and 6 – written with Pierce and others – was staged at Richmond’s, a theater in Los Angeles. Later, with Roger Penycate, he developed the musical Laughing Daughter, based on songs from Meal Ticket, and performed at the Black Box Theater, Silver Spring, Maryland, in 2009.

Her 1960 marriage to Min (Marina) Ayles ended in divorce. He married Valerie Neale in 1986 and they recorded an album, Life Drawing, together in 2008. He is survived by Valerie and the daughters of his first marriage, Leaflyn and Chrysta.

Rick (Frederick Joseph) Jones, actor and musician, born February 7, 1937; passed away on October 7, 2021


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San Francisco housing complex gives victims of domestic violence a fresh start

Tucked away on her Chesterfield sofa, her power wheelchair close at hand, Rosemary Dyer examined the glittering peacock figures she had purchased on her first solo trip to San Francisco’s Chinatown after her release from prison, and admired the bright tablecloth with silk flowers in her new living room.

Dyer, an effervescent woman with a mischievous sense of humor, brought these and other prized possessions to Home Free, a new transitional apartment complex in San Francisco. It was designed for women who have been jailed for killing their abusive partner or being at a crime scene coerced by an abusive spouse or boyfriend. Dyer was convicted of murder and sentenced to life without parole in 1988 for the shooting death in 1985 of her eight-year-old husband, who abused and tortured her, at a time when expert testimony related to domestic violence and its effects were not permitted. in court in most states.

The insidious villainy that defined her life included being repeatedly beaten and sodomized with a loaded handgun. Her husband had dug a grave in the backyard, saying he intended to bury her alive.

Home Free – where Governor Gavin Newsom’s 2020 Dyer’s Switch is proudly hung on the wall – was created by Five Keys Schools and Programs, a statewide nonprofit that provides education, training professional, therapeutic programs and housing for inmates and new releases. The five-bedroom, two-bedroom apartment complex is the result of years of advocacy by survivors of intimate partner violence and the organizations that work with them. Their efforts have enabled women like Dyer to secure their release by pardon or by retroactively presenting evidence of their abuse to the state parole board or the courts.

“The fact that women who have suffered unspeakable violence against them have not been allowed to provide evidence of the abuse is the epitome of injustice,” said Sunny Schwartz, founder of Five Keys. “We are committed to creating a vibrant, dignified and safe home, a place that says ‘you are worth it.’ “

Previous transitional housing options for women were largely limited to those dealing with substance abuse. Home Free, on Treasure Island, a former naval base in the San Francisco Bay area, was forged during the pandemic last year with a tight start-up budget of $ 750,000, including staff. The once grimy apartments have been renovated with the help of nearly 100 volunteers – architects and landscapers, flooring and cabinet installers, plumbers, transporters, electricians and urban construction apprentices. They all gathered on this somewhat bizarre island originally built for the 1939 Golden Gate International Exhibition.

Interior design students at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco dedicated a semester to the project, joining mini-charettes on Zoom with Irving A. Gonzales of G7 Architects. They also reflected with the women, whose desires included full-length mirrors (they had been denied in prison to monitor their form for years).

“We wanted color! said Dyer, who visited the construction site while still in temporary accommodation. She and others had a particular aversion to gray, a shade associated with bunks and metal prison lockers.

A 69-year-old cancer survivor with congestive heart failure, Dyer has been using a wheelchair since she injured her hip in prison. A huge pirate flag – a nod to the Treasure Island theme – greets visitors as they arrive. Her accessible apartment adjoins a patio where she grows pots of tomatoes and radishes.

The landscape itself was designed by Hyunch Sung of the Mithun firm, who chose 10 different tree species. (Because the soil on Treasure Island is contaminated with industrial chemicals, the trees are planted in brightly colored containers.) Sung said she approached her work there as if designing for high-end clients. . “The idea of ​​beauty is underestimated for disadvantaged communities,” she said.

Nilda Palacios, 38, who lives upstairs, said it was “emotionally moving” to join the resort. She grew up with a history of abuse: she was assaulted as a child by an uncle and a stepfather, then raped at the age of 15 by a high school teacher. The teacher’s stressful ordeal made her dependent on drugs and alcohol (“I was trying to sleep my life,” she says). Palacios became distraught and suicidal. When a beggar cornered her one day, she said, she thought he was planning to attack her and “went on a rampage”, strangling her. She was convicted of second degree murder. Incarcerated for 17 years, she benefited from therapists in prison who helped her understand “how the depth of my crime relates to my story,” she said. “I confused someone who was not a threat for someone who was.”

Palacios was paroled. She benefited from a broader vision for Home Free, which now welcomes women like her, whose crimes were directly linked to their abuse.

Upon moving in, she was “shocked” at the prospect of a private room after years of sharing an 8 x 10 foot cell and cramming all her things into a six cubic foot box, with, as one inmate put it, current. , “your panties against noodles and peanut butter.”

“No way, is this my room?” Palacios recalled. “It felt like a real house to me.”

The idea for Home Free arose during a conversation between Schwartz, its founder, and the state treasurer of California, Fiona Ma, then the deputy of the state. Ma’s legislation, signed by Gov. Jerry Brown in 2012, allowed women who had experienced domestic violence and been convicted of violent crimes related to their abuse the opportunity to have their cases heard again using Women’s Syndrome. beaten (as it was called then) as a defense. The law also gave them the right to present evidence of abuse by intimate partners during the parole process. It applied to persons convicted before August 1996.

The number of Rosemary Dyers still behind bars is unknown. About 12,000 women are currently incarcerated for homicide nationwide, said Debbie Mukamal, executive director of the Stanford Criminal Justice Center at Stanford Law School and director of the Regilla Project, a three-year effort to study the frequency with which women in the United States are jailed for killing their attackers. Small studies, including one in Canada, suggest that 65% of women serving a life sentence for the murder of their intimate partner had been assaulted by them before the offense. The link between abuse and violent crime was highlighted by grim statistics in a 1999 US Department of Justice report showing that a quarter to a third of incarcerated women had been abused as minors and only a quarter to almost a half in adulthood.

Despite increased public awareness, “there are still a large number of criminal lawyers who do not understand how intimate partner violence creates the context for a crime,” said Leigh Goodmark, director of the gender-based violence clinic at the University of Maryland School of Law.

In New York State, the Domestic Violence Survivors Justice Act, enacted in 2019, was put to the test in the high-profile case of Nicole Addimando, a young mother of two in Poughkeepsie who shot and killed her baby friend and his father. children in 2017 after years of heartbreaking abuse (the case is dramatically captured in the documentary film “And So I Stayed.”)

Sentenced to 19 years in life for second degree murder, Addimando was entitled to a subsequent hearing under the law, where her allegations of abuse could be factored into a reduced sentence. The county court judge dismissed the allegations, saying she “had been given the opportunity to leave her attacker safely.” In July, the appeals division of the state Supreme Court overturned the decision, reducing the length of Ms. Addimando’s detention to 7.5 years.

For Kate Mogulescu, associate professor at Brooklyn Law School and director of its Survivors Justice Project, the case illustrates “the impossible burdens we place on survivors to prove their victimization.” Women are scrutinized by the courts in a very different way than men, she added. “With women, they are a bad mother, or promiscuous. The tropes are trotted on women and the punishments reflect this. However, so far 16 women have been punished in New York.

By far the most common reason that women who have been abused by intimate partners end up in prison are accomplice laws, in which a victim is forced to be at the scene of an abuser’s violence, like driving the getaway car, said Colby Lenz, co-founder of Survived and Punished, a national rights organization.

This was the case with Tammy Cooper Garvin, a victim of sex trafficking at the age of 14 and jailed for 28 years for being in the car while her pimp murdered a client. Her sentence was commuted and she was hired by Home Free as a residential coordinator.

Another advocate – and a guiding force behind the founding of Home Free – is another survivor named Brenda Clubine, who started a weekly support group at the California Institution for Women. Some 72 women quickly joined. Dyer was one of the original members, but until Clubine encouraged her, she was so terrified of life that she could barely speak.

Clubine herself had suffered years of abuse, including broken bones and stab wounds, by her husband, a former police detective. She hit her head with a bottle of wine and he died of blunt trauma. She served 26 years of a 16 life sentence. Her fierce retelling of the stories of the women in the prison group – which she sent to state lawmakers and governors – led to public hearings and the 2009 documentary “Sin by Silence,” which in turn inspired California laws.

Clubine’s close friendship with Dyer continued and is essential to Dyer’s rebounding confidence. At Home Free, Dyer now delights in making homemade noodles with chicken from his grandmother’s recipe. Clubine, his BFF, found that a safe and strengthening place for his “sisters” was long overdue. “I can’t say how full my heart feels that he’s available to them now,” she said.


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Obituary of Charles Embleton (1922 – 2020)

B. Ed., M. Ed. (UBC), CD
Our dear dad, grandfather, uncle, stepfather, friend and mentor passed away peacefully at the Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria, British Columbia last year.

Predeceased by his parents Charles Victor Embleton and Sybil Ellen Richardson who emigrated from England in 1915, his sister Jean Ward, his beloved wife of 58 years Nonie (née Carruthers), his son Dennis Embleton and his daughter-in-law Joyce Embleton . Affectionately missed by his daughters Jean Kaltenbach (Gill Yochlowitz) and Margaret Embleton (Tim O’Loan); son Peter Embleton; five grandchildren: Sabrina (Jeff), Dianna, Scott (Kim), Chelsea and Patrick; and four great-grandchildren: Amy, Mason, Rachel-Jean and Rylee; and several nephews, nieces and friends. We are grateful for the care, love and kindness of all family and friends who visited her at Shannon Oaks in Victoria.

During World War II, Tony was an infantry reinforcement lieutenant and army training instructor. After the war he continued his university studies at UBC and obtained a bed and later a master’s degree in education. Shortly after marrying Nonie in Victoria in 1948, he accepted his first teaching assignment at Prince George High School and became Deputy Principal in 1953. While in Prince George, Tony joined the Regiment of the Rocky Mountain Rangers militia and, as captain, became the Officer in Charge of Company “A”. Tony served over 13 years in the Canadian Army.

