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Hometown Alaska: Teens talk coping with COVID


Young people trying to stay connected during the Covid pandemic. Wikimedia Commons image by SGerbic,

In this week’s Hometown Alaska, teenagers in Anchorage describe how they suffered, endured and even grew while living under the Covid pandemic. We’ll hear from teens from Alaska Teen Media Institute (ATMI), Covenant House, and MHATS, which stands for Mental Health Advocacy Through Storytelling, a nonprofit organization founded and run by students in Anchorage.

ATMI students have started creating a series called “Podcast in Place, Youth Stories from Quarantine” recorded at home due to COVID constraints. Topics include individual student reactions to school closures and uncertainty, interviews with Alaska’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Anne Zink, and a multi-generational family interview (grandparents, their daughter and their grandchildren) on immunization information and engagement management.

Two Covenant House students talk about the emotional impact of isolation and job loss due to restaurant closures during the pandemic.

The MHATS teens describe their commitment to better mental health education for young people in school, and their own ups and downs throughout the pandemic.

Either way, these students were changed by the experience of living through Covid. They also represent an age group, according to the CDC, that has the lowest rate of vaccination and booster compliance.

This program has been pre-recorded for scheduling purposes, so hosts will not take your calls during the program. However, we still want to hear from you. Please call our 24/7 registered line (550-8480) and tell us about your own experience. Have you hesitated to get vaccinated or to be vaccinated? What helped you overcome this hesitation?

This program is part of Alaska Public Media’s “Talk to Your Neighbor” project, providing trusted voices and accurate information to listeners about Covid vaccination. APM has partnered with 20 community groups to help overcome vaccine hesitancy.

HOSTS: Kathleen McCoy and ATMI’s Daisy Carter

GUESTS:

  • Caelan Vossa.k.a PeanutAlliance House
  • Grace MargesonAlliance House
  • Abby LauferMHATS
  • Marshall ivyMHATS
  • Tara SkidmoreMHATS
  • daisy carterATMI and Alaska Public Media, co-host and guest

CONNECTIONS:

TO PARTICIPATE:

  • Today’s program has been pre-recorded so hosts cannot take live calls. However, we still want to hear from you. Dial 550-8480 and leave a recorded message, 24/7.
  • Send E-mail to [email protected] before, during or after the live broadcast.
  • post your comment or question below (comments can be read on-air).
  • The pre-recorded show air: Monday February 21, 2022 at 10 a.m.
  • RE-AIR: Monday February 21, 2022 at 8 p.m.
  • PODCAST: Available on this page after the program.
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Non profit living

‘Worthy to take up space’: Jennifer Lee ’23 founds nonprofit to support disabled Asian Americans

In June 2020, after months of doctor’s appointments and medical tests, Jennifer Lee ’23 was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease. Although she had many typical symptoms of the disease, Lee said her doctors were initially hesitant to consider Crohn’s disease because of its rarity in Asian Americans.

“From the beginning of my journey with a chronic illness,” said Lee, “I began to see how my Asian American identity influenced not only the way I perceived my illness and my body, but also the way which even medical professionals perceived the disability and diagnostic processes. ”

After his diagnosis, Lee sought out communities like the Crohn’s and Colitis Young Adults Network and the National Council of College Leaders of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation. But even in groups with other young adults with disabilities, Lee felt her Asian American identity set her apart from her peers.

“I soon discovered that I didn’t see people who looked like me, and so for a very long time I thought that I was the only person who felt that way, that I had no one else to talk to. of the specificity of the cultural stigmas around disability, what it was like to be of two marginalized identities — to be both Asian American and disabled,” she said.

Although Lee may have felt lonely, she is one of more than 1.3 million Americans who identify as both Asian American and disabled. After meeting others who shared his identity during the American Association of Persons with Disabilities (AAPD) internship program in the summer of 2021, Lee decided to form a group dedicated to this intersection.

In July 2021, along with a coalition of Asian Americans with disabilities and non-disabled allies from across the country, Lee founded the Asian Americans with Disabilities Initiative (AADI), a nonprofit organization run by and for people like her who identify as both Asian American and disabled. Lee is now Executive Director of AADI and manages a leadership team of approximately 20-25 people at any one time.

“AADI’s overriding mission is to amplify the voices of Asian Americans with disabilities and provide the next generation of Asian Americans with disabilities with the tools, resources, and infrastructure necessary to thrive in a world which hasn’t always welcomed them,” Lee said.

In its short existence, AADI has already made great strides toward fulfilling its mission to increase the visibility of the disabled and Asian American community and provide resources on how to live in a world that is not not built to accommodate either group.

AADI started with what Lee calls a “three-pronged vision.” She hoped to publish a resource guide for Asian Americans with disabilities, host speaker panels and events with people involved in Asian American and disability advocacy, and build a community of peers. disabled and Asian Americans.

On all three fronts, AADI has made tangible progress.

On January 10, after months of preparation, AADI launched its Resource Guide, an 80-page document described on AADI’s website as a guide “to combat ableism within the Asian American community. disability through first-person accounts, extensive peer-reviewed research, and AADI event summaries.

The AADI Research Committee has compiled collections of academic research, alliance lessons, and profiles of Asian American and disabled activists for inclusion in the guide. AADI received support from the TigerWell Initiative and Service Focus in developing the guide.

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“We had recognized that in the academic field there is very little research that has been done on the intersection of disability and Asian American identity, and the reason it is so important is that this type of research directly informs and feeds into what policy looks like,” Lee said of the importance of the academic research section.

The audience for the research guide, and AADI as a whole, encompasses a wide range of stakeholders, according to Megan Liang, program manager at San Diego State University and AADI’s director of external relations. As an Asian American amputee, Liang got involved with AADI after seeing them highlighted on social media.

“Whether you are an Asian American with a disability, an ally, a social worker, or only identify as disabled or identify only as an Asian American, you can take away a fresh perspective on how this community is dealing with things and issues that they might face,” Liang said. “And even though it’s a small impact of change, I’m just glad we’re able to do that.”

AADI has held two speaker events so far. The first panel of speakers took place on August 13, 2021, featuring Lydia XZ Brown, Miso Kwak and Mia Ives-Rublee, three Asian American activists with disabilities. The event was virtual and included American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters and captioning services. More than 50 people attended the event, according to Lee.

“That panel kind of served as a starting point,” Lee said. “[The panelists talked] about the intersection of these two identities themselves, the difficulties our speakers might have encountered while navigating through space, as well as any advice they had for other younger Asian Americans and disabled watching.

Most recently, on January 29, AADI hosted another virtual panel focusing on the intersection of art, disability, and being Asian American. Comedian Steve Lee, poet Topaz Winters ’23 and dancer Marisa Hamamoto spoke at the event.

“I was on the panel with several other Asian American and disabled artists, so we talked a lot about how our Asian American identities fit into our disability rights work, as well as ‘to our artistic work,” Winters said.

“The three streams of my identity – being an artist, being disabled, and being Asian – aren’t really streams that intersect very often in my advocacy work or in my artistic work,” they added. “It was really special for me to be among a group of people who understood very well what it was and the unique challenges, but also the unique joys of existing in these three beautiful spaces, and simply expanding the definitions of what these spaces can be.”

The ultimate goal of forming a community of disabled Asian American peers has been achieved, so far, in a largely virtual setting. Most people involved with AADI have never met in person.

“It’s just about showcasing the community, and for me, part of what AADI does is show that Asian Americans with disabilities and our experiences deserve to take up space,” Lee said.

“I knew the second I found AADI, I had found a specific kind of community that I wouldn’t have been able to find if I hadn’t looked for it otherwise,” Liang said. “I hope we can do more community events in the future, because I understand how empowering it is to be among people who have shared life experiences.”

In the coming months, AADI plans to continue its outreach efforts and spread its mission of accessibility and inclusion for the Asian American and disabled community.

Jiyoun Roh ’24 is AADI’s Director of Outreach and is responsible for managing the organization’s social media. Roh’s brother has cerebral palsy and she became interested in disability justice after noticing how her disability had led to a lack of inclusion in the Asian American community.

“We want accessibility to be more than just a disability community,” Roh said. “We want it in other AAPI organizations.”

“We get a lot of collaborations with many other organizations and together with them, we want to build our own community because a community is made better by the people in it,” she continued.

Lee hopes the conversations started during the COVID-19 pandemic about racial justice and chronic disease will continue in the future.

“I think in this era of the COVID-19 pandemic, we face an extraordinary opportunity to redefine how we understand the experience of people with disabilities and how we understand the Asian American experience,” Lee said.

She looks forward to expanding the advocacy work AADI has done in the six months since its inception.

“The more we work in the disability, Asian American, and nonprofit space, the more our team realizes that there are many definitions of success in terms of what our mission can accomplish,” Lee said.

Naomi Hess is an emeritus editor who focuses on university politics and alumni affairs. She can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter at @NaomiHess17.

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History organization

Nasdaq Announces Retirement of Executive Vice President of Market Technology Lars Ottersgård; appoints new leadership for financial crime technology and market infrastructure companies

Nasdaq, Inc.

Consolidates legal and regulatory functions and group risk management responsibilities

Nasdaq Announces Technology Market Leadership Updates

Nasdaq, Inc. announced the retirement of Lars Ottersgørd, executive vice president of Market Technology, after 16 years at the helm of the organization.  As a result, the company is appointing two senior executives – Jamie King and Roland Chai – to advance its Financial Crime Enforcement and Market Infrastructure Technology businesses, respectively.

Nasdaq, Inc. announced the retirement of Lars Ottersgård, executive vice president of Market Technology, after 16 years at the helm of the organization. As a result, the company is appointing two senior executives – Jamie King and Roland Chai – to advance its Financial Crime Enforcement and Market Infrastructure Technology businesses, respectively.

NEW YORK, Feb. 14 10, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Nasdaq, Inc. (Nasdaq: NDAQ), today announced the retirement of Lars Ottersgård, executive vice president of Market Technology, after 16 years leading the organization. Ottersgård will transition to an advisory role on April 30, 2022, until his official retirement on August 31. As a result, the company is appointing two top executives – Jamie King and Roland Chai – to drive its anti-financial and market crime infrastructure forward. The technology companies, respectively, and both will report directly to Nasdaq President and CEO Adena Friedman.

The announced changes are not expected to impact the Company’s public financial reporting structure for the Market Technology segment, comprised of the Anti-Financial Crime and Market Infrastructure Technology businesses. Additionally, the Nasdaq continues to maintain its financial and operational performance targets for the Market Technology segment.

During a 16-year career at Nasdaq, Ottersgård presided over a near tripling of the company’s market technology franchise and was instrumental in growing the company into one of the biggest global solution providers for exchanges, clearing houses, central securities depositories, regulators, banks, and brokers. After a 20-year career at IBM, Ottersgård joined OMX AB in 2006 to lead global sales for the Nordic-based exchange company’s trading technology business and was appointed to lead the market technology business. combined following Nasdaq’s landmark merger with OMX in 2008. His vision and leadership has resulted in the provision of Nasdaq’s technology capabilities to more than 130 market infrastructure operators in 50 countries, including one of largest market infrastructure agreements in the history of the industry. Following the launch of the Nasdaq Financial Framework, Ottersgård led the company into new areas beyond traditional capital markets, including building and scaling the company’s anti-financial crime solutions for banks and brokers around the world, and played a key role in advancing the Nasdaq cloud journey.

“Lars has been an exceptional leader and colleague, having led our Market Technology segment through some of the most significant milestones in industry history,” said Adena Friedman, President and CEO of Nasdaq. “After bringing OMX to Nasdaq in 2008, his keen eye for emerging technologies led Nasdaq to acquire SMARTS Surveillance and Cinnober, cementing our leadership position in providing essential technology to over a hundred exchanges and of market infrastructure operators around the world.His recent efforts to expand our solutions and marketplaces in the cloud, as well as to serve new markets, including cryptocurrencies, puts us in a privileged position for us partner with customers across the marketplace ecosystem as we move toward an interconnected future.”

The following management changes will take effect on April 4, 2022:

  • Jamie King will be elevated to Executive Vice President, Nasdaq, and assume leadership of Nasdaq Anti-financial crime (AFC). AFC’s business includes solutions used by thousands of banks, stock exchange operators and other financial institutions to detect and combat financial crime through trade and market monitoring, as well as fraud detection solutions and Verafin’s anti-money laundering program. King is currently president and CEO of Verafin, which he co-founded in 2003.

  • Roland Chai, currently Global Chief Risk Officer of Nasdaq, will be elevated to Executive Vice President and will lead the Nasdaq Market Infrastructure Technology company, which includes products specifically designed to meet the technology needs of market infrastructure customers. Prior to joining Nasdaq in 2020, Chai served as Head of Post-Trading and Head of Group Risk at the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. He previously held the position of Equity Manager at LCH Ltd after starting his career in software development.

  • Following these changes, John ZeccaNasdaq’s Chief Legal & Regulatory Officer, will assume leadership of Roland Chai’s Nasdaq Group Risk Management team and become Legal, Risk and Regulatory Director.

“The organizational and leadership changes announced today will accelerate Nasdaq’s ability to realize its potential as a global leader in anti-financial crime solutions and as a leading, innovative technology partner to exchanges and markets around the world,” said Friedman. “Jamie and Roland are both respected leaders in their fields with deep industry expertise, proven track records of success, and a shared focus on deepening client relationships. I look forward to continued success as we are driving the next phase of growth in our anti-financial and market crime solutions.”

CAUTION REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

The information in this communication contains forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. The Nasdaq cautions readers that any forward-looking information is not a guarantee of future performance and that actual results could differ materially from those contained in the forward-looking information. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, projections regarding our future financial results, products and services and achievement of objectives, and other statements that are not historical facts. Forward-looking statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties or other factors beyond Nasdaq’s control. These factors include, but are not limited to, Nasdaq’s ability to implement its strategic initiatives, economic, political and market conditions and fluctuations, government and industry regulation, interest rate risk, competitive U.S. and worldwide, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business operations, results of operations, financial condition, workforce, or the operations or decisions of our customers, suppliers, or business partners, and other factors detailed in Nasdaq’s filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, including its annual reports on Form 10-K and quarterly reports on Form 10-Q which are available on the Investor Relations website. Nasdaq Investors at http://ir.nasdaq.com and on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. The Nasdaq undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

About the Nasdaq

Nasdaq (Nasdaq: NDAQ) is a global technology company serving capital markets and other industries. Our diverse offering of data, analytics, software and services enables clients to optimize and execute their business vision with confidence. To learn more about the company, technology solutions and career opportunities, visit us on LinkedIn, Twitter @Nasdaq or www.nasdaq.com.

Contacts for Media Relations:

Will Briganti
+1 (646) 964-8169
[email protected]

Yan-yan Tong
+1 (240) 721-8066
[email protected]

Contact with Investor Relations:

Ed Ditmire, CFA
+1 (212) 401-8737
[email protected]

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/56fb1997-149e-4e2f-9aeb-4871b7a2fcf7

-NDAQF-

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Non profit living

Vancouver awards contract for 2nd Safe Stay Community to Living Hope Church

Vancouver City Council voted unanimously on Monday to contract with Living Hope Church to operate the city’s second Safe Stay community.

Brian Norris, associate pastor of Living Hope, said the organization has built relationships with the homeless population which will be an asset to the church while running the Safe Stay Community.

“They know where we come from; we know where they are (and) what their struggles are,” he said. “We want to see the best in people and we want them to see the best in themselves.”

The additional initiative from city staff came shortly after setting up its first site at 11400 NE 51st Circle, which operated for more than a month. Residents of the cul-de-sac in Vancouver’s North Image neighborhood have achieved many goals, said Jamie Spinelli, Vancouver Homeless Intervention Coordinator.

Three residents got jobs while others decided to seek treatment. A person has found his family; several residents have obtained their driver’s license; and some received essential medical care.

Outsiders Inn, a Vancouver-based nonprofit, operates the city’s first Safe Stay community. Adam Kravitz, executive director of Outsiders Inn, said community residents have already achieved milestones after more than a month of operation.

“Most of the time, success comes from people stabilizing,” he said.

Outsiders Inn is working on some issues, such as maintaining a continuous flow of essential supplies, including paper products, garbage bags and cooking utensils, Kravitz said. Some challenges require patience as the pieces fall into place, such as waiting for WiFi to be installed, he added. The organization’s staff shares their acquired knowledge and other general advice with Living Hope Church to ease their transition.

“We’re working very closely with them (to) help them get off the ground as smooth and easy as possible,” Kravitz said.

Spinelli said the added location will operate around the clock, connect residents to outside resources and provide peer support, just like the first site.

Living Hope Church operated a relief site early in the COVID-19 pandemic and operates the county’s only walk-in severe weather shelter. Volunteers also provide meals, a food and clothing bank, mobile sanitation facilities and other outreach services on a weekly basis.

Mayor Pro Tem Ty Stober said the community may question the role of a religious organization in running a municipal program and stressed that the church will abide by the Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity Act. employment opportunities, which is described in the contract.

The city will pay Living Hope Church $552,212 per year to operate the site. Location and shelter options have not been determined.

Vancouver’s first Safe Stay community was included in its 2021-2022 budget, and additional communities will be funded with the first supplementary budget in 2022. The proposed second site and additional support sites may be funded through the Fund for the affordable housing, a sales tax on affordable housing. , and community development grants.

In the same motion, council members approved an updated administrative plan for the Affordable Housing Fund. The proposed changes allocate funds to meet changing community needs, such as the growing demand for temporary shelters during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Affordable Housing Fund initially allocated $300,000 per year for temporary shelters. The proposed update increased the amount to $1.66 million per year, which would support Safe Stay Community operations and the creation of additional sites.

The increase comes as the $3.96 million allocation for housing production and preservation has been reduced to $2.6 million, said Samantha Whitley, community development manager. City staff found that their goals had been met and that more investment was needed to help people in need find shelter.

“We’re nimble in responding (and) to the needs of our community, and this is a great way to do that,” Councilor Bart Hansen said.

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Non profit living

Alice Cooper doesn’t think politics and rock ‘n’ roll go together

Alice Cooper doesn’t ask for much, but when it comes to politics, he wants to be left alone. The legendary shock rocker doesn’t think politics and rock ‘n’ roll go hand in hand – more specifically, that they “don’t belong in the same bed together”.

Though he’s spoken about his dismay for political topics in the past, the topic came up in a new interview with Tampa Bay’s Creative Loafing, where the icon was asked about his relationship with outspoken Ted Nugent at the light of all the political and social unrest that has occurred in recent years.

“Ted and I grew up together in Detroit, and he’s always been the mouth that roared. When he gets into it, no one can stick with him. I sort of consider him his own entity. I never talk of politics…I hate politics,” Cooper said.

“I don’t think rock and roll and politics are in the same bed, but a lot of people think they are – because we have a voice and we should use our voice. But again, rock and roll should be anti-politics, I think. When my parents started talking about politics, I was turning on the [Rolling] Stones as hard as possible. I don’t want to hear politics, and I still feel that.”

Cooper ultimately wants his music and live performances to be a “vacation from CNN.” And while he’s not trying to insult anyone who uses his platform to share his own opinions, he said he would never take the stage and tell his fans who to vote for in an election.

“If I did something like ‘Elected,’ which we always would do in elections, and I brought Trump and Hillary in to fight, and they’d both be wiped out! That’s what who was funny about it. If you’re into political theater, you better be able to take a joke.”

Although the rocker is not into politics, he is still a humanitarian. At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, he set aside money for his team so they wouldn’t struggle financially during the tour stoppage. In early 2021, he wrote a song just for Harry Nilsson’s son, Zak, who was battling terminal colon cancer. Last December, a photo went viral of the musician serving food to children at some sort of food bank event – and these are just examples of his selflessness that has happened over the past two years .

The “School’s Out” singer is currently embarking on a winter tour of North America, which will wrap up Feb. 14 after the 2022 Monsters of Rock cruise. He’ll be heading back in March, though, with Buckcherry. See all dates here.

14 Rock + Metal Artists Giving Back

These artists do so much to give back to a wide variety of communities and causes.

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Canadian army

Survey Respondents Say Canada Should Boycott Beijing Games

59% of Canadians remain adamant that this country should stay away from the 2022 Winter Olympics, up three points since December.

We are days away from the start of the Winter Olympics and Canadians can be forgiven for not feeling particularly cheerful.

The ramifications of the COVID-19 pandemic continue to rock our lives, with increased discussions of vaccine mandates and daily statements from health authorities. Residents of the country are also more concerned about economic stability and inflation than in the past.

If the Games were held in the United States or in Europe, the feeling of Canadians might be different. However, as those interested in skating, skiing and hockey will no doubt know, the Olympics are held in Beijing, which makes the city unique as the premier host of both summer and winter varieties of the event. jock.

From the perspective of the average spectator, the Olympic Winter Games will be unusual in North America. Broadcasters who secured the rights to the Games years before anyone knew what COVID-19 was won’t send the usual army of reporters and commentators to Beijing. These Games, like those held in Tokyo last summer, will feature little local flavor and many virtual settings operated from Ontario and Connecticut.

Research Co. and Glacier Media have consistently tracked Canadians’ views of China and the 2022 Olympics. Only about one in five Canadians have had a positive view of the People’s Republic of China over the past year and a half (20 % when we last asked this question in December).

As well in December, 56% of Canadians thought Canada should boycott the 2022 Winter Games because of China’s human rights record. The poll also highlighted that Canadians want athletes to have freedom of expression during the Games, as well as concerns about their safety: partly because of COVID-19, but also because they keep mind the arbitrary detention of Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig.

A few days ago, we asked Canadians again about Beijing 2022. Perhaps the lure of a sporting event that Canadians have watched closely in previous editions would change minds. Or perhaps, to follow the rhetoric of past and current presidents of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), it’s “time for sport, not politics.”

The answer to both questions is a resounding “No”. In our latest survey, 59% of Canadians are adamant that Canada should boycott the Beijing Olympics, up three points since December and the highest level seen in four different polls conducted since March 2021.

The generational divide that is typically present in national public opinion polls is not prominent in this regard. The majority of Canadians aged 18-34 (59%), 35-54 (54%) and 55+ (65%) want to send a message that goes beyond the absence of an official at the opening ceremonies – essentially what a “diplomatic boycott” enacted by Canada and the United States entails.

As was the case a few weeks ago, residents of three provinces are particularly keen to keep Canadian athletes at home: Quebec (66%), British Columbia (also 66%) and Ontario (57% ). There is no political divide on this issue either. More than three in five Canadians who voted for the Conservative Party of Canada (67%), the Liberal Party of Canada (63%) and the New Democratic Party (NDP) (62%) last year also support a boycott.

Regardless of participant status, most Canadians strongly believe that athletes should be able to protest China’s human rights record at Beijing 2022 (72%, down two points) and that the CIO should not punish those who choose to do so (also 72%, up one point).

An equal proportion (72%, down two points) remain concerned about the health and safety of Canadian athletes traveling to Beijing. In addition, 47% of Canadians (up two points) say they will make a conscious effort to refrain from watching the Games, a proportion that rises to 53% in Quebec.

We also continue to see consistency in the relationship between Canadian portfolios and Chinese exports. Only 30% of Canadians (down two points) say they never avoid products from China. Of the remaining 70% who try to be careful what they buy, 41% avoid Chinese products “most of the time” and 16% say they follow this course of action “all the time”.

As the start of Beijing 2022 approaches, nearly half of Canadians say they will pull out of this edition of the Winter Olympics altogether. The negative opinions of Canadians about the host country have not changed. Compared to last year, a slightly higher proportion of Canadians believe a full boycott is warranted.

Mario Canseco is president of Research Co.

The findings are based on an online survey conducted January 21-23, 2022 of 1,000 adults in Canada. The data was statistically weighted according to Canadian census counts for age, sex and region. The margin of error, which measures sample variability, is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

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Non profit living

Accountant who embezzled over $1 million from adoption agency sentenced to 4.5 years in prison

A former international adoption agency accountant who stole more than $1.6 million from her employer and her own family was sentenced to four and a half years in federal prison on Wednesday.

U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernandez said he believed the fraud lasted about eight years and involved multiple victims. He said he also considered the COVID-19 pandemic as a mitigating factor when determining his sentence.

Melodie Ann Eckland, 56, of Hillsboro, pleaded guilty to wire fraud, aggravated identity theft, filing a false tax return and willfully failing to collect or pay payroll taxes.

She was also ordered to pay more than $1.6 million in restitution.

The illegal scheme was uncovered in March 2018, when one of the owners of Journeys of the Heart adoption and surrogacy agency received a call from a Premier Community Bank representative requesting information on several company checks that had been presented for payment with a signature of the owner. which appeared to have been tampered with, prosecutors said.

Eckland stole funds directly from the adoption agency’s business account at the bank by using the Journeys of the Heart computer to make unauthorized wire transfers to his personal bank account in the United States and writing checks unauthorized to herself, according to prosecutors.

She also transferred unauthorized funds by computer as a “bonus” from the adoption agency’s bank account to her own bank account.

To hide his fraud, Eckland kept two separate QuickBooks files on the adoption agency’s computer.

To cover the money she had stolen, Eckland applied for loans from at least five loan agencies in the adoption agency’s name, using the agency owners’ names without their permission. Eckland altered the agency’s financial records to give the impression that she owned the agency and was authorized to enter into the loan agreements. As of 2016, Eckland stopped making the agency’s quarterly employment tax payments to the IRS and stopped filing employment tax returns. As a result, the agency owed more than $94,000 in overdue employment taxes.

In yet another cover-up, she transferred $123,900 she had stolen from an account belonging to her deceased brother-in-law’s estate to the adoption agency’s bank account by forging her husband’s signature , according to prosecutors.

Eckland, who worked as an accountant for the adoption agency from 2011 to April 2018, spent her flight money on gifts and living expenses for her adult children, trips to Hawaii, Mexico and Disney World, event tickets, groceries, household items and living expenses, prosecutors said.

As part of the plea agreement, Eckland admitted that the amount of loss she caused to the adoption agency, the owners of the agency, and the estate of her brother-in-law and IRS was over $1,565,000.

“The crimes committed by Melodie Eckland reveal an astonishing level of greed, deceit and callousness towards her victims. Eckland repeatedly victimized the adoption agency and its owners over seven long years, bleeding the organization nonprofit over $1 million,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Claire M. Fay wrote in a sentencing memo.

“The owners of the adoption agency are devastated by the accused’s embezzlement and identity theft. They have worked hard for 26 years to fulfill an important mission: to help children around the world find caring and loving families,” Fay wrote. “However, due to the theft, selfishness and greed of the defendant, the owners feel they can no longer continue financially with the adoption agency.”

Eckland, a mother of two and grandmother of three, began stealing from her employer because she was heavily in debt and felt pressured to support her children and grandchildren, the company’s attorney said. defense Jamie Kilberg. She used the stolen money for household expenses, retail expenses, family support, debts, some travel and repayment of stolen funds, Kilberg said.

