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Community members and non-profit groups unite in support of Ukraine – Macomb Daily

As the world has learned in recent weeks, there are strong Ukrainians and then strong Ukrainians.

Ukrainians around the world have received an overwhelming response of support and solidarity from non-Ukrainians since Russia’s February 24 invasion.

The colors of blue and yellow are flying at rallies and demonstrations throughout Metro Detroit and beyond in overwhelming support and urges for help and relief for the people of Ukraine.

The Jewish Federation of Metro Detroit has allocated approximately $1.4 million in rescue and relief funds to Jewish Ukrainians.

“The Jewish community is extremely concerned about this,” said Rabbi Asher Lopatin, director of the Jewish Community Relations Council/AJC in Bloomfield Hills. “We are totally focused and praying for Ukraine and taking this very seriously.”

According to the Jewish Federation website, there are around 200,000 members of Ukraine’s Jewish population, including Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

Jewish Federation funds are intended for temporary housing and emergency kits for refugees, food and medical supplies, care for the elderly and more.

Many Ukrainians in the Detroit metropolitan area have direct ties to family members and friends abroad.

Warren resident Lesia Osypova is from Ternopil in western Ukraine and her husband is from Mykolaiv in southern Ukraine near the Black Sea.

On March 1, Osypova created an Amazon registry with medical supplies needed by the Ukrainian army. Within the first two hours of posting the link on social media, 1,000 items – out of 5,000 listed – were purchased.

“I reached out to other New Jersey volunteers and a nurse gave me some ideas of the most wanted items in the military,” she said. “I’m so surprised at how many people responded.”

Thinking that the link would only reach a few friends, Osypova did not expect the overwhelming amount of purchased items. By the next day, her porch was covered with Amazon boxes and packages of donated items.

Warren resident Lesia Osypova’s Amazon Registry donations for the Ukrainian military filled her porch after a day. (Photo courtesy of Lesia Osypova)

As more and more packages arrive at her house each day, Osypova works to organize and pack the supplies to be shipped. The logistics of shipping overseas to Poland can be tricky. Flights depart from Chicago and New Jersey weekly, so trucks must be driven to airports in time to be loaded onto the plane.

Staying in touch with her family in Ukraine, Osypova will be able to find out when items are being delivered and what is needed as soon as shipments start arriving. She plans to continue accepting donations on her Amazon page and will update with more or different items as needed.

The Ukrainian American Crisis Response Committee of Michigan, a grassroots coalition of community members and organizations formed about two months ago when Russian President Vladimir Putin began mustering troops on the Ukrainian border, also collects and ships military donations to Ukraine.

“The organization was formed to respond in case the worst happened, which it has now,” said Jordan Fylonenko, communications manager for the committee.

The committee is made up of representatives from most major Ukrainian organizations, including the Ukrainian Cultural Center, Ukrainian Immaculate Conception School, St. Mary’s Orthodox Church, Ukrainian Immaculate Conception Church, and Ukrainian Selfdependence Michigan Credit Union.

Since the initial Russian attack, the crisis committee has held several Pray for Ukraine rallies and events in the Detroit metro, which some local government officials have attended.

Their current focus is collecting and shipping military supplies, surgical aid, and home defense donations, under the direction of relief coordinator Anya Nona.

In conjunction with the Ukrainian American Crisis Response Committee of Michigan, the Ukrainian Children’s Aid and Relief Effort (UCare) will host a Humanitarian Aid Campaign for Ukrainian children from 1-7 p.m. March 21-26 at St. Mary’s. , 21931 Evergreen Road, in Southfield. Volunteers will collect new or lightly used clothing, shoes, diapers, formula, baby bottles, hygiene items, toys and first aid supplies throughout the campaign.

Troy resident Vera Petrusha founded UCare in 1997 to help children living in orphanages in Ukraine. Petrusha is a parishioner and board member of St. Mary’s Cathedral, which has opened its facilities for many events and collections over the years.

UCare will accept monetary donations in addition to collecting items, which will be used to cover shipping costs, such as fuel.

Supporters at the rally for Ukraine at Hart Plaza in Detroit. (Photo courtesy of Stephanie Preweda — For MediaNews Group)

The war has also struck close to home three Ukrainian-born dance teachers at Fred Astaire Dance Studios in Bloomfield Township, who each have immediate family members in Ukraine who are in desperate need of emergency assistance. , according to studio owner Evan Mountain. In support of instructors Viktor Tkachenko, Yuliya Lukina and Mykhailo Annıenkov, Mountain is hosting a month-long fundraiser, “Waltz for Ukraine”, to raise funds that will go directly to their families to provide food, a shelter and other basic needs they may have. The studio is also offering a free waltz dance class for individuals or couples (a $115 value) for anyone who donates to help the families of their teachers.

If you would like to participate in the “Waltz for Ukraine” event and receive a free dance lesson, call 248-454-1715 to schedule. Donations can be made at bit.ly/3I6jLzb.

For more information on local events and donation opportunities from the organizations listed above, visit:

• The Jewish Federation: jewishdetroit.org

• Ukrainian American Michigan Crisis Response Committee: uacrisisresponse.org

• Ukrainian Child Aid and Relief Effort: ucareinc.org

• Lesia Osypova Amazon Registry: amzn.to/3KoqINm

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History organization

Basketball world reacts to Popovich’s win on all-time coaching win list

Bench-winning Gregg Popovich has become a fixture in the NBA over the past two and a half decades. With Friday’s win over the Utah Jazz, the San Antonio icon passed Don Nelson to become the league’s all-time leader in coaching wins.

Players, people and teams who crossed paths with Popovich during his storied career quickly recognized the historic feat, sending their respect and affection to the four-time NBA champion.

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International headquarters

Myrtle Beach International Airport Named Airport of the Year, Category II

MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) – The next time you arrive at or exit Myrtle Beach International Airport, you’ll be the 2021 Category II-IV Airport of the Year.

MYR was named the 2021 Category II-IV Airport of the Year for its outstanding operational performance in 2021 as part of the TSA’s annual honors awards.

“It’s a great honor to have an airport recognized, but the real recognition comes from the workforce and the leadership that always shows through a positive attitude and team spirit,” said David McMahon, TSA Federal Security Director for South Carolina. “Myrtle Beach’s workforce and additional dispatchers deserve recognition for their outstanding performance.”

Passenger volume at the airport increased by 200% in July and August from 2020 to 2021 and by around 40% compared to pre-pandemic levels in 2019.

MYR management has worked closely with the State and TSA Headquarters to secure additional staff and resources to maintain a strong security posture and screen passengers as efficiently as possible.

This posture included the addition of the TSA’s National Deployment Agent (NDO) force and the TSA’s explosive detection canine teams. Both have been deployed at the airport to help with the dramatic increase in passenger volume, which exceeded screening lane capacity by up to four lanes during peak periods last summer.

Myrtle Beach shares the title of airport of the year with Harry Reid International Airport in Las Vegas, selected among major airports.

Copyright 2022 WMBF. All rights reserved.

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Non profit living

Morehead State Music Ambassadors Prepare for Carter Fold | Living

HILTONS — The Music Ambassadors of Morehead State are ready to bring bluegrass and early music to The Carter Family Fold.

The group includes faculty members and students from Morehead State University’s Traditional Music Program, as well as Raymond McLain, who has his own Carter Fold story.

McLain is the director of the Kentucky Center for Traditional Music at Morehead State University, located in Rowan County, Kentucky. He also sits on the board of the Carter Music Center and is the artistic director of The Carter Family Fold.

He performed at the fold and many Carter family shows over the years, starting with his family, the McLain Family Band. According to a press release from the venue, he first began performing at Carter family shows when Janette Carter began performing concerts at the former AP Carter Grocery in 1974. Saturday night he will also be joined by his sister, Ruth McLain Smith. .

Throughout his 50+ year musical career, Raymond McLain has performed across the United States, in 62 foreign countries and has also toured as the Music Ambassador for the US State Department.

The Carter Family Memorial Music Center is a non-profit organization that offers old-school country and folk music weekly at Hiltons. The venue also pays homage to the legendary Carter family (AP Carter, Sara Carter and Maybelle Carter), whose first recordings in 1927 are credited with giving birth to the commercial country music industry.

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Carter Family Fold shows are on Saturday nights. Doors open at 6 p.m. and music begins at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults; $2 for children 6-11 and children 6 and under are free.

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History organization

Chief Winstrom ready to build trust with all communities

GRAND RAPIDS, Michigan — Chef Eric Winstrom was sworn Monday night and said it was “fantastic” to get to know members of the city government and the police department.

However, what he is really looking forward to is meeting everyone in the city, he said.