In 1957, the Embleton family with children Jean, Den and Peter moved from Prince George to Kamloops for Tony to become vice-principal of North Kamloops Jr / Sr Secondary. In 1959 he became principal of the newly established John Peterson Jr High School, where he was the longest-serving principal for 14 years. On February 15, 1965, he hung the new Canadian flag at school after the birth of his fourth child, Margaret. In 1972 he became Principal of MacArthur Park Jr High School, and in 1979 of Sahali Jr High School, until his retirement in 1982.

Retired, Tony and Nonie built a home in the family’s beloved Lake Heffley, north of Kamloops, spending time skiing, hiking, swimming, teaching white-sailing lessons. and to organize sailing regattas and to welcome family and friends. After seven wonderful years of living on the lake, they returned to Victoria, their birthplace, where they continued to build a life full of love, respect, adventure, community service, family and friends. Tony continued his carpentry, sailing, hiking, biking, bird watching and travel while volunteering with the Victoria Natural History Association and St Aiden’s Church.

He has received awards for his contributions, including Honorary Life Members of: BC Principals and Vice-Principals Association, Victoria Natural History Society, Kamloops Sailing Club and Friends of Wells Gray Park and Appreciation Awards from St Aiden’s Thrift , Green Spaces, BC Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection.

His welcoming smile, kindness, humor, support, wisdom and leadership will be missed, but the unforgettable moments he created for each of us will always be in our hearts.

The family gathers over Thanksgiving weekend near Kamloops for a little celebration of family life and tradition of a hike to Embleton Mountain, last done on Tony’s 90th birthday, as pictured on the picture. He would be so happy to know that the trail system and views are loved by many other outdoor and nature enthusiasts.

Tony has always been a champion of the advancement of education, in his memory and in lieu of flowers the family would appreciate a contribution to: The Tony Embleton Entrance Scholarship (SD73) at Thompson Rivers University. For more information visit: www.tru.ca/makegift or call Janet at: 778-471-8469. If you would like to contact the family, please email: [email protected]

Posted in Kamloops this week from October 5 to November 4, 2021.


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10 in-demand jobs of the decade that don’t require a bachelor’s degree

A college degree can put you on the fast track to success in today’s job market by increasing your earning potential and your access to different work opportunities – but higher education is a costly investment that continues to grow. be inaccessible to many.

Over the past 10 years, college costs have increased by about 25%, according to a CNBC Make It analysis of College Board data. Along with these rising costs, student debt has skyrocketed; Americans currently owe over $ 1.73 trillion in student loans.

According to a recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there is a range of jobs that do not require a bachelor’s degree in several industries that are expected to be in high demand over the next 10 years.

Many of these jobs require a high school diploma, an associate’s degree, or a non-degree post-secondary scholarship. A non-degree post-secondary scholarship is a course typically taken in less than two years that teaches you the specific skills or knowledge needed for a job. Community colleges often offer these programs, which can include EMT certificates or library technician training, as two examples, Bureau of Labor statistics division chief Michael Wolf told CNBC Make It.

“It’s a bit of a mishmash,” Wolf says of the job classification. “It’s hard to find a common explanation as to why they are all popular… there are specific reasons why each is in demand, and will continue to be in demand over the next ten years.”

However, three trends are driving the growth of almost every job: increased demand for sustainable energy, an aging population and a renewed interest in personal care during the coronavirus pandemic.

Wind turbine maintenance technicians and solar PV panel installers are expected to be among the fastest growing jobs of the decade due to the climate change emergency and the resulting demand for sustainable energy.

Occupational therapy assistants, physiotherapy assistants, orderlies and physiotherapist assistants will become essential roles as more baby boomers retire and depend on these services. In a recent analysis, the University of Southern California notes that health care costs for this group are expected to be high, as this generation “lives longer, but experiences higher rates of obesity, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension ”.

Wolf specifies that physiotherapist assistants and physiotherapist assistants have separate and distinct roles: assistants are actively involved in providing patient care, while assistants are not involved in providing care, but rather focus on providing care. administrative tasks such as setting up equipment and completing office documents.

After dealing with the exhaustion and isolation induced by the pandemic over the past 18 months, people are investing more in personal services like massages and self-enrichment classes, resulting in increased demand massage therapists and teachers. “People are realizing that focusing and maintaining their personal care is important not only for their mental state, but also for their overall well-being,” said Vicki Salemi, career expert at Monster.

If you are interested in pursuing one of these careers, Salemi recommends that you read job descriptions to identify the skills recruiters are looking for, and read professional publications or blogs for up-to-date industry information. It also helps to have related work experience, she adds, whether through an online certification course, a work-study program at your local community college, or volunteering. in a non-profit organization. “Even if you don’t have any work experience, you can train yourself or follow someone in the field,” says Salemi. “Not only will you gain valuable skills, but you will also be able to meet contacts and references for that next job.”

To verify:

These are the 6 fastest growing jobs of the decade grossing over $ 100,000

How Networking Helped a 23-Year-Old Student Make an “Early Career” Discovery

The 3 fastest-disappearing jobs in the United States over the next decade

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Argus Wesleyan | WesCeleb: Philippe Bungabong ’22 on Freeman Scholarship, Nonprofit Work and American Idol

c / o Yongxi Tan ’22

During his college application, Philippe Bungabong ’22 was looking for an opportunity to further broaden his intellectual horizons. Throughout his time at the university, Bungabong has made himself an indispensable member of several campus communities, including the sailing team, the economics department and the Career Center. Outside of class, Bungabong can be found co-managing his non-profit organization, cooking delicious meals or singing. The Argus caught up with Bungabong on a foggy Tuesday evening over a glass of wine.

Argus: Why do you think you are nominated to be a WesCeleb?

Philippe Bungabong: [Laughs.] I think I was nominated for, well, part of it has to be nepotism.

A: Yeah, WesCeleb is talking about nepotism. [Laughs.]

PB: I have a number of great friends on The Argus, but I also think the other part of that should be the time I spent working at different levels on campus. I have been a residential counselor, I have worked as a teaching assistant for several classes and I am also part of the sailing team. I also sing and write songs and am friends with several people on the artistic side of campus. It’s just a gift, to know different people from different walks of life, and I am honored to be a WesCeleb.

A: Could you tell us more about the Freeman scholarship?

PB: The Freeman scholarship program, as it operated during my year, was that Wesleyan selected one student each from 11 countries in the East and South East Asia regions. I believe the countries are Philippines, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Indonesia, Malaysia, Japan, China, South Korea, Thailand and Vietnam. Of course, this has been a great opportunity to learn Wesleyan at no cost, but I also think the Freeman Scholars community is such a powerful community just to have students who really love to learn and study so many different things. I like the way I study economics and applied data science, but a number of other Freeman fellows are more in computer science or more in environmental studies or government. And they’re always the first, or among the first, groups of people I would tap into for insight into these areas.

A: Speaking of fields of study, did you know you wanted to study economics when you arrived? How did it happen?

PB: I came in thinking I wanted to study something more quantitative. I was either thinking about physics, math, or economics, and I took the three years of first and second year, but I think what I was most excited about was economics, and the ECON300 class, of which I am currently CA. It is a course on quantitative methods in economics. It was in this course that I really realized how economics is an area that will help me see and quantify the systems and interactions in the world.

A: It makes sense! I want to go back to your experiences at Wesyou mentioned that you have met so many different people on campus, people from all walks of life through your engagements. Which were the most valuable in shaping your Wesleyan experience?

PB: My closest friends are on the sailing team. I live with two of my co-captains. I had never sailed before entering college and it was just something I had chosen in first year and kept. I love sport. I also like the people in it. But aside from the sailing team, I would say my time as a tour guide, and now as a senior interviewer, continues to inform my time at Wesleyan. As a tour guide, I continue to introduce Wesleyan to future students, and this has given me a new set of eyes again through which I look at Wesleyan…. I always try to keep finding things that I love about Wes and also things that I want to improve about Wes, or things that I would like them to be different about Wesleyan, all with the goal of communicating why I think Wes might be a good fit for someone. I would say Wesleyan is not a perfect school, but for some people it is the ideal school, and I want to make sure that I am able to communicate that to all the potential students who come here.

A: Speaking of college admissions and helping people find perfect universities, you also run an educational non-profit organization.!

PB: I co-founded CAUSE Philippines when I was a freshman here. I co-founded it with two other low income Filipino students and we really built it with the idea that talent is everywhere, but opportunity not. We wanted to equip other low income Filipino students with the best college education they can receive so that one day they can go home and develop their community for the better, as we believe low income students know the more intimately the problems of their community. focused towards.

A: Could you explain what CAUSE does in particular?

PB: We organize a variety of programming events. We have a mentoring program, where we match mentees (low income high school students) with mentors, who are currently students in the US, UK, Singapore and around the world. We guide them step by step through the university application process, preparing for the SATs, writing their common application activities, their essays, requesting recommendations from teachers, all because it There is no defined infrastructure with which these students can really work, especially in terms of applying abroad.

Apart from that, we also run webinars that are more open to the public, and we do that on topics like how [to] get scholarships abroad, which scholarships are even available. We run these events throughout the year where we really try to bring together talent, not only from the capital of Metro Manila, but also from remote provinces in the Philippines.

A: Beyond non-profit and academic work, you are also an artist! What does music mean to you? You always joke about how you want Ryan Seacrest to work, so tell me about “American Idol” and the role he’s played in your life.

PB: [Laughs] Music has always been an outlet for me. I grew up watching American Idol, Kelly Clarkson, Carrie Underwood from the living room, even though I lived in Manila, Philippines, a 17 hour flight from New York. Growing up, I was always drawn to singing competitions. I think it’s so much fun watching people sing, but also from a competitive point of view, strategizing and trying to win a singing competition. My interest in music really arose from the fact that I grew up watching shows like American Idol, but also growing up in the Philippines, where everyone sings karaoke. So I sang a lot of karaoke growing up, and now music is still my biggest outlet. I rely on a number of songs for whatever mood I’m in. If I can’t find the appropriate song for this moment, and if I have enough creativity in me, I would write the song and my approach to songwriting This is typically what I want to learn from my own experiences , but also wanting to generalize, so that a number of other people can also feel what I felt.

A: It’s really beautiful, isn’t it? The interaction between an audience and the artist and how it reinforces meaning.

PB: Yeah yeah.

A: Well Philippe, we’re kinda friends because of the pandemic.

PB: [Laughs] Yes.

A: [Laughs] Well we were stuck here [on campus] for a long time.