Kilberg argued for a maximum sentence of three years, noting that Eckland has no criminal record, is unlikely to commit future crimes, is remorseful and is working hard to repay her victims.

“In my quest to take the financial burdens of my family on my shoulders, I have wronged others,” Eckland wrote to the judge. “It’s just not okay and it’s not the person I want to be. … I want to right my wrong, and I don’t feel like I have the opportunity to do that if I’m incarcerated… I promise to work every day to become a more honest and trustworthy person.

Appearing via video for her remote sentencing hearing, she apologized to her former employers, saying she felt regret and shame for betraying their trust and stealing from them.

“I know better and I should have done better,” she said.

–Maxine Bernstein

Email to [email protected]; 503-221-8212

Follow on Twitter @maxoregonian

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Canadian army

Maple Ridge Sally Ann gets kettle campaign proceeds at critical time – Maple Ridge News


The Salvation Army Department Ridge Meadows has once again surpassed $ 100,000 in fundraising thanks to its annual Christmas Kettle Campaign.

This follows a year in which the campaign raised an unprecedented amount of $ 138,000.

The exact number is not yet known, as revenue from the six-week campaign is still being calculated, the local charity said in a press release.

The funds are coming at a critical time. The organization is seeing an increase in demand for programs and services due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

“This year has been tough for a lot of people,” spokesman Mark Stewart said. “Due to almost two years of living in a pandemic, a lot of people are still struggling. We are seeing an increased need and we are relying on the public to help us meet the demand. “

Programs such as Community and Family Services are seeing more and more families and individuals using their Emergency Bridge Hamper program. And with this recent cold weather purchase, the Community Meal Program is operating 24/7 to keep vulnerable people safe and warm throughout the day and night.

The agency says every dollar raised through the Red Kettle campaign will stay in Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows, where it’s used to fund essential programs and services, 365 days a year. The Salvation Army strives to provide the necessities of food, clothing, and shelter, while delivering life-changing programs, such as emergency baskets, youth programs, and advocacy.

“The people of Ridge Meadows have been incredibly generous this holiday season,” said Stewart. “Every year we ask them to help their community, and every year they come together to meet the demand and we can’t thank them enough. “

With money still running out, the organization hopes to reach its provincial goal of $ 5 million. Nationally, the organization hopes to meet its goal of $ 21 million.

In addition to individual donors, The Salvation Army thanked corporate partners, including Walmart, Costco, BC Liquor Stores, Canadian Tire, Save-on-Foods, Sobeys and many more, who generously donate and place Christmas kettles in their stores and at ringers.

“A special thank you to our wonderful volunteers and community partners who have supported this campaign with hours of their time over the holiday season. “


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Maple Ridge Pitt Meadows Salvation Army




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International headquarters

Vancouver’s Salvation Army sees donations drop 40%


The Salvation Army Vancouver’s Red Kettle Campaign – the annual holiday fundraiser where volunteers collect cash donations outside grocery stores and other businesses – records 40 percent fewer donations compared to to last year.

“Although we have already made a commitment to help hundreds of families with food and Christmas gifts, this drop in income will have a serious impact on our ability to help families throughout the year,” said Steve Rusk, Salvation Army Vancouver business manager.

Last year, the organization raised approximately $ 308,000 by the end of the campaign, which ends today.

This year, the organizers aimed to raise $ 300,000, which represents 15% of the organization’s annual budget. On Thursday, Rusk said achieving that goal would be a challenge.

“It really puts us in a difficult position,” he said. “From what I’ve seen, donations are also below average for our virtual campaign. “

The Salvation Army Vancouver has sought to raise $ 10,000 as part of its Virtual Red Kettles campaign. By Christmas Eve, the campaign had raised $ 1,886.

Solicitation by mail makes up the remainder of the organization’s annual budget, and those funds are so far down 50% from last year, according to Rusk.

However, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day are generally great fundraising days for the Red Kettle campaign. On Thursday, Rusk said donations for that day matched last year’s levels. In addition, the organization generally sees an increase in donations during year-end donations.

“We have some ground to catch up,” said Rusk. “It’s unlikely to catch up with the days before when the Red Kettle campaign ends, but the year-end donations could definitely help. “

Multiple factors could explain the decrease in donations to the organization, such as the COVID-19 pandemic limiting in-person purchases.

A Wall Street Journal Editorial published on December 16 criticized the Salvation Army nationwide for being ruled by “awakened ideals”, pointing to a guide to discussing racism published by The Salvation Army’s international headquarters in London and withdrawn later.

The organization’s national commander, Kenneth G. Hodder, refuted this claim in an open letter Wednesday, writing: “The Salvation Army has never been in politics. Hodder wrote that the editorial negatively impacted Salvation Army donations across the United States.

Rusk declined to comment on the controversy, saying he was not authorized to represent the organization nationally.

“We can only speculate on the reason for this reduction,” he said. “There is no really solid way to measure the motivation of donors to give or not. “

In Vancouver, if the Red Kettle campaign does not meet its goal of raising $ 300,000, Rusk said donations at any time of the year will go to the organization’s annual budget.

“Please consider a gift today to help us make up for this loss,” he said.

Those interested in donating to The Salvation Army Vancouver can do so on their website and on its virtual Red Kettle Campaign Website.


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Non profit living

Pastor Monroe’s work to help underserved creates believers


Pastor Heather Boone once dubbed a campaign to buy a larger church for her growing community mission the “Miracle on Second Street,” and some say the title still applies to the neighborhood she remodeled. to help the under-served.

Oaks Village, a Monroe nonprofit that serves thousands of struggling residents each year, and its dynamic leader have drawn attention to their attention even on the little things that can change lives, from products to clothing to ‘interview. Boone recently won USA Today’s Best of Humankind Awards, and that award made her even more determined to serve.

If his mission was not simple, the way forward is now.

“We just want the world to know what we’re doing in this little corner,” Boone said. “And we hope others will replicate what we do.”

His victory caught the national attention of Boone and his team. She said this would only amplify their mission and broad reach in Oaks Village, with its grocery store, daycare, tutoring, addiction recovery, health clinic and more.

“She’s a great woman,” said Robert Tucker, a former resident of the Oaks shelter who now works there. “… This is not a job for her. It’s his life. “

The program had humble beginnings, with twists and turns and miracles reflecting the scriptures she often shares for inspiration.

Boone grew up in Detroit, where the 45-year-old said she was “a very bad teenager.”

Through a religious awakening and conversion at the age of 20, Boone joined the African Methodist Episcopal Church, met her husband, Britton, and became a youth pastor.

“Once I found God, I wanted to help other young people not to go through all the trials I went through,” she said.

Over a decade ago, Boone was assigned to lead a small congregation in Monroe. The denomination leaders wanted to relocate her after three years, “but I really felt that God had called us here,” she said. “My husband and I made the decision to start our own ministry. “

Inspired by a Bible passage referring to God’s people, the couple launched Oaks of Righteousness in 2012, meeting for the first time at a community center and school. The following year, they bought a building that once housed a Salvation Army church, which also housed shelter for the homeless during the colder months, Boone said.

The first winter drew over 90 people and convinced the Boones to establish a year-round facility. Guided by prayer, they moved into space while working to raise enough money to do so.

Then came what they called a divine turn of events which brought forth an abundance of blessings.

Learning that the Archdiocese of Detroit was selling the nearby St. Joseph’s Church, which had several buildings, Boone embarked on a “Miracle on 2nd Street” fundraising campaign. Supporters raised over $ 320,000 purchase the property in 2016, which paved the way for upgrading the shelter as well as expanding or creating initiatives under the umbrella of Oaks Village.

Today the shelter has 75 beds, with separate floors for men, women and families. Clients are offered help finding housing, recovering from drug addiction and more.

Among them is Eric Uselton, who recently moved there after meeting Britton Boone on the job. He said he lived in a motel in Detroit and spent hundreds of dollars a day on drug addiction.

This month, Uselton marked 35 days of abstinence. Before heading back to a bunk bed one recent night after volunteering to install spotlights outside, he praised the Boones and their work which he calls transformative.

“If I had stayed where I was, I would have ended up in jail or dead,” Uselton said. “They have their hearts in the right place and they do it for the right reasons. They don’t do it to get credit or anything like that. They do it because they are Christians and want to help.

News of this aid regularly draws hundreds of visitors to the mostly volunteer-run “campus” as well as numerous partnerships.

Boone has seen a growing need since the COVID-19 pandemic.

The US Census Bureau estimates that 9.7% of Monroe County residents live in poverty. According to the website of the national network of food banks Feeding America, the county has a food insecurity rate of about 11.9%.

Boone estimates that Oaks Village, which has an emergency pantry, summer lunch cafe and soup kitchen, serves up to 10,000 meals each year.

The donated items come from supporters such as David Voggenreiter, 16, who arrived with his father on Monday to unload canned goods, bread and other items.

The Monroe County Middle College student discovered the site while preparing for a civic engagement project and immediately decided to contribute. “It feels good to be able to help people,” Voggenreiter said.

This is the objective of the association, which also has a “clothes closet” full of accessories, toiletries and free household items as well as a free health clinic which has opened its doors. doors in 2019.

The clinic is run by medical staff from the ProMedica health system and dedicated volunteers such as Sandy Libstorff, a retired registered nurse who first met Boone after helping deliver a patient living at the homeless shelter. -shelter.

Much of their work is now focused on COVID-19 testing, Libstorff said, as well as on patients who “have had bad experiences with mainstream medical care and are suspicious”.

Noting that some patients have reported diabetes or high blood pressure and cholesterol without any transportation to reach fresh food, Boone and his team worked to acquire an old party store shortly before Christmas 2020 and turn it into one. neighborhood market with fresh produce.

Village Market opened this year through a partnership with Meijer, which supplies the products.

“Pastor Boone’s unique approach to bringing fresh food to an underserved community was compelling to us, and something we were delighted to support,” said Frank Guglielmi, senior director of corporate communications at Meijer.

The store participates in a state program that allows EBT / Bridge card users to ‘double’ their fruit and vegetable purchases and is a partner in the special federally funded supplemental nutrition program for women, infants and children. children. He also owns a cosmetics business, tutoring space, and products from a local independent dairy.

All of this “means access to the community,” Boone said as he stood in an aisle wearing a black shirt emblazoned with the words “Be kind.”

“We understand that we don’t have everything because we are still a very small store. But when you don’t have transportation, you can get the things you need.

Recognizing a need for some residents of the shelter and others in the neighborhood looking for work sparked another business. Acorn Children’s Village, which opened last year in a donated building renovated through an Art Van charity challenge that raised over $ 50,000, offers free, low-cost child care for children. children up to 5 years old.

It’s licensed for over 30 kids who “love to learn and grow with us,” said Becky McCollum-McCrea, who helped start the installation and working on it.

The longtime educator argues that the long waitlist for his classrooms is a testament to the community’s need and Boone’s vision.

“She has a genuine love for people, and I’ve seen miracles happen because of her,” McCollum-McCrea said. “In my entire life of involvement in the church, I have never seen anything like this happen. I just feel like God is giving him ideas on what is needed or what to do and before long it will come true.

This prompted Libstorff to nominate Boone to the USA Today competition, which recognizes “everyday people who have demonstrated the highest level of kindness, compassion and persistence,” her website said.

His nomination joined more than 600 others before an advisory committee selected the finalists and 72,000 votes were cast to determine the 11 winners.

In a ceremony broadcast live this month to announce the winners, NBC personality Jenna Bush Hager, daughter of former President George W. Bush, described Boone as “living a life of service.”

The accolade underscores the commitment of a pastor who is known to donate bedding if someone else needs it, Libstorff said. “She has dedicated her whole life to helping people. She is an incredible woman.

Tucker acknowledged his support for helping him quit drugs, embrace spirituality, and become a homeowner. “My fall has become a rise,” he said.

Kellie Vining, a member of Monroe City Council whose precinct includes the non-profit organization, said that “her generous spirit has rubbed off on a lot of people. She has a true pastor’s heart.”

Boone is now focused on the future. Amid her daily watch and long hours meeting with residents, she hopes to find support for a program to build affordable housing on plots near the market.

With her businesses making headlines, she gets calls from across the country to repeat the success.

“There is a role model we can give them,” Boone said. “It has been amazing because we want to be successful and multiply. “

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Non profit living

These rock stars to perform Lou Reed and Sex Pistols albums at concert to benefit mental health – Daily News


Since 2018, Jane’s Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro and Billy Idol guitarist Billy Morrison have joined forces to host an annual celebrity concert that raises funds for the nonprofit MusiCares to benefit mental health treatment.

The show, dubbed Above Ground, did not take place in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but will resume for its third installment on Monday, December 20 at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles. It will feature a host of special guest musicians including Corey Taylor, Slipknot frontman, Foo Fighters drummer Taylor Hawkins, Sugar Ray’s Mark McGrath, Jane’s Addiction Perry Farrell, singer Etty Lau Farrell, Idol rocker. and guitarist Steve Stevens and more.

“I missed it last year, because Billy and I fell in love with the cause, with the mission statement; we fell in love with the job and all the things that are needed to make this show happen, ”Navarro said in an interview with Zoom.

“It’s actually quite a different experience from our day jobs,” Morrison added on the same video call. “This kind of show is so different in terms of production, and when Dave said we fell in love with the job, it’s because he doesn’t show up and play ‘Jane Says’ or ‘Rebel Yell’ . We can do it with our eyes closed, but we really have to work on this show. “

  • Jane’s Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro (left), Ministry’s guitarist Al Jourgensen and Billy Idol Billy Morrison perform at the Above Ground benefit party for MusiCares at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles in 2019 (Photo by Jim Donnelly)

  • Jane’s Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro (left) performs with singer Juliette Lewis during the Above Ground benefit concert for MusiCares at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles in 2019 (Photo by Jim Donnelly)

  • Jane’s Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro (left) performs with Tenacious D frontman and actor Jack Black to benefit Above Ground for MusiCares at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles in 2019 (Photo by Jim Donnelly)

  • Each year, Jane’s Addiciton guitarist Dave Navarro (left) and Billy Idol guitarist Billy Morrison host Above Ground, a star-studded benefit concert that raises awareness and raises funds for mental health for MusiCares. This year’s event will take place on Monday, December 20 at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles.

Faithful to the tradition of choosing influential two-act musical releases – an American act and a British one – for the evening, the performers will cover all the songs in order from Lou Reed’s 1972 album “Transformer” and the Release of the Sex Pistols in 1977. “Don’t forget the bullshit, here are the Sex Pistols. “

In 2018, artists from the “Above Ground” lineup performed 1980s “Kings of the Wild Frontier” by Adam and the Ants and the eponymous 1967 album by The Velvet Underground and Nico. In 2019, they took on David Bowie’s 1972 “The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars” and the 1969 Stooge’s self-titled debut album.

“Every year we have to dive deep into these records and find parts that we maybe a little overlooked or missed when we just listened to them and we really dissect them and kind of go into the songs and doing that process is rewarding. , frustrating, distressing, ”said Navarro.

“And scary,” Morrison added, laughing. “Right before this interview, we go through the songs on the show and ask ourselves, ‘Are we doing something right? Is everything alright ?’ “

“It’s a little scary because we choose the albums that mean the most to us,” Navarro continued. “We want to render the greatest possible service to these albums. Therefore, there is no harsher criticism of our sound than Billy and I. Lots of bands do covers, and Billy and I are in a cover band called Royal Machines, but for Above Ground we tried our best not to just do our version of the songs, we try to get as close as possible. the sound of the album and it’s difficult.

Navarro said he chose Reed’s “Transformer” to play because “it was one of the most interesting and provocative albums I’ve ever heard.”

“If you listen to the lyrical content and the message Lou is talking about on this record and think about the climate today – but then you think about the climate when he wrote these things – that was light years ahead. on his time, “he said. noted. “He was basically saying these are people living their lives and doing well and just as complete and whole as you or me or anyone else.”

Morrison agrees.

“Hearing ‘Transform’ and someone singing about different sexualities, drugs and all that stuff affected me a lot,” Morrison added. “The other thing we’re trying to do with this show is play albums that you can’t go and listen to. We’re not going to play a Coldplay album. We love Coldplay, but they still exist. So we play albums that you can’t listen to live.

“The greatest album of all time for me – being British and being a teenager when it was released – is ‘Never Mind the Bollocks’,” Morrison continued. “It changed my life and I was very loud about it.”

The recipient of the evening, MusiCares, is an organization that provides funds and resources to workers in the music industry, and with so many of those people out of work and unable to tour or create over the past 18 In recent months, fundraising and efforts to encourage open talk about mental health is imperative, Navarro and Morrison agree.

“When we started this concept, it was before COVID and it was very necessary,” Morrison said. “Dave and I felt that we both suffered from trauma and mental health issues, but our philosophy is really very simple and it’s okay to ask for help. So if he and I can be really public about, listen, we’ve been there, we’ve been asking for help, and we’ve been very lucky to get some help, and we’re now living a loving life and fulfilling, so can you. It’s pre-COVID. Imagine the world now as we are? This message must be spread more than ever.

There’s also an on-site auction with artwork donated to raise more money by artists such as Morrison and Navarro, contemporary street artist Shepard Fairey, and Los Angeles-based graffiti artist Risk.

“I don’t know how we do this,” Navarro said with a laugh. “It’s not just us. It’s everyone who comes to perform and is part of it. Getting back to sanity, which is the most important aspect, at the end of the day here you are looking at two ex-junkies. It is therefore clear that we can overcome what causes suffering. “

Above ground 3

With: Billy Idol, Taylor Hawkins, Perry and Etty Farrell, Corey Taylor, Mark McGrath, Steve Stevens and more

When: 7 p.m. Monday, December 20

Or: Fonda Theater, Los Angeles

Tickets: $ 59.50 on AXS.com


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History organization

From pandemic to endemic: this is how we could get back to normal | US News


First of all, the bad news. With unpredictable epidemics still occurring around the world and variants like Omicron raising questions about the contagiousness of the virus, we are still in a pandemic.

The good news: While it’s difficult to predict the exact time, most scientists agree that the Covid-19 pandemic will end and the virus will become endemic. This means that the virus will probably never be completely eliminated, but as more people get vaccinated and become exposed to it, infections will eventually occur at a consistently low rate and fewer people will become seriously ill. An area with high vaccination and booster rates is likely to experience endemicity sooner than an area with lower rates.

What does this transition look like?

Concretely, there will be an announcement. The World Health Organization and local health agencies will officially declare the global pandemic over, a designation based on certain biological and statistical credentials: the contagiousness of the virus, the death rate and the power to overwhelm hospitals, for n ‘ to name a few.

In some places, like the United States and other wealthy countries with easy access to vaccines and antiviral treatments, endemicity could look a lot like the present day: people emerging from despair, diners crowding into rooms. restaurants and vaccination cards verified with decreasing rigor. But there could also be other, more profound societal changes.

To understand how daily life will change if Covid-19 becomes rampant, we can turn to history for a useful (albeit imperfect) guide.

A change in mentalities and behaviors

People generally respond to epidemics with fear and panic, both individually and as a society. According to Charles Kenny, director of the Center for Global Development and author of The Plague Cycle, these reactions reliably take shape in some now recognizable ways: closing borders, sequestering the sick and withdrawing from society.

Until the advent of modern medicine, all people could do was hope (and pray) that epidemics would go away on their own. When it became clear that a disease was inescapable – or endemic – societies often made strides to reframe disease as an integral part of life. This could also become the case with Covid-19.

Kenny’s book offers potential insight. In 17th century Japanese cities, attitudes to smallpox changed as the disease became endemic; by then, most people had been exposed as a child and subsequently recovered. Once people accept “that everyone is going to get smallpox,” Kenny says, they ritualized and normalized it as a milestone in childhood, making it a part of “the story of growing up.” .

It is too early to say how this process of normalization vis-à-vis the Covid will unfold. However, if infections become a normal part of the winter months, they may simply be absorbed into what is called cold and flu season. Much like smallpox in Japanese cities, this change will be reflected in the language and everyday expectations of people. Already, some are starting to use the term “Covid season”.

Effective medical interventions also make it easier for societies to come to terms with the idea of ​​coexisting with disease. “My parents were terrified [of polio]”says Nancy Tomes, professor of history at Stony Brook University and author of The Gospel of Germs.. Tomes, on the other hand, was part of “the generation that went to local high school and got the lump of sugar,” referring to a common dispensing method for an orally administered polio vaccine.

“We stopped worrying about polio after that,” Tomes says.

Although Covid remains widespread, the advent of effective vaccines has quickly changed the extent of its threat. In March, when only 9.2% of Americans were fully immunized, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention relaxed its social distancing guidelines to allow people with the immunity to congregate indoors. And on Thanksgiving, Joe Biden said the United States was “back” from pandemic hibernation – despite the nearly 100,000 new cases of Covid-19 still confirmed every day.

Finger pointing and misinformation

Unfortunately, history suggests that some negative behaviors related to the pandemic tend to persist after a disease becomes endemic or is eliminated. One of them is the disproportionate targeting of groups perceived as “outsiders” within mainstream society. When the pandemic subsides, Kenny says, the social restrictions that are likely to remain “are those that affect minority groups.”

Imposed in 1987, the xenophobic and homophobic travel ban imposed on HIV-positive people in the United States lasted 22 years. And today, people wrongly associated with Covid, such as those in Asia or Africa, are still harassed and excluded despite the full understanding that the coronavirus does not discern race.

A propensity for disinformation and conspiracy theories has also been associated with epidemics – “a shit show,” Tomes says, with a legacy “stretching back to every epidemic we have written records of.” Some of these falsehoods prove to be lasting. “There are still people who don’t believe that HIV causes AIDS,” she says.

During pandemics, groups of people also become susceptible to developing extreme opinions on topics that elicit strong opinions – like vaccination and personal freedom – that they did not initially have. Even after a pandemic is over, this phenomenon of “group polarization” can remain “in the background,” says Steven Taylor, professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia and author of The Psychology of Pandemics. . This polarization is likely to “wake up again when something similar happens” in the future.

Know what we can’t know (yet)

It is important to note that the return to normalcy will not occur uniformly across the world. Once people in rich countries become endemic, those in the south of the planet could continue to fight the coronavirus for a long time, as has been the case with a host of tropical diseases that have been all but forgotten in places like the United States.

Like all infectious diseases that have plagued the world before it, Sars-CoV-2 will hopefully fade into distant memory, for better or for worse. This oversight can bring relief, growth and recovery, but it could also leave us woefully unprepared for the next pandemic. The 1918 flu taught us that masking and social distancing can reduce deaths, Kenny says – a lesson we relearned too late in 2020.


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Canadian army

Wolseley Barracks grounds transformed for Canadian Armed Forces Disaster Preparedness Exercise – London


Londoners near Wolseley Barracks might notice a little more action than usual this weekend, with the 31st Canadian Brigade Group of the Canadian Armed Forces performing realistic disaster scenarios.

The planned training is all the more relevant as the soldiers are training for scenarios similar to the massive flooding in British Columbia at this time.

“It’s ironic that we are here at our headquarters when a similar headquarters has been deployed to help in flood situations. Our service is therefore very relevant insofar as it is a real situation, ”said Lt. Col. Alex Colic.

About 100 local Army Reserve soldiers conduct a simulated emergency scenario-based exercise in Ontario.

The scenario is designed to provide a realistic, simulated response to a request for assistance (PD) from a Canadian community, such as a COVID-19 pandemic, an ice storm, or a natural gas leak.

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About 100 local Army Reserve soldiers conduct a simulated emergency scenario-based exercise in Ontario at the Wolseley Barracks. November 20, 2021.


Sawyer Bogdan / Global News


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Floods in British Columbia – 350 soldiers “ready to deploy” from Edmonton

With climate change making problems like wildfires or flooding more frequent, Colic said it was important for the military to be trained to respond at all times.

“All of this is designed so that when the Canadian government asks for help, we can mobilize successful teams and send them across Canada to support our fellow citizens,” said Colic.

A semi-permanent tent-shaped structure is installed on the grounds of Wolseley Barracks, which can house up to 150 soldiers and serves as a mobile command base. November 20, 2021.


Sawyer Bogdan / Global News


A semi-permanent tent-like structure is installed on the ground of the Wolseley Barracks, which can house up to 150 soldiers and serves as a mobile command base with flooring, heating, lighting and insulation.

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Lieutenant (N) Andrew McLaughlin noted that the Canadian Army Reserve has two tasks: one to help missions abroad and the other to help Canadians in need.

“Being there for Canadians when they need us there most there, and that means in crisis situations when Canadian communities go through the process of asking for help and find themselves in need, the CAF are able to intervene. “

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.


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Canadian army

As more military troops head to British Columbia, experts call for civilian disaster response solution


Like the Canadian Armed Forces send additional troops To respond to the flooding in British Columbia, military and disaster management experts say now is the time to invest in civilian response teams.

This week’s catastrophic rainfall has left a handful of cities underwater, displaced thousands of people, killed at least one and caused millions of dollars in critical infrastructure damage.


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Floods in British Columbia: Trudeau says “hundreds” of military personnel deployed to help with disaster


Floods in British Columbia: Trudeau says “hundreds” of military personnel deployed to help with disaster

According to federal statistics, the number of calls for a military response to natural disasters has nearly doubled over the past decade. Five of 23 calls for help in the past four years have come from British Columbia

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Canadian Army Boosts Air Support to Help BC Flood Evacuations and Supply Chain Chaos

“With the increase in natural disasters that we are seeing as a result of climate change, and in terms of scale, scope and frequency, we have to start saying, ‘is there another alternative? »Is there a better way? Said Josh Bowen, instructor in the faculty of disaster and emergency management at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology.

Bowen, a veteran and former deputy director of CAF disaster and emergency response plans in Edmonton, said the military is a “force of last resort” in disaster situations and is on a budget. limit.

It is the only force in Canada with the expertise to respond immediately and effectively to a natural disaster, he added, but that may not be enough as the effects of climate change intensify.

“What I would say is we need to look at what our neighbors are doing, what our NATO allies are doing, what our G20 allies are doing so that we can have a civilian response capability,” Bowen said. .


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Flooding in British Columbia: Premier John Horgan announces provincial state of emergency due to flooding


Flooding in British Columbia: Premier John Horgan announces provincial state of emergency due to flooding

Countries like Germany and Australia have formalized large pools of civilian volunteers to respond to disasters – a much cheaper option than deploying the military.

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According to Bowen, every dollar spent on disaster mitigation and prevention saves $ 6 in disaster response and recovery, which is why provinces must invest in localized solutions.

This includes not only civilian response teams and their training, but also more climate-smart land use planning.

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‘Goods are coming’: appeals for patience in British Columbia following reports of panic buying

Details of the military’s deployment to British Columbia were still being finalized on Wednesday, a spokesperson for the Canadian Joint Operations Command told Global News.

Examples of support that could come include transport assistance, supply chain support to move resources from one point to another, and humanitarian aid, although details remain to be worked out.

“Yes, the military can do it, the question is, should the military do it? Asked Christian Leuprecht, security expert and professor at Royal Military College and Queen’s University.