“I plan to go to the Children’s Advocacy Center,” he said during an interview with FOX 17 Thursday at headquarters. “I’m going to take to the streets with the homeless outreach team this weekend, so I can meet the folks from Network180 who work on the team and the fire department.”

Additionally, he plans to meet with other community organizations across the city, he said. As COVID restrictions ease and the weather warms up, he plans to meet with all communities.

“Before I was even sworn in, NAACP President Cle Jackson graciously reached out to me and asked if I wanted to speak with his organization, which is absolutely fantastic,” Chief Winstrom said. “We spent about an hour and a half or two hours talking with President Jackson and his leadership team about just about every issue they see in the police department.”

In recent years, Grand Rapids officers have been involved in tense situations with communities of color. More recently, an officer’s gun exploded near Daevionne
Smith, cousin of Breonna Taylor, during an incident near her father’s house. The police called it an accidental discharge. Smith was shaken, he told FOX 17 in a previous interview.

READ MORE: Bodycam footage released of GRPD officer accused of inadvertently firing a gun

It was incidents like these and the May 2020 unrest following the death of George Floyd that former police chief Eric Payne created a three-year plan to build trust between the community and the department.

Chief Winstrom said building trust is key.

“I talked a lot about accountability and transparency. And when it comes to accountability, you can’t tolerate any kind of bias-based policing, any excessive force like that,” Chief Winstrom said. “It’s too early for me to point out shortcomings in the police service as I’m still learning about it. But, I’m going to try to make sure that we’re as transparent as possible, to earn that trust.

He said another way to build trust is to know the history of the police. He recalled educating young officers in the Chicago Police Department, where he got his start, on the importance of knowing the past.

“You must know the history of the police. You must know the history of race relations and policing in this country. Is it really your measure of whether we are doing better? Are we better tomorrow? It is very important for me.

Winstrom said when he became a police officer in 2000, the metrics to determine success were the number of arrests made or cars towed. However, that is not his approach. He is ready to build trust, he said, and asks his officers to do the same.

” I love this city. I’m so excited to be here,” Chief Winstrom said. “It may only be four days here, but I already feel like I belong.”

RELATED: Grand Rapids Police Chief Eric Payne Recalls Time With Department Last Day

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Canadian army

Top Canadian sniper joins Ukraine in battle against Russia

(NewsNation) – As millions fled war-torn Ukraine, one of the world’s deadliest snipers turned in the opposite direction, heading to the Eastern European country to fight Russians.

According to media reports in Canada, a Canadian sniper known only as “Wali”, earned a reputation as one of the world’s deadliest snipers in Afghanistan fighting ISIS. Now he will fight Putin’s army.

Since the Russian invasion nearly two weeks ago, Ukrainian President Zelensky has called on the world to help him in the fight, rallying his own citizens and foreigners with military experience to take up arms in defense of Ukraine.

The call appears to be working as Ukrainian forces continue to slow the Russian advance.

US Army veteran James Carafano said it was likely the Russians intended to quickly eliminate the Ukrainian government and immediately occupy the territory. Since this did not happen, Putin’s army changed its approach.

“The original Russian invasion plan clearly failed and it’s clear the Russians are now making this up as they go along and their strategy just seems to be winning through brute force,” Carafano said.

Carafano expects Wali’s skills to be used in the Ukrainian cityscape, targeting Russian forces in unexpected ways, under cover of buildings with plenty of places to hide. This strategy could prove effective against a Russian army that does not know the territory.

“If you’re Russian, you haven’t been to these cities, you don’t know your way around, you’re lost, you’re confused, it’s noisy. Snipers can be incredibly effective, especially if they know the terrain and can choose their terrain,” Carafano said.

He added that someone like Wali is capable of boosting morale, even if his participation alone is not enough to turn the tide of the war.

“If the quality of the opposing army is low, which seems increasingly true for Russian ground forces, it’s a fairer fight,” Carafano said.

Canadian reports indicate that Wali is a computer programmer and former Canadian soldier who felt compelled to help Zelenskyy in this fight. He even let his wife and child do it.

Wali joins a growing contingent of volunteer soldiers traveling from North America to support Ukrainian defence.

Cody Heard, US Army Veteran also joined the fight against the Russians. He reached out to other veterans on social media and gathered a group to take the long flight to fight for Ukraine.

Cody’s original plan is to stay in Ukraine for a month. Depending on his ability to support his family back home, he may stay longer.

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International headquarters

Latest news on Russia and the war in Ukraine

Ukraine announces evacuation routes from 7 cities

Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister Iryna Vereshchuk said there would be seven civilian escape routes on Thursday.

Six of the routes will take civilians fleeing heavy fighting in Trostyanets, Krasnopillya, Sumy, Mariupol, Volnovakha and Izyum to other parts of the country, while another will transport people from the outskirts of Kyiv to the center of the city.

Numerous attempts to evacuate civilians have been halted in recent days, with Ukrainian authorities accusing Russian forces of violating ceasefire agreements, attacking agreed escape routes and only allowing civilians to flee to Russia.

— Chloe Taylor

‘Close the skies and stop the bombings’: Ukrainian Zelensky urges allies to create no-fly zone

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky speaks during a news conference in Kiev on March 3, 2022.

Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy renewed his call for Western allies to create a no-fly zone over the country, saying any further delay would be “too late” to avert a humanitarian disaster.

“We’re talking about closing the sky. You can’t decide to close or not to close, you can’t decide,” Zelenskky said. in an interview with Sky News.

“Do not wait [for] me asking you many times, a million times, to close the sky. No. You have to phone us…our people who have lost their children and say, ‘Sorry, we didn’t yesterday, a week ago. We didn’t push Putin, we didn’t talk much with him, we didn’t find a dialogue with him. We didn’t do anything.'”

“And it’s true. Yesterday the world did nothing. I’m sorry but it’s true,” Zelenskky said, calling on policymakers to act faster to impose a no-fly zone over Ukraine.

“Close the skies and stop the bombings,” he said.

Asked about Western concerns of a no-fly zone leading to a direct confrontation with Russia, further aggravating the situation, Zelenskky replied: “So it would be worse for whom? For our families? No, for whom? For them “No, who knows? Nobody knows. But we know that’s exactly what’s happening now. And in the future, it will be too late.”

—Sam Meredith

Ukrainian and Russian foreign ministers to meet for talks

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba briefs the media after a General Assembly meeting on the situation in Ukraine at the UN headquarters.

Lev Radin | Light flare | Getty Images

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba is due to meet his Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov in Antalya, Turkey on Thursday for talks.

The two ministers will hold separate press conferences after the meeting.

—Chloe Taylor

IMF approves $1.4 billion in emergency financing for Ukraine

The seal of the International Monetary Fund is seen near the headquarters of the World Bank (R) in Washington, DC, January 10, 2022.

Stefani Reynolds | AFP | Getty Images

The International Monetary Fund has approved $1.4 billion in emergency funding to support Ukraine’s economy, citing the devastating humanitarian crisis and destruction of infrastructure following the Russian invasion.

It is estimated that more than 2 million people have fled Ukraine since the Russian assault began two weeks ago.

“The Russian military invasion of Ukraine has been responsible for a massive humanitarian and economic crisis,” IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva said in a statement.

“The tragic loss of life, huge refugee flows and immense destruction of infrastructure and productive capacity are causing severe human suffering and will lead to a deep recession this year. Financing needs are large, urgent and could increase dramatically as the war continues,” she added.

Earlier this week, the World Bank approved a package of grants and loans totaling $723 million to Ukraine.

—Sam Meredith

Read previous CNBC coverage here:

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Non profit living

Onward and Upward, the acclaimed military veteran nonprofit, has huge goals for 2022

Classes in session on January 8, 2018. Cabin workspaces

Group of new customers – the photo was taken with their permission

Suicides of active duty personnel and veterans are reaching new heights. This is an alarmingly growing statistic that Onward and Upward want to prevent this from increasing further.

– forward and upward

LOS ANGELES, CA, USA, March 9, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — What has a relatively unknown Wisconsin-based nonprofit been up to for the past 90 days? Onward and Upward, an acclaimed military veterans society, sought to understand why the rate of military suicides has risen from 22 to now more than 30 a day in the United States. According to a Washington Post article written by Peter Marks, dated January 1, 2022, suicides of active duty personnel and veterans are reaching new heights. This is an alarmingly growing statistic that Onward and Upward want to keep from increasing further.