PB: [Laughs] During a very long time.

A: How do you think COVID-19 impacted you and your time at Wesleyan?

PB: The pandemic really made me appreciate the importance of community, of staying in touch with those who matter to you, whatever the circumstances. Of course, respecting the safety and hygiene measures. During the pandemic, I realized that my friends in the Wesleyan community are so important to me and so important to my college experience and that they really add a lot of color to a genre of college learning that was otherwise mostly black and White. When we were all sent home in second year, I realized that, my God, I’m still so lucky to have other Wesleyan students around me.

And when people were sent home, Nalu Tripician, my best friend on this campus, was so far away from me, but we still called every now and then, and that was one of the times I really realized that I wanted to stay in touch with many members of the Wesleyan community and friends that I have met over the years. And now that we’re all in person again, I really try to cherish every moment that I have with my friends in Wesleyan.

A: What advice would you give your freshman?

PB: I would say “breathe”. Breathe and recognize that everything will be fine. Just keep doing your best, but also live in the moment and don’t always think about what to expect.

A: Certainly not! [Laughs]

PB: I think as a senior now I realize that college is really short. And it’s the last four years (unless you’re in graduate school), the last four years of your life that are super structured, after that you’ll be released into the workforce and you’ll have 17 days of paid leave. So for my first year, breathe, have fun, and keep doing your best, but rest assured knowing that if you do your best, you’ll be fine too.

A: In that vein, how did Wesleyan shape you?

PB: I think Wesleyan made me more open-minded, in every sense of the word. I came here from a rather conservative Asian family, studied at a science high school and grew up with the idea that you would only be successful if you studied something in science or something quantitative, but coming to Wesleyan, meeting so many open-minded people like that, also made me realize that there are so many different perspectives that I could learn from, recognize and grow with. It is something that I will strive to keep in my heart even as I leave Wesleyan. Being open to as many experiences as possible, to as many right perspectives as possible, and not always having a clear idea of ​​what is right and wrong on my mind, and being open to changing your mind.

The interview has been edited for length and clarity.

You can reach Magda Kisielinska at [email protected].


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Non profit living

Calendar | News, Sports, Jobs

Editor’s Note: The Sentinel offers nonprofits and other community organizations the opportunity to promote upcoming events in this community calendar for free for three days prior to the event. Events requiring reservations can also be promoted up to two weeks before the reservation date.

Submit articles at least one working week before publication by e-mail, [email protected]; voicemail, (717) 248-6741; online, virtual press room at www.lewistownsentinel.com; or by mail or deposit, The Sentinel, PO Box 588 Lewistown, PA 17044. The publisher reserves the right to modify all submissions.

With all submissions, you must include a phone number for verification purposes. The phone number is not for publication unless otherwise noted.

If your organization would like to add a recurring event (for example, every Monday, third Thursday) that has been canceled due to the pandemic, contact Lifestyles editor Jeff Fishbein, email [email protected], or call ( 717) 248-6741, ext. 108.

Reserve now

Central PA Pink Connection Costume Party – 7-10 p.m. October 9 at Brookmere Winery in Belleville. Tickets cost $ 25 and can be purchased by calling or texting (571) 422-8969 or online at https://bit.ly/3o2xqAT. More information: pinkconnection.org or [email protected]

¯RAP Mifflin County Section Lunch – October lunch at noon on Friday October 15 at Birch Hill Event Center, 1100 N. Pine St., Burnham. The menu will be caprese salad, ham, sweet potatoes, almond green beans, roll / butter, gingerbread. The cost of the meal is $ 14. The program will be “Unusual suspects”. If you plan to attend, please respond to this email, [email protected], by noon on Tuesday, October 12, or by calling (717) 437-6024. Please indicate the number of people present. All retirees from the school are welcome.

Thursday September 30

¯Ace the Interview – 10 a.m. to noon; PA CareerLink Mifflin County, MCIDC Plaza, Bldg 58. Learn the best way to present yourself on paper and in person.

¯Intro to Microsoft Excel – 1 pm to 2:30 pm, PA CareerLink Mifflin County, MCIDC Plaza, Bldg 58. Learn how to use basic Microsoft Excel spreadsheet functionality to create, track, and edit data. Find out how to insert and format formulas, use shortcuts, manage rows and columns, and insert headers.

Bingo – 1 p.m., Yeagertown Senior Center

¯Standard Steel Melt Shop Retirees Lunch – 8:30 a.m. at Yetter’s, McVeytown

Friday October 1

¯Free Community Lunch – 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., New Life Church, 101 N. Beech St., Burnham.

¯ American Red Cross Blood Drive – 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Christ Church, Beaver Springs. Appointment required. For appointments and “Fast pass” visit: www.croixrouge.org.

¯45th annual JCS auction – 4 p.m. and up, McAlisterville Park. Local food trucks, crafts, baked goods, fresh produce, housewares, outdoor items, gift certificates, specialty coffees and themed baskets available. The profits will be donated to the Juniata Christian School.

Kettle Fest – 8 a.m. until dark at Tuscarora Heritage Days in East Waterford. Flea market with free installation. More information: (717) 543-8457.

Saturday October 2

¯Church Hill UMC Art Festival – 9 am-2pm, 199 Woodland Circle. Rain or shine event. Information: (717) 667-3778.

¯Keystone State Muscle Cars Cruise – 5-8 p.m., Londonderry Restaurant and Pub, Reedsville, across from Rutter’s. All cars, trucks, motorcycles are welcome. Meets every Saturday until October 30.

¯45th Annual JCS Auction – All Day, McAlisterville Park. Local food trucks, crafts, baked goods, fresh produce, housewares, outdoor items, gift certificates, specialty coffees and themed baskets available. The profits will be donated to the Juniata Christian School.

Kettle Fest – 8 a.m. until dark at Tuscarora Heritage Days in East Waterford. Flea market with free installation. Auto Show, 10 am-4pm Horseshoe Tournament; Reenactors of the Civil War. More information: (717) 543-8457.

¯ Rescue Our Furry Friends Adoption and Giving Event – 9 am to noon at Blaise Alexander Subaru, Lewistown.

Sunday October 3

¯ Flea Market – 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Lewistown Moose, 80 Brady Lane.

Kettle Fest – 7 a.m. to noon at Tuscarora Heritage Days, East Waterford. Flea market with free installation. More information: (717) 543-8457.

Meetings

Upcoming meetings are posted in the calendar. Missing classmate requests are posted once and repeated only if they are updated. Brief minutes of meetings and photos of class reunions with identified individuals in the order in which they appear are accepted for publication in the Living section. The deadline for submitting reviews is one week before publication. Submit meeting notices to Jeff Fishbein at The Sentinel; email [email protected] or call (717) 248-6741.

1956 Rothrock High School class reunion – noon October 13 at Hoss’ home. More information: Shirley Davidheiser, (717) 248-2746.

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Canadian army

Mercedes-AMG G 63 2021 – ROUES.ca

The Mercedes-Benz G-Class has to be one of the most remarkable vehicles of all time, not because of the revolutionary technology it represents (although there is a bit of it) or any stylistic homerun that tried to be copied since. (also questionable, but bear with me) but because of what he did not do: and that has changed a lot since he started serving as part of the Shah of Iran’s personal armada in 1979, that infamous year in Iranian history.

So Mercedes – where the Shah was a major shareholder – went ahead and spawned the Geländewagen, which translates to ‘terrain vehicle’, although the former looks a lot cooler. They It has sort of been done since (it’s the oldest Mercedes model after the Unimog truck), to the point that the Canadian military itself continues to use the military version in its fleet to this day. Just like a handful of other countries including Greece, Norway, Belgium, Australia and of course Germany.

The AMG G 63 you see here, of course, is about as far removed from the military version as it gets when it comes to the G-Class. The huge 22-inch wheels (which don’t seem as big as the numbers on the suggest thanks to the great ride height and the gap between the tire and the mudguard) wrapped in Pirelli Scorpion Zero rubber, bright red brake calipers with “AMG” plastered on them, two side tailpipes of the two sides, dark almost limo-tinted side windows and silver bash guards underneath – all scream “civilian specification.” Except the painting. The ‘deep green’ ‘seen here does a pretty good job of showcasing the military origins of the G-Class’; on top of that, he looks damn good and has turned heads everywhere I’ve been. Indeed, if The Hulk was a car, it probably would be this one.

Inside it’s more or less the same, but before you get in you need to of course unlock it and the sound those locks make when you fold the keychain is unlike anything you’ve got. already seen from a car – normally we’re talking about the shifting action of a car sounding like a gun bolt; with the G-Class, it is the locks that recall this noise and it is strong. The lights will flash when you fold the lock, but it is not necessary; you can hear those damn locks going on a block away. Just be sure to push these doors firmly when closing to make sure those heavy locks hit their latches in the first place.

Open the same worker as Jeep Wrangler-esque doors and you’re greeted with patented Mercedes luxury but with a bit of a twist. You see, the Black Fiddleback open pore leather from my tester (yes, I don’t know either) is part of the “G manufaktur”. line that offers a number of interior finishes specific to the G-Class. The exterior paint, in this case, is also part of this line. Indeed, the black brown leather looks fantastic and complements the exterior paint perfectly.

Otherwise, it’s normal modern Benz business here; Fully digital editable gauge cluster and infotainment display, vent medallions, analog clock at the center of everything, steering wheel with more buttons than the Texas Instruments you had in high school, and centralized touchpad controller. Everything is very chic, very modern and the way you can access the gauge cluster menus with a numeric keypad on the left wheel spoke and the infotainment screen (including Apple CarPlay) with a corresponding button on the straight spoke is a good way to do things, once you get used to it.

There are, however, some things that are a bit harder to get used to.

It should come as no surprise that the ceiling height is ample – just look at the height of this roof! – but the legroom in the front and rear isn’t really enough for such a big vehicle because you sit so straight and are surrounded by vertical panels everywhere. I never quite freed my right knee from having to be pressed firmly against the lower dash. The placement of the interior door handle has never been natural either; it is too far back on the door panel and too close to the leg, forcing users to contort their wrists in a somewhat uncomfortable manner to release it.