“It’s not like the military doesn’t have other things going on – the military is completely exhausted with what we’re already asking them to do.”


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Flooding in British Columbia leaves Saskatchewan truckers expecting delays and farmers brace for backlog


Flooding in British Columbia leaves Saskatchewan truckers expecting delays and farmers brace for backlog

In 2021, Canadian troops were deployed to support provinces in both the COVID-19 pandemic and the wildfires. The budget of the Department of National Defense is approximately $ 23 billion for 2021-2022.

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“One of the challenges is that, as long as the provinces know they can always ask the federal government to bail them out when things go wrong, the provinces and municipalities have an incentive to underinvest in critical infrastructure,” he said. declared Leuprecht.

The military is not in the best position to repair underfunded municipal infrastructure, he said, nor to provide food, logistical support and “medium-term” aid.

Read more:

Three people still missing in deadly mudslide on Highway 99 in British Columbia

Adam McDonald, a doctoral student in the Department of Political Science at Dalhousie University and a member of the Canada International Council think tank, said there was no system in place for provinces to share resources or move their resources. assets across the country in the event of a disaster.

The federal government must make a political decision on the real priorities and responsibilities of the military, he added, as climate disasters escalate.

“The biggest concern is that everyone is going to think that the military is going to step in and solve these problems, when in fact the military is really good as a stopgap measure when existing measures are outdated,” he said. Explain.

“I think unfortunately this side of the house is under very careful thought and it will be a disservice to Canadians across the country if we don’t start planning for this. “

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.



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Non profit living

Bezos Day One Fund Provides $ 2.5 Million to Family Life Center in Kahului, Maui


Family life center, Kahului. File photo by Wendy Osher.

Family Life Center, Inc., a non-profit organization serving the homeless on the islands of Maui, Moloka’i and Kaua’i, has been selected to receive a $ 2.5 million grant from Bezos Day One Families Fund, the largest grant in the history of the Family Life Center. .

This is the second year in a row that the organization has received a donation from the Bezos Day One Families Fund. In 2020, the association received $ 1.25 million from the same fund. The Family Life Center is one of 32 organizations in 21 states, and the only one in Hawaii to be included in funding allocations this year.

Launched in 2018 by Amazon Founder and Executive Chairman Jeff Bezos, the Day One Families Fund presents annual leadership awards to organizations and civic groups doing compassionate and needle-moving work to provide shelter and support. against hunger in order to meet the immediate needs of young families.

“The Family Life Center is incredibly grateful to the Day 1 Families Fund, which has so generously supported our organization for the second year in a row,” said Maude Cumming, Executive Director of the Family Life Center. “Our Day One Families Fund 2020 grant allowed us to expand our reach beyond Maui and Kaua’i to reach Moloka’i as well. This year’s donation will allow us to improve and expand the services we offer on the three islands.

This one-time grant will allow the Family Life Center to continue expanding its services on the islands of Kaua’i and Moloka’i, where the homeless population is “very underserved,” according to Cumming. The organization also plans to develop a suitable shelter model for families, replicating a pioneering approach during the COVID-19 pandemic in Maui.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW THE AD

Family Life Center was selected as a Day One Families Fund grant recipient by an independent advisory board of homeless experts with experience in politics, advocacy, racial equity, protection child and housing and service delivery, as well as direct experience of homelessness.

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This year, the Day One Families Fund awarded a total of $ 96.2 million in grants to dozens of organizations across the country.

“Without the support of the Family Life Center, my family and I may still be living in our car,” said a former client of the Family Life Center. “I am so grateful to have a home for our son. We will never be homeless again.

The Bezos Day One Fund has pledged $ 2 billion to focus on creating meaningful and lasting impacts in two areas: funding existing nonprofits that help homeless families and the creation of a network of new non-profit first-level preschools in low-income communities. .

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

The Day One Families Fund presents annual leadership awards to organizations and civic groups that do compassionate and needle-moving work to provide shelter and support from hunger to meet the immediate needs of young families.

Since 2018, the Day One Families Fund has awarded 130 grants totaling more than $ 398 million to organizations across the country that fight homelessness and help families gain housing and stability. The vision statement comes from Mary’s Place in Seattle: No child sleeps outside.

Founded in 1982, the Family Life Center serves the homeless in Maui County. The organization has grown to employ over 40 employees. As a primary resource for homelessness services in Maui County and a growing key resource in Kaua’i and Moloka’i, the organization has assisted over 1,271 families over the past three years.

The Family Life Center offers a holistic approach to meeting the needs of the homeless through a wide range of services, including outreach, shelter, shelter and prevention services.

Bezos recently purchased a 14 acre Maui beachfront estate at Keoneʻōʻio “La Perouse” in the Mākena area of ​​South Maui.

The Family Life donation is the latest in a list of contributions Bezos made to Maui this year. Other donations were made to:


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International headquarters

2K announces the acquisition of elite3d


Spain-based art studio to expand global presence of developer 2K 31st Union and the company Global Services Division

NEW YORK, November 09, 2021– (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – 2K today announced that the company has acquired PLATYGOBIAN, SL, doing business as elite3d, one of the world’s leading creative studios dedicated to innovative 2D and 3D illustrations for the video game industry. Based in Valencia, Spain, the newly acquired team will rebrand in two ways: First, to form a second office for the wholly owned developer. 31st Union; and second, develop a new 2K publishing site, with a focus on its Global Services division. In addition, 2K acquired TURIA GAMES, SL in Valencia, a development studio co-owned by the founders of elite3d. Financial terms and employment figures relating to the acquisition were not disclosed.

For 31st Union, founded in February 2019 and led by video game industry veteran Michael Condrey, the new Valencia office will complement the studio’s headquarters in San Mateo, California, on the ongoing development of its AAA project. currently unannounced and highly anticipated. Following the acquisition, 31st Union will operate as a global and integrated team across all disciplines, taking an ongoing approach to seamless connection and collaboration among colleagues.

Other elite3d employees will form a new location for 2K’s Global Services division, which will help the company further expand its global footprint and support its growing product portfolio. They will join the internal 2K team responsible for animation, art, motion capture, project management, game technology, talent search, user search, visual effects, etc. New team members will have the opportunity to support established and new franchises, including both announced and unannounced projects; in addition, Valencia joins the Global Services teams in London; Austin, Texas; 2K’s head office in the San Francisco Bay Area in Novato, California; and the division’s head office in Montreal.

“Elite3d has had a significant impact on our industry by helping many developers and publishers bring their games to life with world-class passion and creativity,” said David Ismailer, President of 2K. “The team’s work style and employee culture are also a great complement to our vision and values. We look forward to seeing our new colleagues contribute to the progress 31st Union has made to date and play a key role. in the growth and development of Global Services for our current and future games. “

“31st Union is founded on a culture of inclusiveness, talented individuals and exceptional character. Diversity of perspectives and experiences is the cornerstone of our growth as a team, ”said Michael Condrey, President of 31st Union. “Considering our ambitions and the breadth of our game, welcoming to an incredible team like elite3d was an incredible opportunity. We are honored to welcome Oscar, Jose and all of the elite3d members into our family of development and we look forward to them enriching our studio and realizing our gaming aspirations. “

elite3d was formed in 2005 by Oscar Ferrero and Jose Luis Queral in their common hometown of Valencia, Spain – a vibrant and connected city with an international population, a strong base of local talent, a high quality of life and a rich environment in art, culture, and technology. Over the years, elite3d has become a go-to partner for many interactive entertainment companies, including 2K, with its work showcased in an impressive portfolio of critically and commercially acclaimed releases for video game consoles, personal computers and mobile devices. The current studio office will house both 31st Union Valencia and 2K Publishing Valencia.

“We are extremely proud to build a team that is now at the forefront of our creative expertise while seeing our initial dream come true,” Ferrero and Queral said in a joint statement. “We strongly believe in the vision, people and products of 2K, and we look forward to taking this incredible new step in our collective journey as employees of 2K and the 31st Union.”

31st Union is currently recruiting additional team members in Valencia and San Mateo, while Global Services is hiring at all of its locations. Those interested in pursuing a career can visit the workshop website Where 2K Jobs for more information.

2K is a publishing label of Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. (NASDAQ: TTWO).

All trademarks and copyrights contained in this document are the property of their respective owners.

About Take-Two interactive software

Based in New York City, Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. is a leading developer, publisher and marketer of interactive entertainment for consumers around the world. We develop and publish products primarily through Rockstar Games, 2K, Private Division, and T2 Mobile Games. Our products are designed for console systems and personal computers, including smartphones and tablets, and are delivered through physical retail, digital download, online platforms and cloud streaming services. The Company’s common shares are listed on the NASDAQ under the symbol TTWO. For more company and product information, please visit our website at www.take2games.com.

About 2K

Founded in 2005, 2K develops and publishes interactive entertainment for video game consoles, personal computers and mobile devices, with product availability including physical retail and digital download. The company is home to many talented development studios, including Visual Concepts, Firaxis Games, Hangar 13, Cat Daddy Games, 31st Union, Cloud Chamber, and HB Studios. 2K’s portfolio includes several AAA, sports and entertainment brands, including a global powerhouse NBA® 2K; renowned BioShock®, Borderlands®, Mafia, The civilization of Sid Meier® and XCOM® brands; popular WWE® 2K and WWE® SuperCard franchisees; as well as critical and commercial success PGA TOUR® 2K. Additional information about 2K and its products can be found at 2k.com and on the Company’s official social media channels.

Caution regarding forward-looking statements

Statements contained in this document that are not historical facts are considered to be forward-looking statements under federal securities laws and may be identified by words such as “expects”, “believes”, “believes”, “Expects”, “intention”, “plans,” “potential”, “predicts”, “projects”, “research”, “should”, “shall” or words with similar meaning and include, without be limited to statements concerning the outlook for the Company’s future and financial activities. performance. These forward-looking statements are based on the current beliefs of our management as well as on the assumptions made by and information currently available, which are subject to inherent uncertainties, risks and changes in circumstances that are difficult to predict. Actual results and results may differ materially from these forward-looking statements based on a variety of risks and uncertainties, including: the uncertainty of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the actions taken in response to it. -this ; the effect that measures taken to mitigate the COVID-19 pandemic are having on our operations, including our ability to deliver our securities and other products in a timely manner, and on the operations of our counterparties, including retailers and distributors ; the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on consumer demand and the discretionary spending habits of our customers as the situation with the pandemic continues to evolve; risks associated with doing business internationally; the impact of interest rate cuts by the Federal Reserve and other central banks, including on our short-term investment portfolio; the impact of potential inflation; volatility of foreign currency exchange rates; our reliance on key management and product development personnel; our dependence on our NBA 2K and Grand Theft Auto products and our ability to develop other successful titles; our ability to take advantage of opportunities on PlayStation®5 and Xbox Series X | S; the timely release and significant market acceptance of our games; the ability to maintain acceptable price levels on our games; and the risks associated with international operations.

Other important factors and information are contained in the Company’s most recent annual report on Form 10-K, including the risks summarized in the section titled “Risk Factors”, the Company’s most recent quarterly report on Form 10-Q and the Company’s other periodic reports to the SEC, available at www.take2games.com. All forward-looking statements are qualified by these cautionary statements and speak only as of the date on which they are made. The Company assumes no obligation to update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211109005640/en/

Contacts

Jaime Jensen
2K
(415) 209-4206
[email protected]

Alan Lewis (Company press)
Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc.
(646) 536-2983
[email protected]


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International headquarters

Owners confirm Philip Morris move to Stamford


STAMFORD – Tobacco giant Philip Morris International will open its new headquarters at the end of next year in the downtown Washington Boulevard complex previously occupied by UBS, the owners of the property said on Wednesday.

PMI has signed a 12-year lease for 71,484 square feet, covering all 11th and 12th floors, at 677 Washington, according to an announcement from commercial real estate company George Comfort & Sons, who is part of the property team. of the property. The signing of the lease and the planned move in late 2022 follows PMI’s announcement in June that it would move its main offices from 120 Park Ave. in midtown Manhattan to somewhere in Connecticut and create around 200 jobs. .

The selection of 677 Washington – which is just yards from Interstate 95 and the main Stamford Metro-North Railroad station – was widely anticipated after Governor Ned Lamont and U.S. Representative Jim Himes said last week that ‘they planned that PMI would move to this location.

“We are delighted to welcome these tenants to 677 Washington Blvd., and bring the complex closer to full occupancy,” George Comfort & Sons CEO and Chairman Peter Duncan said in a statement. “This property has long been viewed as a commercial centerpiece of downtown Stamford, and recent successful rental activity here proves that it is more attractive than ever to a range of businesses across various industries.”

A message left on Wednesday for PMI was not immediately returned.


The arrival of PMI, which sells brands of cigarettes such as Marlboro and smokeless tobacco products outside the United States, will bring the number of Connecticut-based Fortune 500 companies to 15. revenue of nearly $ 29 billion in 2020.

PMI does not sell or market tobacco products in the United States. Philip Morris USA – a subsidiary of the Altria group, from which PMI emerged in 2008 – dominates the cigarette market in the country. Marlboro is Philip Morris USA’s best-selling brand.

No more arrivals at 677 Washington

George Comfort & Sons also announced several other new leases on Wednesday at 677 Washington, a three-building complex that spans more than 12 acres. It consists of a 13-storey office tower, a seven-storey pavilion, and a three-storey commercial and “auxiliary” building.

XL Global Services, a provider of property and casualty insurance services, signed an 11-year lease for 21,879 square feet on the 10th floor. It plans to move from its Stamford location to 70 Seaview Ave. in the third quarter of 2022.

Investment firm General Atlantic, which decided to take part of the eighth floor earlier this year in a move from Greenwich, has expanded its planned presence to a total of 21,879 square feet. Another financial services company, Sandbrook Capital, has signed a 10-year lease for 4,995 square feet on the eighth floor and plans to take possession in the first quarter of 2022.

The resort is now 95 percent leased, according to George Comfort & Sons.

WWE, which is now headquartered on the East Side of Stamford at 1241 E. Main St., will be the largest tenant at 677 Washington.

In March 2019, WWE announced its decision to move its headquarters to 677 Washington and lease approximately 415,000 square feet for office space in the tower and a production facility in the pavilion.

The disruption from the COVID-19 pandemic has delayed the relocation, but WWE officials said earlier this year that the company plans to begin its move in the fourth quarter of 2022.

Those additions, combined with arrivals over the past two years such as professional services firm KPMG and architectural firm Perkins Eastman, highlighted a dramatic recovery for 677 Washington. Three years ago, it had become the largest vacant office building in the city after international banking giant UBS in 2016 moved its local offices to a smaller space across the street at 600 Washington Blvd. ., amid major job losses.

While based at 677 Washington, UBS operated one of the world’s trading floors.

Manhattan-based George Comfort & Sons joined Beverly Hills, California-based AVG Partners as part of the property’s ownership team in early 2018, taking on operating and leasing responsibilities. George Comfort & Sons’ portfolio also includes two other office complexes in Stamford, High Ridge Park and Shippan Landing.

The owners team’s “repositioning program” also includes on-site plans for an apartment building of approximately 400 units and additional commercial use.

[email protected]; twitter: @paulschott


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International headquarters

US tech company NetApp to open global headquarters in Cork


US tech company NetApp will open its international headquarters in Cork, employing up to 500 people by 2025.

Recruitment will begin immediately and will take place in phases, with the company adding roles of engineers, business operations and finance.

The company, which employs 11,000 people worldwide, provides its customers with hybrid cloud data and data management services. It is looking to expand its operations internationally, a strategy the Irish office will help support. The exact location of the office is still under discussion, with a shortlist of five locations.

NetApp is headquartered in California, United States, with a network of offices around the world, including Australia, Russia, Hong Kong, United Kingdom, Netherlands, and Germany. The Cork-based international headquarters will be responsible for supporting the growth of the business outside of the United States.

Business growth

“There are two major trends in the market, the cloud and digital transformation. NetApp’s strategy is to continue to grow our business and expand our international presence, as well as expand engineering talent, ”said Marc Montiel, NetApp’s vice president of business for Europe, Middle East and Africa.

“For this reason, we have decided to establish our international headquarters in Ireland. We went through a long process to find the best location. When we looked at the different ecosystems we thought Ireland was the best for us.

Attractive factors were the level of graduates in the Irish labor market, as well as the presence of companies in the NetApp ecosystem in Ireland. Google, Microsoft, and Intel have all settled here, along with most of the top 10 software companies, some of which work with NetApp.

The company continued to strengthen its activities, even as the Covid-19 pandemic continued. This is due to the trend of digital transformation which has accelerated as businesses have been forced to find new ways to keep their businesses operational during the restrictive measures to try to slow the spread of the virus.

“We have benefited from the acceleration of the digital transformation that we have experienced during the recovery. For NetApp, this was an opportunity to show our customers that we can help them accelerate the transformation, ”said Mr. Montiel.

“Before Covid, some companies told us that it would take them years to go through this digital transformation, but because of Covid, they had to step up.

“If you look at NetApp over the last three or four quarters, we’ve had some really good numbers, very strong numbers. “


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Non profit living

-profit celebrates 10 years of healing with horses | Online features


Silver Lining Riding, a non-profit organization providing adaptive riding and horse-assisted therapy, celebrates 10 years of helping others heal through horses.

The organization, located at 7220 N. 185th Avenue in Waddell, offers therapeutic and educational horseback riding and horseback riding programs for people with physical, mental and cognitive disabilities. It caters to a wide range of special needs, aimed at challenging its students physically, cognitively and socially.

Founded in 2011, Silver Lining Riding is a member of the Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA) and celebrates a decade since achieving non-profit status, according to Silver Lining Riding Board Chairman Gregg Brown.

“We work with special needs, but it’s a pretty big topic and we’re trying to be a little vague,” Brown said. “Our mission is to help people overcome the obstacles in life, whatever those obstacles, whatever.

Silver Lining typically serves 35-40 clients per week, ages 4-90. Classes can be delivered as semi-private or group lessons in six-week blocks. They are also adapted, with the help of parents and guardians, to the needs of each student.

According to Cori Morris-Sweetalla, instructor and manager of the Silver Lining Riding program, horse-assisted experiences help improve balance, strength, range of motion, coordination, motor skills, reflexes, breathing, circulation and sensory integration, to name a few.

“We adapt it to the needs of each student. Our main goal is to make sure that all students end up riding independently, ”she explained. “With that in mind, we know this may not always happen. We do admissions so our students know what their goals are, and from there we build. “

Because horseback riding moves the body rhythmically in much the same way as a human gait, the act can be therapeutic, said Morris-Sweetalla, who has seen students with physical disabilities improve their flexibility, balance and strength. muscular.

“When you are on horseback, after you finish your first lesson, you get off and it hurts – so it’s the same with these kids when they are out and riding them (the horses) for 30 minutes of lessons” , she said.

“We’re looking for that automatic reaction where, when you see them start sliding to one side, their body automatically adjusts, regains their balance and readjusts themselves,” he said.

Physical benefits aside, horses have gained a reputation within the mental health community as quality companions for relieving stress, anxiety, and depression.

Equines can “mirror and respond” to human behavior, says the Anxiety Treatment Center. With similar social and responsive behaviors, it’s easy for clients to bond with the animal in the herd.

The benefits of Silver Lining can also be educational, Brown said.

“We have a riding program where we teach the different parts of the horses, how to saddle them and how to groom them,” he explained.

Riding students work with their equine partners in the field, building a stronger relationship. Brown suggests pairing the adaptive riding lessons with the riding feature to get the maximum benefit.

Silver Lining Riding is scheduled to host its 10th Anniversary Student Showcase in February of next year. Originally scheduled for May 2021, the two-day event has been postponed due to security measures related to COVID-19.

The student recital gives the nonprofit organization’s students a chance to show off their riding skills through a series of locally judged events, Brown explained. They will also have the opportunity to qualify to compete in the Silver Lining Riding Special Olympics Track and Field Games.

“We’re just starting to plan for it, but I don’t think it will differ from previous years,” Brown revealed. “We have different classes and they follow a pattern. We have judges, and it’s very much like a horse competition – just for special needs. We make trophies and have a trophy party – for everyone to receive a trophy. “

Morris-Sweetalla added that the Special Olympics portion of the recital is the highlight of his career each year.

“This is literally why I come to work every day, especially the Olympics,” she said. “When you see the kids, it’s really worth it to see how their faces light up. Some of these kids will never get the chance to do a horse show, and it’s their day. “

To be eligible, students must complete a full six-week session. Riding lessons suitable for groups of four are $ 35 each, or $ 55 with the riding program.

Semi-private two-rider lessons cost $ 45 each and $ 65 to include horseback riding. Private lessons are available for $ 60.

Although most of the funds go towards operating expenses, Morris-Sweetalla said Silver Lining Riding is always open to volunteers.

Brown echoed his partner’s sentiments, adding that he was eager to get Silver Lining Riding up to standard with his students in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I have seen real breakthroughs,” he shared. “But the great thing I take in – and I’ve heard this from a lot of parents – is that they become a normal family, at least one day a week.”

To complete a student registration form, go to silverliningriding.org/student-

registration. For more information visit

silverliningriding.org or contact Morris-Sweetalla at [email protected]


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Non profit living

Zena empowers women living in poverty in Uganda


OXFORD, UK – Zena, a non-profit organization with a deep and lasting impact on women living in poverty in Uganda, works in several parts of Uganda, including Kamuli, one of the most poor people of the country.

Women in Uganda

Due to pervasive gender inequality in Uganda, women are treated like second-class citizens. Women are marginalized in many ways, whether due to lack of access to education, political under-representation or the violation of harmful cultural practices such as female genital mutilation and marriage. of children. Although overall poverty has declined over the years, the poverty rate is still high in Uganda, rising to 21.4% in 2016. Notably, high poverty rates have a disproportionate impact on women.

In an interview with The Borgen Project, Loren Thomas and Caragh Bennet, co-founders of Zena, point out that the women they work with “are not beneficiaries but benefactors”. Entrepreneurship women are enrolled in The Zena Launchpad program, where they gain confidence, education and community, while simultaneously gaining a learning / employment opportunity to create jewelry for the community. Zena brand. This work allows women to save to start their own business and escape poverty.

Origin story

Thomas and Bennet met in Uganda while volunteering on a gap year after high school. After active discussions on best practices in aid, Thomas’ experience in developing a social enterprise program for women, and Bennet’s research thesis in Uganda, they agreed that “women entrepreneurs needed debt-free capital ”. From there was born the idea of ​​Zena.

Zena has two bodies that go together. One is the Zena Launchpad where the focus is on social impact. The other is the product line, The Zena Brand, which focuses on creating unique jewelry. The quality and style of Zena’s products make the brand popular, featured in Vogue Italia, Marie Claire and Harper’s Bazaar.

Hybrid model

What makes Zena unique is that it is not a traditional charity. Zena is partly nonprofit because she works with donors who invest in women, wishing to have an impact rather than getting a capital reward. At the same time, Zena is a social enterprise as women gain access to stable employment and acquire skills and earned capital for their business ideas.

Thomas explains: “The hybrid model Zena Launchpad allows women to access start-up capital without loans and without handouts. This is extremely important in fostering a sense of agency, as it “allows them to start businesses from a real place of strength and trust, knowing that they have fully earned this opportunity themselves”.

The model in practice

The selection process is simple: the participants / potential members of the program are women living in poverty in Uganda with viable business ideas. Women are an eclectic mix of backgrounds, all “from a variety of religions, tribes and even different countries,” says Thomas. Some were once refugees, others were abused, but all women come into Zena and find not only a new livelihood, but a new community of support. Women end up becoming clients of each other and looking after each other’s children.

Once selected for the jewelry apprenticeship program, women receive education and training in business and literacy. Each member is assigned a unique contract based on their business idea and the amount they need to save to start the business. Zena supports achievable goals so that women graduate and the next cohort can then be enrolled.

But, Zena doesn’t stop there. Bennet and Thomas intentionally decided to use only recycled and locally sourced waste to make their products, believing in the power of the fashion industry to do good not only for workers but also for the environment.

Education

Education in Zena is extremely important. The program takes a holistic approach through three areas of learning: classroom instruction, work experience, and personal development through mentoring. Zena sees literacy as crucial in changing the lives of women living in poverty in Uganda alongside formal business education and leadership training. Women gain “project management experience and communication skills” while working and discussing important topics, such as violence, family planning and mental health in a supportive environment.

Bennet and Thomas are continually looking for a way to improve their program. They are now planning a course on social media and smartphones after noticing during the COVID-19 pandemic that a lack of computer literacy can be a barrier to success.

Combat gender inequalities

In Uganda, there is a significant gender disparity in human capital wealth, with women accounting for only 39%, while men accounting for 61%. What is more, girls and women of lower socioeconomic status are the most affected by gender inequality. Therefore, the Zena Launchpad program, active since 2016, deliberately focuses on creating future women entrepreneurs by empowering women living in poverty.

The Zena team believes that these women will then also become leaders in their communities, defending and supporting other women. Some of Zena’s graduates now only hire women at their startups, and a graduate called Susan is going one step further, focusing on hiring single mothers. Thomas says that another graduate, Eva, “is currently working to run for local government to better advocate for women in her community.”

The empowerment and social awareness gained through the model has a clear impact on the community, not just the women in the official program. This belief in solidarity is something Bennet and Thomas stand for, with weekly team bonding sessions mandatory for all Zena members, regardless of the role of the participant, from security personnel to board members. .

An exemplary model

In her first five years, Zena supported the development of 31 women entrepreneurs, with 19 graduating from her program. This impact means that 200 people are lifted out of poverty, 90 children receive an education and 17 women are literate.

Zena’s founders are now looking to expand their program to help more women living in poverty in Uganda, believing the success of their model is proof of its potential for replication around the world. Zena, a community power-driven nonprofit, is one to watch for the future and be inspired by today.

– Hope Browne
Photo: Courtesy of Zena


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History organization

WaterFire Welcomes First-Ever Lighting in Honor of BIPOC Residents


As the sun set on Saturday, hundreds of visitors and residents of Providence gathered at the Providence River to watch WaterFire, a community gathering and fire-lighting show that takes place regularly from summer to late. of autumn. The October 16 show was the first WaterFire to celebrate Blacks, Indigenous people and people of color.

The event was sponsored by Papitto Opportunity Connection, a Rhode Island nonprofit that aims to invest in “education, skills training and entrepreneurial ventures” for BIPOC communities across the state, according to the website organisation.

Besides the long tradition of lighting fires and the presence of many local food vendors, participants also had the chance to attend dance performances and learn about different initiatives sponsored by Papitto Opportunity Connection.

Peter Mello, Managing Director of WaterFire Providence, told the Herald he was grateful for the opportunity to host the “first BIPOC-themed WaterFire, where we celebrate Blacks, Indigenous people and people of color. in the arts, business and culture in the State of Rhode Island. “

“The WaterFire event has been going on for 25 years, and a big part of what happens at WaterFire is that we celebrate the best of Providence and Rhode Island – the people, the organizations, the culture, the history,” Mello said. . He noted that local organizations often use the platform provided by WaterFire “to engage their audience” with social issues relevant to the community, so they were “super excited to work with (Papitto Opportunity Connection) to create a special evening. “uplifting the members of the BIPOC community.