Who is this non-profit organization? It is a veteran-owned and operated community-based online job center (“the Center”) designed to facilitate the employment of home-insecure and unemployed individuals seeking employment. an online or on-site job. Inside this facility is a laptop classroom on one side of the building and on the other side of the building is an area of ​​cubicle computer workstations. For people at the Center who want to work online as remote employees, this arrangement is fine. They have a workplace for their part-time or full-time online employer with mentorship, healthy food and drink, and a six-month program after which they graduate and take their computer home with them and continue to work for their online employer.

For people who are employed to work on-site, the Center mentors them and, if necessary, coordinates transportation to get them to their place of work safely and on time. In either online or on-site employment, the Center offers a six-month program that includes housing and soft skills training designed to provide what is needed to obtain, retain and progress in their employment. During the six months, the client works for their employer, saves up to three months in rent, utilities, and groceries, and attends all professional development training sessions covering topics such as interpersonal communication company, reliability/reliability, conflicts and negotiation, time management. , stress management, money/budget management and networking.

What’s really great about having the Center is to see all the people who once lived in tents, on sidewalks, benches and alleys now employed and safely housed, straighten up and staying up. It is also nice to witness the reunion of mothers with their daughters, brothers with brothers and couples who were once separated and can now be together thanks to a job and a safe place to live.

Onward and Upward helped 17 people in the first year of operation in 2017 (7 of whom were military veterans) to be employed and housed to never be homeless again. In 2018 there were 12 people (7 of which were military veterans) and the third year, 2019, there were 38 people (12 of which were military veterans) who once lived in tents and are now housed and employed and currently all living in their homes. them, working for their employers (online and/or onsite) to never be homeless again. “Our organization within the Center also teaches our clients and community members how to get, keep and grow in any job,” says Onward and Upward. “We enjoy witnessing the personal and professional growth of everyone we have the privilege of meeting and assisting with employment and advancement in employment. Our organization truly enjoys being the conduit and catalyst for new beginnings. for people who are homeless and unemployed, especially military veterans.”

That’s why, over the past 90 days, Onward and Upward is so thrilled to have been introduced to five other veteran service organizations who are equally passionate about ensuring people have the services they need to get back on their feet. foot and stay on their feet. sustainably. After meeting, they formed a coalition of veterans.

Onward and Upward continues, “Collectively and individually, we aim to make a difference in people’s lives, especially for our military brothers and sisters. The other five organizations are Project Diehard, Veterans Warriors One-Stop-Shop (VWOSS), Faith Hope Love for Veterans, Hope Advanced, and Veterans Ranch. Transitional Housing for Veterans and to provide a place for other nonprofit veterans to provide their services is with Project Diehard, more than 5,000 resources and sources for managing military transition issues and advocacy for veterans. VWOSS veterans, women’s issues are resolved and small home villages are established with Faith Hope Love for Veterans, credit issues, background issues and tax liens are resolved with Hope Advanced, and Veterans’ Ranch Veterans works with veterans and their families through horses (horse therapy) with a mission to get these great Americans to put down their heavy coats of burden and walk away as new and improved versions of themselves.

Collectively, the Five Veterans Service Organizations and Onward and Upward is a coalition of veterans whose mission is to prevent 22 military suicides from occurring a day. Onward and Upward have hosted a special day on 02/22/2022 titled “2-22 to Save 22” to bring attention to this crisis and announce that by working together, we can stop military suicide.

The event took place onsite at the Kalahari Resort, Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin, and via online conferencing platform, Whova. The introduction of a “home front forward operating base” was made on 02/22/2022. With the promise of introducing a possible solution to the military suicide crisis, over 200 LinkedIn sign-ups for the 2-22 to Save 22 hybrid event took place, and over 300 connections were made after the event for continue the conversation and start planning this event. concept to become a reality.

Working interdependently with each of the five Veteran Coalition organizations, Onward and Upward is confident that more and more military veterans will avoid going to a dark place and instead have a life worth living.

“We believe that if our brothers and sisters in arms have a life worth living, they will want to live it! We invite individuals and organizations who want to support us in the mission to stop military suicide to visit our website. in our collective and individual missions, we seek people to help us as volunteers, sponsors and/or donors of time, talent and/or treasure. We know that stopping military suicide ‘takes a village’ and we appreciate anyone who would support us in this fight to stop military suicide,” Onward and Upward conclude.

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History organization

Energy-related CO2 emissions hit their highest level on record in 2021 (IEA)

A worker cuts steel pipes near a coal-fired power plant in Zhangjiakou, China November 12, 2021.

Greg Baker | AFP | Getty Images

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions hit their highest level in history last year, according to the International Energy Agency, as economies rebounded from the coronavirus pandemic with high dependency coal.

The IEA found that global energy-related CO2 emissions increased by 6% in 2021 to a record high of 36.3 billion metric tons. In an analysis published on Tuesday, the Paris-based organization identified the use of coal as the main driver of growth.

“The recovery in energy demand in 2021 has been compounded by adverse weather and energy market conditions – including spikes in natural gas prices – which have led to more coal being burned despite the strongest ever growth in renewable energy generation,” the IEA said.

The energy agency said its estimate was based on a fuel-by-fuel and region-by-region analysis. Breaking down his findings, he said coal was responsible for more than 40% of the overall growth in global CO2 emissions last year, reaching a record 15.3 billion metric tons.

“CO2 emissions from natural gas rebounded well above their 2019 levels to reach 7.5 billion tonnes,” the IEA said, adding that CO2 emissions from oil were 10.7 billion metric tons. Oil emissions were “significantly below pre-pandemic levels” due to “the limited recovery in global transport activity in 2021, mainly in the aviation sector”.

Learn more about clean energy from CNBC Pro

China has played an important role in the increase in emissions, according to the IEA. “The rebound in global CO2 emissions above pre-pandemic levels was largely driven by China, where they increased by 750 million tonnes between 2019 and 2021,” he said.

“In 2021 alone, China’s CO2 emissions exceeded 11.9 billion tons, accounting for 33 percent of the global total,” he said.

Even as coal use jumped, the IEA also noted how renewables and nuclear managed to provide a greater share of electricity generation than fossil fuels in 2021. renewables exceeded 8,000 terawatt-hours last year, which the IEA described as “an all-time high.”

Although it remains an important source of electricity, coal has a substantial effect on the environment.

The US Energy Information Administration lists a range of emissions from burning coal. These include carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, particulates and nitrogen oxides. Elsewhere, Greenpeace has described coal as “the dirtiest and dirtiest way to produce energy”.

The IEA said it was now clear that the economic recovery from Covid-19 had not been sustainable. “The world must now ensure that the global rebound in emissions in 2021 is timely – and that an accelerated energy transition contributes to global energy security and lower energy prices for consumers,” he said. -he declares.

The IEA’s findings underscore the Herculean task of achieving the goals set out in the 2015 Paris Agreement and the more recent Glasgow Climate Pact. While major economies attempt to increase their renewable energy capacity, the world remains heavily dependent on fossil fuels.

In recent weeks, this sad reality has been highlighted by the Russian invasion of Ukraine, not least because Russia was the largest supplier of oil and natural gas to the EU last year, according to Eurostat.

On Tuesday, the EU’s executive arm, the European Commission, released what it called “the outline of a plan to make Europe independent of Russian fossil fuels well before” the end of the decade.

“We must become independent of Russian oil, coal and gas,” said Commission President Ursula von der Leyen. “We simply cannot rely on a supplier that explicitly threatens us.”

The Commission’s announcement came after the IEA said the EU should not enter into new gas supply contracts with Russia to reduce its dependence on Russian natural gas.

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Canadian army

NATO chief advises Russia against attacking supply lines supporting Ukraine

The NATO Secretary General has warned that a Russian attack on the supply lines of allied countries supporting Ukraine with arms and ammunition would be a dangerous escalation of the war raging in Eastern Europe.

Jens Stoltenberg made the remarks Tuesday during an interview with CBC News as he, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the leaders of Spain and Latvia toured the NATO base and training range at Adazi , outside Riga, the Latvian capital.

“Allies are helping Ukraine uphold its right to self-defense, which is enshrined in the UN charter,” Stoltenberg said after meeting with Trudeau, Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez and Latvian Prime Minister Arturs. Krišjānis Kariņš at Adazi base.

“Russia is the aggressor and Ukraine is defending itself. If there is an attack on a NATO country, a NATO territory, it will trigger Article 5.”

Article 5 is the self-defense clause of NATO’s founding treaty which states that an attack on one member is an attack on all 30 member countries.

“I am absolutely convinced that President Putin knows this and we remove any possibility of miscalculation, of misunderstanding about our commitment to defending every square inch of NATO territory,” Stoltenberg said.

The United States and its allies, including Canada, have been in a race against time to send arms and ammunition to Ukraine, which has been under relentless assault by Russian forces for more than two weeks.