2021 Mercedes-Benz G63

The same goes for the rear cargo space, as this is another example of wasted space due to the need to store all that undercarriage as high as possible to get the necessary ground clearance. for what is a suitable all-terrain vehicle. The rear cargo space also collides with a raised leading edge, so there’s no flat cargo floor if you drop the seats. It has a barn door style tailgate, however, and unlike the Land Rover Defender, it swings the right way for typical North American curbside parking; left towards the road as opposed to right against the sidewalk.

What this upright seating position and cockpit offer, however, is a wonderful view and thanks to the square corners, getting around town in the G 63 – where most G63s will spend most of their time – is surprisingly easy considering the volume of the packaging. The surprisingly short wheelbase also helps; At 2,890mm, the G 63’s wheelbase is 245mm shorter than its sibling GLS 63. So that means this big SUV isn’t even the biggest in its own lineup.

It really is the beefiest, however. It starts with the engine – a four-liter twin-turbo (or “twin-turbo,” to use Mercedes parlance) good for 577 horsepower and 627 pound-feet of torque. Yes, it’s less horsepower than this GLS 63 but equal torque and it’s lighter. So it should come as no surprise that the G 63 will carry you-know-what on the highway when you set foot.

2021 Mercedes-Benz G63

The image in your mind as you do it – that tall, somewhat gangly military truck in civilian clothes bouncing on the freeway, passing all traffic as its traffic stopped – will make you smile every time. Just like noise – these pipes are loud and can be made louder by pressing a button or selecting one of the more aggressive riding modes. At this point, that same knob can be used to soften the exhaust note, but won’t change the throttle, suspension, and transmission settings the drive modes play with.

While since The Hulk has made a name for itself in the comics and the image depicted earlier is somewhat comedic, the G 63 is no joke. Especially when it comes to its all-terrain chops, which are on top with the Defenders, 4Runners and Wranglers (and Broncos) of the world. There are three separate locking differentials – remember that innovation we alluded to earlier? Well, the G-Class is one of the only vehicles with this feature – and 217mm of ground clearance so it can climb and go through anything.

I had the opportunity to really put the G 63 and its less endowed brother G 550 on narrow off-road tracks normally reserved for ATVs and with its short wheelbase, super short front and rear overhangs and its great view, it was a remarkable joy to drive under these circumstances. Sure; we had to play with the differentials – they’re activated by three individual buttons right there on the dash – in order to create sharper bobby pins, but once down there was no way to stop the G 63.

2021 Mercedes-Benz G63

What’s really remarkable, however, is actually how it performs on the beaten track, as opposed to off it. Indeed, you knew it would be good off-road, but it takes corners with surprisingly minimal body tilt for such a large vehicle. It’s the adjustable shocks and strut tower brace at work, and I never really got past the feeling that this was a properly non-Jeep jeepish that performed much better on the road than it did. ‘she should. Maybe the bad guy in Bourne’s supremacy was on to something when he decided to chase Jason Bourne in a G…

It’s the G-Class in a nutshell, really. It’s a multi-colored icon – military icon, rap icon, pop culture icon – and, soon, maybe an EV off-road icon because an electric battery-powered version of EQ wouldn’t be that far away.

He’s got presence, he’ll put a smile on your face (and, if my experience is telling, many passers-by as well), and he’ll tackle almost anything you throw at him. Good enough for a vehicle that started life as a humble civil servant over four decades ago.

The vehicle was provided to the writer by the automaker. Content and vehicle ratings were not subject to approval.


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Non profit living

Powell meets a changing economy: fewer workers, higher prices

WASHINGTON – Restaurant owners and hoteliers are struggling to fill jobs. Delays in the supply chain drive up prices for small businesses. Unemployed Americans unable to find work even with record high job vacancies.

These and other disruptions to the U.S. economy – the aftermath of the viral pandemic that erupted 18 months ago – appear likely to last, a group of nonprofit business owners and executives said on Friday. to Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell.

The business challenges, outlined during a “Fed Listens” virtual panel discussion, highlight the ways the COVID-19 epidemic and its delta variant continue to transform the U.S. economy. Some event attendees said their business plans are still evolving. Others have complained of sluggish sales and fluctuating fortunes after the pandemic eased this summer, then escalated over the past two months.

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“We are living in truly unique times,” said Powell at the end of the discussion. “I’ve never seen these kinds of supply chain issues, I’ve never seen an economy that combines drastic labor shortages with a lot of unemployed … So it’s an economy that evolving very quickly, it will be very different from the one (before).

The Fed chairman asked Cheetie Kumar, a restaurant owner in Raleigh, North Carolina, why she is having such a hard time finding workers. Powell’s question goes to the heart of the Fed’s mandate to maximize employment, as many people who worked before the pandemic have lost their jobs and are no longer looking for them. When – or if – these people resume their job search will help determine when the Fed can conclude that the economy has reached the peak of jobs.

Kumar told Powell that many of his former employees have decided to quit the restaurant industry for good.

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“I think a lot of people wanted to change their lives, and we lost a lot of people in different industries,” she said. “I think half of our people have decided to go back to school.”

Kumar said her restaurant now pays a minimum of $ 18 an hour, and she added that higher wages are likely a long-term change for the restaurant industry.

“We can’t get by and pay people $ 13 an hour and expect them to stay with us for years and years,” Kumar said. “It just won’t happen.”

Loren Nalewanski, vice president of Marriott Select Brands, said his business was losing out to similar challenges as many former employees, especially housekeepers, left for other jobs that recently raised wages. Even the recent cut to a federal unemployment supplement of $ 300 per week, he said, has not led to an increase in the number of job seekers.

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“People have left the industry and unfortunately they are finding other things to do,” Nalewanski said. “Other industries that may not have paid that much … are (now) paying a lot more.”

Jill Rizika, president of Towards Employment, a non-profit workforce development organization in Cleveland, said she sees the stark disconnect every day between companies posting millions of job vacancies. and those struggling to find work and escape poverty. About 60% of the people her organization helps find jobs have criminal records, she said, and 65% have only high school diplomas. Many parents, especially mothers, are still unable to return to full-time work.

“They tried to work but because of the epidemics, the children are being sent home from daycare or school, which makes their schedules unmanageable,” said Rizika. “Where the digital divide comes in: a young mother tried remote working but didn’t have enough broadband to make it work.

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Small businesses are also grappling with rising costs, with little relief in sight, some participants said. The Fed has accelerated its plans to start withdrawing its low interest rate policies, in part because of concerns about rising inflation.

Larry Andrews, chairman of Massachusetts Growth Capital, a state agency that supports small businesses, said that during a recent tour of the state, a cafe owner told him that the price of a case of eggs had skyrocketed since the pandemic. Another restaurant owner said a jug of cooking oil went from $ 17 to $ 50 – “if you can get it.”

“The speed and intensity of this slowdown – and the speed of the recovery in many areas – is unprecedented in modern times,” said Powell in prepared remarks at the start of the event. “The business plans have been reworked, the outlook has been revised and the future continues to be tainted with uncertainties.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


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History organization

Newsmakers: Local journalist named first Latina president of SPJ

ADVERTISING MARKETING

Kate lattimore norris was appointed vice president of Pavlik and associates, a full-service communications company. Norris has been with the firm for over 12 years, most recently serving as Director of Community Engagement.

In her new role, she was elevated to a leadership role in developing and executing successful communication strategies for the range of Pavlik’s public and private sector clients. She will continue to specialize in community engagement of all types.

She is currently pursuing a doctorate. in Public Administration and Public Policy at the University of Texas at Arlington. Norris holds an MBA in Marketing from the University of North Texas and a BA in Art History and Religious Studies from Texas Christian University.

ARCHITECTURE

VLK Architects promoted Dalane E. Bouillion, Ed.D., to the Director of Development in response to his outstanding accomplishments in supporting VLK’s commitment to link educational philosophy with focused design to better benefit current and future educational clients.

VLK Architects has offices throughout Texas and provides architectural, planning, and interior design services to clients in the automotive, K-12, college, corporate, and university industries. institutions.

She sits on the board of directors of Friends of Texas Public Schools. Other affiliations include the Texas Association of School Administrators, the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, and the Association for Learning Environments. In 2011, she received the American Education Research Association’s Woman of the Year Studies Program Award.

In addition, on August 26, representatives of VLK Architects attended a grand opening ceremony commemorating the new Sherman High School. This new building measures 500,000 square feet, can accommodate 2,600 students in grades 9 to 12 and is part of the November 2017 requirement.

BANK AND FINANCE

Independent financier named Michael keith as Head of Mid-Market Banking Services for North Texas.

McKinney-based Independent Financial, ranked by Forbes as the nation’s sixth best publicly traded bank, operates as a financial services company with offices throughout Texas and the Colorado Front Range region.

The Lone Star agricultural credit newly elected board of directors Brent Neuhaus as president and Asa Langford as vice-chairman of the board of directors of the rural credit union. Neuhaus was first elected to the Board of Directors in 2017 and is originally from Waco. He is a director and corporate inventory manager at United Ag and Turf, which operates John Deere dealerships in Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas. He is also President and Director of TGBTG Property LLC and JORE LLC and breeds Angus cattle in McLennan County.

Jeff schmid joined the Foundation of the Southwestern Graduate School of Banking (SWGSB), headquartered at SMU Cox School of Business, as President and Chief Executive Officer effective September 1. Schmid’s move comes as current President and CEO S. Scott MacDonald, Ph.D., is retiring after 24 years of service.

With nearly 40 years of banking and regulatory experience, Schmid began his career at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) in 1981 and remained there until 1989. He graduated from the SWGSB Summer Residency Program at SMU Cox in 1990.

After completing the SWGSB program, Schmid became President and CEO of two private banks in the Midwest. In 2007, he led the creation of Mutual of Omaha Bank, an investment wholly owned by Mutual of Omaha, of which he served as Chairman and CEO. He turned the organization into a national franchise with assets of nearly $ 10 billion.

BOARDS

BoardBuild announced the addition of five new members to the Board of Directors: Sandra Garcia Acevedo, Vianei Lopez Braun, Anthony Placencio, Brian Renteria and James Sackey. New board members join existing board members Jeffrey Allison, Kathryn Ball, Matthew Ciardiello, DJ Harrell, Elise Kensinger, Gregory Nielsen, Willie Rankin, Ed Riefenstahl and Beth watson.

BoardBuild also welcomes two staff members: John hernandez, director of strategy and Krista johnson, director of communication and training.