“Each event is a little different,” added Mello. This week’s WaterFire included performances by members of the BIPOC community and demonstrations of Capoeira, a Brazilian form of martial arts that integrates dance and music.

A number of local organizations were invited by Papitto Opportunity Connection and spent the evening educating passers-by on community initiatives to support residents of BIPOC Rhode Island. One of those organizations was Southside Community Land Trust, a non-profit organization that aims to help low-income neighborhoods in Rhode Island access organic food.

“We’ve been around for over 30 years,” said Chandelle Wilson, SCLT training program manager. “Our hope and goal right now is to support many immigrant and migrant farmers, people from other countries, and our hope is to connect more with the people of BIPOC.”

Throughout the event, SCLT discussed current food safety initiatives and distributed products such as “chayote squash, kale or collard greens, fresh lemongrass (and) dried onions” to community members in attendance, Wilson added.

“We’re here to connect people with a space to grow their own food,” Wilson said. All products distributed were “grown here in Providence and Cranston”.

Allison Cavallo ’24, who first attended WaterFire on Saturday, enjoyed the performances and the music. Considering it was the family weekend at college, “my mom dragged me a bit (to the event), but I’m having a great time,” she said.

“I was surprised at the amount of activities, tents and music,” she said. “I didn’t know they were doing all of this. I thought it was just fire and water, but I like the festival aspect.

Lisa Tutaj, a medical assistant from Chicago, attended the event as she visited her stepdaughter for the family weekend. “So far it’s been a lot of fun,” Tutaj said, pointing out how much she enjoyed one of the dance performances of the evening.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on WaterFire, and the first insights and performance since the onset of the pandemic took place on September 4 in honor of those who served as essential workers during the pandemic.

Mello noted that despite the challenges posed throughout the pandemic, events like Saturday’s WaterFire show the organization’s renewed commitment to supporting local arts. “It’s probably the most complicated fire we’ve done,” Mello said.

Mello remains confident that WaterFire will remain important in uniting community members in the weeks and years to come. “There is no special language you have to know to experience this. There is nothing intimidating, ”he said. “It’s a visceral experience.

This year’s WaterFire will take place every two weeks until December 4th.

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Canadian army

Vaccines, Child Care, Canadian Thanksgiving: Your Weekend Briefing


(Want to receive this briefing by email? Here is the register.)

Here are the best stories of the week and a glimpse into the future.

1. Moderna’s vaccine appears to be the world’s best defense against Covid. Poor countries struggle to get it.

Moderna sells almost all of its Covid vaccine – the only product it sells – to rich countries, generating billions in profits. About a million doses went to countries the World Bank classifies as low-income, compared to 8.4 million Pfizer doses and about 25 million Johnson & Johnson single-injection doses.

Most middle-income countries that have deals with Moderna have not received any doses. Thailand and Colombia pay a premium. The Biden administration has pressured the company to make its vaccine, which was developed with support from the US government, more widely available.

The development of Covid vaccines means that more effective influenza vaccines could emerge, using the same technology. In the meantime, public experts say it is very important to get the flu shot this year to avoid “twindemia”.

2. As Congress debates President Biden’s $ 3.5 trillion social policy bill, we took a close look at one key element: child care.

The bill would cap families’ spending on child care at 7% of their income, offer large subsidies to day care centers and force centers to increase salaries in the hope of improving the quality of teachers. The grants “would be the biggest investment in the history of child care,” said one expert.

Democrats describe the problem as a fundamental market failure – it simply costs more to provide care than many families can afford. Republicans say the plan is unaffordable and smacks of socialism. As Democrats consider slashing the bill to $ 2 trillion, a proposal to limit programs to the poor has reignited debate about the government itself.


3. Most abortions in Texas are banned again after a federal appeals panel reinstated the restrictive law.

The decision came two days after a lower court blocked the law in a case brought by the Biden administration. Many vendors expected the Conservative Fifth Circuit to side with Texas. The panel called on the administration to respond by Tuesday. While at least six Texas clinics had started performing the procedure beyond the limits of the new law over the past week, most of the state’s roughly two dozen providers had chosen not to. .

4. Taiwan is at the heart of the American-Chinese tensions, with the potential to ignite military conflict and reshape the regional order.

China’s growing military might made it possible to conquer Taiwan. The island’s readiness has wilted; China sent 56 fighter jets to test its besieged air defenses on Monday. The United States has seen its military dominance in Asia erode.

Few people believe that a war is inevitable. The economic and diplomatic aftershocks would be astounding for China. But China is now acting with growing confidence, in part because many officials, including Xi, believe US power has faltered.

American failures with the Covid-19 pandemic and its political upheavals have reinforced these views. In war games since at least 2018, American “blue” teams have repeatedly lost to a “red” team representing a hypothetical Chinese force.

5. Is Big Tech the Next Big Tobacco?

The testimony of a Facebook whistleblower last week generated an unusual bipartisan agreement that it was time for regulations to put the brakes on the tech industry. But if what’s facing Big Tech is anything like what happened to Big Tobacco in the 1990s, what lies ahead will likely be a multi-year struggle.

Lawmakers are weighing proposals, such as creating a new federal agency dedicated to overseeing the industry or overhauling laws so companies can be held accountable for amplifying damaging rhetoric. But the industry has built the largest army of lobbyists in Washington.

Our tech reporter also watched on how two recent high-profile implosions – those of Ozy Media and Theranos – are a reminder of how risky the bet of start-ups is and how often companies distort the truth.

6. Erika Girardi has become famous for her lavish lifestyle. Then her husband’s law firm was accused of embezzling millions of dollars. What has happened since is drama made for television.

Girardi, an actor in “The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills”, is married to Tom Girardi, who helped win the lawsuit that made Erin Brockovich famous. He is accused of robbing vulnerable customers – including victims and relatives of those killed in the Lion Air plane crash in 2018 in Indonesia – to support their extravagant tastes. She, too, has been cited in half a dozen civil lawsuits and seems to be enjoying the attention.


7. How can you make up for 52 years of lost time in 11 days?

After years of battling cancer, Sam Anthony was running out of time. Before he died this summer, he found the courage to post a letter he had long been afraid to send, to a man he had never met: his biological father. A colleague from the National Archives helped find him.

Sam’s father, Craig Allen, had lost all hope of finding his son. After receiving the letter, father and son spent Sam’s last days together. “It was a combination of the saddest moments of my life, but also the proudest,” Craig said.


8. Phoebe Robinson is a comic, but a better description could be the boss.

Over the past few years, Robinson has grown from a pushy stand-up to a mini-mogul with a staff, a production company, a publishing imprint, TV deals, and even an intro to leadership she wrote. after noting the lack of views of black women. in business books. She writes, “Where’s ‘Lean In’ for us? “

In other news from the entertainment empire, what happens when Balenciaga collaborates with “The Simpsons” to present its latest collection? Springfield meets Paris in a delicious 10-minute episode.


9. If you are frustrated with trying to grow figs in a cold climate, you are not alone.

Our gardening expert, Margaret Roach, spoke to another expert about how to make your tree fruitful. The simple way to grow figs is in a pot, and that requires proper size and proper protection. A sunny location during the outdoor growing season and good drainage is also necessary.

Ahead of Canadian Thanksgiving tomorrow, our correspondent wrote a tribute to a different fruit tree: the McIntosh apple. The crunchy, tangy apple was discovered by John McIntosh in 1811, just south of Ottawa. If you feast on tomorrow, here are 11 delicious last minute recipes.


Have a fruitful week.


David Poller photos compiled for this briefing.

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International headquarters

OECD hails ‘victory’ as dissenters join global tax reform


“HISTORICAL MOMENT”:
A 15% global corporate tax set to go into effect in 2023, but Oxfam called it a capitulation to tax havens like Ireland

A global push to enact a minimum international tax on large corporations came closer to reality on Friday as one of the last holdouts, Hungary, agreed to join a reform that now has 136 countries.

The agreement brokered by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which sets a global tax of 15%, aims to prevent international companies from reducing their tax bills by registering in countries with low rates.

“Today’s agreement will make our international tax agreements fairer and more efficient,” said OECD Secretary General Mathias Cormann. “This is a great victory for effective and balanced multilateralism.

Photo: AP

Hungary’s announcement came a day after another key opponent, Ireland – whose low tax rate attracted Apple Inc and Alphabet Inc’s Google – caved in and agreed to join the global effort.

Along with Hungary, 136 countries representing 90% of global GDP have now signed on, the Paris-based OECD said.

Estonia also joined the reform on Thursday.

The OECD has said Kenya, Nigeria, Sri Lanka and Pakistan are the latest holdouts among the 140 countries that negotiated the tax.

Pakistan was on a previous list of signatories.

The organization said the countries aim to sign a multilateral convention next year, with a view to implementing the reform in 2023.

The years-long talks were given a boost earlier this year when the administration of US President Joe Biden backed a global minimum tax rate of at least 15%.

The COVID-19 pandemic has made reforms more urgent as countries need new sources of revenue to pay for the huge stimulus packages that were rolled out during last year’s global recession.

“Today’s agreement represents a unique achievement for economic diplomacy,” US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said in a statement.

“Since this morning, almost the entire world economy has decided to end the race to the bottom in corporate taxation,” Yellen said.

The President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, called it a “historic moment”, saying that “all companies must pay their fair share”.

The Brussels IT and communications industry association welcomed the agreement.

It was a step “to ensure that international tax rules reflect today’s global economy,” association vice-president Christian Borggreen said in a statement. “This is an important step towards greater fairness and certainty in the global tax system. “

However, the Oxfam charity was scathing.

“Today’s tax deal was about ending tax havens for good. Instead, it was written by them, ”said Susana Ruiz, Oxfam tax policy expert. “This deal is a shameful and dangerous surrender to the low-tax model of nations like Ireland.”

Comments will be moderated. Keep comments relevant to the article. Comments containing abusive and obscene language, personal attacks of any kind or promotion will be removed and the user banned. The final decision will be at the discretion of the Taipei Times.


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International headquarters

The old Secure-24 leaves the big new Southfield Headquarters, Auburn Hills outpost


One of the towers in Southfield town center has lost its biggest tenant in what could be bad timing.

NTT Communications Corp., the Tokyo-based parent company of the cloud service provider formerly known as Secure-24, abandoned its approximately 100,000 square foot headquarters in the 4000 Town Center skyscraper off the Lodge Freeway and sublet the space along with a small 9,000 foot outpost square in Auburn Hills at 3250 University Drive.

Southfield’s lease was signed in September 2019, just months before the COVID-19 pandemic threw a wrench into the cogs of office markets around the world and forced businesses to rethink their space needs while remote working has become the norm for many.

Broker Steven Badgero, Associate Vice President of the Southfield office of Colliers International Inc. which represents NTT, confirmed that the sublet space is NTT’s new headquarters and that it was released on last month.

A SEO on the Colliers website states that the asking rate is $ 19 per square foot per year for the space, which is on the second through eighth floors.

An email has been sent to NTT’s general email account as well as a spokesperson seeking information on why the space is being abandoned. It is not clear whether the company is moving employees to another space or moving away.
Steve Morris, a longtime tenant-focused broker who runs Farmington Hills-based Axis Advisors LLC, said it was unique that NTT decided to relinquish all of its corporate headquarters.

“They have arranged their entire space and have not gone hybrid,” he said, also adding that it is difficult to fill the sublet space because potential occupants want the sub-lessor to pay for. changes to the office, which the sub-donor is generally reluctant to do.

NTT acquired Secure-24, which was founded in 2001, in 2018 when it had around 600 employees.

It’s far from the only major Oakland County company to give up office space during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Earlier this year, Crain’s reported that others include Michigan’s Blue Cross Blue Shield, which had 118,000 square feet in Southfield for sublease, and Delphi Technologies, which had 102,000 square feet in Troy for sublease. .

CoStar Group Inc., a real estate information service based in Washington, DC, said that in the third quarter, for the first time since the COVID-19 outbreak, the amount of sublet space available at the nationwide has shrunk to about 205 million square feet. At the end of the second quarter, it was approximately 207 million square feet.

The 4000 Town Center building measures 396,000 square feet and was constructed in 1979, according to CoStar.

The 2.2 million square foot Southfield Town Center was purchased in 2014 by New York-based 601W Cos. For $ 177.5 million. In 2018, Crain’s reported that the complex had undergone some $ 56 million in renovations, including leasehold improvement allowances, under 601W ownership.

Earlier this year, it was revealed that Plante Moran had closed his own 125,000 square foot office at 27400 Northwestern Highway in the Victor Center building, put it up for sale at an undisclosed price, and leased eight floors. more in downtown Southfield to on top of the four it already takes, bringing its footprint to 192,600 square feet, up from 50,200.


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Non profit living

California experiments with social democracy


In summary

A flurry of laws signed by California Governor Gavin Newsom is an experiment in European social democracy. Will it work?

California, as everyone should know by now, has the highest poverty rate in the country, as determined by the Census Bureau when the cost of living is included in the calculation.

While family incomes in California aren’t particularly low compared to other states, our extremely high living costs, especially on housing, mean that those incomes don’t stretch as far as they would. elsewhere.

The Public Policy Institute of California takes it a step further by calculating how many Californians live in near poverty, using a methodology similar to that of the Census Bureau.

In total, more than a third of the state’s roughly 40 million people are in severe economic distress. They are, for the most part, workers in low-paying jobs and their families, and their plight has been exacerbated by the nearly two-year COVID-19 pandemic, which has hit them the hardest both in terms of medical than economic.

Backed by unions, Gov. Gavin Newsom and his fellow Democrats pledged to reduce the state’s high levels of poverty and income disparity and this year generated a basket of bushels of laws that they say will reduce deviations.

California is indeed testing the long-held beliefs of the political left that America should move closer to the European model of “social democracy” by expanding supportive public services and empowering workers in their dealings with it. employers.

The former include increasing eligibility for Medi-Cal, the state health care system for the poor that already covers more than a third of California’s residents, expanding early childhood education childhood to both improve learning outcomes and free up more parents to work, and increase housing expenses for low- and middle-income families.

The latter is a variety of bills that impose new labor and pay standards on industries that employ large numbers of low-paid workers, including clothing production, agriculture, and the ever-growing distribution centers operated by Amazon and other big companies.

“We can’t allow companies to put profit before people,” Newsom said as he signed a law to relax production quotas at Amazon’s huge “distribution centers”.

“The hard-working warehouse workers who have helped support us during this unprecedented time should not have to risk injury or be punished because of operating quotas that violate basic health and safety.” , Newsom added.

“California holds corporations accountable and recognizes the dignity and humanity of our workers, who have helped build the world’s fifth-largest economy,” Newsom said later as he signed a bill banning piece-work in the garment industry centered in Los Angeles.

Newsom also signed bills to extend protections for domestic workers, increase the minimum wage for workers with disabilities, increase criminal penalties for “wage theft” by employers, and provide agricultural workers with smoke protection equipment. forest fires.

This is not, however, a 100% sweep for union-backed legislation. Newsom has vetoed a bill allowing postal voting in elections for the agricultural workers’ union organization and one that would extend paid family leave.

Expanding government services will of course cost the state billions of dollars, which it can afford now as income taxes pour into its treasury, but its sustainability is questionable. California is overly dependent on high-income taxpayers, which means its income plummets during an economic downturn.

New benefits for workers, meanwhile, will drive up costs for employers, potentially prompting some to move their operations and jobs to less expensive locations. The clothing industry is particularly competitive, which is why a large part has already gone abroad.

Higher public and private costs are the flip side of the California experiment in social democracy. Ultimately, Newsom and the legislature cannot repeal the laws of economics.


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Canadian army

Planned recruitment announcements aimed at women as military tackles sexual misconduct – Summerland Review


An expert on sexual misconduct said it would be dishonest for the Department of National Defense to promote the military as a positive workplace for women in an upcoming campaign after much information to the contrary.

The Canadian Armed Forces, which have long struggled to increase the number of women in its ranks, hope they will make up a quarter of the membership by 2026.

That figure now stands at around 15%, and an internal study suggests the department needs to recruit around 3,500 women each year to reach its goal.

Although recruiting more women poses a challenge, the military was rocked last year by public reports of allegations of sexual misconduct, including against its most senior officials.

Complaints of widespread inappropriate behavior prompted Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to say that it was clear military complainants did not think they had a place to report their experiences. He asked a former Supreme Court justice in April to investigate the matter, more than six years after a previous report on the matter.

That same month, a consulting firm released a report based on focus groups with women aged 18-34 to test the ads ahead of a recruitment drive originally slated for October.

“Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, production has been halted and an adjustment in campaign plans and tactics has been required,” National Defense spokesperson Andrew McKelvey said Thursday.

He added that the department started working on this latest effort in the spring of 2020 and had released different versions of those ads over the years.

“Currently, we are planning to launch a campaign for women in winter. “

A summary of the report posted on a federal website explains how attendees saw storyboards with different advertising concepts that examined the lives of women in the Air Force, Royal Canadian Navy, and Canadian Army.

The images showed women traveling, mothers able to find a work-life balance with their families, and opportunities to serve in non-traditional settings.

“I think they have to deal with a cultural issue before they can somehow make claims in the recruitment drives,” said Megan MacKenzie, chair of international law and human security at the University. Simon Fraser who studies sexual misconduct in the military.

“It is dishonest to recruit women into an institution at this point with such positive messages when so many women and men who have been the victims of sexual misconduct say they do not feel safe in the institution. . “

The report includes summaries of the comments the 59 participants gave on the advertisements they saw, including one where they saw the post as one of the women accepted into the military if they were part of the LGBTQ community. .

“Participants felt that the ad did not address concerns about LGBTQ in the military, and to a few, it seemed at odds with what recent headlines are communicating about sexual abuse in the forces,” reads. we.

Another theme communicated through the various advertisements was that of women serving in the military still being able to care for their children, which drew both positive and negative reactions.

“Some participants did not like the stereotype that women have to take care of family or children and that a similar approach would not be used to recruit men,” according to the report.

For a similar case, he said the women felt that “the importance of a family-work balance is displayed in a more subtle way, showing only the pram instead of the baby.”

Different responses were also recorded for scenes showing a woman from the Royal Canadian Air Force working as a mechanic.

“The youngest participants said it was important to highlight work typically done by men done by a woman, but that a female mechanic is no longer so rare,” the report said, while asserting that others found the image “empowering”.

“It seems there is a little bit of trouble in explaining why the Canadian Defense Forces are a good place for women, or a good employer for women,” MacKenzie said after reviewing the report.

She questioned whether it was even possible for the department to conduct a positive recruiting drive when the military is in “crisis,” adding that she suspects that the months of well-documented reports of military misconduct are among the longest. High ranks could have an impact on the number of women and men who decide to join in the future.

—Stéphanie Taylor, The Canadian Press

Military sexual harassment


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International headquarters

Kforce secures new headquarters in Midtown Tampa


TAMPA, Fla., September 29, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Kforce Inc., a solutions company specializing in technology and other professional staffing services, today announced that it has signed a lease for its new headquarters in Midtown Tampa. Kforce is proud to have honored their commitment to stay in Tampa. The company will occupy the fifth floor of Midtown West, one of four office buildings slated for the 22-acre, $ 500 million mixed-use development. The 10-year lease comes into effect in October 2022.

Kforce, one of the largest publicly traded companies in Tampa Bay, announced the sale of its Ybor headquarters in April. Its management team immediately began searching for a state-of-the-art space that aligns with its future hybrid work environment. Kforce has been operating remotely since March 2020, but signing the lease does not mean employees will be required to return to the office five days a week or on a regular rotational basis. Instead, Kforce takes a “casual office” approach where employees are encouraged to come to the office for better in-person interactions, such as team building, collaborating with clients, and training. Otherwise, Kforce intends its employees (Kforcers) to continue to work remotely, leveraging the technology and processes deployed by the Firm over the past 18 months, allowing them to build an optimal work-life balance. Kforcers’ workdays will move seamlessly between Midtown Tampa, their home offices, a coffee shop, or wherever their day takes them.

“Our new headquarters, and all that Midtown has to offer, really complements our casual approach to the office and the future of our business,” said Kforce President Joe Liberatore. “We are building a culture of flexibility and choice based on trust and technology. Midtown Tampa, located off Interstate 275 between downtown and Tampa International Airport, offers a host of amenities for Kforce employees. It is home to 11 restaurants, 13 retailers, a hotel, and Tampa Bay’s largest Whole Foods Market.

“We are delighted that Kforce has chosen Midtown West as their new headquarters,” said Dan Woodward, senior vice president and Tampa market leader for Highwoods Properties. “Kforce is a powerful addition to the region that further complements the diverse mix of leading national businesses, upscale retailers and local restaurants, and we look forward to seeing the additional momentum they bring to Midtown. “

Kforce was one of the first large employers in Tampa Bay to engage in a hybrid work environment after the COVID-19 pandemic forced many businesses to go remote overnight. “This vision comes directly from our people, who thrive with this new-found freedom,” said Liberatore. “We gave them the flexibility to design their best life, and they responded with a record year.”

Find out why Kforce is a destination employer.

About Kforce Inc.

Kforce Inc. is a solutions company specializing in technology and other professional staffing services. Each year, we provide meaningful opportunities to more than 30,000 highly skilled professionals who work with approximately 3,000 clients, a significant majority of whom are Fortune 500. At Kforce, our promise is to deliver great results through strategic partnership and knowledge sharing. For more information, please visit our website at www.kforce.com.

Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

All statements in this press release, other than those of a historical nature, are forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to, statements regarding the performance of technology-driven companies, age-old drivers of technology , the pace of digital transformation, the opportunity for the company to continue investing in its future growth, returning capital to its shareholders, including the intention and ability to declare and pay quarterly dividends, and the Company’s forecast for the third quarter of 2021. These forward-looking statements are within the meaning of that term in Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as as amended. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially include the following: business conditions, the rate of growth of temporary staff and the economy in general; competitive factors; risks due to variations in market demand; the ability to continue to function successfully in a predominantly remote working environment; a reduction in the supply of consultants and candidates or the firm’s ability to attract and retain such people; the Company’s success in attracting and retaining its management team and key operating employees; the impacts (direct and indirect) of COVID-19 on our business, our consultants and employees, and the economy in general; changes in the range of services; ability of the Company to repurchase shares; the occurrence of unforeseen expenses; the effect of adverse weather conditions; changes in our effective tax rate; changes in regulations, laws and government policies that impact our business and our ability to comply with them; the risk of contract performance, delays or termination or inability to obtain new assignments or contracts, or funding under contracts; changes in customer demand and our ability to adapt to such changes; our ability to continue to operate on government sponsored COVID-19 initiatives; the continuous performance and improvement of our business information systems; impacts of pending litigation or other legal matters, including risk factors and matters listed from time to time in firm reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including, but not limited to, the firm’s Form 10-K for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2020, together with the assumptions regarding the foregoing. The terms “should”, “believe”, “estimate”, “expect”, “intend”, “anticipate”, “foresee”, “plan” and similar expressions and their variations contained therein press release identify certain of these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this press release. Therefore, these forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks and uncertainties. Future events and actual results may differ materially from those indicated in forward-looking statements. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements and the Company does not undertake to update these forward-looking statements.

Media contact
Alexa rodriguez
Public relations supervisor
813.552.1817 | [email protected]


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International headquarters

The Panama Development Fund invests significantly in


NEW YORK, Sep 28, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Notarc Management Group establishes the Panama Development Fund (PDF), a venture capital and opportunity fund focused on Latin America that has already made a significant investment in Fuel Venture Capital Partners, an American Venture Capital Fund company based in Miami, Florida, to strategically align with expanding technology investments throughout Central and South America through its hub in Panama, where it already has a pipeline over $ 7 billion in various investments in infrastructure, real estate and renewable energy.

“The mission of the Panama Development Fund is to align with strategic capital partners and investors to support and develop innovation, technology, infrastructure and sustainable initiatives in Latin America and the Caribbean with a target allocation. 20% of its capital to be deployed in global technology and innovative companies selected and organized by Fuel Venture Capital Partners ”, noted Leslie C. Bethel, CEO of Notarc Management Group during recent meetings held in New York with key investors and Panamanian officials.

“LatAm is a market with over 625 million consumers and where many are already using technology in their daily lives and where the demand for innovation and business-driven solutions is growing exponentially and is being catapulted by the COVID pandemic. As such, we are very focused on expanding our investment and business footprint in this region through this new partnership, ”said Jeff Ransdell, Managing Director and Founding Partner of Fuel VC.

This merger has already opened the door for 30 existing holding companies (including Eyrus, Ubicquia and OhmniLabs) that will have the opportunity to leverage the Panama Development Fund as a hub to expand in the Latin America region. “Our smart city technology will provide significant energy savings while improving public safety and connectivity in communities in Latin America and the Caribbean,” adds Ubicquia CEO Ian Aaron.

“Panama is truly the perfect location and hub for multinational companies to thrive around the world. We are happy when international investors realize the potential of this region. Today we want to send a message to the world , and in particular to the technology / innovation sector, that Panama is here to facilitate the connection of the dots as a key global hub and we are open for business and want all entrepreneurs and businesses to consider our location and who wish to benefit from attractive business incentives, ”said President Laurentino Cortizo of Panama.

Under President Cortizo’s leadership, Panama continues to thrive as a global logistics hub and is often referred to as America’s Singapore. He has promoted policies and implemented programs that continue to build investor confidence and have helped support Panama’s GDP, which has grown steadily over the past decade. “A business-friendly environment and a well-established strategic location with convenient access and connectivity to all From Central, South and North America through its airport hub at Tocumen and the Panama Canal, these factors and many more are key elements that businesses and investors find attractive in this key growth region, we are excited to expand our presence in the Americas, “noted Sir Baltron Bethel, Chairman of the Advisory Board, Notarc Group of Companies.

****

About the Notarc Management Group

Notarc Management Group includes leading investment and asset management professionals in UK, Europe, Panama, Asia, Bahamas and USA. As an advisory and private equity firm, Notarc Management Group focuses exclusively on investing in asset class opportunities in real estate, hospitality, logistics, technology and infrastructure in the Americas; while maintaining its primary focus on stabilized and key strategic markets in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Notarc provides expert local knowledge and asset management oversight while aligning with sovereign wealth funds, institutional and private private equity firms and global family offices to invest capital through its various opportunity funds. SPV, including the Panama Development Fund.

For more information on Notarc Management Group, please contact:

Mr. Dion L. Bowe

Managing Partner Latin America

Notarc Management Group

Email: [email protected]

Web: www.notarc.com

About Fuel Venture Capital

Fuel Venture Capital is committed to propelling revolutionary ideas into businesses that change the world and democratizing access to the creative economy to shape the future of society. The company’s ‘founder-driven, investor-driven’ approach is led by a core team with over 60 years of combined experience in the areas of investment banking, wealth management, banking and finance. executive leadership and entrepreneurship. The fund boasts a portfolio of 31 companies based around the world in many industries, bringing a positive impact to virtually every corner of our modern economy. To find out more, visit www.fuelventurecapital.com and follow Fuel VC via Twitter: @FuelVC and Instagram: @FuelVentureCapital.