Some members of the US intelligence community fear that Moscow is trying to cut off the flow of weapons into Ukraine, either with airstrikes or long-range artillery. Weapons coming from the West are unloaded in neighboring countries, such as Poland, and then transported by land.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, left, and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg walk during their visit to the Adazi military base in Kadaga, Latvia on Tuesday March. 8, 2022. (Roman Koksarov/AP)

Stoltenberg said there is a clear distinction between supply lines within Ukraine and those operating outside its borders.

“There is a war in Ukraine and, of course, supply lines inside Ukraine can be attacked,” he said.

“An attack on NATO territory, on NATO forces, on NATO capabilities, that would be an attack on NATO.”

Stoltenberg said NATO’s message to Russia is that “they must end the war, that we will continue to support Ukraine, and that we will continue to impose unprecedented sanctions.”

Poland offers fighter jets to Ukraine

The stakes appeared to rise dramatically on Tuesday night when Poland announced it was ready to transfer all of its MiG-29 planes to the United States so they could be handed over to the Ukrainians.

The Polish Foreign Ministry has urged other NATO members with the same type of Russian-made warplanes to do the same.

WATCH | Ukrainian Chargé d’Affaires Andrii Bukvych says fighter jets are needed immediately

Ukraine needs fighter jets and a no-fly zone (diplomat)

“We need these fighters [jets] and sheltered skies as soon as possible,” said Ukrainian Chargé d’Affaires Andrii Bukvych. “Otherwise the cost will be calculated in thousands of civilians.” 6:59

The United States suggested that it would support Poland by providing replacement fighters. But in a tweet on Tuesday evening, the Pentagon said the proposal was not “sustainable” because it would involve fighter jets in the hands of Americans flying in “airspace that is disputed with Russia. .

“[That] raises serious concerns for the entire NATO alliance.”

The West has sent Ukraine thousands of anti-tank and anti-aircraft missiles since the war broke out.

Ukrainian civilians receive weapons training, on the outskirts of Lviv, western Ukraine, Monday, March 7, 2022. (Bernat Armangue/AP)

A Canadian shipment of small arms – including machine guns, carbines and 15 million rounds – arrived in Ukraine just before the Russian invasion. The Liberal government has pledged to send anti-tanks and grenade launchers, but it is not known if the shipment has arrived.

Some of the lethal aid is taken from the Canadian Armed Forces’ own stocks. This highlighted some of the shortcomings facing the Canadian military; the Canadian army does not have its own dedicated anti-aircraft system, for example.

Trudeau was asked on Tuesday if his government was ready to place an urgent supply order to equip the Canadian army in response to the war and Ottawa’s plans to increase the contingent of Canadian troops in Latvia.

“All of these weapons are far more useful right now and in the weeks to come in the hands of Ukrainian soldiers fighting for their lives than they would be in the hands of Canadians,” Trudeau said.

“But of course we have to make sure that we replace those weapons quickly and that we continue to invest in the equipment that allows our armed forces to be able to continue contributing.”

A Russian MiG-29 aircraft in flight outside Moscow on August 11, 2012. (Misha Japaridze/Associated Press)

Trudeau, Stoltenberg and the other leaders visited a training range on Tuesday where troops from a 10-nation contingent were conducting a live-fire training exercise. They walked among armored personnel carriers, tanks and mobile guns and chatted with the troops.

Colonel Sandris Gaugers is the commander of the Latvian mechanized brigade working with the NATO battle group. He said integrating equipment and procedures from different armies has been a challenge but the mission is succeeding.

“Certainly we can go fight”

“Honestly, if I had to say, can we go fight? Sure, we can go fight,” he told Trudeau, Stoltenberg and Sanchez as they overlooked the training area from a position at the top of a hill.

Canada has pledged to add an artillery battery of 120 soldiers to its current commitment of 540 soldiers and staff in Latvia.

General Wayne Eyre, Canada’s top military commander, told CBC News in an exclusive interview on Tuesday that he is currently focused on organizing those reinforcements.

“We have the same challenge we had in World War I, World War II,” the Chief of the Defense Staff said. “We have to cross this great lake known as the Atlantic and we only have limited strategic lift capability. So we are going to have an effect on the ground here very soon.”

Canada activates NATO reinforcements

The federal government has ordered the activation of 3,400 reinforcements who could join the NATO Response Force (NFR) if called by the Supreme Allied Commander.

Eyre said the military is still investigating if and how they will be needed.

“The NATO Response Force is a shopping list of capabilities, which can be requested depending on the nature of what NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander is requesting,” he said. “So the likelihood of all 3,400 being called is relatively low.”

Trudeau also announced on Tuesday the anticipated renewal of Canada’s military contribution to the NATO deterrence mission, known as Operation Reassurance.

WATCH: Canada renews Operation Reassurance

Canada renews NATO’s Operation Reassurance

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the renewal of Operation Reassurance a year before its scheduled end during his visit to Latvia. 1:11

“As Russia continues its unwarranted and unjustifiable attacks on Ukraine, Canada stands united with our European allies in supporting Ukraine and the Ukrainian people, and democracy and human rights everywhere,” said Trudeau on Tuesday.

The mandate to deploy hundreds of Canadian troops to Latvia was set to expire in 2023. The federal cabinet extended it indefinitely in response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Prior to the invasion, the Liberal government signaled in Defense Minister Anita Anand’s mandate letter that it intended to renew the mandate of the NATO mission. Stoltenberg welcomed the move when he and the three prime ministers met the media after their meetings.

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International headquarters

Photos: The world comes together for Women’s Day under the shadow of war in Ukraine | Gallery News

Protesters took to the streets around the world for International Women’s Day on Tuesday with rallies in Pakistan defying security warnings and demonstrations in Europe calling for solidarity with war-torn Ukraine.

Despite the marches, all eyes were on the relentless flow of women and children leaving Ukraine after the Russian invasion, sparking the fastest growing refugee crisis in Europe since World War II.

With more than two million people forced into exile, few arriving in the Polish border town of Przemysl could think to mark the date, although a lone priest can be seen wandering the station with an armful of tulips , distributing them to the women who arrive.

Meanwhile, in Brussels, protesters staged a “Women Stand With Ukraine” rally, waving a vast blue and yellow Ukrainian flag.

And in Paris, several thousand people marched against gender violence and for equal pay in a rally entitled: “the feminist groundswell for equality”.

Ahead of the rally, organizers read a letter from Russian feminists urging women’s rights activists around the world to ‘take a stand against war’, saying it highlighted both ‘bullet violence but also violence sexual”.

In Pakistan, some 2,000 women gathered in the eastern city of Lahore despite official efforts to ban the protest and withdraw security from an event frequently targeted with violence.

In a jovial atmosphere, they marched through the streets chanting “Respect women” and “End the patriarchy” as 1,000 other women gathered in Karachi, Pakistan’s largest city, and 200 in the capital, Islamabad.

Such gatherings have sparked a violent backlash since they began four years ago in deeply conservative Pakistan where women have been shot, stabbed, stoned, burned and strangled for undermining family “honour”.

Critics said they promote liberal Western values ​​and disrespect religious and cultural mores, and two years ago Islamist extremists stoned women as they walked through Islamabad.

Meanwhile, Afghanistan marked a muted day with militants intimidated by the threat of arrest by the country’s Taliban leaders who returned to power in August.

In Turkey, demonstrators spent days preparing banners ahead of the main march in Istanbul later on Tuesday to protest femicide and urge Ankara to join a European treaty protecting women from violence.

Last year, 416 women were killed in Turkey, while the toll this year currently stands at 72, according to figures from We Will Stop Femicide.

There was a wave of protests after Turkey’s withdrawal last year from the Istanbul Convention which establishes a legal framework to combat, prevent and prosecute violence against women.

Ankara justified the withdrawal by saying the 2011 treaty had a hidden agenda to normalize homosexuality.

And in Kenya, 150 people marched through the capital Nairobi to demand an end to gender-based violence after a woman was violently assaulted by motorcycle taxi drivers.

The incident happened after a traffic accident on Friday, with a video going viral showing the men grabbing the young woman’s clothes as she screamed inside her car.

Protesters marched to police headquarters, waving banners that read “Hear my cry” and urging an end to gender-based violence.

Police have arrested 16 people in connection with the assault.

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Non profit living

H&M ANNOUNCES SECOND YEAR OF PARTNERSHIP WITH BUY FROM A BLACK WOMAN IN HONOR OF INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY 2022

Buy From a Black Woman is a non-profit organization founded in 2016 by Nikki Porcher that connects more than 600 black women-owned businesses across United States and provides a supportive community with the goal of helping their businesses thrive. Throughout 2021, H&M sponsored events such as the Buy From A Black Woman Inspire Tour and the BFABW Holiday Market which ran from November to December 2021 at the Times Square location of H&M. These events, which saw products from more than 50 black women-owned businesses sold in H&M stores across the country, exposed new customers to these Buy From a Black Woman member businesses.