COMMUNICATION

Rebecca Aguilar became the first Latina national president of the Society of Professional Journalists in her 112-year history when she was sworn in by the SPJ National President Matthew T. Hall at the President’s Awards ceremony at the recent SPJ21 conference in Indianapolis.

Aguilar, who turns 40 as a journalist, is a Dallas-based freelance reporter. His journey began as a reporter at a television station in Toledo, Ohio. She also made professional stopovers at television stations in Chicago; Corpus Christi, Texas; San Antonio; Phoenix; Los Angeles and Dallas. Along the way, she received 50 awards and nominations for her work as a journalist.

Aguilar joined the SPJ in 2009 when the Digital Media Committee asked him to get involved. She has held senior positions in the digital and diversity committees.

Aguilar is the daughter of immigrants from Mexico. She grew up in Ohio and Mexico City. She received her BA in Communication from Bowling Green State University and earned her MA in Journalism from the University of North Texas.

EDUCATION

Barry lambert, Ph.D., has been appointed Acting Dean of Tarleton State University College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, pending approval from the Texas A&M University System Board of Regents, which is expected. He succeeds Steve damron, Ph.D., who retired on August 31.

Previously associate dean of the college and associate vice president for research, Lambert joined Tarleton faculty in 2003, becoming director of the Southwest Regional Dairy and dean of the College of Graduate Studies. He also headed the zootechnics and environmental and agricultural management departments.

HEALTH CARE

Lisa Albert was promoted to Assistant Vice President of Strategic Communications at Fort Worth Timely®, the leading provider of telehealth specializing in higher education. Albert joined TimelyMD in 2019 and leads the communications strategies that bring TimelyMD’s mission, vision and values ​​to life.

Former President of the Greater Fort Worth Chapter of PRSA, Albert previously held executive communications positions at Texas Christian University, Justin Brands, Inc. and the Texas Ballet Theater.

In a newly created role, Zac Fleming has broad responsibility for product management, product design and product strategy. Leveraging technology and strategy, he seeks to create innovative products so that students around the world can seamlessly access the care needed to thrive.

Fleming’s previous roles include Vice President of Product Management at Citi, General Manager of Digital Transformation at Baylor Scott & White Health and CTO at Three to Abandon. He also serves as an advisor to start-up founders, mentors global product leaders and volunteers to help move his local community forward.

NON-PROFIT

Courtney g lewis, Senior Vice President of BancorpSouth of the Fort Worth / Dallas area, is the new president of the Downtown Fort Worth Rotary Club for the year 2021-2022.

President Courtney was installed on July 1 and joins a long line of exceptional community leaders with the distinction of being the first woman of color to serve as president of the Rotary Club of Fort Worth. President Courtney brings a new perspective of leadership that inspires Rotarians to reflect on their service and role.

In addition to the Rotary Club, Lewis’s civic engagement includes Ronald McDonald House of Fort Worth as Past President and Housing Channel, Chairman of the Board, Camp Fire First Texas and Leadership Fort Worth.

PROMOTIONS

FASTSIGNS International Inc., a Carrollton-based signage and visual graphics franchisor with more than 750 FASTSIGNS locations in eight countries around the world, announced four internal promotions at the company that include Jeff Lewis, Barbara Engle, Grant Walker and Lana Daley.


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Non profit living

Get addicted to Colorado Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop

Drifters co-owner Beckie Clarke finishes brewing coffee in the downtown New Castle boutique.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

There’s a new buzz to pick up in Old Town New Castle.

Combining the West’s love for trout fishing and potent elixirs, Colorado Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop truly reflects highland culture at its best.

As the great Colorado River rushes a few hundred yards from its back porch, New Castle’s freshest cup of coffee in town offers both a full coffee bar and, yes, an entire fishing section. fly.



“Who doesn’t love coffee and fly fishing, seriously?” Wonders co-owner Kyla Hemelt, 36, standing behind the rustic cafe’s caramel-colored wooden bar adorned with a school of fish to the side. “Or, who doesn’t like coffee in the river?” “

Housed in a high-ceilinged historic monument in the heart of New Castle’s West Main Street, guests can sip locally brewed coffee while sinking into the welcoming furnishings greeting the front door. Palates can enjoy the Bonfire artisan roaster based in Carbondale. Hemelt said Drifters will soon sell two in-house mixes using this primary supplier.



For every bag sold, 3% of the proceeds will go to Fish For Change, a Denver-based nonprofit that promotes international fly fishing programs. Specifically, the funds will help sponsor a member of the Coal Ridge High School Fly Fishing Club.

Drifters co-owner Kyla Hemelt chats with business partner Beckie Clarke in the downtown New Castle boutique.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

Beyond its roasted benefits, Drifters offers so much, like sweet treats, breakfast burritos, and homemade tea, called “Here, Fish, Fish.” Source: Moving Mountains Tea Company in Steamboat Springs.

But uniquely adapting to that ragweed of organic coffee harvested from small farms in the Roaring Fork Valley and high mountain tea is a recreational expertise. Meet 40-year-old co-owner Beckie Clarke, there’s a good chance she’ll serve you a hot cup of Jo before she talks about trout pretty quickly.

Clarke is from Fernie, British Columbia, Canada. There she ran a fly fishing guide outfit for 17 years.

“My heart runs through the waters of these mountains and I know them very intimately,” she said. “Unlike these waters, everything is new and great. It’s just a completely different fishery. It’s pretty epic.

Not surprisingly, Colorado Drifters offers recreational opportunities in harmony with the landscape. Stand-up paddleboard rentals, fly fishing lessons, and qualified fly fishing guides are available for trips along the Colorado River Valley, a world-famous artery that sometimes jumps with 16-inch trout. inches.

Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop in downtown New Castle.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

To catch these behemoths, the next customer is a sip of fresh coffee to check out the vast collection of Colorado Drifters flies backwards.

“We probably have the most flies in the valley,” Clarke said. “We have minimal space there, but we focused on the flies. You should choose two things that you are really good at when starting a business.

Products available at Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop in downtown New Castle.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

While fly fishing can be an expensive habit, Colorado Drifters’ selection is all about modesty. All fly rods are priced from $ 80 to $ 150.

“Everything that we have chosen to go to this store has been specially chosen for our community,” said Clarke. “We definitely want tourists, but we want to support local people and families and make things affordable, because rivers are our passion.”

“We are not fancy,” she added. “We are a family.”

Clarke and Hemelt first met during the height of COVID-19. Hemelt, a mother of two, grew up “living the river life” as a native of Gunnison. She started hanging out with Clarke, a mother of three who was passionate about the subject of trout.

One day, the two new friends noticed that something was missing in the restaurants of Old Town New Castle: a coffee shop.

“There was no cafe and there was no fly shop,” Clarke said.

Drifters in downtown New Castle is a combination of cafe and fly shop.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

After spending many late nights texting each other and ultimately making a business plan, Clarke and Hemelt acquired the storefront and began work on the building in May. By the time they opened the doors, “New Castle arrived,” said the owners.

Now, locals have a place to sip an early morning coffee in the mountains and bask in the Colorado Drifters mantra.

“The river brings everything to life, but it’s also what brought us together,” said Hemelt. “It brings people together.”

A wide variety of flies available at the Drifters Coffee and Fly store in downtown New Castle.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

Journalist Ray K. Erku can be contacted at 612-423-5273 or [email protected]


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History organization

Salinas students stand up for ethnic studies – Voices of Monterey Bay

Zaira Hernandez testifies at school board meeting | Zoom screenshot

| YOUTH BEAT

By Karen Dorantes

On June 22, parents and grandparents arrived at a meeting of the Salinas Union High School District Governing Board to express their disapproval of the ethnic studies program currently taught in high schools in the district.

That night, no student was there to defend him.

Mike Lipe, one of the adults who came forward to oppose the curriculum, told the board that “there is absolutely no room for activists in our school boards and administrations. . These principles are deeply rooted in radicalism and racism. They promote division and hatred within society.

But the board members who voted for ethnic studies as a condition for a one-semester graduation in 2019 – to be implemented for the class of 2024 – held on.

The council’s support for ethnic studies contrasted with a 2012 decision in Tucson, Arizona, where one of the most popular and successful Mexican-American ethnic studies courses was banned by a law banning any course that ” advocates ethnic solidarity ”.

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Diego Puga Escobar speaks at school board meeting | Zoom screenshot

Carissa Purnell, who has taught ethnic studies in Salinas for the past six years, defined ethnic studies as “courses that use an interdisciplinary approach to analyze historical and contemporary issues and experiences associated with race, class and genre “.

She said ethnic studies were first introduced in the fall of 1968, when the Black Student Union led a student strike at San Francisco State University to demand more representation on campus.

School board president Phillip Tabera said it took five years of discussions to approve the district’s one-year ethnic studies course in 2018. It has become an option for all five high schools in Salinas this year. -the. The council approved a one-semester ethnic studies course in 2019 that will become a graduation requirement for the freshman class of 2024. District officials said the curriculum was developed with input from students. teachers, parents, students and the board.

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CarissaOffice provided-by-Alisal-Union-School-District

Carissa Purnell | Photo provided

Students defend ethnic studies

After the controversy at the June 22 meeting, about half a dozen young people came to the July 13 board meeting to express their support for the ethnic studies program. Many other students attended the meeting, hoping to speak, but public testimony was limited by the council. The most notable group of students was from La Cosecha, a youth organization that is part of the Building Healthy Communities initiative. (Disclosure: I am a member of La Cosecha.)

Seeing a group of students come together and stand up against adults telling them what they should and shouldn’t study in schools is something new to this generation.

Young people in La Cosecha, who are mostly Latino, said they supported ethnic studies because they wanted professionals to teach them about their own history. “My story should be taught, my story should be shown in these schools,” said Diego Puga Escobar, a member of La Cosecha and entering his last year at Alisal High School.

Escobar said after the meeting that he chose to speak to the board because he wanted to be the voice of those who might have been afraid to stand up for ethnic studies. Without ethnic studies, he said he believed there was a much bigger “gap” between people of different cultures, nationalities or ethnicities.

“If we are constantly taught a [side of history], then we’re going to be made to believe that there is only one truth, ”Escobar said. “All we’re trying to do is provide the resources to our people and be able to see that there are many truths on one side. “

Maraly Escalante introduced herself but was unable to speak at the July 13 meeting due to lack of time. She recently graduated from North Salinas High School and took an Ethnic Studies course at Hartnell College. She said the class allowed her to see Mexicans and Latinas in history, but she also learned about the history of other ethnicities and races.