For more information on Fuel Venture Capital, please contact:

Nicole Martinez, The Tag Experience

Phone. : 561.827.3937

Email: [email protected]

Related files

press release – panama development fund established under the fuel vc and notarc latam alliance regime (final on 28/09/2021) .pdf

Related images

Image 1: PDF at Nasdaq Headquarters in NY

Notarc and Fuel VC Portfolio Companies at Nasdaq with President Cortizo of Panama

This content was posted through the press release distribution service at Newswire.com.

  • PDF at Nasdaq Headquarters in NY


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Non profit living

Seiler promotes the benefits of living in the great outdoors | State and region


Melanie Seiler’s life is very much about wellness.

Having a little fun doesn’t hurt either.

In uncertain times like the Covid-19 pandemic, many have pointed out that being outdoors is one of the best remedies for fighting the spread of the disease.

“The Covid-19 pandemic was very difficult to navigate, but an extremely important time to continue health education campaigns and creative ways to keep people active,” said Seiler, Executive Director of Active Southern West Virginia. “We relaunched the organization in 2021 to bring the programs back in person.”

Although her mother Susie Hofstetter’s family is from Ohiopyle, Pa., And her father Bob Seiler’s family is from the Cumberland, Md. Area, Seiler grew up in Fayetteville. It allowed him to appreciate – and understand – how much outdoor fun can be discovered in southern West Virginia.

Prior to his affiliation with Active SWV, Seiler worked for Adventures on the Gorge following the merger of the family rafting business, Songer Whitewater with AOTG in 2011. At Songer, Seiler was responsible for the river for several years and responsible for the river. vacation cabin, and she also spent a lot of time dealing with accounts receivable and human resources.

She has also been a certified ski instructor for 20 years and a member of the National Ski Patrol for 10 years.

“Growing up in the outdoor industry made me feel like everyone had the opportunity to raft and paddle white water or meet friends on bike trails and rock climbing routes. She said. “What motivates me is to later realize the lack of access and interest in outdoor recreation on the part of my peers and my generation.

“I want to express and share opportunities to experience the benefits of being active in the outdoors. “

Her days at Active SWV currently include “a lot of paperwork to keep track of funding requests and reports,” she says. “I really try to provide my people with all the tools and resources they need to do a great job.

“I spend a lot of hours on my computer, but I love going out and talking to groups about our work and free events,” she said.

Active SWV has made huge strides in recent years, Seiler believes.

“Active SWV was formed in late 2014 with a non-profit status, then I was hired as a sole employee in February 2015,” she said. “We quickly acquired a member of the AmeriCorps VISTA service and took to the streets recruiting volunteers to run programs.

“The first two years were tough structuring each program area and building a brand, but it paid off and in 2016 we entered into a cooperative agreement with the New River Gorge National River (today the New River Gorge National Park and Preserve), many county parks and had a handful of children’s clubs in elementary schools in the area. In 2019, we had the highest number of volunteers with over 200 people across our four program areas: Community Captains, Kids’ Running Clubs, Workplace Wellness, and SWV Bike / Walk.

“I am very proud of the trusted partnerships, of the people who have improved their lives through the activity and of the staff who remain cohesive and dynamic,” she added.

As the battle continues to urge children – and adults for that matter – to stay active and not focus too much on computer or phone screens and adopt a more sedentary lifestyle, Seiler says that ‘Active SWV has made progress.

“Active SWV is seeing progress in youth through our Kids Run Club grant program. Surveys before and after show that children achieve the recommended amount of daily physical activity, have less screen time, and 75 percent report being able to get someone home more active with them.

“The progress we are seeing in the region is more collective resources from agencies, organizations and the faith community to reach underserved families and individuals. One collaboration being Adventure Fayette County providing substance abuse prevention and the Icelandic youth model combining survey data with programming solutions. It means finding populations at risk, understanding their challenges in accessing healthier choices, and creating programs with a strong group of volunteers and mentors.

“Throughout the pandemic, Active SWV continued to work with companies as members of the Active SWV Workplace Wellness program. We spend many hours of the day at work or on our computers working remotely. Implementing changes to policies, systems, and the environment to make healthy choice an easy choice has shown results in employee morale, productivity, and increased buy-in to other investments in well-being at work.

Each year, Active SWV – in partnership with WV Health Promotion and Chronic Disease – awards a series of workplace wellness capacity building grants to businesses across the state. This year, they searched for 20 workplaces, each of which will receive $ 1,000. The mission of these grants is to increase access to healthy foods, physical activity and other supports to improve employee well-being. The application period is closed and the winners will be announced on October 1.

The agency created the Kids Run Club program in 2015 with a pilot club, and the program has since grown to reach more than 30 schools and community groups across West Virginia, Seiler said.

“With our comprehensive Kids Run Club manual providing structure to all clubs, trained volunteers lead groups of children through the activities described in the manual,” she explained. “Through these activities, children acquire lifelong skills and strengthen their confidence in their physical activity abilities.

“The goal of the Kids Run Club program is for children to have fun with physical activity and have a positive team experience. It is important to Active SWV that the program is offered free of charge so that all children have the opportunity to participate.

To apply, go to https://activeswv.org/2021/07/fall-kids-run-club-mini-grant-is-now-open/.

Active SWV also sponsors an adult / family / multigenerational program known as the Community Captain program. This is a volunteer-led activity that usually meets once a week. Weekly programs in locations such as Summersville, Fayetteville, Oak Hill, Beckley and Williamson focus on running / walking, Pilates, youth disc golf, Refit, yoga, stand-up paddleboarding and paddling. cycling / walking.

For example, a Wednesday run group from Fayetteville that Seiler and his friends participate in will meet as a three-year free run group in December.

“We started the winter of 2018 thinking that we would come together every Wednesday in December to get through the dark days of winter,” she said. “So we started to meet at 6:15 pm when everyone got out of work and ran down the sidewalks of Fayetteville with the street lights and headlamps.

“Well, the group decided to continue meeting in January, then February, and so on. Every three months or so, we move to a different location and usually end up in a restaurant to eat together. Many people have joined the group over the years and we continue to welcome new people.

“Group responsibility helps keep people and myself,” Seiler said. “You know that your running friends are waiting for you and making the activity more fun in good company.

“Even when it rains and snows, we dress appropriately and go out anyway. Physical activity is good for the body and the mind, and the social connection is good for the mind.

To learn more about the Community Captains program, visit https://activeswv.org/community-captains/.

SWV’s active staff and volunteers have “made a difference in the lives of individuals and improved the health culture in Southern West Virginia,” said Seiler. “This was accomplished by normalizing beginner activities like walking and hiking, and having easy ways to volunteer increased the ways to be active.

“These efforts have been well received and volunteers find that their friends, family, neighbors and coworkers are helping each other remove barriers to an active lifestyle such as transportation, skills, equipment, child care. children and fear of injury. This work is even more important during the pandemic to help people stay healthy and active. “

Seiler, of Fayetteville, is married to Travis Hames and has daughters-in-law Kalila and Delaney.

His favorite outdoor hobbies are telemark, a skiing technique that combines elements of alpine and Nordic skiing; paddleboarding and surfing.

Her hobbies and interests also include raising chickens and adventures with her bird dog.

E-mail: [email protected]erald.com or follow us on Twitter @gb_scribe


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Non profit living

Anonymous reader pays Saint-Dominique cancer patient’s debt


Linda Burks owed more than $ 4,000 for her breast cancer treatment at St. Dominic, a not-for-profit church hospital in Jackson who hired a debt collector to sue her. Burks works as a full-time receptionist with Medicare who has started taking extra janitorial shifts to pay his bills.

After a series of investigations which the Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting product, and the Mississippi Free Press republished in its entirety, a woman who read the series took action. Earlier this month, she hooked up with Burks and paid off her medical debt.

“We’re supposed to help each other, aren’t we? Wrote the reader, who wished to remain anonymous. “People helped me when I needed it.”

After receiving treatment for her breast cancer at St. Dominic’s Hospital, Linda Burks had thousands of medical debts, which the hospital sent to collections. Photo by Sarah Warnock

However, St. Dominic Hospital did not change its policies in response to the report.

Burks’ story was part of an investigation into the aggressive debt collection policies of St. Dominic and its debt collectors. Reports revealed that the hospital was billing thousands of Mississippians when these patients should have qualified for free or reduced medical care; inflated patient bills by a third or more with attorney fees, court costs and interest rates by 8%; the wages of the seized patients; money seized from patients’ bank accounts; and sued thousands of patients, many of whom work in low-wage industries like fast food and retail.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the the federal government has given the hospital millions of dollars in pandemic relief funds, but St. Dominic continued to sue patients and even their employees, as the hospital sued over a hundred staff for medical debts.

Burks: “What am I doing? “

Linda Burks was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2016 and received treatment at St. Dominic. She faithfully paid her bill for over a year when she said she noticed Saint-Dominique was no longer automatically withdrawing from her account.

Burks said she proactively contacted St. Dominic, but was told it was too late – her invoice was sent to the collections. Smith, Rouchon & Associates, a Jackson-based collection agency, started calling him, demanding more money from Burks. The debt collector sued her, adding more than $ 1,500 to her bill for legal fees.

Relief sculpture of Saint Francis of Assisi kneeling before an angel
Saint Francis of Assisi (photo) inspired the religious order which now sponsors Saint Dominic Hospital. Photo by Fr. Daniel Ciucci on Unsplash

St. Dominic has annual operating expenses of around half a billion dollars and pays virtually no tax due to its nonprofit status. Experts say suing patients for medical debts is only a tiny fraction of a hospital’s income, but the effects can be devastating for patients. For Burks, this meant she was reluctant to return to St. Dominic for treatment because she feared she would be sued again.

“I’m a cashless receptionist, living from paycheck to paycheck,” Burks wrote to a judge in 2018. “… I want to live, and these tests play a big role for me in whether I stay cancer-free. … What should I do. to do?”

Follow the example of the founder?

In 2019, the Dominican Sisters for St. Dominic’s Health Services sponsorship transferred from St. Dominic Hospital to the Health system of the Franciscan Missionaries of Notre-Dame, whose inspiration, St. Francis of Assisi, was a man born into a wealthy family who gave up his wealth and begged with the poor.

“Let us therefore have charity and humility and give alms because they wash souls from the stain of sins”, François wrote in the 13th century. “For men lose all that they leave in this world; however, they carry with them the reward of charity and alms which they have given, for which they will receive a reward and remuneration worthy of the Lord.

When contacted this week, a spokesperson for the Franciscan Missionaries of Notre Dame, the Louisiana-based health system that owns St. Dominic, reiterated that the hospital no longer directly pursues patients – a policy that took place in July.

“We always want to be compassionate and improve the experience for our patients,” spokesperson Ryan Cross said in an email.

But St. Dominic rarely sued patients directly, relying instead on two local collection agencies to handle the vast majority of medical debt collection lawsuits. The hospital still allows its debt collectors to sue patients, garnish their wages, damage their credit and bankrupt them.

The Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting produced the series. Email reporter Giacomo Bologna To [email protected]. Read Giacomo Bologna’s full series on medical billing in Mississippi:

Part 1: Investigation: St. Dominic’s nonprofit hospital routinely sued patients who could not afford care

Part 2: “It broke my heart”: the tactics of the Saint-Dominique debt collectors cause lasting damage

Part 3: Medical debt lawsuits hurt low-income Mississippians; Here are expert solutions


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Non profit living

Many obstacles for families with dietary challenges | News, Sports, Jobs


WASHINGTON – Many Americans who have struggled to feed their families in the past pandemic year say they have struggled to find how to get help and have struggled to find healthy foods they can afford.

An Impact Genome and Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll finds 23% of Americans say they haven’t been able to get enough to eat or the types of foods they eat. they want. Most people with food issues signed up for a government or nonprofit food aid program in the past year, but 58% still had difficulty accessing at least one service.

And 21% of adults who have difficulty meeting their food needs have not been able to access any assistance. The most common challenge for those in need was a fundamental lack of knowledge about eligibility for government and nonprofit services.

Survey results paint a big picture of a country where hundreds of thousands of households suddenly found themselves food insecure due to the economic disruption of the COVID-19 pandemic

They often found themselves navigating the intimidating bureaucracy of government assistance programs and with limited knowledge of local food banks or other charitable options available.

Black and Hispanic Americans, Americans living below the federal poverty line and young adults are especially likely to face eating problems, according to the survey.

Americans who struggle to afford food also feel less confident than others about their ability to afford healthy foods. Only 27% say they are “very” Where “extremely” confident, compared to 87% of those who do not face dietary challenges.

For housewife Acacia Barraza in Los Lunas, a rural town outside of Albuquerque, New Mexico, the challenge has been finding a steady supply of fresh fruits and vegetables for her 2-year-old son while respecting the family budget.

Barraza, 34, quit her job as a waitress before the pandemic when her son was born. She considered returning to work, but intermittent childcare shortages as the pandemic set in made that impossible, she said. The family lives off her husband’s salary as a mechanic while receiving help from SNAP, the government program commonly known as food stamps.

Despite government help, Barraza said she still scrambles to find affordable sources of fresh vegetables, actively browsing local markets for bargains such as a bag of fresh spinach for $ 2.99. .

“If we don’t always have vegetables, he won’t want to eat them in the future. And then I am worried that he will not get enough vitamins from vegetables in the future or now for his growing body. So it’s really hard. It’s just really hard. she said.

Even those who haven’t lost income during the pandemic find themselves stretching their food dollars at the end of the month. Trelecia Mornes of Fort Worth, Texas works as a customer service representative over the phone, so she was able to work from home without interruption.

She earns too much money to qualify for SNAP, but not enough to easily feed the family.

She decided to take distance education with her three children at home over fears about COVID-19 outbreaks in schools, which took school lunches out of the equation. Her job responsibilities prevent her from picking up free lunches offered by the school district. She takes care of her disabled brother, who lives with them and receives SNAP benefits. But Mornes said that $ 284 a month “Lasts about a week and a half. “

They try to eat healthy, but budgetary considerations sometimes lead them to prioritize cost and longevity with “canned soups, maybe noodles – things that last and aren’t that expensive”, she said.

Radha Muthiah, president of the Capital Area Food Bank in Washington, said the difficulties reflected in the survey are evidence of a new phenomenon brought by the pandemic: families with no experience of food insecurity are suddenly in need, without knowledge of charitable options or experience in navigating government assistance programs.

“It’s all new to them” she said. “Many people and families, especially those experiencing food insecurity for the first time, don’t know all of their options. “

Many are reluctant to engage directly in government programs such as SNAP and WIC – the government’s parallel food aid program that helps mothers and children. Muthiah said reluctance often stems either from frustration with paperwork or, among immigrant communities, from fear of endangering their immigration status or green card applications.

The survey shows that overall, about 1 in 8 Americans regularly get their supplies from convenience stores, which typically offer less nutritious foods at higher prices. This experience is more common among Americans with dietary issues, with about 1 in 5 frequenting convenience stores.

Reliance on convenience stores is a particularly troubling dynamic, Muthiah said, as the options there are both more expensive and generally less nutritious. Part of the problem is just habit, but a much bigger problem is the lack of proper groceries in “Food deserts” that exist in the poorest neighborhoods of many cities.

“Sometimes they’re the only quick and efficient option for many people to get food,” she said. “But they don’t get the full range of what they need in a convenience store and that has a lot of negative health effects.”

The survey shows that half of Americans with dietary challenges say extra money to pay for food or bills is needed to meet their dietary needs.

Fewer consider reliable transportation or enough free food for a few days, such as in emergency food parcels, or free prepared meals at a soup kitchen or school as necessary resources to meet their food needs, although the majority states that this would be helpful.

Gerald Ortiz of Espaeola, New Mexico, bought a 2019 Chevrolet pickup truck before the pandemic, then lost the office job he had for 20 years. Now he’s scrambling to make the monthly payment of $ 600 and gets by with charity and just eating less. His unemployment benefits ended this month.

“I make sure that the payment for my truck is made” Ortiz said, as he sat in a line of around 30 cars waiting to collect food from a charity, Barrios Unidos, near Chimay. “After that, I, I just eat once a day” he said, pointing to her stomach. “That’s why you see me, I’m so thin now.”

He applies for several jobs and survives on charity and all the produce he can grow in his garden – peppers, onions, cucumbers and watermelons.

“It was depressing. It’s been, like, stressful and I have anxiety. he said. “Like, I can’t wait to find a job. I don’t care what it is right now.

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International headquarters

Aery Aviation, LLC invests $ 15.3 million in new facility,


NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Sept. 22, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Aery Aviation, a full-service commercial and government services provider to the aerospace industry, inaugurates a new 60,000 square foot hangar with Newport News / Runway Access Williamsburg International Airport to expand maintenance and modification service capabilities for its customers, as well as an engineering technology center.

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam announced Aery’s expansion and investment at a groundbreaking ceremony, held at the site of the new hangar on September 14. Aery selected Virginia for the project after reviewing opportunities in Maryland, Ohio, South Carolina, and West Virginia. Guests of honor and speakers for the event included Jay Joseph, Chairman of the Peninsula Airport Commission, Congressman Bobby Scott, Senator Monty Mason, Delegate Michael P. Mullin and Deputy Newport News Economic / Industrial Development Authority Chairman Howard H. Hoege III.

“The rich history of Hampton Roads in the aerospace and aviation industry provides an ideal backdrop for Aery Aviation to grow and be more successful than ever”, Governor Northam said. “The region is home to world-class higher education and research institutions that have helped advance the aerospace industry. We look forward to supporting Aery Aviation as it enters its next phase of growth here in the Commonwealth.

“Virginia companies like Aery Aviation are at the forefront of advancements in aerospace, aviation and unmanned systems,” said Secretary of Commerce and Commerce Brian Ball. “This expansion will allow the company to further improve its capabilities and technology. The aerospace industry has been a vital part of the economy of the Hampton Roads area for over a century, and we look forward to Aery’s continued contributions to this thriving sector.

“We congratulate Aery on committing to the largest private monetary investment in the history of Newport News / Williamsburg International Airport,” said Jay Joseph, Chairman of the Peninsula Airport Commission. “We are open for business and will continue to help the region grow and prosper.

“Newport News / Williamsburg International Airport is a vital part of our economy in Newport News and Hampton Roads, and this is good news as we continue to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Congressman Bobby Scott. “This investment will create hundreds of new jobs in the region.

“Aery Aviation is delighted to build its new state-of-the-art engineering, design, certification, modification and manufacturing global headquarters at Newport News / Williamsburg International Airport.” said Scott Beale, vice president of Aery Aviation. “Aery has enjoyed the partnership with the Newport News community and airport staff over the past five years,” continued Beale. “Their collective support and the enabling environment for businesses persuaded Aery to invest more than $ 15 million in the construction, expansion and fit-out of the buildings of this new state-of-the-art facility, which also includes an investment in machinery, tools, furniture, accessories and commercial personal property. Aery is happy to call Newport News his home for decades to come. ”

The new construction will increase Aery’s overall capabilities and efficiency. The footprint and area of ​​the new hangar dramatically increases the size of aircraft that can be worked on in the hangar. Aery’s manufacturing plant will be adjacent to the new facility, increasing overall efficiency. The company’s expansion will also create 211 well-paying jobs with average salaries of $ 85,000. “Aery is looking for engineers, pilots, mechanics,” Beale continued. “We start a lot of our employees in an internship program and hire people who have decades of experience.

Founded in 2016 and headquartered in Newport News, Aery Aviation provides solutions in design, engineering, systems integration, modifications, certification, maintenance and flight operations. These services meet the essential requirements of aeronautical missions for national and foreign governments, as well as for certain companies and individuals in the private sector. Aery Aviation’s team of experienced professionals provide efficient, economical and flexible services that meet the demands of the aerospace industry. The company’s commitment to safety, compliance and security has earned Aery a reputation as a forward-thinking aviation company. Aery Aviation has developed over 100 additional type certificates and over 500 airworthiness clearances.

For more information, please contact Heather McAfee at [email protected]

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This content was posted through the press release distribution service at Newswire.com.

  • Featured image for Aery Aviation, LLC


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Canadian army

Here are five of the biggest losers in the 2021 federal election


Party leaders Annamie Paul and Maxime Berniers both lost in their respective ridings to a Conservative and Liberal candidate

Content of the article

After weeks of fierce campaigning, Canada’s 44th election ended in much the same way as the last – a narrow Liberal minority and a power reshuffle on the electoral map.

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The Liberals’ planned stay in power was accompanied by the defeat of several prominent Liberal ministers, reducing the party’s political influence, despite Justin Trudeau’s hopes of a majority government for the third time.

Here’s a look at five of the top candidates who have been overlooked for another in the polls:

MARIE MONSEF

Canadian Minister for Women, Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development Maryam Monsef speaks at a meeting of the Special Committee on the COVID-19 Pandemic, as efforts continue to help slow the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada on May 20, 2020.
Canadian Minister for Women, Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development Maryam Monsef speaks at a meeting of the Special Committee on the COVID-19 Pandemic, as efforts continue to help slow the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada on May 20, 2020. Photo by Blair Gable /Reuters

The Liberal Minister for Women, Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development has lost her constituency of Peterborough-Kawartha to Conservative candidate Michelle Ferreri.

Monsef, who had held the Ontario constituency since 2015, has likely lost his support after last month’s controversy over his remarks on the Taliban’s capture of Afghanistan. During a press briefing, she called the terrorist group “our brothers” and implored them to “ensure the safe and secure passage of anyone in Afghanistan out of the country”.

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When asked to clarify his comments, Monsef refused to withdraw his comments and instead defended them by referring to the practice of the Islamic community of labeling its members as “brothers and sisters.”

She insisted that she viewed the Taliban as a terrorist group, but still faced a public backlash.

Peterborough-Kawartha’s victory is particularly unique as the constituency, long regarded as an indicator, voted for the winning side in 19 of the last 20 general elections.

BERNADETTE JORDAN

Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, addresses the audience during the keel-laying ceremony of the future HMCS HMCS William Hall at Irving Shipbuilding in Halifax on Wednesday February 17, 2021.
Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, addresses the audience during the keel-laying ceremony of the future HMCS HMCS William Hall at Irving Shipbuilding in Halifax on Wednesday February 17, 2021. Photo by Andrew Vaughan /The Canadian Press

Jordan, who was Nova Scotia’s sole federal minister overseeing Fisheries and Oceans, lost her riding of South Shore-St. Margarets in a major upheaval for Conservative candidate Rick Perkins.

Perkins told Global News Jordan likely lost his handling of the province’s lobster fishing dispute between commercial fishermen and Sipekne’katik fishermen and his inability to find a resolution.

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Jordan lost the vote by a margin of 2,000 votes, CBC reported, having occupied the constituency since 2015. Perkins ran for election in the constituency in 2019, but lost.

LENORE ZANN

Lenore Zann, MP for Cumberland-Colchester, at her home in Truro, Nova Scotia on Friday July 3, 2020.
Lenore Zann, MP for Cumberland-Colchester, at her home in Truro, Nova Scotia on Friday July 3, 2020. Photo by Andrew Vaughan /The Canadian Press

After a term in office, incumbent Liberal MP Zann was overthrown in Cumberland-Colchester, Nova Scotia by Conservative candidate Stephen Ellis by a margin of over 2,000 votes.

Zann declined to comment on her loss to Saltwire, saying she would wait for the mail-in ballots to be counted.

“These are the people speaking and the people will vote and I totally accept what they decide,” Zann said earlier in the night.

Earlier in the campaign, she had expressed hope that she would garner more votes in this election than in the previous round, now that people knew her better.

MAXIME BERNIER

People's Party of Canada (PPC) leader Maxime Bernier speaks during a protest rally outside the headquarters of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, September 16, 2021.
People’s Party of Canada (PPC) leader Maxime Bernier speaks during a protest rally outside the headquarters of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, September 16, 2021. Photo by Chris Helgren /Reuters

For the second time, the leader of the People’s Party of Canada failed to secure a seat in the riding of Beauce, Que., Losing to incumbent Conservative MP Richard Lehoux.

Bernier had noted that his riding would be a “tough race,” but that he was happy with the increase in support for the People’s Party of Canada.

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“Thank you very much to the purple army! We have made history today. We have more than tripled our total vote, ”he tweeted Tuesday morning.

Saskatoon police told Global News on Monday evening that they were working with public health to investigate the party leader’s election night after reports of several people attending the event without a mask.

ANNAMIE PAUL

The Green Party Annamie Paul lost for the second time in the Toronto-Center race.
The Green Party Annamie Paul lost for the second time in the Toronto-Center race. Photo from The Canadian Press

For the third time, the leader of the Green Party lost the race in Toronto Center, placing fourth, while her party recorded lower support nationally.

Liberal MP Marci Ien, first elected in a by-election just a year ago, took the seat handily on Monday evening, garnering nearly 50% of the vote, with Paul getting just 8% voices.

Paul admitted during his campaign that internal party strife had weakened public perception of him in the weeks leading up to the vote.

Members of the Green Party board have made several attempts to remove her from leadership, with Jenica Atwin, the party’s first MP from outside British Columbia, handing over to the Liberals.

The party limited the budget she could use to campaign for the Toronto Center seat and, at the time of the vote, she still faced a legal challenge to remove her from her post.

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Non profit living

Diapers and push-ups desperately needed for children living in Village of Hope – Orange County Register


Orange County Rescue Mission is in desperate need of diapers for toddlers and young children living in Village of Hope, a transitional living center for homeless families.

The association is looking for diapers in sizes 5 and 6, as well as diapers and wet wipes for boys and girls 3T-4T.

“We have received generous community donations of newborn and small infant diapers, but the continued need for larger diapers and retractable diapers is often underestimated,” said Jim Palmer, president of the Orange County Rescue Mission.

The increase in homelessness in the wake of the pandemic has contributed to this continued need, the mission said.

Those wishing to donate or organize a diaper drive can drop off their donations at the Village of Hope at 1 Hope Drive, Tustin, 92782. Donations can also be made online and delivered to this address.

For more information, visit rescuemission.org/urgent-baby-needs.

The facility’s donation warehouse is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Sunday.

Upcoming fundraisers

The Orange County Community Foundation is hosting a fundraiser on Wednesday, September 22 for 17 local nonprofits, seeking to raise $ 200,000.

The 24-hour Ignition Potential event will support programs that help Orange County youth.

Participants include Assistance League of Irvine, Child Creativity Lab, Court Appointed Special Advocates, Early Childhood OC, Giving Children Hope, Helping Others Prepare for Eternity, Irvine Public Schools Foundation, Kid Healthy, Kidworks Community Development Corporation, MOMS Orange County, Parentis Foundation , Pretend City – Orange County Children’s Museum, Scholar’s Hope Foundation, Literacy Project, Prentice School, Orange County Youth Center and YMCA.