“Over the past year, working with H&M, we have been able to shine a light on what it means when you believe in and support the communities that support you. The Black Woman Inspire Tour, The Business Accelerator, The Black Woman Holiday Market, these events have helped open the doors wider and we were able to show the world that black women are here,” said Nikki Porcher, Founder of Buy From a Black Woman. “I am thrilled to continue this partnership through 2022 and show why we believe black women are living examples of what is possible, not only when you believe in yourself, but also when you have the support of others. “a community that believes in you. When you support a black woman business owner, you support an entire community. H&M believes in supporting black women.”

Throughout 2022, H&M United States will continue to support Buy From a Black Woman through a variety of activities and support aimed at continued growth and success for business owners, beginning with a donation of $250,000. Starting this summer, H&M United States will once again sponsor the organization’s Buy From a Black Woman Inspire tour, building on H&M the United States brick-and-mortar channels and locations to highlight black women-owned businesses across the country. On the way to fall, H&M United States will continue to focus on sustainability in business by sponsoring the nonprofit’s Black Woman Business Accelerator program. This 10-week business training course includes a structured, expert-led online program to assist Black women business owners in the different ways they can grow, while providing an opportunity to access finance. Internally, H&M United States will sponsor both eligible colleagues who wish to join the Buy From a Black Woman directory and online network and will spotlight the nonprofit’s various ventures throughout the year.

“We are thrilled to enter the second year of our partnership with Buy From a Black Woman. Our relationship with Nikki Porcher and Buy From a Black Woman vendors have allowed us to witness the growth of these businesses in ways we could not have imagined. This partnership exemplifies the impact we want to have in empowering and building capacity in the communities where we live and work,” said Donna DozierGordonInclusion and Diversity Manager at H&M United States.

“After the success and impact we saw in our first year of partnership, we knew we had to continue and expand our support for Nikki Porcher and Buy from a Black Woman for 2022. Through our continued work together, we can further amplify their mission to uplift Black women, their businesses, and their communities,” said carlos duartePresident, H&M Americas.

To watch the trailer for “The Living Example” and see images from the announcement, click here.

For more information on Buying From A Black Woman, please contact:

Nikki PorcherFounder
E-mail: [email protected]
Customers can also donate here.
Support and learn about businesses owned and operated by black women here.

For more information about H&M, please contact:
H&M press relations
E-mail: [email protected]
*We hope you enjoyed reading the latest from H&M, but if not, just email [email protected] and request to be removed from our media list.

H & M Hennes & Mauritz AB (publ) was founded in Sweden in 1947 and is listed on Nasdaq Stockholm. The business idea of ​​H&M is to offer fashion and quality at the best price in a sustainable way. Besides H&M, the group includes the brands COS, Monki, Weekday, & Other Stories, H&M HOME and ARKET as well as Afound. H&M Group has 54 online marketplaces and approximately 4,800 stores in 75 markets, including franchise markets. In 2021, net sales were 199 billion Swedish crowns. The number of employees amounts to approximately 155,000. For more information, visit hmgroup.com.

SOURCEH&M

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History organization

Gregg Popovich ties Don Nelson for most wins in NBA history – NBC Chicago

Gregg Popovich equals Don Nelson for most wins in NBA history originally appeared on NBC Sports Chicago

Gregg Popovich is now one win away from becoming the winningest coach in NBA history.

With the triumph of the San Antonio Spurs 117-110 over the Los Angeles Lakers On Monday, Popovich tied Don Nelson with his 1,335th career regular season victory. Popovich will have a chance to pass Nelson on Wednesday when the Spurs host the Toronto Raptors.

Popovich reached Nelson’s 1,335 win mark in 370 fewer games and five fewer seasons. At 1,335-693, Popovich also ranks eighth all-time in winning percentage among people who have coached at least 100 NBA games.

Popovich first joined the Spurs organization in 1988 as an assistant coach in Larry Brown’s team. After spending a short time as Nelson’s assistant to the Golden State WarriorsPopovich joined the Spurs as general manager and vice president of basketball operations in 1994. He named himself head coach in December 1996 after firing Bob Hill 18 games that season.

The Spurs won the NBA Finals in Popovich’s second full season with the team and remained in title contention for the next two decades. From 1997 to 2019, San Antonio won five NBA titles and never had a season with a record below .500.

Popovich’s side are just 90-118 since the start of the 2019 season. At 25-40, the Spurs currently sit as the No. 12 seed in the Western Conference, 2.5 games from last. play-in spot.

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Canadian army

DVIDS – News – Task Force 46 leads Exercise Cyber ​​Impact 2022

U.S. Army Task Force 46, commanded by Maj. Gen. Pablo Estrada, is a national response force supporting civilian responders to manage catastrophic chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear incidents, conducts an exercise on the effects of Cyber ​​Attack in Buffalo March 8-10, 2022 Exercise Cyber ​​​​​​Impact 22 features leaders from 12 Army National Guard and other military units from across the country working in subordination to the 46th Military Police Command (MPC) to build relationships and develop mutually supportive plans and processes with local, state, federal and private sectors, academics and Canadian partners.

“We are in the digital age…as we watch the attacks that occur, we are one click away from affecting a power grid or a banking institution, and this is only going to become more prevalent,” said the US Army colonel. David Hayes, deputy chief of staff, communications, 46th MPC, Michigan National Guard.

The three-day exercise is intended to build unity of effort and familiarity with the effects of a cyber attack among all Homeland Defense (HD) partners, all-hazards, defense support civil authorities (DSCA)/Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) to prepare for disaster response and consequence management. Participants from Michigan’s National All-Domain Warfighting Center (NADWC) and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police will also join in person and virtually from Canada.

NADWC maximizes joint combat readiness by providing an adaptable, cost-effective, and integrated training environment across all domains, supported by an ever-expanding Joint Joint Command and Control (JADC2) architecture. All of this is designed to allow the application of combined arms effects in a contested threat environment close to peers.

A high-profile example is last May’s ransomware attack on Colonial Pipeline which disrupted plant operations for days and led to a nationwide fuel crisis, which also dramatically increased prices. . Scenarios like this will be used to help guide discussions, brainstorming sessions and expert roundtables.

“This is an exercise that will test the nation’s resilience, strengthen preparedness and cooperation among partners, and improve the effectiveness of a joint response to protect national security,” Hayes said. .

Cyber ​​Impact 2022 attendees will include government and industry leaders from the local, state and federal levels, including those representing police and emergency response units, environmental conservation authorities and electric utilities, Canada-US border security and more.

Mercyhurst University cybersecurity professor Christopher Mansour will be among the panel of distinguished speakers from institutions including MIT, FBI, FEMA, Army Cyber ​​Institute, Niagara University, Ontario Police Cybercrime Investigation Team and U.S. Coast Guard District 9, which oversees operations. across the five Great Lakes.

“Considering how devastating cyberattacks on critical infrastructure can be, it is important to test our vulnerabilities so that we can work to prevent them in the future,” said Mansour, whose presentation will focus on security system threats. industrial control (ICS).

The three-day exercise will include the following:
• Day 1 – Academic Presentations, M&T Bank, Buffalo, New York,
• Day 2 – Tabletop Training Exercise, Red Team Maneuvers, KeyBank Center, 1 Seymour H Knox III Plaza, Buffalo
• Day 3 – Communications exercise at Highmark Stadium, Orchard Park, New York and a tour of key infrastructure in the region (New York Power Authority, US Coast Guard Station)

“Multi-domain operational exercises like this help prevent and prepare not only Task Force 46, but also key metropolitan partners for what unfortunately could be America’s Worst Day. We owe it to all Americans to ensure that the military and emergency responders are prepared for all risks,” said U.S. Army Col. Chris McKinney, Chief of Staff for Task Force 46.

For more information or to arrange interviews and other media coverage, please RSVP by 5 p.m. on March 2, 2022 by contacting:
Staff Sgt. Cambrin Bassett, Public Affairs NCO for Task Force 46, Michigan National Guard: (616) 990-9112 or [email protected]; [email protected]

About Task Force 46.
U.S. Army Task Force 46 is a national response force that assists civilian responders in managing catastrophic chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear incidents. The 46th MPC provides command and control of 12 Army National Guard units and other military units nationwide to build relationships and develop plans and processes for mutual support with local, state, federal, private sector, academic and Canadian partners. For more information, please visit: https://www.facebook.com/46MPCMD







Date taken: 03.07.2022
Date posted: 03.07.2022 07:25
Story ID: 415902
Location: LANSING, MI, United States





Web views: 45
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International headquarters

Astronautics moves manufacturing operations to new headquarters

Estimated reading time 3 minutes, 39 seconds.