Escalante said she believes ethnic studies gives students a better understanding of where members of their community come from, what their cultures are like, and what challenges they may have.

“I feel like ethnic studies unites us more because we have a new understanding,” she said. “A friend of mine used to tell me that throughout his school career he was ashamed of being African American and he didn’t know why he should be ashamed of it. In a way, ethnic studies help us understand why certain stereotypes exist in our communities and how to correct them.

To those who oppose ethnic studies, Escalante replied, “Yes, a lot of people can identify as Americans, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they see themselves everywhere. [the version of] American history they teach in high schools.

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Philip-Tabera-supplied-by-Carlos-Castro

Philippe Tabera | Photo by Carlos Castro

Meaningful conversation

Alma Cervantes, regional education equity manager for Building Healthy Communities, said her goal is to give young people a platform and “critically challenge a system that has prevented them from learning truth about this country, a system that has not provided a space for them to talk about their history, their history, their cultures.

Cervantes said ethnic studies creates a transformative space where students can engage in meaningful conversation not only with teachers, but with each other as well.

“Ethnic studies is beyond a curriculum,” she said. “It’s a transformative way for students to feel like they belong to the class. It supports their self-esteem, it supports their academics, good attendance and it allows us to see each other in the classrooms. “

Purnell cited three articles that support Cervantes’ point. She said research shows ethnic studies have been “proven to increase grade points, credits, attendance, graduation, and college education, as well as lead to better test scores,” she said. grades, math, reading, writing, science and social studies ”.

Zaira Hernandez, another La Cosecha member and recently graduated from Alisal High School, who spoke at the July 13 board meeting, said: “These young students are supposed to know who they are. , where they want to go and what they want. do for the rest of their lives, but how can you expect them to know who they are, who they are, without taking a course like this, which shares their history and culture? “

Beyond Salinas, on July 17, Gov. Gavin Newson signed a bill requiring freshmen at California State University to take an ethnic studies course to graduate.

Hernandez said pursuing ethnic studies has helped her discover people who may be more like her, not only in terms of race or ethnicity, but also gender. She disagrees with the claim that the program encourages hatred.

In fact, she says, it helps students respect others better. “It’s not trying to divide people.”

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Oregon legislature’s resume under scrutiny before explosive resignation

Nate Monson, bottom left, addresses lawmakers at a hearing in April.

Screenshot / OPB

When he resigned last month, making explosive allegations upon his exit, the official responsible for handling harassment complaints in the Oregon Legislature had reason to believe he would be out of office any longer. .

Lawmakers and human resources officials had recently learned a number of concerning things they missed when hiring Nate Monson, according to documents released by the state legislature on Thursday.

This included the fact that Monson had distorted his work history and offered misleading references. He had also quit a former job in Iowa over concerns about harassment and financial mismanagement which were not communicated to officials in Oregon until nearly two months after Monson began working here in as Interim Legislative Fairness Officer.

“I am deeply disturbed by the information shared with me today,” wrote Jessica Knieling, Acting Director of Human Resources at the Legislative Assembly, in a June 8 memo released to the OPB and officials. from the Capitol. “Frankly, when I got the first email today, I had hoped it was just a misunderstanding.”

Nothing in the memo contradicts Monson’s claims when he resigned on June 15. In his own note to lawmakers, Monson detailed a history of unpaid legal bills, delayed investigations, unethical contracts, sloppy record keeping and lax responsiveness to the Office of Legislative Fairness. d resumed. The office, established in 2019, is a kind of clearinghouse for complaints about harassment, retaliation and other misconduct.

Related: In flashy outing, former Capitol Hill official expresses top concerns about how Oregon is handling harassment

“We want you to know that we take his allegations relating to the state of the office very seriously, ”wrote the four lawmakers who chair the Joint Conduct Committee, Monson’s direct supervisors, in an email sent to Capitol Hill Thursday. “We are now taking the time to gather all the relevant facts to verify the veracity of the allegations …”

But recently released records provide more context for Monson’s sudden departure, suggesting he knew he had little future on Capitol Hill as scrutiny intensified.

Monson declined to comment on the note on Friday, citing advice from legal counsel.

It is not known what due diligence the legislative administrators performed when hiring Monson. Records released this week show that they emailed at least one of his referrals. But a simple Google search would have detected a gap much earlier in the hiring process.

Officials began to learn much more about their new recruit in June, after a fact various city his resume claim that he worked for six months at the Iowa Coalition for Collective Change.

That was not true, as a call and email made clear to legislative administration officials from Coalition Executive Director Luana Nelson-Brown. According to the memo, Nelson-Brown explained that she had been “friendly colleagues” with Monson, and that “they spoke of him coming to work for the coalition, but never anything close to what he wrote down. on his curriculum vitae “.

Nelson-Brown further explained that his board would not allow him to hire Monson because of the “problems” he encountered while working for Iowa Safe Schools, an affiliate organization that Monson had led for 13 years before she was fired in 2020. According to the memo, Nelson-Brown suggested that Monson’s “oversight and racism” had become a concern in this role and that a financial audit by the attorney general’s office Iowa was underway.

“Nate might be good for certain roles in the Legislature, but Equity is not one of them,” the note said, summing up what Knieling reported hearing from Nelson-Brown.

As he delved into the matter, Knieling learned that not all Monson’s references were what they appeared. He had listed a reference as a board member of the Iowa Safe Schools, not pointing out that this person was a high school student who acted as a student representative, but had no supervisory authority.

Another reference, listed by Monson as a board member of the Iowa Coalition for Collective Change, had never been on that organization’s board of directors, a fact Knieling said he discovered with research. Google months after Monson was hired. In fact, the person had served on the board of directors for the Iowa for Safe Schools, she wrote.

As part of its investigation in June, Knieling also spoke with current leaders of Iowa Safe Schools, who said the organization severed ties with Monson in November 2020, but declined to provide many details. . Knieling learned, she said, that Iowa Safe Schools had “discovered financial irregularities,” but gave no details.

“The [ISS] The chairman of the board said she would have serious concerns about him in such a role, ”Knieling wrote in the June 8 memo, referring to Monson’s work as head of legislative fairness. . “I asked if he had engaged in unlawful harassment or discrimination. She said she wouldn’t say illegal, but that had been very inappropriate.

In interviews while considered for the role on Capitol Hill, Knieling wrote, Monson told officials he “intentionally quit” his job with the Iowa Safe Schools.

Knieling’s memo was written a week before Monson submitted his resignation. Monson’s direct supervisors, the chairmen of the Joint Steering Committee, suggested in their email Thursday that he was aware that concerns had arisen that would prevent him from moving from an “interim” role to a permanent one.

“Given the level of trust and integrity required by the LEO position, we, as the Co-Chairs, have decided to schedule a meeting of the Joint Steering Committee to review Mr. Monson’s employment in light. of this new information, “the lawmakers wrote. , the senses. Floyd Prozanski and Chuck Thomsen, and Representatives Julie Fahey and Ron Noble. “Mr. Monson has been advised of the plan to schedule a meeting and has chosen to tender his resignation.”

The substantive concerns Monson alerted lawmakers to on his way remain – and have sparked a great deal of interest in a legislature still grappling with how to handle harassment.

“When I started, there were no records, electronic documents, scheduled training, and unpaid invoices, resulting in investigations averaging 10 months in the past year.” Monson wrote in his June 15 resignation letter. “There have been outstanding cases where individuals have tried to file a case but have received no response. The gravity of the situation means that justice is not being served to those who have come forward and can cost taxpayers millions of lawsuits due to the liability of not having proper procedures, documentation and oversight. “

In their email to officials and staff at the Capitol, the chairmen of the Joint Steering Committee said they had “taken action” to address one of Monson’s concerns: that financial constraints had driven investigators stop work, delaying harassment investigations. They also suggest that the unpaid bills had not resulted in work stoppages, as Monson claimed.

The two outside investigators who do contract work for the legislature did not answer questions from the OPB about Monson’s claims.

The email sent Thursday suggests that the chairmen of the joint steering committee were widely releasing the note on Monson in light of media requests. The documents communicated to the OPB are more complete than what has been requested.

Despite the difficult end of his term, at least one of Monson’s former supervisors has positive things to say.

“I thought Nate Monson was the right fit for the job,” Rep. Ron Noble, R-McMinnville, told OPB last week. “There were some things he obviously felt he needed to move on.”

In a job that demands confidentiality – and whose activities are often shielded from lawmakers because of it – Noble has said he believes Monson is capable of acting as an auditor of some sort for the way the office was managed before his tenure.

“I don’t think the system is broken,” Noble said. “I think Nate’s arrival exposed some of the weaknesses in the logistics of the post and the supervision of the post.”

Lawmakers are in the process of seeking Monson’s replacement.


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Discovery Canyon, CSU sprinter Lauren Gale, heads to Tokyo with Team Canada | Colorado Springs High School Sports

Lauren Gale, Canadian Olympic Track and Field Team.

“I’m going to put it on my Instagram bio, on my resume when I apply to dental hygiene school,” said Gale, 21, noting that these schools are difficult to access. “Maybe that will help, I don’t know.”

The former Discovery Canyon student, who just finished her junior year at Colorado State, is heading to the Tokyo Games as part of the 4×400-meter relay team.

Gale and his parents had coffee on his porch in Fort Collins in early July 3 as they waited for the life-changing email from Athletics Canada, but Gale’s former track club, the Lions d ‘Ottawa, beat him with a Tweet. Gale was the youngest member of Canada’s track and field team.

Gale’s time of 51.96 put her firmly in contention before Rio Olympian Alicia Brown tied her at the 2021 Olympic Trials. Brown handed in a 51.82 later in June, casting minor doubts on the inclusion of Gale.

She is due to leave for Japan on Saturday.

“To have to compete on the biggest stage of the biggest track event possible – that’s crazy,” said Gale. “I still can’t believe it.”

Gale was always the one chasing the ball down the field in youth football, giving her parents the idea to try athletics. Years later, at an indoor competition, they cheered on Lauren after what they thought was a good 400-yard run, but other spectators saw more.

“After all, everyone looked at us and said, ‘Wow, this is a really good time,’” her mother Lisa said. “We didn’t even know what a good time was, but apparently for that age it was super fast.