To donate, go to igniting-potential-giving-day.ocnonprofitcentral.org or bit.ly/2VOfvSz

The Santa Ana Chick-fil-A at 3601 South Bristol St. will contribute 20% of sales from 4 pm to 7 pm Tuesday, September 22 to the non-profit MOMS Orange County if you mention “Spirit Night”.

Donations for MOMS

Eat chicken, help a mom.

The Santa Ana Chick-fil-A at 3601 South Bristol St. will contribute 20% of sales from 4 pm to 7 pm Tuesday, September 22 to the non-profit MOMS Orange County if you mention “Spirit Night”.

MOMS Orange County helps moms caring for newborns and pregnancy health, helping improve birth outcomes, infant health and development.

Body Spa Salons, a concept that leases space to beauty professionals, has opened an 8,000 square foot location at 3333 West Coast Highway in Newport Beach. The company rents spaces to specialists in hair, nails, skin, massage and medical / wellness care such as weight loss services, medical spas, vitamin infusions and acupuncture. (Courtesy of Body Spa Salons)

New spa debuts in NB

Body Spa Salons, a concept that leases space to beauty professionals, has opened an 8,000 square foot space in Newport Beach.

Spa salon at 3333 West Coast Highway rents spaces to professionals specializing in hair, nails, skin, massage, and medical / wellness treatments such as weight loss services, medical spas, herbal teas of vitamins and acupuncture.

The company has 11 sites in California, Nevada and Arizona. For more information, visit bodyspasalons.com.

  • Justine Cromer is the new director of Goodwill at the Tierney Center for Veteran Services in Orange County. She is a retired US Air Force Lieutenant Colonel with 28 years of military service in the Air Force, Air Force Reserves and Air National Guard. (Courtesy of Brocoff Photography)

  • Gynecologist-oncologist Antonio Castaneda has joined Hoag Gynecologic Oncology. He comes to Hoag from the Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University. (Courtesy of Hoag)

  • Paul Fleck, partner at the law firm Atkinson, Andelson Loya, Ruud and Romo, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based non-profit organization. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

  • GK Kannan, vice president of research and development at Grifols, a Los Angeles-based biopharmaceutical company, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

  • Jay Lee, family physician and co-founder of Family Medicine Revolution, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

  • Robert Handy, former police chief and assistant faculty member at Arizona and California universities, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

Moving

Justine Cromer is the new director of Goodwill at the Tierney Center for Veteran Services in Orange County. She is a retired US Air Force Lieutenant Colonel with 28 years of military service in the Air Force, Air Force Reserves and Air National Guard. As Director of the Tierney Center for Veteran Services, Cromer will lead strategic planning, project implementation, collaboration and innovation for the Goodwill program. She started her new role on September 1st.

Gynecologist-oncologist Antonio Castaneda has joined Hoag Gynecologic Oncology. He comes to Hoag from the Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University. Her research and expertise covers a wide range of gynecologic oncology issues, from the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for women with early-stage cervical cancer to the incidence of ovarian metastasis. in small cell neuroendocrine tumors of the cervix.

On board

Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit, has added four new members to its board of directors, including Paul Fleck, Robert Handy, GK Kannan and Dr. Jay Lee.

Fleck is a partner at Atkinson, Andelson Loya, Ruud and Romo, a firm of professional lawyers, with a focus on federal, state and local employment and labor laws.

Handy is a former police chief and was an adjunct faculty member at the universities of Arizona and California.

Kannan is vice president of research and development at Grifols, a global biopharmaceutical company based in Los Angeles.

Lee works in family medicine and co-founded the Family Medicine Revolution, a popular social media brand.

Venture capital financing

Vibrato Medical, a medical device startup in Irvine, closed a $ 4 million Series A funding round led by Newport Beach-based Horowitz Group.

Vibrato also received a $ 1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

The money will support a clinical trial of the company’s non-invasive wearable device designed to treat patients with critical limb ischemia, peripheral artery disease, directly from their homes.

Vibrato’s technology is based on ultrasound research which has shown increased tissue perfusion and vessel growth. The company believes that the approval and commercialization of its device could reduce the costs of the current average annual treatment.

The 10th edition of the Getzlaf Golf Shootout, held on September 11 at the Monarch Beach Golf Links, raised $ 800,000 for CureDuchenne, a non-profit organization focused on finding a cure for muscular dystrophy by Duchenne. Seen here are Ryan Getzlaf, Jeff Frieden of F&F Capital and title sponsor, Zandy Davidson, Ryder Getzlaf and David Bradley.

Good work

The 10th edition of the Getzlaf Golf Shootout, held on September 11 at the Monarch Beach Golf Links, raised $ 800,000 for CureDuchenne, a non-profit organization focused on finding a cure for muscular dystrophy by Duchenne.

The event, hosted by Anaheim Ducks captain Paige and Ryan Getzlaf, included a golf tournament, awards reception and dinner.

Status Update is compiled from press releases from Editor Karen Levin and edited by Editor-in-Chief Samantha Gowen. Send high resolution articles and photos to [email protected] Allow at least a week for publication. Elements are edited for length and clarity.


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Non profit living

Colleges expand mental health services for students


The COVID-19 pandemic has created an increased need for mental health services in colleges as students grapple with the social and economic consequences of closed campuses, online learning, and in some cases, loss of life. illness or death of their loved ones. Now, as most institutions return to more normal in-person operations, they are relying on telehealth mental health services to provide assistance to students, whether on campus or off campus.

“We have seen that many schools are focusing more on their services and making sure that they offer a health and wellness offering such as telehealth and teletherapy,” said Seli Fakorzi, director of health operations. mental health at TimelyMD, a telehealth provider. “Campuses are now wondering if they are offering enough services that offer virtual and in-person support. “

In June 2020, TimelyMD found that 85% of students reported experiencing increased stress and anxiety due to the pandemic and uncertainty about continuing with their education. Another survey from the Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement found that 53% of freshmen reported a substantial increase in mental and emotional exhaustion. Due to the increased need for services, institutions are strengthening their mental health resources for the fall semester. And given the wide range of student needs and living and learning situations – on-campus, off-campus, in-person, remote, hybrid – many institutions are using technology in innovative ways to deliver advisory services. and support to all who seek them.

T. Anne Hawkins, director of the Carruth Center for Counseling and Psychological Services at the University of West Virginia, said she and her team recognize they need to do something “outside the box” for the next semester. fall. So they established a one-year partnership with Talkspace, an online platform and app that connects students with licensed therapists. Students can send text, audio, photo and video messages to their therapist anytime, as well as schedule live video sessions. Hawkins said the partnership is especially helpful for out-of-state students because of telehealth licensing laws. As of the semester started on Aug. 18, 178 students have signed up for the app, Hawkins said.

“We know some of our students haven’t returned and are out of state or elsewhere in the state navigating virtual learning,” Hawkins said. “Our goal is really to increase mental health services to support students and help them manage the events of the pandemic and get back to in-person learning.”

She added that the university has a “large menu” of mental health resources, both in person and virtually. In addition to seeing counselors on campus during office hours, WVU students have 24/7 access to the Crisis Text Line, a mental health service where they can text a trained counselor. live that responds to messages privately. Students can text the counselor, who asks questions, empathizes, and actively listens. ProtoCall is another mental health service that students can call for crisis intervention and stabilization, as well as for referrals for network providers and other resources.

Such programs hold great promise in helping students. Studies have shown that teletherapy can be just as effective as face-to-face therapy in treating post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety, as one researcher said. The New York Times. Even before the pandemic, researchers from the Milbank Memorial Fund, a nonprofit health foundation, drew similar conclusions, also pointing out that behavioral telehealth can cost less than in-person visits and affect more people as well.

“What we’ve seen is that telehealth is essentially as effective as face-to-face psychotherapy – and retention rates are higher,” said David Mohr, director of the Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies at Feinberg. School of Medicine at Northwestern University. the American Psychological Association.

At Belmont University in Tennessee, Katherine Cornelius, director of counseling services, said students were torn between the need for in-person or virtual mental health services. In the first two weeks of classes, the institution saw a 60% increase in the number of counseling appointments compared to 2019, Cornelius said. His office has worked to increase access to mental health for non-traditional students, including graduate students or those in full-time employment.

“Over the past few years, we’ve really focused on improving access to care and reducing barriers,” Cornelius said. “Telehealth has been a huge benefit for this. Students don’t have to go to campus, and we’ve seen that a lot of students are really concerned about their health, so they really feel more comfortable doing virtual tours.

Before the onset of the pandemic, Belmont purchased Therapy Assistance Online, a virtual self-help platform that offers self-guided tools, educational and interactive modules, reviews, and progress tracking tools, to which all students , teachers and Belmont staff have free access. This fall, the school also purchased TimelyCare from Timely MD, which provides free virtual physical and mental health support and is available 24/7 to all students at Belmont, Cornelius said.

“Student life doesn’t end at 4:30 pm when our office is closed. A lot of them are just getting started, ”Cornelius said. “So TimelyCare kind of fills the gap after working hours. “

At the University of Virginia, Nicole Ruzek, director of counseling and psychology services, said students were grappling with issues beyond the pandemic. Many have felt the impact of racial injustice following the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, among others, at the hands of police, as well as the anxiety over the climate crisis and the 2020 presidential election. which divides. She said students seemed to like in-person and virtual counseling, so her department offers hybrid options. In 2018, the university contracted with SilverCloud, a virtual mental health platform that focuses on digital therapy, to give students access to informational videos, mental health quizzes and interactive tools.

In addition, the university signed a contract with TimelyMD “to continue to meet this demand for service,” said Ruzek. The contract allows students to have 24/7 virtual access to individual counseling, psychiatric services and on-demand support with a healthcare professional.

“Some students really appreciate having telehealth as an option. It can be much more convenient if they don’t want to travel, ”said Ruzek. “Having that option to be able to engage with a mental health provider, through a remote service, I think it’s really helpful. Then there are other students who really want to be seen in person.

Cooper Union, a private college in New York where the majority of students commute, has had to develop mental health resources that meet with students while they are on campus and when they are at home, said Chris Chamberlin , dean of students.

“We are small and we are trying to capitalize on our geography and all the resources that are available to us here in New York and in our neighborhood to provide students with significant access to care,” Chamberlin said.

In partnership with TimelyMD, Cooper Union created Cooper Care, an online app and platform that gives students 24/7 access to virtual healthcare providers. Chamberlin said that using Cooper Care with the institution’s own counseling program created “maximum flexibility” for students to meet their needs. He added that students are encouraged during Welcome Week to download and configure the Cooper Care app so that in the event of a crisis, they can immediately access help.

And it’s not difficult to engage students in telehealth resources if campuses standardize their use, said Fakorzi of TimelyMD. 24-hour services like TimelyCare can connect students with help during late hours and early when in-person care is not available in a crisis.

“If the problems boil over at 4 am I think it’s definitely a benefit for campuses to have a backup program to say, ‘Hey, this is also a place you can get help. “” said Fakorzi. “But it also gives the campus the security of knowing the help is there.”

There is always a stigma around helping with mental health, said Cornelius, of Belmont. Some students are concerned about confidentiality, while others come from backgrounds where mental health treatment is not the norm. And there is greater stigma against students struggling with mental health issues other than depression and anxiety, she said, including bipolar disorder and trauma.

Ruzek of the University of Virginia said the shift to more virtual mental health resources has opened up access for students from families or cultural backgrounds who do not typically seek mental health help.

“They don’t even have to come through our doors anymore,” Ruzek said. “They can connect with us electronically and we can put them in touch with the right resource without their parents knowing, if they don’t want their families to know, or even without their peers knowing if they are. are in a private location. “

Chamberlin agreed, saying the switch to telehealth “created access in a way that did not exist before”, when many mental health resources were confined to a certain time and place on campus. .

“More and more students are engaging in our virtual programming, whether it’s seeing a therapist remotely or attending a workshop they normally couldn’t do,” Chamberlin said. “I also think we’ve continued to do a number of things virtually that we could have done in person, because we also know that people learn differently and engage differently.”


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Reuters Global News Summary | Politics


Here is a summary of the news in the world.

Taiwan threatens to take China to WTO in new fruit dispute

Taiwan on Sunday threatened to bring China to the World Trade Organization after Beijing said it would suspend imports of sugar apples and wax apples from the island due to pest concerns, during the last quarrel between the two over the fruit. Relations between Taipei and Beijing, which claim democratically ruled Taiwan as its own territory, are at their lowest in decades, with China increasing political and military pressure for the island to accept its sovereignty.

Explanation – The Canadian Federal Election: What Happened and What Are the Stakes

Canadians go to the polls on Monday in an election that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called two years earlier, seeking to turn public approval for his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic into a new four-year term . WHY NOW?

Stored COVID vaccines must be handed over to poorest countries, says former UK prime minister

A vaccine summit hosted by US President Joe Biden this week is expected to come up with a plan to transfer 100 million stored COVID-19 vaccines to poorer countries before they reach their expiration date, said the former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown. Biden is due to convene a virtual COVID-19 summit on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly on Wednesday, aimed at boosting vaccinations around the world with the aim of ending the pandemic by the end of 2022.

World leaders return to UN with focus on pandemic and climate

World leaders return to the United Nations in New York this week with a focus on stepping up efforts to tackle both climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic, which forced them last year to send video statements for the annual gathering. As the coronavirus still rages amid an unfair vaccine rollout, about a third of the 193 UN states plan to send videos again, but presidents, prime ministers and foreign ministers of others are expected get to the United States.

Canadian Trudeau hammers his rival on COVID-19 position on the last day of the campaign

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, crisscrossing the country to deliver a final speech to voters ahead of Monday’s election, said on Sunday that only his Liberals can end the COVID-19 pandemic and accused his main rival of adopting the wrong approach. Opinion polls indicate that the political advantage is with Trudeau, who is stepping up attacks on Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole over the pandemic. Trudeau supports vaccination mandates against O’Toole, who prefers testing to control the public health crisis.

Russia’s ruling pro-Putin party wins majority after crackdown but loses ground

Russia’s ruling party United Russia, which backs President Vladimir Putin, has retained its majority in parliament after three days of elections and a widespread crackdown on critics, despite losing about a fifth of its support, have showed partial results Monday. With 33% of the ballots counted, the Central Election Commission said United Russia won just over 45% of the vote, with its closest rival the Communist Party at around 22%.

Australia defends cancellation of French submarine deal, Macron and Biden discuss

Australia defended on Sunday its decision to drop a multibillion-dollar order for French submarines and opt instead for an alternative deal with the United States and Britain, saying it had signaled its concerns in Paris months ago. Canberra’s move angered Paris, sparking an unprecedented diplomatic crisis that analysts say could cause lasting damage to US alliances with France and Europe. It has also annoyed China, the main rising power in the Indo-Pacific region.

Netanyahu suggests on Facebook that Biden fell asleep upon meeting new Israeli PM

Former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu suggested in a video posted to Facebook on Sunday that US President Joe Biden fell asleep when he met with new Israeli leader Naftali Bennett last month. A Reuters fact check https://www.reuters.com/article/factcheck-biden-asleep-idUSL1N2Q00H8 previously debunked the idea that Biden dozed off, after social media users shared a video clip of the US President who they said showed him looking down and falling asleep while Bennett spoke in the Oval Office.

Syrian military leader pays rare visit to Jordan to discuss border security

The Syrian Defense Minister visited Jordan on Sunday to discuss stability at their mutual border, the first such meeting since the Syrian conflict erupted ten years ago when the two neighbors backed opposing factions , officials said. The meeting follows a major military offensive to retake the last rebel stronghold in southern Syria, and after reestablishing control this month over Daraa, a town south of Damascus, as part of a deal brokered by Russia that prevented a full Iranian-led military assault. army units.

France cancels defense meeting with UK over submarine dispute, sources say

France canceled a meeting between Armies Minister Florence Parly and her British counterpart scheduled for this week after Australia canceled a submarine order with Paris in favor of a deal with Washington and London, two sources said. close to the file. Parly personally made the decision to drop the bilateral meeting with British Defense Secretary Ben Wallace, the sources said.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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What are vector-borne diseases? Here are the symptoms, the story in numbers


As Kerala witnesses a third outbreak of the Nipah virus, Uttar Pradesh is plagued by a mysterious dengue-type fever that has killed at least 100 people, mostly children, in recent weeks.

Mumbai is also seeing an increase in dengue cases compared to last year: 129 in 2020 to 138 in the last eight months of 2021. As for malaria, 3,338 cases have been reported in the financial capital so far. to August 29 of this year. As new cases of dengue and malaria increase amid the Covid-19 pandemic, here’s a look at the top mosquito-borne diseases in numbers.

What are vector-borne diseases? Human diseases caused by parasites, viruses and bacteria transmitted by vectors, according to the World Health Organization. These diseases account for over 17% of all infectious diseases, causing more than seven lakhs of deaths worldwide each year.

Many of these vectors are blood-sucking insects, which take up pathogenic microorganisms during a blood meal from an infected host (human or animal) and later transmit it to a new host. When a vector becomes infectious, it is able to transmit the pathogen for the rest of its life with each subsequent bite / blood meal.

Mosquitoes are just one type of vectors, which cause diseases such as malaria, dengue chikungunya, etc. ), sand flies (sand flies), ticks (Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever), triatomines (Chagas disease) and tsetse (sleeping sickness).

graphic

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Syrian opposition calls for renewed focus on political solution


The leader of the Coalition of Syrian Revolutionary and Opposition Forces (SMDK), Salim al-Muslat, on Saturday criticized the international community for focusing only on humanitarian issues and not showing the necessary interest in the political solution process in Syria, which has not progressed.

Al-Muslat, who was elected as chairman of the SMDK at the ordinary general assembly held in Istanbul on July 12, spoke to the Anadolu Agency (AA) about the issues surrounding the work the Constitutional Committee is trying to accomplish, SMDK efforts for the political process, the latest situation in Idlib, the visit of Bashar Assad to Russia and the return of the Syrians to their country.

Regarding the work of the Syrian Constitutional Committee, which has met five times since October 30, 2019, in Geneva, Switzerland, as part of the political solution process, al-Muslat said the talks ended in failure. because of the uncompromising attitude. and the frivolity of the Assad regime.

Noting that they met with the United Nations envoy for Syria, Geir Pedersen, in Istanbul on September 14, al-Muslat said: “Pedersen has not yet announced a date for the new round of Constitutional Committee talks. and we’ll wait and see what it’ll do. “

Al-Muslat drew attention to the fact that the drafting of the constitution has not yet started, although it has been almost two years since the start of constitutional studies. “No progress can be made because of the regime’s delays. International delegations and Pedersen must act more seriously on this issue,” he said. “The international community has focused on humanitarian issues rather than on the political solution that the Syrian people need.

He stressed that the international community should stand by the side of the Syrian people, adding that the activities of the WDKD contribute to the process of political solution.

“In this process, we have had meetings with many international organizations. As SMDK, we have visited many circles related to the Syrian question. In fact, we met Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlüt ÇavuÅŸoÄŸlu ago a few days (September 9). In addition, we had meetings with officials from other countries, “he said.

Stressing that they attach great importance to a political solution to the civil war which has been going on since March 2011, al-Muslat said: “We will have a visit to New York in the coming days before the sessions of the General Assembly of United Nations. have meetings with UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres and officials from other countries. Our pain is great and there is no more room for compliments. We have to move forward in the political process, which is a strategic choice for us. We are seeing a recession in the countries that must act and take responsibility, we do not want to accomplish something and go back. “

Stating that they are still engaged in talks on Syrian territory, al-Muslat said: “Although our headquarters are abroad, we also have centers in Syria. We want to be partners in decision-making. . This means that we meet people intensively, listening to them and working to end their suffering. “

Turkey’s support

Al-Muslat said SMDK institutions go to great lengths to meet the needs of civilians in Syria – in areas under opposition control.

Emphasizing that the Syrian interim government is doing everything in its power to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, al-Muslat said: “Brother Turkey has never denied us its support. The burden has grown heavy. Turkey has always supported us in the field of education, health and safety. “

Referring to the Syrians in Turkey, al-Muslat said: “Since the beginning of the revolution, the words we have heard from our Turkish brothers and their honorable position… have never changed.

Stressing that everyone is in favor of voluntary return to the country, al-Muslat said: “All Syrians want to return to their country if a safe environment is maintained in Syria. No one comes back to die or be detained. We must obey the laws in the countries where we are. We must obey the rules of settlement and not act against them, and no one will harm those who obey them.

Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, Turkey has supported moderate opposition groups against the Assad regime and has opened its doors to those who had to flee the country for their lives.

Today, Turkey hosts nearly 3.8 million Syrian migrants, more than any other country in the world. The country is also leading humanitarian aid efforts for Syrians in Turkey and in opposition-controlled areas in northern Syria.

“Russia has no respect for the agreements”

Referring to the situation in Idlib, al-Muslat noted that the Assad regime and its supporter Russia continue to violate the ceasefire agreement reached in March 2020.

“There is an agreement between Turkey and Russia in Idlib. However, for months we have been witnessing violations by Russia and the regime by targeting civilians. Russia does not respect any agreement. It is a sensitive subject. There are violations every day. , but the components of the National Army are ready and on alert, ”he said.

In the report released by the Syrian Network for Human Rights (SNHR) on September 9, he reported that the regime and Russia have launched intense attacks against southern Idlib since June 5. It was reported that a total of 61 civilians, including 33 children and 12 women, were killed in the bombings by Russian forces and the regime from June 5 to September 1.

Regarding the visit of Bashar Assad, the head of the regime in Syria, in Moscow on September 14, al-Muslat said: “The problems that we went through are because of Russia, Iran and the regime. We don’t know the content. of the visit, but maybe there is something on the horizon because there are talks between the United States and Russia in Geneva. We can’t predict anything, we have to see some things.


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For Latinx Heritage Month, Celebrate Our “Achievements and Moments of Joy”


Vice-Chancellor for Equity and Inclusion Dania Matos sent the following message to the campus community on Friday:

Each year we celebrate National Latinx Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15. The past twelve months have been particularly difficult for many Latinx communities, but there have also been wonderful accomplishments and times of joy.

Dania Matos is the new Equity and Inclusion Manager at UC Berkeley. (Photo courtesy of Dania Matos)

For those I haven’t met yet, I’m Dania Matos, the new Vice-Chancellor for Equity and Inclusion. I recently came from UC Merced where I was the first Associate Chancellor and Director of Diversity. I have a background in law, racial justice and intersectionality and look forward to working with you to increase inclusion, belonging and justice on our campus.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionate effect on Latinx communities across the country, resulting in greater impacts on our health, finances, and well-being. In fact, a recent survey by UC Berkeley’s Institute of Governmental Studies, led by co-directors G. Cristina Mora and Eric Schickler, found that people in Latin American and Native American communities were less confident about their finances and of their health problems than other groups. And our UC alumnus and faculty member Dr David Hayes-Bautista recently released a report with UCLA’s Center for the Study of Latin American Health and Culture that explores the number of Disproportionate deaths for communities of color, especially for the elderly in Pacific Island communities and Latinx.

The strength of Latinx communities is demonstrated from the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, to student activism on campus. UC Berkeley students have a long history of organizing space on campus: from the creation of the César E. Chávez Student Center to the creation of the Multicultural Community Center in the Martin Luther King Jr. building. continues and students have worked hard to establish a new Latinx Student Resource Center (LSRC) which will open in early 2022. The “phase 1” space of the LSRC will be located at Hearst Gym and will be managed by the office Development Center for Chicanx / Latinx Students. , directed by director Lupe Gallegos-Diaz. Students will co-create programs and create a familia y comunidad that increases their sense of belonging to UC Berkeley.

UC Berkeley is committed to becoming an Institution Serving Hispanics (HSI) by 2027. The HSI Initiative is UC Berkeley’s plan to increase the number of Latinx students and create sentiment membership where Chicanx / Latinx students can flourish academically, personally and professionally. Campus speakers, led by Co-Chairs Dr Oscar Dubón and Dr Kris Gutierrez, completed the HSI Working Group Preliminary Report in Spring 2021. The university is delighted to announce that our new Fall 2021 class is again exceptionally diverse and brings us closer to our HSI goals. The university increased the number of admitted students from underrepresented communities in higher education, including Chicanx / Latinx students, by almost 7% from fall 2020. We welcomed our newcomers. students with the shared book for new freshmen and transfer students, The Undocumented Americans, by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio. The author gave a talk at Golden Bear Orientation last month and more book programming is planned for this fall.

Increasing the number of Latinx professors at Berkeley is also an institutional priority and will be a key component in becoming an HSI. The university has adopted the strategy of “recruiting faculty clusters” as a means of creating intellectual communities and diversifying the faculty. The Latinx Communities and Democracy cluster will begin the recruitment process this academic year 2021-22.

Research by and on Latinx communities continues to thrive in Cal. The Latinx Research Center continued to host important programs throughout the pandemic year, including “Decolonizing Epistemologies: A Conversation with Latinx Philosophers” and a new podcast by poet Alán Pelaez Lopez titled “What’s In a Name? Where they explore the term “Latinx”. The Latinxs and Environment Initiative provides students with research opportunities focused on issues of climate change and environmental justice. Representatives recently attended the Second Annual Agriculture and Technology Conference in Stockton, Calif., Hosted by the Environmental Justice Coalition for Water, led by Cal’s former student Esperanza Vielma.

We are delighted to announce that we have ten UC Berkeley Award winners who have received the Northern California Chicana Latina Foundation Fellowship. The organization’s mission is to empower Chicanas and Latinas through personal, educational and professional advancement.

To help commemorate the important role that the students, faculty, and staff of Chicanx and Latinx have played on this campus, the Department of Ethnic Studies, the Chicanx Latinx Student Development Center, and the premier learning program cycle have teamed up to launch the Legacy Timeline project. This project researches and documents the role and history of the Chicanx and Latinx community on the UC Berkeley campus. For more information, please contact Lillian Castillo Speed ​​or Lupe Gallegos-Diaz.

Please join me in welcoming the California Alumni Association (CAA) to its new president, Alfonso Salazar. Alfonso is a UC Berkeley ’90 alumnus who was a student activist in organizations such as MEChA and United Students of Color. He is committed to working with student leaders and continuing to diversify the leadership of CAA. To continue building a pipeline of Latinx leaders across the system, the Chicanx Latinx Advisory Board will host the Chicanx Latinx Leadership Summit on Monday, September 20. Chancellor Juan Sánchez Muñoz of UC Merced will introduce President Drake, who will speak with Moderator Stephanie Reyes-Tuccio, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Educational Partnerships at UC Irvine.

UC Chicanx Latinx Alumni Association, the new collective organization for UC’s ten campuses, was recently recognized by UC President Michael V. Drake, MD, as the “first” group of alumni. system-wide in over 150 years of UC history! The group’s mission is to advocate and represent the collective interests of Latinx alumni on UC’s ten campuses to the Office of the President of the University of California. And our current UCB Chicanx Latinx Alumni Association (UCB CLAA) is gearing up for its Homecoming event on October 2, which will feature a speaker, scholarship ceremony, and alumni class reunions.