Astronautics Corporation of America, a global designer and manufacturer of avionics and connectivity solutions for the aerospace industry, is relocating its manufacturing operations and repair station from the Federal Aviation Administration in Milwaukee to a newly renovated, 80-room state-of-the-art facility. 000 square foot facility in Oak Creek, Wisconsin.

Astronautics’ newly renovated 80,000 square foot state-of-the-art facility in Oak Creek, Wisconsin. Astronautics Photo

The relocation of Astronautics’ manufacturing operations to its new production facility at corporate headquarters will be complete by mid-March 2022. The transition marks the completion of the company’s second phase of renovation on its Oak Creek property and the first time in more than 60 years of history that production, repairs, quality, engineering, programs and support services will be consolidated within the same purpose-built campus to improve collaboration and innovation.

“What was a game-changer with this relocation was that the Oak Creek warehouse we were turning into our new production facility was a blank slate, allowing us to plan and design our ideal manufacturing workflow, from start to finish, before any construction begins,” said Jason Rowell. , Director of Astronautics Operations. “We have implemented purposeful designs intended to streamline our manufacturing and repair processes, improve production efficiency and create a flexible environment that can easily adapt to workflow changes as we build new new products and adding new people and equipment.”

Astronautics’ new 190,000 square foot headquarters is located eight miles south of Milwaukee Mitchell International Airport, 27 miles from downtown Milwaukee and 80 miles from Chicago. The company’s campus is adjacent to Oak Creek’s Drexel Town Square, the city’s newest commercial, retail, civic and residential development with convenient access to parks, restaurants, shopping, hotel accommodations and Interstate 94.

“We are excited to consolidate most of our Milwaukee area facilities into our Oak Creek campus where natural synergies and improved communication will emerge from bringing our teams together, which will positively impact innovation and product production,” commented Mary Loomis, director of communications for Astronautics. . “Additionally, our new facility provides us with the opportunity to grow our operations with a talented, high-tech workforce motivated to design and build state-of-the-art solutions that make flying safer and more secure.”

The first phase of Astronautics’ design-build project was completed in January 2020 when the company moved its engineering, programs and support departments to its newly renovated Oak Creek headquarters. To learn more about Astronautics products and services, as well as career opportunities, visit the company’s website at www.astronautics.com. Demonstrations of Astronautics’ leading display systems and connectivity solutions will be held at HAI Heli-Expo 2022, Booth 4312, March 8-10 in Dallas, TX

This press release was prepared and distributed by onautics Corporation of America.

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History organization

‘Incredible and unique community’: New historical society in Winnipeg Beach seeks to preserve area’s history

A new historical society has been established in Winnipeg Beach to help preserve the area’s history.

The Winnipeg Beach Historical Society held its first meeting a few weeks ago. Society president Wendy Peter felt it was important to have a historic organization for the area.

“When I couldn’t find a historical society, I decided to build what I needed,” Peter said.

She said she wanted to include the community as much as possible in forming the organization and even spoke with the mayor to make sure the society was set up properly.

The group hasn’t been up and running for long, but Peter said there are already over 400 members online.

“Winnipeg Beach is an amazing and unique community…I think it really struck a chord in the community to say, ‘We need to celebrate what we have and what we’ve had in the past. “”

As she prepared to start the company, Peter said she read every book she could find about Winnipeg Beach and at some point learned it was one of the biggest tourist attractions. of Western Canada.

“In fact, at one point, just around the turn of the century, as CP Rail was opening up the West, it was a destination to go to…we see Winnipeg’s elite and wealthy creating a playground for their weekends. -ends.”

She said that on weekends, Winnipeg Beach drew thousands of people on the train and it was a way for people to get away from the Victorian way of life.

“People in this society wanted a place to get away from the pressure and I think that’s a theme that has continued to this day.”

Once the area gained popularity, Peter said people started building cabins, hotels and other attractions, noting that a lot of thought and care went into what was built.

Peter also noted that there is a strong Jewish connection to the community’s past, compared to other parts of Manitoba.

“Jews weren’t allowed to buy cottages. It probably wasn’t written, but there was hostility and a lack of welcome in other communities, but in Winnipeg Beach they started to gathering and celebrating. There was a synagogue there. There was a big presence on the beach.”

She said it is stories like this that show the importance of remembering history so that today’s society can continue to grow and learn from the past.

Going forward, Peter said the community wants to continue collecting stories from the past. They also have events in the works, like a historic cabin tour, and Peter also wants to host an old-fashioned dance where people can dress up in clothes that match the era.

If people want to get involved, Peter said they can join the historical society’s Facebook page or photos from the past can be shared at [email protected]

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Canadian army

What if the Winter War came to Canada?

There is a nice sound in the expression “war in the mountains”. He has a Ring of Audacity; it feels cleaner than trench warfare and lighter than tank warfare. The only thing that can match it is war in the air, and it’s gotten too deadly to be nice. It has also become too familiar; while the War in the Mountains is still weird enough to seem romantic. Except, of course, to the men who have to fight it.

– McKay Jenkins The last ridge

Like many of you, last week I was in shock watching Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Just when we think we have seen enough defining world events for our generation to last into the next century, Putin decides to flex his imperialist muscle and plunges two nations, including a military superpower, into an unprovoked and unnecessary war. Let’s be clear: there is no splitting the freedom convoy, let’s try to listen to both sides here. On one side are the Kremlin belligerents and on the other are thousands of soldiers and civilians defending their homeland. Millions of people are now displaced. The world stands in solidarity with Ukraine. I am with Ukraine.

I am not a soldier and I am lucky not to have known the war. I enjoy studying military history as a hobby, which leads me to listen to Dan Carlin’s podcasts for many hours. I never believed that war was the answer, but if it comes to your doorstep and threatens your family and your country (as it does for Ukrainians), I believe defending your homeland is justified.

Such an event of this magnitude taking place in the 21st century got me thinking: what if we were the ones being invaded at the behest of a narcissistic autocrat? It’s a highly unlikely scenario given Canada’s fortuitous geopolitical position, but dystopian fiction writers have explored the plausibility of US annexation. So imagine, for a second, that in the middle of a cold winter, Canada is invaded on many fronts by armed forces far superior to ours, and the leader of Canada is calling on everyone of fighting age to take up arms against the ‘aggressor.

If this scenario were to come true, I would volunteer for a Mountain Division. Not because of an illusion that ski warfare would somehow be more fun than urban warfare, but because I know I have the skills to travel through snow and through mountainous terrain quite quickly.

Military skiing has a rich history in the Scandinavian nations. In 1716, during the Great Northern War, a Norwegian general was alerted to an impending Swedish attack by a messenger on skis. After surprising the Swedes and repelling the attack, Norway realized the advantage of rapid mobilization on the snow and drafted all the skiers they could find into their military ranks. In the 1800s, Nordic military ski patrols began to organize competitions which led to the foundation of modern Nordic ski racing. The ability to move quickly over rugged mountainous terrain was essential for armies in the European Alps in the 20th century.

In the context of soldiers on skis defending themselves against a superpower, the best example is the Winter War, which began with the Soviet invasion of Finland on November 30, 1939, three months after the outbreak of World War II. The Finns were vastly outnumbered and under-resourced, with many recently enlisted soldiers not even having a uniform and making do with their own winter clothes. But they knew their terrain and climate, and almost all Finnish soldiers were skilled in cross-country skiing. They used the cold, the snow, the forest and the long hours of darkness to their advantage. The Finns dressed in layers with skiers wearing light white snow capes, the camouflage rendering them nearly invisible and capable of executing many successful guerrilla attacks against the Soviet columns.

The United States has the 10th Mountain Division, which was active in World War II and until recently served as a dedicated mountain warfare unit in places like Iraq and Syria. Although there are special operations training programs in Canada for mountain travel, the armed forces still do not have a dedicated mountain unit, at least not the one they want us to know. In a 2017 service article titled “Mountain Warfare In The Canadian Army,” Maj Aafaq Hyder, a student at the Canadian Forces College, wrote:

“The [Canadian Army]recent involvement in the Alpine operations in Korea, the Balkans and Afghanistan has highlighted the importance of preparing its leaders and troops to [Mountain Warfare] and fight at high altitude. Currently, the [Canadian Army] little focus on preparing permanent units specially trained or equipped to deploy to a mountainous theater. To remain operationally viable and meet its military commitments to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the [Canadian Army] must develop their skills in mountain operations. It must carve out a place for itself as an expeditionary force capable of rapid intervention in [Mountain Warfare].”