“We thought, ‘We need to look at this a bit further. “”

Lauren’s father’s work as a Canadian Army Engineer took him to Peterson Air Force Base and family in Colorado Springs for six years. Lauren arrived at Discovery Canyon in 2015. In 2016 and 2018, on both sides of hip surgery, she won the 100, 200 and 400-meter state races in 4A. She was named Gazette Preps Female Peak Performer of the Year in 2017-18.

Lauren tried out international competition at the 2017 Commonwealth Youth Games, where she competed in the 200 meters and 400 meters for Team Canada. After graduating from high school, she competed in the 200 at the 2018 IAAF World Under-20 Championships.

“I love Canada and I love representing them. I still claim it as my home even though I’ve been here for a few years now, ”Lauren said.

“But it’s always good to be able to display a Ram sign in other places. It’s cool to be able to represent them both.

She set school records in the indoor and outdoor 400 this season. She finished 13th in the NCAA West prelims on May 29, with a place to qualify for the NCAA Championships. It was a good enough time for Team Canada.

She had hoped to attend the trials, but crossing the border in Montreal from June 24-27 required a two-week quarantine. A strange season, full of mask mandates and canceled meetups, had required a creative solution – times and world rankings were factored in, Lauren said.

Lauren’s own dental hygienist’s work will be on display when she visits the stage at Tokyo Olympic Stadium.

His parents, preparing for a move across the country, will try to install their TVs as soon as they arrive. If that doesn’t get sorted out quickly, they’ll be them at a Washington DC sports bar telling everyone who their daughter is.

“She can go against the best in the world,” Lisa said.

“We’re so proud it’s crazy.”

One day, the gloved hands in your mouth might belong to an Olympian.

“If I can help build people’s confidence, then my job is done,” Lauren said.

Colorado heptathlete Annie Kunz can celebrate with family as she secures trip to Tokyo

Olympic athletes to wear their own medals at Tokyo ceremonies

How Draymond Green helped reignite Team USA’s offense to rebound from two losses


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DVIDS – News – Sea Breeze Sailor Profile: Meet Lieutenant-Commander Elizabeth Eldridge of the Royal Canadian Navy

Lieutenant-Commander Elizabeth Eldridge of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) is honored and proud to share her experiences as a Naval Logistics Officer during her deployment as a mentoring staff officer for Exercise SEA BREEZE 21 in Odessa, Ukraine, June 28 – July 10, 2021 SEA BREEZE is an annual multinational exercise co-hosted by the United States Navy (USN) and Ukrainian Navy (UN) with support from the Partnership for the NATO peace, and this year’s Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) participation is part of Operation UNIFIER, the CAF’s military training and capacity building mission in Ukraine.

“As the Navy Logistics Officer, we are responsible for all logistical requirements on board the ship, from administration to finance, food, transport, supply, movement of sailors. and equipment to and from the ship, all types of port services and hospitality, to name a few, ”said LCdr Eldridge. “So we really manage the whole range of logistical support activities that allow the ship’s crew to accomplish our mission,” she noted.

Coming from a military family, LCdr Eldridge had the privilege of living in Ottawa and Halifax. Although she comes from a family spanning several generations of military service, she said, surprisingly, that was not her primary motivation for becoming a sailor. “I wanted to join because I wanted to do everything,” she said. “I first joined the Canadian Army Reserve as a clerk when I was in high school just to get a taste of it and since I’ve always wanted to be a Naval Logistics Officer, I decided to go this route when I pursued my undergraduate studies. at the Royal Military College (RMC), ”she added.

LCdr Eldridge says the most appealing part about going to RMC is that you can pursue a variety of interests and hobbies in addition to earning your degree. “Unlike other universities where students may only have the opportunity to pursue or become interested in a new interest, at RMC you are encouraged and supported to do it all – you have to show leadership. , you have to play sports, you have to do extracurricular activities, you have to do a second language – and for me that was the biggest draw. So the inspiration to join was not really on the family side, but more because of the vast opportunities offered by the military, where you can have the space, time and resources to do so, ”he said. she declared.

A proud Naval Logistics Officer, she said the most rewarding part of being a Logistician is the fact that you can make a difference every day, and you see the immediate results of what you do to support the mission.

“Whether it’s processing a travel expense claim or organizing a hospitality event during a port stopover to represent Canada abroad, you know you always have an impact. positive, ”she said.

A seasoned sailor proudly wearing the gunmetal Maritime Service Badge (SSI), he has been deployed several times in Canada and abroad. Some of its national deployments include Operation NANOOK and Operation NUNALIVUT in the Arctic. Abroad, she participated in RIMPAC in Hawaii and was deployed aboard Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Charlottetown as part of Operation REASSURANCE ROTO 5 in Europe.

During exercise SEA BREEZE 21, LCdr Eldridge is part of the CAF mentoring team. “As a naval logistics mentor in this exercise, I advise and guide Ukrainian naval logisticians on logistics planning and the importance of looking at logistics from an operational perspective,” she said. “My goal is to provide options and other perspectives in handling logistical issues related to operations. It’s about sharing our best practices and giving advice they can take into account in their problem-solving process.

Asked about her advice to aspiring sailors and those considering joining the RCN, “Logistics is cool! Never discredit the importance of logistics and the importance of the support professions that work for operations – to join the Navy as a supporter you can see and experience so much, while making a tangible difference, ”he said. she declared.

Date taken: 07.08.2021
Date posted: 07.08.2021 11:23
Story ID: 400531
Location: ODESA, UA

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Non profit living

Summerville teenager helps community members escape homelessness | New

SUMMERVILLE – One of the most obvious priorities in helping someone get out of homelessness is finding a place for them to live.

But what happens when they move into a space with nothing but a crate full of clothes and rent money?

“The difference between having a bed or not really changes all day long,” said John Michael Stagliano, 18, a lifelong Summerville resident.

Stagliano is also the founder of Home Again, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing furniture and household items to families leaving behind their old conditions and moving into new homes.

It all started with Stagliano volunteering at a Summerville homeless shelter, where he learned that residents’ needs don’t end with just leaving the shelter.

Over the past five years, Home Again has supplied the homes of nearly 500 people and helped raise thousands of dollars for local shelters.

Stagliano managed to accomplish all of this before graduating from high school.

“You can always do something to help someone else,” he said.

While acquiring something as simple as furniture may seem small to some people, it has been life changing for those who have benefited from Home Again. Connie Ross, one of these recent furniture recipients, said the organization’s help took a lot of stress away.

“Because I had nothing,” she said. “Not even a chair to sit on.”

Do something right

Ross now has two jobs – one at a local fast food restaurant and another for a cleaning service. She recently moved into a new apartment after being homeless for over a year. Between November and this summer, she was living at Hope’s House, the homeless women’s shelter at Dorchester County Community Outreach.

Before getting a place in the shelter, she had also spent a year living in her car while recovering from drug addiction. She said she still remembers the rainy nights sitting alone in her car, including during the pandemic, which compounded the isolation.

“I’ve had a few nights of crying, but not a lot,” Ross said. “You just have to find your inner strength.”

She became homeless after leaving a space where she lived with others. Ross learned that someone loaded furniture and other items in his name and damaged his credit.

This caused him to spend most of the pandemic in his car.

Summerville sees need for affordable housing options but struggles to find a place

“I had to pay off a lot of debt,” she said.

She was able to keep both of her jobs and save money, enough to eventually afford her own place.

The shelter did not allow women to buy anything because everything was given. “It was a breath of fresh air,” she said.

When Ross was finally able to find a place to stay, she hooked up with Home Again. Stagliano and his team gave him a bed, lamps, crockery, toiletries, a TV and more.

She said that as a black woman it felt good to see someone willing to help her. When looking for apartments after fixing her credit, she said there were times she could see that property managers were disappointed when they found out about her race.

With Stagliano being so young and doing so much volunteer work in the community, it was inspiring, she said.

“He’s doing something right,” she said. “And I think people should support him in any way they can.”

Who gets help

Home Again recipients ranged from people like Ross to entire families and local veterans. Stagliano said what he expects the most in his job is to see the change in personalities in people when they get help.

He remembers helping a veteran who slept on his apartment floor for at least a week.

When they visited him after delivering the furniture, he noticed that he was more social with his neighbors and happier overall. He said he had the same level of excitement when he saw two children jump on the beds his team brought them.






Back home

John Michael Stagliano (left) prepares to prepare a bed for veteran Timothy Hall on June 19, 2021. Stagliano founded Home Again, which helps provide furniture and household items to families emerging from homelessness and moving to new accommodation. Brad Nettles / Staff




It was a sense of accomplishment that Stagliano knew well from having spent much of his childhood volunteering.

Volunteering and giving back to the community is something the Stagliano family know well.

In addition to Home Again, John Michael’s sister Katie founded and runs Katie’s Krops. This is another Summerville nonprofit that creates community gardens to support food drives to end hunger.

This organization was formed after Katie grew a 40-pound cabbage when she was in third grade. John Michael was 4 at the time.

Cabbage then fed nearly 300 people and propelled Katie towards the launch of Katie’s Krops. The nonprofit now spans 31 states across the United States with dozens of community gardens.

Summerville's Katie's Krops reflects on more than a decade of national community garden work

“I think it was just meant to be,” Katie said. “The entire Summerville community as a whole, they have been amazing.”

Years later, while preparing meals at a Summerville homeless men’s shelter called Home of Hope, John Michael began helping residents of the shelter obtain furniture. He and his family would solicit the community for donations. After joining the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center and supporting homeless veterans, Home Again was born.

“It really changes lives and helps bring families together,” Katie said. “I couldn’t be prouder to be his sister.”

Without this giant cabbage, the family is not sure the two nonprofits would have taken off. But, they said the enthusiasm for supporting the community would have always been there.

“It’s kind of who we are as a family,” said Stacy Stagliano, mother of John Michael and Katie.

She said she never imagined that any of her children would oversee the organizations. With Home Again, she said she was surprised because John Michael has always been her shy child.

“They just see the possibilities,” Stacy said.

Without the support of the community, she said nonprofits would never have had the impact they are having now.

John Michael agrees.

“I couldn’t do it on my own,” he said.

During the height of the pandemic, Home Again was not receiving many calls. John Michael’s best guess was that, unfortunately, few families were getting out of homelessness.