Alumni are also kicking off the Legacy 2022 event which will feature three days of alumni celebrations, networking and campus engagement.

We invite you to learn more about Latinx Heritage Month here at UC Berkeley and to read, listen, learn, participate and engage with the many communities and activities highlighted this month.


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Chinese military epidemiologist worked with licensed scientist at Canada’s best disease lab: report


Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory | Twitter | @AnonHeel

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New Delhi: Chinese military senior epidemiologist Major-General Chen Wei, who co-developed a single-injection Covid vaccine, had collaborated on Ebola research with a scientist who was later fired from a high-security lab in Canada, a new report found.

According to the Canadian daily The Globe and Mail, Major-General Chen had worked with Dr. Xiangguo Qiu, a former scientist at Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) in Winnipeg, on two scientific papers on Ebola, published in 2016 and 2020. NML is the only laboratory in level 4 in Canada, which researches the world’s deadliest diseases.

The report, released Thursday, noted that the identity of the Chinese major-general was withheld and that instead of revealing her ties to the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), she was identified as simply “Wei Chen,” a doctoral epidemiologist who had previously worked at the Beijing Biotechnology Institute.

However, The Globe and Mail confirmed that Wei Chen and Major General Chen are the same person.

The Chinese military scientist was also recently congratulated by President Xi Jinping for her contribution to the development of CanSino’s single-injection Covid vaccine.

Meanwhile, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada, the country’s leading federal health organization, the NML did not have institutional arrangements with the LPA.

“Although the NML does not have institutional agreements with the Chinese military, Canadian scientists have collaborated with Chinese scientists to contribute to the global public health fight against deadly diseases, such as Ebola. These collaborations have produced candidate vaccines and treatments for diseases, as peer-reviewed journals show, ”said PHAC spokesperson Anne Génier. The Globe and Mail.

However, PHAC declined to release information as to whether Major-General Chen had ever visited the Winnipeg lab, citing privacy laws.

Several opposition leaders also slammed the government of Justin Trudeau for allegedly “withholding” information about the Chinese scientist and her links to the NML.


Read also : World Bank Suspends Doing Business Report After Investigation Uncovers Changed Data In Favor Of China


Dr Qiu’s dismissal

Major-General Chen’s connection to Dr Qiu was first brought to light by journalist Elaine Dewar, in her new book On the origin of the deadliest pandemic in 100 years: an investigation.

Dr Qiu and her husband, Keding Chang, were fired from their positions at NML in January. However, the reasons for their dismissal have not been officially disclosed.

Their security clearances, including some of Dr. Qiu’s students in the lab, were revoked in July 2019 – four months after the NML shipped the Ebola and Henipah viruses to the Wuhan Institute of Virology in China.

The same month, investigation was also launched by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to find out whether the two laid-off scientists had passed the intellectual property over to China, including the Wuhan Institute of Virology, according to The Globe and Mail.

This series of events has evolved into Canada’s “Winnipeg-lab conspiracy theory”, which points to an alleged link between the Covid-19 pandemic and the 2019 shipment of samples to China.

However, this theory was rejected by Dewar. “This particular conspiracy theory is nonsense, and there is absolutely no evidence to support it,” she said. Recount CBS News.

But the author commented on the cooperation between the two countries. “The cooperation raises questions about what kind of collaborations the sensitive government lab should undertake.”

“When you involve military scientists, it becomes a bigger question because it can be militarized,” she added.

Meanwhile, Gary Kobinger, an infectious disease specialist who worked with Dr Qiu until 2016 and shared an award with her, called Qiu a “very ethical person.”


Read also : Senior US general called on China over fears Trump would order military strike, new book says


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Why the news media is in crisis and how to fix it

India is all the more in need of free, fair, uninhibited and questioning journalism as it is facing multiple crises.

But the news media are in a crisis of their own. There have been brutal layoffs and pay cuts. The best of journalism is shrinking, giving in to crass spectacle in prime time.

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Local files | News, Sports, Jobs


Lt. Darryl Ng, Civil Air Patrol Commander of the Maui County Composite Squadron, will be the guest speaker at the Lahaina Sunset Rotary Club Virtual Reunion at 5:30 p.m. on September 21.

For more than 50 years, the 57th Maui County Composite Squadron has served the community, responding to Hurricane Iniki and famous Eddie Aikau research, according to a press release. Ng will share history and information about the squadron as well as its main mission and programs in Maui.

Club members and guests are welcome to attend the meeting via Zoom. To receive a meeting link, contact Joanne Laird at [email protected]

*****

Pizza Charity founder to speak to Rotarians

The Rotary Club of Kihei-Wailea will welcome Jonathan Yudis as a guest speaker at its virtual meeting on Wednesday at noon.

Yudis is the founder of the “Charity Pizza in Maui” community service project, which provides hot meals to homeless people in Maui.

The Zoom room will open at 11:30 am for communion. The Zoom meeting ID is 829 1334 8817; the access code is 081120.

For more information, contact Allan Weiland at [email protected]

*****

Shelter to host an adoption event

The Maui Humane Society will be hosting an adoption event from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on September 18.

No appointment is necessary and there is no adoption fee. Prospective pet parents can participate in the Maui Humane Society’s 10-day Paws to Adopt trial program.

In addition to the animals that await their homes forever, there will be food trucks and live entertainment at the event. Social distancing and masks are mandatory.

For more information, visit www.mauihumanesociety.org.

*****

Bezos donates to Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity Maui received a personal donation from Jeff Bezos, Founder and Executive Chairman of Amazon.

“We are incredibly grateful for the support of Mr. Bezos”, said Sherri Dodson, executive director of the association. “We are in the process of expanding our home security repair and modification program for low income kupunas and / or homeowners with disabilities, so this donation could not have come at a better time. Sadly, so many of our low income seniors live in unsanitary conditions and just need a helping hand. This donation will help us build our capacities and allow us to continue our mission. Everyone deserves a safe and decent place to live.

*****

Children’s advocacy group receives donation

The Friends of the Children’s Justice Center of Maui received a personal donation from Amazon Founder and Executive Chairman Jeff Bezos.

“This donation comes at a crucial time for us due to the overwhelming increase in service requests we have received during the COVID pandemic, as well as the broader needs we have seen in the community,” said Paul Tonnessen, executive director of the Friends of the Maui Children’s Justice Center.

The nonprofit organization provides assistance to abused and neglected children, promotes the prevention of child abuse and neglect, and supports the Maui Children’s Justice Center, which is part of the State Judiciary. Hawaii.

For more information about the Friends of the Maui Children’s Justice Center, contact Tonnessen at 986-8634 or visit mauicjc.org.

*****

Bezos donates to boys and girls clubs

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Maui is one of many local nonprofits that have received a personal donation from Jeff Bezos, founder and executive chairman of Amazon.

“We want to send a huge mahalo to Mr. Bezos and his team for his support and for recognizing the incredible value that Maui’s nonprofits provide,” said Kelly Maluo-Pearson, CEO of Boys & Girls Clubs of Maui.

The nonprofit said it would use the donation to continue providing its evidence-based programs that help young people learn, develop social skills, express themselves creatively and participate in events. sports.

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Non profit living

Study: Food insecurity and poverty rate increased for Colorado children during pandemic


Referrals to early intervention services, which help young children from birth to 3 years old with developmental skills like speech therapy, also dropped dramatically in the first few weeks of the pandemic, dropping 63% over the course of the pandemic. during the first two weeks of March 2020.

That’s because primary care physicians, who make about a third of all referrals for such support, stopped doing good health checks on children at the start of the pandemic.

Providers aim to provide children with early intervention services in their ‘natural environment’, be it home or childcare – with the aim of making them function at the same level as their peers. said Christy Scott, director of the early intervention program at Colorado’s Office of Early Childhood. “And if we don’t get the early intervention they need, then we might see the ramifications when they get into kindergarten, special education, or even kindergarten.”

Scott said there has been an increase in referrals recently, and advocates for child care are hoping that trend continues.

Household income has fallen and food insecurity has increased

Almost half of households with children have reported loss of employment income since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. At the beginning of March 2021, a third declared having difficulty paying the usual household expenses.

Meanwhile, about 10 percent of Colorado households with children reported not having enough food to eat over the past week.

Black and Latino families have suffered disproportionately, reporting more food and rental insecurity – and more job losses – than white families.

“They entered the pandemic with higher rates of child poverty, higher proportions of children without health insurance, limited access to high quality child care, and kindergarten to grade 12 education.” , Manoatl said. “During the pandemic, they were hit harder than other households (economically)… it’s kind of like an aggravated effect.”


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History organization

The relationship between race and well-being has never been so pressing | At the Smithsonian


This summer, Simone Biles, widely regarded as the greatest female gymnast of all time, shocked the sports world by retiring from the majority of her events at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. Citing her struggles with “twisties,” a mental block that makes gravity-defying gymnastics movements incredibly dangerous, the 24-year-old has received widespread praise for putting his health first.

Biles later said she took inspiration from Naomi Osaka, the 23-year-old tennis star who retired from Roland Garros and Wimbledon in order to prioritize her mental health. The two women, both black athletes at the peak of their sport, are part of a growing wave of black individuals “publicly [taking] their sanity in their hands in a way never seen before in elite sports, ”as NBC News reported.

Lonnie Bunch, secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, says the example set by Biles, Osaka and others has brought the issue of “mental health through the lens of race” to the fore. This topic, along with the broader relationship between race and well-being, looks particularly timely in 2021, as the United States continues to contend with systemic racism and a pandemic that disproportionately affects people of color.

“Part of the fight for equity in America is the fight for equitable health care and access to mental health care,” Bunch said.

Race, welfare and wealth will feature prominently in an upcoming forum hosted by the Smithsonian’s Our Shared Future: Reckoning With Our Racial Past initiative. Scheduled for Thursday, August 26 at 7 p.m. EST, the virtually broadcast summit will put Smithsonian academics in conversation with authors, experts and activists. Planned programming includes sessions on the history and impact of race, the link between health and wealth, the role of race in mental health and trauma, and local organizations striving to reinvent a better future.

The Smithsonian announced its Reckoning With Our Racial Past initiative last summer, following the murder of George Floyd and the outbreak of widespread protests against police brutality. Funded with a $ 25 million donation from Bank of America, the goal of the campaign is to “confront race and highlight racism and social justice from a historical perspective,” Ariana said. Curtis, director of content for the initiative. Reckoning With Our Racial Past also seeks to emphasize the relevance of its topic today and to offer ideas on how to move forward as a nation.

The Smithsonian announced the initiative last June, in the wake of George Floyd’s murder and widespread protests against systemic racism.

(Photo by Tasos Katopodis / Getty Images)

In addition to virtual and live events, the multi-year initiative will include town halls, digital resources, educational tools, immersive pop-up experiences, storytelling projects, fundraising efforts and more. This week’s event will be the first of three national forums.

“When I became a secretary [in 2019], what was important for me was to recognize that the Smithsonian had a contemporary resonance, that it had an opportunity, really a responsibility, to have value, to say basically: we are going to help the public by giving him tools to grapple with everyday life, from the challenge of climate change to race issues, ”says Bunch.

He adds: “When a nation is in crisis, its institutions must be strengthened. And clearly, this country is in crisis.

The Smithsonian’s collections and researchers represent a wealth of expertise, and its status as a beloved 175-year-old American institution means it is uniquely positioned to bring together people of different backgrounds and experiences.

“Our network includes other museums and cultural centers in the United States of varying sizes and missions, as well as community organizations, academics and activists,” says Curtis. “We are certainly not assuming that the Smithsonian is the first organization to think about these [questions of race,] but thinking of the power we have as a trusted institution to bring these [issues] to a larger and larger audience is really important.

The secretary envisioned the project as a way for the Smithsonian to “do what we do best”: namely, to make complicated subjects accessible to the public, provide a historical and cultural context that illuminates the present, and forge links between people who could not otherwise interact. . With the funded initiative, the Smithsonian could shed “some light” on a moment “fraught with misinformation, hatred and partisanship.”

The team responsible for developing the initiative focused its efforts on six thematic pillars: running and well-being; race and wealth; race and location; race, politics and ethics; race beyond the United States; and race, arts and aesthetics. All of these topics tie in with ongoing Institution-wide work of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center’s Care Package, an online exhibit of creative offerings released at the height of the pandemic, when the crimes of Anti-Asian hatred was in the news across the nation — on the NMAAHC’s Talking About Race portal.

“The term ‘systemic racism’ can seem unwieldy and overwhelming,” explains Curtis, “and so we wanted to think about how to make it knowable? How to make it understandable? How do you make it feel changeable? “

She adds that she wants the forums to give the public a sense of optimism: “We want people to think about a way forward. “

Covid-19 test

The Covid-19 pandemic has taken a disproportionate toll on people of color.

(Governor Tom Wolf via Flickr under CC BY 2.0)

The ongoing pandemic influenced the decision of the organizers to center the initiative’s first forum on race, welfare and wealth. But this week’s event doesn’t just focus on Covid-19. One session will discuss the development of race as a social construct and the lingering consequences of unsubstantiated claims that race is based on biological differences. “[This is] a time when people are trying to go beyond race as an identity and really want to question how race works, what race means, what role race and racism have in our lives today ”, Curtis explains.

Joi Lewis, founder of the Healing Justice Foundation; Monique Morris, President and CEO of Grantmakers for Girls of Color; and Diana Chao, Founder and Executive Director of Letters to Strangers, will lead a separate discussion on mental health and trauma, a topic explicitly linked to public statements made by Biles, Osaka and other black athletes.

“This particular conversation is intergenerational,” Curtis explains. “Younger generations of black women speak openly about their mental health in ways that would not have seemed acceptable or permitted to previous generations. Opening this conversation in public spaces is really important.

To ensure the initiative reaches a large part of the country, the Smithsonian is working with local partners, including cultural organizations, historically black colleges and universities, sports teams, and nonprofits. These groups will help organize pop-up events in cities across the United States, addressing issues through a local lens in recognition of the fact “that the race takes place differently in different places,” according to Bunch.

“It’s less about the Smithsonian saying we have the answers, and more about the Smithsonian as a facilitator,” he adds. “What I hope it will become [is] a driver of possibility, a driver of collaboration that… the Smithsonian can continue to do long after I’m no longer a secretary.

For Bunch, the initiative represents “an opportunity for the Smithsonian to demonstrate that it has value, not only as a place that looks back, but as a place that looks to the future.” He hopes this “will help a nation recognize that it has a common future even though race issues have always divided us.”

The initiative’s first forum, on the theme of race, well-being and wealth, will be held virtually on August 26 at 7 p.m. EST. Join Secretary Bunch and a panel of esteemed experts at oursharedfuture.si.edu.


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Canadian army

Defense Minister urged military to create controversial aid role in Vancouver: Documents – National


Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan called on the military to create a post possibly occupied by a reserve officer from his former unit who had been suspended from Vancouver Police for an inappropriate relationship with a subordinate, according to notes from recently published information.

Sajjan also wanted the military to upgrade the post less than two months after Major Greg McCullough was hired, as the minister wanted even more support in his Vancouver constituency, the notes say, although that request has not come true. .

The briefing note comes amid lingering questions about how and why McCullough found himself in the unique position before his dismissal last month following revelations about the complaint and the disciplinary action taken against him while he was sergeant in the Vancouver Police Department.

McCullough was hired to support Sajjan in March 2020 despite an external investigation that found him guilty in 2018 of two counts of misconduct for his relationship with Const. Nicole Chan, who later committed suicide in January 2019.

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READ MORE: Sajjan’s assistant had an inappropriate relationship, suspended while with Vancouver Police

It also follows opposition calls for Sajjan’s resignation for his handling of allegations of sexual misconduct involving senior military commanders. Global News first reported allegations against retired General Jonathan Vance in February – which he denies – and since then concerns about an “Old Boys Network” protecting top brass have sparked a military sexual misconduct record.

Defense experts have described the case as an institutional crisis for the military.

Vance was charged earlier in July with one count of obstructing justice. Military police brought the charge but turned the matter over to civilian court, citing the “limitations” of the military justice system.


Click to play the video: “Gén.  Jonathan Vance accused of obstructing justice '







General Jonathan Vance accused of obstructing justice


General Jonathan Vance charged with obstructing justice – July 15, 2021

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Sajjan’s office acknowledged that the Minister and McCullough knew each other as officers of the British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own) and that they both served concurrently with the Vancouver Police Department.

But he says the military was responsible for the process that led to McCullough’s hiring, and neither the minister nor his staff were aware of the complaint and disciplinary action taken against him while he was a sergeant. in the Vancouver Police Department.

READ MORE: Officer suspended for inappropriate relationship no longer working as Sajjan’s assistant

The Department of National Defense announced last month that McCullough was no longer working as Sajjan’s assistant, although he remains a member of the Canadian Army Reserve.

Prepared for Jonathan Vance, then Chief of the Defense Staff, dated May 6, 2020, the briefing note obtained by The Canadian Press through access to information does not mention McCullough’s name, but shows the minister personally led the charge for a new assistant in Vancouver.

While Sajjan at the time already had four military assistants in Ottawa, and the Defense Ministry says he has no record of such a post being created outside the capital, the memo reads: “The Minister has determined that additional full-time support is needed while in Vancouver.

He goes on to say that a “suitable candidate” was selected in March 2020 and was currently working with the minister, but that “based on the recent direction of the minister” Sajjan would need even more support and therefore the position should be reclassified from part-time to full-time role.

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Such an upgrade would have represented a significant pay rise for whoever held the post.

READ MORE: Sajjan censored by House of Commons for dealing with military sexual misconduct

The briefing note recommends that the post be reclassified and filled through an “open, fair and equitable” competition, although Defense Ministry spokesman Daniel Le Bouthillier said the reclassification no. had not taken place because such full-time positions only concern exceptional circumstances.

Sajjan spokesman Daniel Minden defended the creation of the post of military assistant in Vancouver, saying in an email: “In order to avoid the high costs of moving military personnel based in Ottawa to Vancouver, a post of military assistant Vancouver-based military assistant was created.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, Minister Sajjan spent part of the last year working remotely from his constituency of Vancouver, where this support was even greater. “

The pandemic is not mentioned in the briefing note.


Click to play video:







Military Ombudsman blames Ottawa for inaction on sexual misconduct


Military Ombudsman Blames Ottawa for Inaction on Sexual Misconduct – June 22, 2021

Le Bouthillier said the post remains vacant.

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“Military assistants from Ottawa travel to Vancouver as needed to perform these tasks,” he added in an email.

“The function is still required, but an updated feasibility and effectiveness analysis (after several months of COVID-19 restrictions) is underway by the Canadian Armed Forces to make a decision on how best to structure the office of the military assistant. “

Reached by phone Thursday, McCullough declined to comment, saying he had gotten into trouble for previously speaking to The Canadian Press and was not allowed to speak further.

“Minister Sajjan had nothing to do with my hiring process,” he said last month. “He needed a military assistant on the west coast because of the time he’s spending here, and that’s it. I have not spoken with Minister Sajjan about this process, and I serve the Canadian Armed Forces.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau insisted that Sajjan, who has been Canada’s only defense minister since the Liberals took office in late 2015, is the right person to lead the charge when it comes to change military culture and eradicate sexual misconduct and hatred.

© 2021 The Canadian Press


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Non profit living

Some residents oppose new plan to provide safe camping for homeless people in Los Angeles city parks – NBC Los Angeles


LA City Council is considering a plan that could separate parts of public parks for safe and secure camping sites for people who are homeless. And the news is not well received by locals.

Westchester Park and Mar Vista Park are two of the locations suggested in a feasibility study commissioned by LA City Councilor for District 11, Mike Bonin. Neighbors in Westchester point to picnic tables, ball fields and parking lots all cramped with tents that have grown exponentially during the COVID pandemic.

“No matter where they set up a safe campsite in Westchester Park, it’s going to affect us,” says Beth O’Rourke, director of youth sports for West Side rugby clubs. “We witnessed urinating in public, we saw excrement on the ground, around the field. The toilets are unusable for an adult and even less for a child.

The City of LA Parks and Recreation Department has been renovating the fields in recent weeks, but some residents say the tents lining the perimeter prove the priority is not on the kids using the park, but on the homeless people who abuse it.

“I don’t feel like they respect the fact that it belongs to everyone. Just for them, ”says Becca Prismantis, a Westchester resident who says she had to take her kids to nearby towns for their lacrosse teams.

Earlier this year, Bonin requested a feasibility study for an alternative to encampments and suggested part of Westchester Park and Mar Vista Park. NBC4 viewers shared photos showing campsites had invaded the softball fields.

“What we are proposing is to allow those who are here now to be in a certain section,” Bonin explained at a city council meeting in May. “Give them security, sanitation, services, install them in housing while restoring the rest of the park for general and public use. “

But some parents say the damage is done; teams have had to move to other parks, parents have had to leave their home neighborhoods to take their children to play – and all because they don’t feel safe in their own local park.

“I see things are taken care of, I see it’s just out of control,” says Prismantis.

But Stephanie Tatro says she has two young children whom she often brings to the park and feels very safe, even at night.

Tatro is a co-founder of the local Grass Roots Neighbors nonprofit and says she has gotten to know many of those who call Westchester Park home.

“I see a lot of uses happening in this park as well as the people who live here who are not housed and who are trying to take the next step in their lives and improve the circumstances,” Tatro says.

She believes the park is big enough for children and the homeless and denies any danger lurking nearby.

“I don’t see how the tents prevent access. Full access is available, ”she said.

But as the NBC4 I-Team first reported on May 20, crime is on the rise near parks and schools in Los Angeles where homeless settlements abound. NBC4 cameras caught brawls, weapons used to harass and threaten homeless people and angry parents over what they say is the city’s lack of interest in addressing the root causes of roaming.

Six days after the NBC4 report, Bonin lobbied city council to provide park space for homeless neighbors.

“I will gladly take all of these things off the table if people can come up with better solutions,” he told voters and colleagues at the May meeting.

Westchester parents say they have an idea.

“A different solution would be to send them or move them to a place that doesn’t take the kids away,” says O’Rourke. “It’s like homeless people are allowed to live here, but children are not allowed to play here.

The results of the feasibility study are expected in early August. Some residents argue that this will not be enough because the study does not take into account the community impact of such a plan, which they say would be a failure.


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History organization

Hackensack University Medical Center Foundation Welcomes New Trustees – Network News, Press Releases


July 20, 2021

From left to right: Stephen Martinez, Tom Evans and Tom Geisel. Not in the photo, Behnaz Baker.

Hackensack Meridian The Hackensack University Medical Center Foundation is pleased to announce the addition of Behnaz Baker, Thomas Evans, Stephen J. Martinez and Thomas X. Geisel to its Board of Trustees.

“These new directors are all great additions to our board,” said Clare Ward, Interim Executive Director, Hackensack University Medical Center Foundation and Vice President, Principal Giving, Hackensack Meridian Health Foundation. “Tom Evans and Stephen joined us at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic and immediately stepped up to help Hackensack University Medical Center through its most difficult time in its history. Behnaz joins us as the pandemic appears to be ending, but she has been involved in medical center-related child-related causes for several years and is eager to use her time and talents as Hackensack University Medical Center continues. its expansion and recognition as one of the best hospitals in the country. Tom Geisel’s extensive experience in regional and national organizations, combined with his leadership experience, involvement in many leading industry associations and passion for extending his expertise to business organizations and the local community make him a wonderful addition to our board of directors.

Baker is the CIO and Executive Director of Integration at Riverside Medical Group, which is part of Optumcare. As a member of the leadership team, she leads several divisions of the practice to execute Riverside’s vision and strategy to provide the best possible care to New Jersey residents through partnerships with internal and external stakeholders. through growth and acquisitions. In 2018, Baker was recognized as one of New Jersey’s “50 Best Business Women” by NJBIZ. She and her husband, Omar Baker, MD, established the Dr. Omar and Behnaz Baker Patient Assistance Fund at Hackensack Meridian Children’s Health at Joseph M. Sanzari Children’s Hospital to provide financial assistance to children and families. faced with chronic health problems. Additionally, she was a member of the Hackensack Meridian Health Children’s Hospital Advisory Committee for the past two years. Baker resides in Manhattan with her husband and three children.

Evans retired from PwC after a 38-year career where he helped develop the organization’s best leaders and teams at all levels. He began his career at PwC in 1977 as a Chartered Accountant in the firm’s insurance practice before joining the Leadership & Development team to launch his industry-specific training efforts where he quickly rose to prominence. through the ranks, eventually becoming the firm’s first Chief Learning Officer, followed by the Development Leader for PwC West businesses in Canada, Brazil and Mexico, as well as in other Latin American and Caribbean countries. He is a member of the Association of the US Army (AUSA), the Association for Talent Development (ATD) and the AICPA. He is also very active in his community and is deputy mayor and commissioner of revenue and finance in his hometown. Evans lives in Nutley.

Martinez is an architect at RSC Architects, a full-service architectural firm specializing in healthcare, education and municipal works. Previously, he worked in New York for Kohn Pedersen Fox, an international architectural firm specializing in skyscrapers in New York and Asia. Martinez is a registered architect in the state of New Jersey and a member of the American Institute of Architecture and the National Council of Architectural Registration Board. He received his BA from Lehigh University and his MA in Architecture from the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Recently married, Martinez lives in Ridgewood with his wife Burgess.

Geisel is President of Corporate Banking at Sterling National Bank, where he leads corporate banking strategic, innovation and execution activities. His responsibilities include strategic planning, mergers and acquisitions, capital allocation and overall execution of revenue generation. In addition, Geisel is a member of numerous committees of the bank, as well as a number of major professional societies in New York and New Jersey. He was named one of New Jersey’s “50 Most Influential People in Banking” by NJBIZ and his ideas have been featured in many leading media outlets.

To learn more about how you can support the Hackensack University Medical Center Foundation, please contact Clare Ward, Acting Executive Director, Hackensack University Medical Center Foundation, at [email protected] or visit hackensackumc.org/givenow.


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Non profit living

More Nursing Homes and Seniors’ Homes are Closing Their Doors Due to the Impact of COVID

The nursing home operated by Alaris Health on John F. Kennedy Boulevard in Guttenberg was old. Built long before there were concerns about isolating large numbers of residents to stop a virus that could spread like wildfire, it was small and could hold up to four people per room.

And now it’s closed.

The long-term coronavirus pandemic has claimed the lives of more than 7,800 long-term care residents in New Jersey.

It also had a big impact on nursing homes.

Since March 2020, three state care facilities have closed, according to state data, highlighting not only changes COVID has brought to standards of care, experts say, but also growing financial instability in the state. nationwide industry. In each of the previous two years before the deadly virus hit, there has been only one nursing home closure in New Jersey, according to the state Department of Health.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has put increased financial pressure on nursing homes and assisted living providers who already operate on very low margins,” said James McCracken, President and CEO LeadingAge New Jersey, the statewide association of nonprofit elderly care organizations.