Of all the things I associate with skiing, war has never been one. And I sincerely hope that war never comes to Canada’s doorstep. But if the last week has shown us all one thing, it’s that the tyrants of this world might just choose to do it anyway.

Vince Shuley encourages you to donate to the Ukrainian Red Cross Humanitarian Crisis Appeal. For questions, comments or suggestions for The Outsider, email [email protected] or Instagram @whis_vince.

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International headquarters

Putin’s Balkan narrative argument for the war in Ukraine

BELGRADE – Long before Russian tanks and troops arrived in Ukraine, Vladimir Putin was using the bloody breakup of Yugoslavia in the 1990s to ostensibly justify the invasion of a sovereign European country.

The Russian president has particularly focused on the NATO bombing of Serbia in 1999 and the West’s acceptance of Kosovo’s declaration of independence in 2008. He says the two set an illegal precedent that broke international law and order, seemingly giving him an excuse to invade Ukraine.

Putin’s arguments, repeated over and over since Russia’s annexation of Crimea in 2014, seem to run along this line: if different ex-Yugoslavian republics and the former Serbian province of Kosovo could become independent with the support and wars countries, why couldn’t Ukraine’s strategic Black Sea peninsula? and the rebel-controlled Russian-majority regions in the east of the country broke away from their parent nations – with Russian help?

A d

With strong American support, the ethnic Albanian-dominated Kosovo seceded despite Serbia’s strong objections. Russia, a historic ally of the Serbs, then argued that this set a precedent that could trigger a series of state claims elsewhere in the world.

In July 2010, the UN’s highest court ruled that Kosovo’s declaration of independence was legal, but did not outright endorse Kosovo’s claim to statehood.

There are many differences between the Russian attack on Ukraine, considered in the West as one of the darkest moments for Europe since the Second World War, and the wars in the Balkans which claimed more than 120,000 dead and millions homeless. There are also some similarities.

WHAT ARE THE MAIN DIFFERENCES?

NATO did not occupy Kosovo after driving out Serbian forces from the former Serbian province, but sent peacekeepers. Russian troops, meanwhile, took control of Crimea even before its referendum on joining Russia.

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NATO only intervened in Kosovo after significant evidence of Serb abuses against ethnic Albanians, including massacres and deportations. Russian forces intervened in Ukraine with no reports of major abuse or violence against ethnic Russians.

The Kosovars declared their independence but did not join their ethnic brethren in neighboring Albania in a single state. Crimea, which has a majority Russian population, signed an agreement to join Russia two days after the referendum, deemed flawed and undemocratic by the West.

WHAT ARE THE MAIN SIMILARITIES?

Both interventions began with false claims that ethnic minorities are being persecuted in neighboring countries. The Serb-led army unleashed a heavy artillery barrage on towns and villages in Croatia in 1991, something similar to the initial attacks by Russian forces on Ukraine.

Just as Croats, Bosnians and Kosovo Albanians feared Serbian repression under the autocratic rule of late Serbian leader Slobodan Milosevic, ethnic Russians feared Ukrainian nationalists.

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WHAT DID PUTIN SAY?

“(German Chancellor Olaf Scholz) just said that people of his generation – and I certainly belong to that generation myself – find it hard to imagine a war in Europe,” Putin said after talks with Scholz at Moscow on November 15.

“But we all witnessed the war in Europe that NATO unleashed against Yugoslavia,” Putin said. He recalled that it was a major military operation involving bombardments against a European capital, Belgrade.

” It happened. Without any sanctions from the UN Security Council. This is a very sad example, but it is an undeniable fact,” Putin said.

He argued that by intervening in Kosovo, the West set a precedent with lasting consequences.

WHAT IS THE VIEW FROM THE WEST?

During the press conference with Putin, Scholz hit back at the Russian president’s arguments about NATO’s actions in Kosovo, saying it was done to prevent genocide, referring to the persecution of the majority of ethnic Albanians of Kosovo by Serbian forces.

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Western leaders have repeatedly dismissed Putin’s arguments, saying Kosovo was a unique case because of the high number of casualties during the Balkan wars amid the violent breakup of Yugoslavia. Former German Chancellor Angela Merkel had insisted that Putin’s analogies between the West’s actions in Kosovo and Russia’s intervention in Crimea were “shameful”.

WHAT CAN THE CONSEQUENCES BE?

There are fears that pro-Russian Serbian leaders are trying to use international attention on Ukraine to further destabilize its neighbours, particularly Bosnia where the Serbian minority is threatening to join Serbia.

European Union peacekeepers in Bosnia have announced the deployment of some 500 additional troops, citing “deteriorating international security (which) has the potential to spread instability” in the region.

Kosovo leaders fear that Serbia is being encouraged by Russia to try to intervene in its former province to end alleged harassment of minority Serbs. Kosovo asked NATO for a fast track to membership in the wake of the Ukraine crisis, which neither Serbia nor Russia would likely accept peacefully.

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Kosovar officials dismissed Putin’s parallels between NATO’s intervention in Kosovo and his invasion of Ukraine as “totally baseless and ridiculous”.

___

AP Balkan correspondent Dusan Stojanovic covered the Yugoslav wars in the 1990s and events in Ukraine in 2014.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Non profit living

San Antonio Ukrainians ask for help during meeting with Rep. Joaquin Castro

SAN ANTONIO — Ukrainians living in San Antonio hope to make their voices heard in Washington, DC A total of six women who represent local Ukrainian nonprofit San Antonio met directly with Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-San Antonio) on Friday.

They wanted to share their worries and frustrations about the war in their native country. They are looking for answers to help their loved ones back home.

“I keep in touch with my friends who are in hiding. They are scared and live in constant fear,” said Viktoriya Lundblade.

Lundblade said his hometown of Kharkiv was leveled by Russian shelling. It is one of many areas under constant Russian assault.

“You see a beautiful city, people dancing. Right now this city is bombed, destroyed,” Lundblade said.

Castro moderated the roundtable and wanted to reassure these women that their calls are being heard.

“I wanted to let them know that I’m listening and Congress is listening,” Castro said. “I know they speak in a very desperate voice because many of them still have family members there.”

A d

These women are calling for tougher sanctions against Russia.

“The United States is stepping up its military support, also imposing very tough sanctions on (President) Putin and Russia,” Castro said.

Castro said he was also working with Missouri Representative Ann Wagner (R-MO) to impose social and cultural sanctions in Russia, as well as a way to help refugees.

“I’m going to take this conversation and talk to other lawmakers in Washington. There has been talk of a humanitarian corridor so people fleeing the country have a safe route, so they don’t risk being hit by Russian fire,” Castro said.

These women just hope that they can one day return to the Ukraine they once called home.

“Please stop this war. I want to go back to my hometown, which is already bombed, and I want to see my people,” Lundblade said.

Copyright 2022 by KSAT – All rights reserved.

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History organization

Nuestra Casa de Sunnyside expands its services to people applying for citizenship | Local

Nuestra Casa, an organization serving Sunnyside’s Hispanic community, has increased its ability to help people become US citizens, which staff members say is a much sought-after service.

Executive Director Caty Padilla and Citizenship Program Coordinator Monica Romero-Castro became partially accredited representatives to provide legal naturalization assistance earlier this year, according to a press release.

The organization has been offering citizenship courses for many years. But speaking with community members, Nuestra Casa saw a need for additional assistance.

“We saw that there really was a need for naturalization legal services,” Padilla said. “Waiting times here to see a lawyer can be very long and sometimes that can put off applicants. It’s the last thing we want, so we decided to go there and ask for accreditation.

The Ministry of Justice granted Nuestra Casa accreditation in March 2020, with a representative.

“We quickly found that wasn’t enough,” Padilla said. So she and Romero-Castro began their own accreditation process.

The partial accreditation process took some time, Padilla and Romero-Castro said. They each had to spend 240 hours shadowing a DOJ-approved representative. And the pandemic has made it more difficult to find places where they can do their training.

Padilla said the organization receives at least five calls a day from people seeking naturalization. Cases that exceed the organization’s ability to help, such as those involving criminal histories, are referred to qualified attorneys.

Although the pandemic has slowed them down a bit, Padilla said the organization has helped around 25 people complete the naturalization process and another 15 are ongoing.

A long process

Obtaining citizenship is not a quick process, with high demand and a limited number of legal aid workers available.

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services field office in Yakima can take more than a year to process a person’s application, according to the release.

Nuestra Casa offers citizenship classes to help people prepare for the process. A semester consists of classes twice a week for 10 weeks, said citizenship program secretary Ariana Vargas. Some people take the course multiple times.