Back home

John Michael Stagliano (center) and his father, John Stagliano, unload furniture with the help of veteran Timothy Hall on June 19, 2021. John Michael founded Home Again, which helps provide furniture and household items to families who emerging from homelessness and transitioning to new housing. Hall needed a bed and furniture. Brad Nettles / Staff




But recently with vaccines there has been a noticeable increase in awareness. Community support is therefore always welcome and necessary, he said.

Along with Ross, she said she was not only grateful to Home Again, but also to the community of Summerville in general for supporting her so much.

She can’t wait for her turn to do the same for someone else.

To support the association, go to Home Again Facebook page or send an email to [email protected].

Summerville's non-profit community garden Katie's Krops opens its first outdoor classroom

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InclusionNado continues its work of equity in Coronado

InclusionNado is cfailed to help Coronado schools achieve their goal of provide safe and supportive schools for all students. Buy a lawn sign from their website and publicly show your support for their cause. inclusionado.org

– Publicity –

The local community organization InclusioNado has spent the past year working to build awareness, acceptance and action for greater inclusion in schools in Coronado. After the summer 2020 protests, InclusioNado was formed by a group of students, parents and community members committed to helping schools in Coronado achieve their goal of provide safe and supportive schools for all students. Even if InclusionNado is run by volunteers, the organization became a registered nonprofit in December 2020 to facilitate fundraising.

InclusioNado has partnered with local visual storyteller Brad Willis to produce a series of videos, Uncomfortable conversations with a black mom. These videos provide candid conversations about fairness with members of our Coronado community. Themes include motherhood and immigration which incorporate a unique perspective from Coronado. Uncomfortable conversations can be viewed on https://www.inclusionado.org/conversations/

– Publicity –

Louise Erdrich’s “The Game of Silence” is a book by InclusionNado reviewed and placed in the Small Libraries around Coronado.

As part of its educational initiative, InclusioNado launched a Little Free Library program to donate and distribute books on diversity themes to the Little Free Libraries around Coronado. These book choices (designated by an InclusioNado label on the cover and spine of the book) include Ninth room by Jewel Parker Rhodes, Uncomfortable conversations with a black man by Emmanuel Acho, and The game of silence by Louise Erdich. Reviews of these books along with specific discussion questions are posted on the InclusionNado website at https://www.inclusionado.org/little-library-book-reviews/

InclusionNado has also developed a catalog of book and film resources for people to learn about diversity and inclusion. Recommended books are listed for elementary school through high school, and suggested films are rated for youth and adults. Most of the movies are available at the library or on YouTube. Recommended resources are listed on the InclusionNado website at https://www.inclusionado.org/books-and-films/

Black History Month flyer created by InclusioNado.

To celebrate February’s Black History Month, InclusionNado has created a list of Black History Books and Movies. The leaflet recommended books for elementary, middle and high school students. The recommended films are intended for all age groups, but are aimed specifically at those with children. The Black History Month flyer was distributed to schools in Coronado and the Coronado Public Library.

On their first anniversary, InclusioNado organized a silent march around Coronado schools for supporters to show their continued commitment to advancing inclusion within the Coronado community. Recent events validate the importance of InclusionNado’s ongoing work.

Community members can show their support for InclusioNado and for diversity in Coronado by purchasing a lawn sign from the InclusionNado website: https://www.inclusionado.org/contact-us/


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Harry O’Neill of Ridgetown was the inventor of the “Slider” baseball field

Harry O’Neill in 1924

As you travel through Chatham-Kent’s sporting history, there are many stories that will surprise you.

One of them concerns the “cursor”.

No, not a delicious miniature burger, we’re talking about the hard-to-touch baseball field.

Several pitchers in Major League Baseball history are well known for their slider, including David Cone, CC Sabathia, Zack Greinke, Clayton Kershaw, Rollie Fingers and Steve Carlton.

However, the land is believed to originate from Ridgetown, Ontario, invented by a man named Harry O’Neill.

Now this fact is debated. Some will attribute the pitch to Charles “Chief” Bender, others will credit George Uhle, still others will credit George Blaeholder; but in the middle of that discussion, there’s always Harry O’Neill from Ridgetown.

After high school, Harry O’Neill attended the University of Toronto and soon found himself in the Canadian military. In 1919, O’Neill helped the Canadian Expeditionary Force team win a tag team championship while playing in London, England.

After World War I, O’Neill returned to Canada and traveled to Alberta, where he won another title, this time throwing for the Medicine Hat Monarchs. His big breakthrough, however, came in 1921 when he was spotted playing for the Windsor Chicks.

In 1922, O’Neill was signed by Connie Mack to play for the Philadelphia Athletics. He made his Major League Baseball debut that year and also adapted for track and field in 1923.

It is while launching with Athletics that O’Neill would have discovered the “slider”. Pitching for batting practice, his teammates asked O’Neill to make easy pitches over the plate. Trying to pick up speed on his fastball, O’Neill adjusted his grip and his throws, although slightly slower, began to cut through the plate. When Hall of Fame Director Connie Mack came to investigate, he told O’Neill to “find out what it is and keep doing it.”

However, most of his professional career has been in the minor leagues, where he has presented his patented slider pitch in cities such as Augusta, Salt Lake City, Shreveport, Dallas, Hollywood and Boise. At Augusta, O’Neill threw a non-hitter.

If it hadn’t been for a car crash, where his hip was injured in his second season with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1923, O’Neill and his pioneering land might have had a much longer career. in the Major League.

At the end of his playing days, O’Neill spent two seasons as a minor league manager for the Salt Lake Bees in 1927 and the Boise Senators in 1928. During those years, O’Neill was known for enter training when needed. .

Upon retirement, Harry O’Neill returned to Chatham-Kent, where he worked for the Township of Howard. O’Neill died in 1969 at the age of 76, but his slider still lives in the big leagues.

Harry O’Neill working for Howard Township

By Ian Kennedy


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Fayetteville Group Celebrates Juneteenth with March at Market House

A local community group honored black American slaves who were sold to the Market House in downtown Fayetteville with a demonstration in the building.

The actors dressed in old clothes and had ankle and wrist chains, while others held signs reading “Slaves Sold Here,” silently marched down Hay Street on Sunday afternoon to perform a slavery reenactment.

Onlookers at restaurants and shops along the street observed that the silent group was led by a white actor with a whip and overalls and another on horseback.

The event, hosted by local nonprofit Let’s Make It Happen Together, was one of many celebrations on June 10 this weekend in Fayetteville and Cumberland County.

Juneteenth is now considered a national holiday to commemorate enslaved black Americans and the end of slavery in the United States.

The Fayetteville Market House:Accounts of slave auctions under the arcades

A controversial historical monument

“I said, if we really want to celebrate Juneteenth, we really have to tell the whole story and tell the truth about it,” said Swan Davis, a community activist. “For us not to do it that way, it means we were afraid of what our ancestors went through.”

Davis, the founder of the organization, said he wanted to tell the story of the Market House and the slaves who were sold there with the show.

The Fayetteville Market House was built in 1832 to replace the old State House, which was destroyed in a fire. It was not built as a slave market, but as a town hall and a market. But records show slaves were sold there at auction.

Let’s Make It Happen Together put on the show in two weeks, and local actors and volunteers performed songs, poems and a play on a stage in front of the building. A large crowd of people attended the event.

Built in 1831, the Market House has been the center of controversy in the city.

Davis has been told by some people that he shouldn’t do this.

“It was just like at the end of the day our ancestors went through this, and it was right that we did it right and tell as much truth as possible about what happened,” said Davis said. “We are just thankful that we were able to do this and we had a lot of volunteers to support as well as our community. “

The re-enactment of slavery, performed by local actors in Fayetteville, told the story of black American slaves who were sold to the Market House between 1820 and 1860.

Davis wanted to challenge claims that the Market House was not a place where slaves were sold and that the conversation about this part of its history should be discussed.

Other speakers at the event included Reverend Christopher Stackhouse, pastor of Lewis Chapel Baptist Missionary Church in Fayetteville.

In his speech, he referred to the bell inside the Market House that rang every night at 9 p.m. signifying a curfew put in place before slavery ended in the city.

“They rang that bell to remind people, black people of Fayetteville, NC, ‘remember your place,’” Stackhouse said. “If you were outside after 9 am, you could be severely beaten if not killed. Even though the Emancipation Proclamation was passed, they still rang that bell. “

Stackhouse, whose ancestor was a runaway slave from the city, said the Market House always serves as a reminder that black people in the city have a “place.”

Christopher D. Stack:Fayetteville Market House, where slaves were sold, not as “historic” as its defenders claim

“They always try to act like all of this stuff has been around for so many generations that we don’t need to mention it anymore,” Stackhouse said. “It is not a distant and distant story that no living person has a connection to. It is still relevant today.”

Some people from Hay Street joined the crowd to watch the show. Others verbally expressed their contempt.

“We’re not painting with a pretty brush what happened here,” Stackhouse said. “It is important for all of us to know that souls, people, men, women, boys, girls and babies have been sold in this building here. Market House which is so historic it cannot be out of place, but so historic that you can’t tell its story.

Storytelling and celebration

Raqi Barnett, 49, was one of the actors in the play outside Market House.

Dressed in a long white skirt and a tattered green top, Barnett passionately recited “The Negro Mother” by poet Langston Hughes in which he describes the life and slavery of a black woman.

Actress Raqi Barnett, a resident of Fayetteville, played "The negro mother," a poem by Langston Hughes.

“When I got ready to do the poem, I really wanted them to feel the power of words on how they could make a difference,” Barnett said. “See how you can take what she’s been through and use it to push yourself to do better, think about the story, treat others well. “

Barnett, a theatrical arts teacher at EE Smith High School, said she wanted to be in the mindset of a enslaved person and what she may have been thinking or what she experienced in the moments before. to be sold in the building.

At the end of the event, the crowd danced to a rendition of Frankie Beverly and Maze’s 1981 hit “Before I Let Go” outside the Market House to celebrate June 19, honor the past and look to the future.

“We’ve been through too much,” Davis said. “And we still have walls to tear down. “

Regional corporate reporter Kristen Johnson can be reached at [email protected] or 910-486-3570.

Support local journalism with a subscription to The Fayetteville Observer. Click the “subscribe” link at the top of this article.


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