Nationally, industry officials predict long-term care providers could lose $ 94 billion in the pandemic and warn that more than 1,800 facilities could eventually close their doors.

The closures in New Jersey, meanwhile, also suggest that the financial pressures felt by long-term care facilities due to COVID may have made nonprofits such as those represented by LeadingAge particularly vulnerable.

Medicaid, a joint federal and state program that helps pay nursing home fees, serves as a safety net for people with limited incomes and resources. But the reimbursement rate in New Jersey remains far too low, critics lament. At the same time, not all for-profit nursing homes will accept Medicaid or may limit the services and beds provided to Medicaid patients, unlike nonprofit organizations.

“Faith-based and mission-oriented organizations are particularly affected because they traditionally care for those in need, regardless of their ability to pay,” McCracken said of the financial crisis caused by the pandemic.

One of the facilities that closed in the state this year – the Armenian Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Emerson – was operated on a non-profit basis. The Villa at Florham Park, an assisted living facility and also a non-profit organization, is also closing. The establishment, which has already relocated all of its residents, has submitted a closure plan to the state, according to a spokesperson for the Ministry of Health.

More recently, the St. Francis Residential Community in Denville, a non-profit independent living facility for seniors operated by The Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother, also said it was closing for financial reasons, although it was not have not linked their problems to COVID. The closure will displace 75 people who live there, including 10 nuns of another order, the Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Conception of the Mother of God. They did not respond to requests for comment.

The Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother, owners of the property since 1895, said in a statement that as the buildings and infrastructure on campus aged, “it has become increasingly difficult to fund maintenance and operations. renovations necessary to maintain the financial viability of the community. “

Although they have not yet filed a notice of intent regarding the closure with the Ministry of Community Affairs, which is authorizing the installation, they have withheld the Springpoint, a non-profit organization that operates 27 retirement homes, to help with the closure and find suitable housing for current residents.

A Springpoint spokeswoman said they had has created a limited number of leases at one of their facilities, The Oaks in Denville, which will be made available to residents of St. Francis and the sisters who live there, based on financial need.

St. Francis Residential Community, an independent living facility in Denville that houses 75 residents and plans to close.Google Street View

McCracken said a more robust reimbursement system is needed to support providers who care for the most vulnerable.

“Nonprofit providers are resident-focused and I am saddened when faith-based organizations close because they cannot afford to continue their ministries,” he said.

Her concern was echoed by Laurie Facciarossa Brewer, the New Jersey long-term care ombudsman, who questions whether faith-based institutions and other nonprofits are having a harder time weathering the effects of the health emergency. public COVID-19, including reduction of occupancy rates.

“At least one national study has shown that nonprofit long-term care facilities are more effective at controlling COVID-19 infections,” she said. “This may suggest that these facilities had better staff ratios and provided more nursing hours, a key indicator of quality in a long-term care facility and the most important tool to combat the spread of the infection.”

The loss of such organizations, said Facciarossa Brewer, “is bad news for people in need of nursing home care in New Jersey.”

Andrew Aronson, president and CEO of the Health Care Association of New Jersey, which represents long-term care facilities in the state, said the pandemic has caused an economic crisis on all long-term care providers, “regardless of the ownership structure”.

Nationally, a recent survey by the American Health Care Association and the National Center for Assisted Living, representing more than 14,000 nursing homes, assisted living communities and other long-term care facilities across the country , revealed that most homes in living communities are now operating at a loss.

This survey indicated that only a quarter of nursing homes and assisted living communities were confident they could last a year or more, citing increased expenses or lost income. There are also fewer inhabitants.

“Even though cases of COVID in long-term care are at historically low levels, providers are struggling to recover from the economic crisis the pandemic has brought about,” said Mark Parkinson, President and CEO from the Association. “Too many facilities operate on tight budgets simply because policy makers have not committed the appropriate resources, and this can have devastating consequences.”

CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES: Live map tracker | Newsletter | Home page

To ensure the stability of the long-term care industry, Aronson said lawmakers and officials must provide short-term economic support and address the chronic underfunding of Medicaid, which only covers about 70% of the cost of caring for a patient in a retirement home.

The problem, however, goes beyond Medicaid funding.

The isolation requirements of sick and infected residents in nursing homes that were never designed to contain a virus like COVID have demonstrated the inadequacies of many older facilities that may no longer be economically viable.

The Alaris Health nursing home in Guttenberg, which looked after nearly 100 residents, was a relatively small facility. Approved for 108 beds, it had an average of 91 residents during the pandemic. But the retirement home, built in the 1960s, also needed modernization. Many of its rooms were set up for up to three and four people, and officials said it was difficult to isolate patients with COVID-19.

Even before the pandemic, the nursing facility had ongoing work issues and union officials complained that their members were working with expired contracts, many of those who had been sick on the job with the coronavirus ended up over later responsible for thousands of medical bills. Its operators had also considered a plan to demolish the facility and replace it with a 15-story residential building overlooking the Manhattan skyline.

In the aftermath of the pandemic, Alaris Health announced last year that it would close the nursing home and began moving residents to other facilities. According to the state’s health department, it closed in January.

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Ted Sherman can be reached at [email protected]. Follow him on twitter @TedShermanSL.

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International headquarters

Turkish strongman’s western charm offensive was born out of desperation


Even before the COVID-19 pandemic hit the world, Turkey’s economy was in a crisis marked by high inflation, rising unemployment and a relentless decline in the value of the lira.

Since the failed coup in mid-2016, the national currency has lost more than 220% of its value against the euro. According to official figures, annual inflation hovers around 17% and the unemployment rate was recorded at almost 14% in May, which is 1% more than the previous month.

However, experts believe the real data on Turkey’s economy is much worse and the government is manipulating the numbers to create a better picture.

The severe effects of the pandemic and the loss of significant tourism revenues for the second year in a row have exacerbated a poor economic situation.

Karol Wasilewski, senior Turkey analyst at the Polish Institute of International Affairs, PISM, in Warsaw, says the economy is behind Ordogan’s “charm offensive” against the West.

“I see this offensive as a tool to help the heavily damaged Turkish economy by calming the waters of Turkish foreign policy and showing investors that Turkey has decided to be a predictable international player again, which can be trusted. “Wasilewski told BIRN.

As part of this charm offensive, Turkey began to support NATO interests with new military deals directed against Russia, despite the controversial purchase of Russia’s high-tech S-400 missiles.

In recent months, Turkey has sold armed drones to Ukraine and Poland to counter Russia’s military presence in Eastern Europe, and Erdogan recently offered to protect Kabul airport and all Western diplomatic missions after the total withdrawal of NATO allies from Afghanistan.

Following an initial meeting with its US counterpart Joe Biden, the White House announced that the two sides had agreed to work together to ensure that the Turkish mission is established before the 9/11 deadline for the withdrawal of states- States of Afghanistan.

Turkey is also now trying to ease tensions with NATO ally Greece after years of military escalation in the eastern Mediterranean over maritime areas and sharing of energy wealth.

“These are tools to support Turkey’s narrative … about the country’s contribution to the Alliance’s deterrence policy towards Russia, and that it is the only ally that effectively balances Russia in the neighborhood of the Europe.

“This narrative is an instrument designed to convince the United States that Turkey, despite many misunderstandings, is still a reliable ally and that it is in the best interest of the United States to mend the relationship,” observed Wasilewski.

A marriage of necessity


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Canadian army

Nutrition researchers saw malnourished children in residential schools as perfect test subjects – Philippine Canadian Inquirer


Two girls lay in bed in the dormitory of All Saints Indian Residential School in Lac La Ronge, Saskatchewan, in 1945. (Boorne & May. Library and Archives Canada, e010962312), CC BY

The discovery of hundreds of children’s remains in Kamloops, Brandon and Cowessess revealed the absolute devastation that settlers inflicted on Indigenous children, families and communities through the residential school system.


Read more: Amid more shocking residential school findings, non-Indigenous people must act


As a nutrition researcher and Canadian settler, I ask my peers to recognize and understand the damage malnutrition and nutritional experiences have on Indigenous peoples and the legacy they have left.

Easier to assimilate

Ian Mosby, historian of food, Indigenous health and the politics of Canadian colonialism, discovered that between 1942 and 1952, Canada’s foremost nutrition scientists carried out highly unethical research on 1 300 Aboriginal people, including 1,000 children, in Cree communities in northern Manitoba and at six residential schools across Canada.

Many were already suffering from malnutrition due to destructive government policies and dire conditions in residential schools.

In the eyes of researchers, this made them ideal test subjects.

Black and white photo: nurse takes blood sample from baby boy
A nurse takes a blood sample from a boy at the Indian Residential School in Port Alberni, British Columbia, during a medical and dental investigation conducted by the Department of National Health and Welfare in 1948 (F. Royal. Canada. National Film Board of Canada. Photo Library, Library and Archives Canada, e002504649), CC BY

Frederick Tisdall – famous for being the co-creator of Pablum infant food at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto – along with Percy Moore and Lionel Bradley Pett were the primary architects of the nutritional experiments.

They proposed that education and dietary interventions would make Indigenous people more profitable for Canada, that if Indigenous people were healthier, the transmission of diseases like tuberculosis to whites would decrease and assimilation would be easier.

They successfully presented their plan of nutrition experiments to the federal government.

Tisdall, Moore and their team based their case on results obtained after subjecting 400 Cree adults and children in northern Manitoba to a series of intrusive assessments, including physical exams, x-rays and blood tests.

Pett and his team’s pitch centered around determining a baseline. They wanted to give the children at Alberni Indian Residential School a small amount of milk for two years, enough to significantly deprive the growing children of the calories and nutrients they needed.

Other experiments involved withholding essential vitamins and minerals from children in control groups, while preventing Indian health services from providing dental care on the grounds that it could impact study results.

And even before these experiences, children in residential schools were hungry – with reports of severe malnutrition and signs of severe vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

Racial motives and foundations of nutritional experiments

Interest in nutrition research increased dramatically in the 1940s after the Canadian Council on Nutrition publicly stated that over 60 percent of the Canadian population suffered from nutritional deficiencies.

Until then, most of the experiments had been done on animals, but researchers like Pett, who was the primary author of what would become Canada’s Food Guide, took the opportunity to use Indigenous peoples as rats of laboratory.

While authors like Pett often operate under the facade of understanding and helping Indigenous peoples, the racial underpinnings of these nutritional experiences are clear.

Investigators sought to unravel the “Indian problem”. Moore, Tisdall and colleagues attributed to malnutrition discriminatory stereotypes such as “lack of speed, indolence, recklessness and inertia”.

AE Caldwell, director of the Alberni Indian Residential School, said malnutrition was caused by traditional diets and lifestyles, which he also called “indolent habits.” The nutritional experiences, along with the deeply inadequate and shoddy foods given to children in residential schools, aligned perfectly with Caldwell’s assimilation mandate.

Denying virtually all children access to adequate traditional foods is another means of colonization and cultural genocide.

Nurse watches boys spit into test tubes
A nurse from the Department of National Health and Welfare supervised the collection of saliva samples from boys at the Indian Residential School in Port Alberni, British Columbia, in 1948. (F. Royal. Canada. National Film Board of Canada. Photo library. Library and Archives Canada, e002504650), CC BY

According to Mosby’s findings, Pett said he aimed to better understand the “inevitable” transition away from country foods, but residential schools were deliberately designed to bring about this.

Their research is unethical by contemporary standards, and it’s hard to believe that it was ever okay to experiment on anyone, let alone children, without consent.

The aftermath of the Holocaust and biomedical experiments in concentration camps led to the development of the Nuremberg Code in 1947, which states that voluntary consent to research is absolutely essential and that experiments must avoid mental suffering and unnecessary physics.

The code came out the same year Pett embarked on his nutritional experiments at six residential schools.

Consequences of malnutrition and experimentation

Childhood malnutrition can be fatal, especially when combined with the risk of disease, which was often the case in residential schools.

The final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission indicates that the leading causes of death among children in residential schools were physical injury, malnutrition, disease and neglect.

For residential school survivors, malnutrition has lasting effects. Starvation in childhood increases the risk of chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes, and research indicates that severe malnutrition can even cause epigenetic changes that can be passed down from generation to generation.

Experimenting with children already in pain was immoral.

Food insecurity and nutrition issues in Indigenous communities are major issues in Canada, resulting from residential schools and colonial policies that continue to this day.

Experiences in residential schools and in communities have made health care settings precarious and traumatic places for many Indigenous peoples and led to some reluctance to be vaccinated during the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, stigma, violence and racism against Indigenous peoples in these contexts persist.

This particular story of experiences of malnutrition and nutrition on indigenous children and adults has already been told. It gained the attention of the mainstream media in 2013 after Mosby’s research and advocacy.

And this is no surprise to indigenous peoples, whose truths we must finally listen to deeply.

If you are a residential school survivor or have been affected by the residential school system and need assistance, you can contact the 24 hour residential school crisis line: 1-866-925-4419

Allison Daniel, PhD Candidate, Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.


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Canadian army

Change of command ceremony inaugurates new cadet leadership


“These young women and men are our future Canadian leaders,” said the lieutenant-colonel. Shaun O’Leary

A virtual change of command ceremony took place today at Canadian Forces Base Borden with the province’s new chief of cadets at the helm.

The Regional Cadet Support Unit (RCSU-Center), which is responsible for the cadet program in Ontario, welcomed a new commander on Friday, who will assume regional leadership of one of the best youth development programs in Canada. .

Lt.-Col. Shaun O’Leary, a long-time member of the Canadian Forces, who was recently assigned to an adult training role at the Canadian Army Doctrine and Training Center in Kingston, will bring extensive experience to the position, which focuses on the development of leadership, citizenship and community service skills among young Canadians.

“I sincerely believe in the Canadian Cadet Organization and am honored to play a role in this organization focused on developing the qualities of citizenship and leadership in youth, promoting a healthy lifestyle and stimulating an interest in the maritime, military and air activities of the Canadian Armed Forces, ”said Lieutenant-Colonel. O’Leary. “These young women and men are our future Canadian leaders.

O’Leary succeeds Lieutenant Colonel. Barry Leonard, who is leaving after two years to take up a diplomatic post at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC

Leonard has held the position for the past 15 months of the COVID-19 pandemic, a very difficult time that has seen the region’s approximately 280 corps and squadrons, including nearly 17,000 cadets, successfully transitioning from what is traditionally an in-person program towards an almost entirely virtually one-to-one program.

Due to current COVID-19 restrictions, this change of command ceremony went virtually.

As RCSU-Central has nearly 20,000 members (adults and youth / cadets) spread across the vast province of Ontario, the virtual adaptation also allowed more audience members to attend than during the ‘a traditionally in-person event.


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Non profit living

BizWest honors healthcare professionals with Health Care Heroes awards – Greeley Tribune

BizWest on Thursday recognized the contributions of healthcare workers and organizations to the well-being of the Boulder Valley and northern Colorado areas with the 2021 Health Care Heroes Awards.

The following people and groups represent the winners and finalists in the various Health Care Heroes categories:

Public Service

Honors an individual or organization – inside or outside of healthcare – for their leadership focused on a particular healthcare problem or need. The applications were assessed on criteria such as the impact on health care in the community and how they met a need that might not otherwise have been met.

  • Winner: Sunrise Community Health
  • Finalist: H2 Fabrication
  • Finalist: Noëlle Rodriguez

Distinguished service

Honors a healthcare administrator who has demonstrated leadership excellence within their organization during COVID-19. Candidates were assessed on the leadership provided during the pandemic, ensuring worker safety, quality patient care, and immunizations for the community.

  • Winner: Lauren Shimp, Columbine West Health & Rehab Facility
  • Finalist: Fred Pitzl, Good Samaritan Society Fort Collins Village
  • Finalist: SCL Health Good Samaritan Medical Center

COVID-19 frontline nurse

Honors a nurse who has demonstrated excellence, dedication and perseverance in meeting the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. Candidates were assessed on their performance during the pandemic, going beyond their usual duties and responsibilities.

  • Winner: Joel Bitler, Columbine Health Systems
  • Finalist: Cheryl Baum, New Mercer Commons ALF / Columbine Health Systems
  • Finalist: Amy Provopulos, UCHealth Mountain Crest

Healthcare innovator / researcher

Honors a person or organization for an innovation in medical technology or research. Priority was given to breakthroughs that contributed to testing, treatment, safety gear or vaccines against COVID-19.

  • Winner: Michael Lindsey, Thermal Strike Ranger
  • Finalist: UCHealth
  • Finalist: Banner Innovation Group

COVID-19 frontline health worker

Honors an individual who has demonstrated excellence, dedication and perseverance in meeting the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, including doctors, paramedics, paramedics and emergency service personnel and others. Candidates were assessed on their performance during the pandemic, going beyond their usual duties and responsibilities.

  • Winner: Jennifer Hogestad, UCHealth
  • Finalist: Rebecca Jackson, Columbine Health Systems
  • Finalist: Mo Lyons, Banner Health

Mental Health Provider of the Year

Recognizes a mental health care provider who has positively impacted their organization and / or patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Candidates were assessed on their performance during the pandemic, going beyond their usual duties and responsibilities.

  • Winner: Alicia Milar, SummitStone Health Partners
  • Finalist: Janina Fariñas, La Cocina
  • Finalist: Adena Kling, Longmont United Hospital Centura

COVID-19 Healthcare Allies Award

Honor someone outside of mainstream health care who excelled during the COVID-19 pandemic, including firefighters, law enforcement, and representatives of civic and non-profit organizations. Applicants were assessed on how well the person went beyond their normal duties to support healthcare workers and the community at large.

  • Winner: Foothills Unitar Church
  • Finalist: AMR
  • Finalist: UCHealth Northern Colorado Foundation

Nursing and Assisted Living Facility of the Year

Recognizes the best nursing and assisted living facility or group in the region. Applicants were assessed based on their response to the COVID-19 pandemic and how they prioritized the physical, mental and emotional well-being of patients.

  • Winner: Good Samaritan Society Fort Collins Village
  • Finalist: Garden Square at Westlake Assisted Living
  • Finalist: Tamara Gebhardt, New Mercer Commons ALF / Columbine Health Systems

COVID-19 support worker

Includes non-physician and non-nurse members of the multidisciplinary team, such as physician assistants, CNAs, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, medical imaging, researchers, technicians, etc. beyond their usual tasks and responsibilities.

  • Winner: Gloria Gonzalez-Engle, Boulder Community Health
  • Finalist: Jeremiah Martinez, Boulder Community Health – Sterile Treatment Service
  • Finalist: Marilyn Schaefer, UCHealth Greeley Hospital

Volunteer Award

Recognizes an unpaid volunteer for service in a health care organization. Applicants were assessed on criteria such as seniority, impact on the organization and how well they met a need that might not have been met otherwise.

  • Winner: Mark Meyer, Boulder Community Health
  • Finalist: Emily Kemme, UCHealth
  • Finalist: Fuerza Latina

BizWest has received over 100 nominations for the Health Care Heroes program. The judges included Gene Haffner, Julie Johnson Haffner, Charlie Harms, George Hayes, Joel Montbriand and Ron Secrist, all veterans of the healthcare or nonprofit sectors.

Health Care Heroes was sponsored by Anthem BC / BS, H2 Manufacturing Solutions and The Weld Trust. A healthcare coalition that included Boulder Community Health, Centura Health Avista Adventist Hospital, Columbine Health Systems, Good Samaritan Society Communities of Northern Colorado, and SCL Health Good Samaritan Medical Center also contributed.

© 2021 BizWest Media LLC

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International headquarters

Protecting detainees during COVID-19: Isolation centers inaugurated in Bangladesh prisons – Bangladesh


A COVID-19 outbreak in a prison can be devastating both for the prison population and prison staff. This is especially true for overcrowded facilities where the health care system is overloaded. The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) continues to support the Bangladesh Prisons Directorate to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in prison facilities.

Three COVID-19 isolation centers (a 70-bed center in Keraniganj Central Prison, a 41-bed center in Feni District 2 Prison, and a 28-bed center in Kishoreganj District 2 Prison) have recently inaugurated by His Excellency Asaduzzaman Khan, the Minister of the Interior.

These centers are the result of close cooperation between the Ministry of the Interior (MoHA), the Directorate of Prisons, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW) and the ICRC.

Elaborating on the ICRC’s support to help set up COVID-19 isolation centers in three prisons, Katja Lorenz, head of the ICRC delegation in Bangladesh, said: “Prisoners are among the most vulnerable populations facing to the coronavirus pandemic. is essential so that prisons can separate those who have caught the virus from the rest of the prison population. “

“Our support included the design and establishment of the centers and the provision of technical support to establish guidelines and implement infection prevention and control measures. We also provided basic medical and sanitary equipment as well as furniture.

Brigadier General Md Mominur Rahman Mamun, Inspector General of Prisons, said: “The Prisons Directorate has been working constantly since the start of the pandemic to develop an effective and comprehensive system to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in prisons. These constant efforts involve all staff in the Prisons Directorate, from headquarters to prison guards. “

“This work was supported by different partners (including MoHA, MoHFW and ICRC) present from the start and actively involved in various projects such as training sessions on precautionary measures against COVID-19 for prison staff , the regular distribution of personal protective equipment (PPE) in the 68 prisons and the renovation and establishment of three isolation centers for inmates with COVID-19. “

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in Bangladesh in 2020, the ICRC has worked with the Prisons Directorate to identify the most important needs in the response to the pandemic in prisons.

We have provided continued support to the Directorate of Prisons to assist both detainees and prison staff, including, in 2021, providing PPE to some prisons and at the Headquarters of the Directorate of Prisons. We are currently setting up additional assistance for the 68 prisons in Bangladesh (as requested by the Prisons Directorate) in response to the latest wave of the pandemic.


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Non profit living

Collaboration Expands Quality Addiction Treatment Services at University of Miami and Across Ohio

DOWNTOWN, Minn .– (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – The nonprofit Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation provides addiction care, as well as recovery, family and educational services to Ohio residents, including students at the University of Miami, with its RecoveryGo ™ telehealth solutions, which are now available to anyone living in the state. A long-standing collaboration with The Haven at College, which has been providing services to the University of Miami since 2018, has helped facilitate Hazelden Betty Ford’s expansion in Buckeye State.

“Our virtual ambulatory care and other telehealth resources and services are proving to be effective and convenient, and have allowed us to expand access and reach more people as addiction problems skyrocket amid the crisis. pandemic, ”said Hazelden Betty Ford, President and CEO Mark Mishek. “Ohio has been at the center of the drug addiction epidemic, and we are grateful for the opportunity to collaborate with the University of Miami and other partners to help bring healing and hope to more. individuals, families and communities. ”

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is the nation’s largest nonprofit provider of addiction treatment, mental health care, recovery resources, and related prevention and education services, with sites across the country , extensive telehealth solutions and a growing network of collaborators across healthcare.

The Haven at College is a member of the Hazelden Betty Ford Patient Care Network and has provided outpatient drug treatment and recovery support services to students at the University of Miami in Oxford, Ohio, for over two years. Now refocusing resources in her home state of California, The Haven at College worked with officials at the University of Miami to ease the transition to Hazelden Betty Ford’s clinical services and ensure that students encountered no lack of access to professional help.

“It was really important for us to have a smooth transition with a quality treatment provider, and no one is better at substance abuse treatment than Hazelden Betty Ford, so we’re thrilled,” said Sharon Weber, co-founder of The Haven at University. In addition to her high-quality, evidence-based treatment services, Hazelden Betty Ford also provides extensive recovery, family and educational services, meaning Miami students and student service professionals will have access to even more resources than before. ”

Hazelden Betty Ford’s Intensive Outpatient and Insurance-Eligible Virtual Drug Treatment Services are now available for the first time not only to University of Miami students, but also to people from all corners of the world. Ohio, including rural underserved areas.

“No matter where you live in Ohio, if you have commercial health insurance and a computer, you and your family are now eligible to participate in therapy without traveling,” said Laura Adams , Hazelden Betty Ford’s Senior Director of Outreach for Ohio.

Designed to replicate her on-site patient care experience, Hazelden Betty Ford’s Virtual Substance Use Disorder Treatment Services combine group therapy and one-on-one counseling sessions via encrypted law-compliant video technology for more of security. To access Hazelden Betty Ford’s treatment previously, Ohio residents had to go to a facility in another state. Now they can access it directly from their homes.

Other RecoveryGo ™ resources and services now available in Ohio and nationwide include a free one-day virtual family program, available in English and Spanish; a virtual program for children; and many digital recovery support tools, such as mobile apps, podcasts, and an online peer community. In addition, Hazelden Betty Ford prevention experts seek to increase their support for Ohio’s school systems by expanding their services to graduate students; and its professional training consultants, already active in Ohio, are available to collaborate with more treatment centers, hospitals, health systems and recovery organizations, as well as public health leaders. from Ohio who want to implement virtual care and other evidence-based behavioral health solutions.

“By providing more opportunities for quality treatment and ongoing support, and working with others in Ohio who are also committed to reducing the negative impact of addiction, we can bring hope and healing to people.” underserved rural areas and others statewide, ”said James Ahlman, executive director of the East Hazelden Betty Ford region.

An industry leader and long-time provider of telehealth solutions, Hazelden Betty Ford moved all of its “outpatients” nationwide at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, to a robust virtual platform that includes a effective virtual drug testing system and other best practices to ensure the highest levels of confidentiality, security and quality. A year later, Hazelden Betty Ford has now provided virtual ambulatory care to thousands of people across the United States.

First results from the Butler Research Center show that Hazelden Betty Ford’s Virtual Intensive Outpatient (IOP) treatment is working well, with patients discharged “against medical advice” at a significantly lower rate than previous IOP patients on site – a good indicator of positive results in the field. long term results. Based on preliminary results at 1 and 3 months, Hazelden Betty Ford also observed little or no difference between on-site and virtual IOP patients with respect to: reported cravings, mental health symptoms, sobriety, confidence in sobriety, attendance and quality of life support group.

“Virtual drug addiction care is here to stay,” Ahlman said. “More than a stopgap solution during the pandemic, telehealth fills important gaps in the behavioral health care system, allowing many patients to take a first step that they would otherwise have delayed and dramatically expanding access. If these preliminary results hold up for the long term, virtual care is expected to create new transformative opportunities for the thousands of people in Ohio and millions across the country struggling with substance use.

See www.RecoveryGo.org or call 1-800-I-DO-CARE for more details and resources.

About the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is a force of healing and hope for individuals, families and communities affected by addiction to alcohol and other drugs. As the nation’s leading nonprofit provider of comprehensive inpatient and outpatient drug treatment and concomitant mental health care for adults and youth, the Foundation has 17 locations across the country, with extensive solutions. on-site and telehealth and a network of collaborators across health care. With a legacy that began in 1949 and included the founding in 1982 of the Betty Ford Center, the Foundation today also includes a Graduate School of Addiction Studies, a Publishing Division, a Center for Addiction Research, recovery advocacy and thought leadership, professional and medical training programs. , school-based prevention resources and a specialized program for children growing up in families struggling with addictions. Learn more about www.HazeldenBettyFord.org and on Twitter.

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