Classes moved online during the pandemic, but staff hope to bring them back in person in the spring. Padilla said class sizes will likely increase when they return and there is already a waiting list.

The naturalization process includes written and oral tests with questions about the applicant’s American civics and background. Nuestra Casa workers hold mock interviews with candidates to help them prepare.

Naturalization can also be an expensive process. The app alone costs $725. Going through a lawyer can increase the final price.

Padilla estimated that most people who complete the process through Nuestra Casa pay between $800 and $900 in total.

give back

Nuestra Casa was founded to meet the needs of low-income immigrant women in the lower Yakima Valley, according to the organization’s website. Padilla said that over the years her reach has expanded to include more members of the Sunnyside community, including men and families.

In addition to naturalization assistance, Nuestra Casa offers classes in English as a second language, financial literacy, and understanding personal health.

Padilla and Romero-Castro said they were drawn to Nuestra Casa because of their own backgrounds. Both come from immigrant families and can understand the needs of their clients.

Romero-Castro became a citizen in 2019 and went through the application process on her own, she said.

“Sometimes when you don’t have that advice, you’re a little lost,” she said. “I think it’s made a huge difference to our community because now they have these tips.”

She is working on becoming an immigration lawyer to continue helping her community.

Padilla said citizenship is not the end of the job. Once people obtain citizenship, they feel more secure participating in their communities and making their voices heard politically.

“Ultimately, the more citizens, the more people who are civically engaged, the more we can work to improve our community,” she said.

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Canadian army

Ukraine-Russia War: Live Updates – The New York Times

A fire broke out early Friday at a complex in southern Ukraine housing Europe’s largest nuclear power plant after Russian troops fired on the area, and the Russian military later took control of the site, Ukrainian officials said.

Security camera footage verified by The New York Times showed a burning building inside the Zaporizhzhia nuclear complex near a line of military vehicles. The videos appeared to show people in the vehicles shooting at power plant buildings. Ukraine’s state emergency service later said the fire was extinguished after 6 a.m.

The fire did not affect essential plant equipment, the International Atomic Energy Agency said on Twitterciting his communication with the Ukrainian government.

About an hour after dawn, the inspection of Ukrainian nuclear regulations said in a press release that Russian military forces now occupied the complex. He said all power units at the site remained intact and no changes in radiation levels were observed.

The fire started after a Russian attack on a training building outside the factory perimeter, according to a statement from Ukraine’s state emergency service. A spokesman for the nuclear power plant, Andriy Tuz, was quoted by The Associated Press as saying on Ukrainian television that shells set fire to one of the plant’s six reactors which was being renovated and did not work.

Ukraine’s nuclear inspectorate later said in its statement that one unit of the six units was working, another was “out of order”, two were being cooled down and two others had been disconnected from the grid.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky had accused the Russian military of deliberately attacking the complex and said an explosion there would have been “the end for everyone, the end of Europe”.

“Only immediate actions from Europe could stop the Russian military,” he added.

President Biden spoke with Mr. Zelensky about the fire and joined him in urging Russia to “cease its military activities in the region and allow firefighters and emergency responders access to the site,” the White House said. Local reports later said emergency teams had gained access.

Mr. Biden’s energy secretary, Jennifer M. Granholm, said on Twitter that the United States had not detected high levels of radiation in the region, echoing an earlier assessment by the International Atomic Energy Agency. “The plant’s reactors are protected by robust containment structures and the reactors are shut down safely,” she said.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said he will request an emergency meeting of the United Nations Security Council over the fire at the complex, according to his office.

Before the fire was reported by Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba, Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency said in a press release that “a large number of Russian tanks and infantry” had entered Enerhodar, a town next to the factory. Chief Executive Rafael Mariano Grossi said troops were “heading straight” to the reactor site.

the Zaporizhia nuclear complex, on the Dnieper about 160 km north of Crimea, is the largest in Europe. According to the International Atomic Energy Agencyits six reactors produce a total of 6,000 megawatts of electricity.

By comparison, the Chernobyl plant in northern Ukraine produced 3,800 megawatts, about a third less. (One megawatt, one million watts, is enough to light 10,000 hundred-watt bulbs.) All four reactors at the Chernobyl complex were shut down after one suffered a catastrophic fire and meltdown in 1986 .

Reactor cores are filled with highly radioactive fuel. But an added hazard at the Zaporizhzhia site is the many acres of open water ponds behind the complex where spent fuel rods have been cooled for years. Experts fear that errant shells or missiles striking such sites could trigger radiological disasters.

For days, social media reports detailed how the residents of Enerhodar erected a giant barrier of tires, vehicles, and metal barricades in an attempt to block a Russian advance into the city and the reactor site. Christoph Koettl, Visual Investigator for The New York Times, noted on twitter that the barricades were so big that they could be seen from outer space by orbiting satellites.

Since last Sunday, three days after the start of the invasion, the Ukrainian nuclear regulator started reporting an unusual rate of disconnections: Six of the country’s 15 reactors were offline. Tuesday, the Installation of Zaporizhzhia was the site with the most offline reactors.

John Youn, Marc Santora and Nathan Willis contributed report.

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International headquarters

Real estate companies plan new headquarters in Alabama, creating 400 jobs

Lake Homes Realty, which bills itself as the nation’s largest real estate brokerage focused on lake properties, and RealSource said the headquarters move aligns with key growth initiatives of both companies.

The companies occupy space at 500 Corporate Parkway in the Meadbrook Office Park off US 280 in the Shelby County portion of Hoover. Building renovations and business relocation will include $1 million in new capital investment in businesses.

“500 Corporate Parkway has met our current business needs while leaving plenty of room for future growth,” said Glenn S. Phillips, CEO of Lake Homes Realty.

CORRIDOR GROWTH

Lake Homes and RealSource settle in an area of ​​Hoover that provides a solid base for technology companies and corporate headquarters. Along the corridor, companies such as McLeod Software, NXTSoft, SS&C Health and FIS employ hundreds of tech workers.

Civitan International is headquartered in the building where Lake Homes and RealSource will be located. Diversified Energy and the Sheffield Group, both located in Meadow Brook Corporate Park, are also headquartered in Hoover.

“Lake Homes and RealSource retain and create hundreds of knowledge-based jobs that further strengthen this type of corporate presence in our city,” said Hoover Mayor Frank Brocato.

Lake Homes Realty currently serves 33 states, while RealSource operates in 12 states and will operate in more in the near future.

“Lake Homes Reality and RealSource’s recent commitment to permanently anchor their national headquarters in Alabama is another testament to the strong business environment we all strive to create,” said Vince Perez, Project Manager senior for the Alabama Department of Commerce.

“We are proud that Lake Homes Realty and RealSource share our vision that Alabama is an ideal place to start, grow and thrive in an innovative business.”

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Non profit living

There are 600 Holocaust survivors in Queens, nonprofit to get big money to help them

A non-profit group with a strong presence in Queens is set to receive millions of dollars to allocate to Holocaust survivors (Picture: Selfhelp website)

March 3, 2022 By Michael Dorgan

A nonprofit group with a strong presence in Queens is set to receive millions of dollars to allocate to Holocaust survivors.

Selfhelp, a Manhattan-based nonprofit that provides a range of services to seniors, will receive nearly $31 million through the German government to help the organization care for elderly New York-area residents who survived the horrors of the Holocaust.

A portion of those funds will be used to support Selfhelp’s Holocaust Survivor program in Queens, which it operates from an office at 70-20 Austin St. in Forest Hills.

The program offers home care, financial management services, community support and social programs. There are about 600 Holocaust survivors living in the borough, according to Aubrey Jacobs, the program’s executive director.

Of the approximately 600 Holocaust survivors living in Queens, 125 of them live in Forest Hills, Jacobs said.

The $30.7 million comes from a global nonprofit organization called Claims Conference, which is working with the German government to secure the funds.

The Claims Conference has secured reparations for Holocaust survivors living around the world since the early 1950s. The organization makes annual payments to hundreds of nonprofit organizations, including Selfhelp.

The payments, which come every year, are the primary source of funding for Selfhelp’s Holocaust Survivor program, Jacobs said.

Jacobs said funding is vitally important to helping Holocaust survivors live out their final years comfortably. Many Holocaust survivors are frail and in their 80s to 90s, she said.

“The support we receive from the Claims Conference is critically important as it enables us to…provide the services, support and care our clients deserve to help them live with dignity and independence,” said Jacobs.

Funding received by the Claims Conference last year, Jacobs said, was also used to cover the cost of medical care, food, utilities and other emergency needs that Holocaust survivors had. need during the pandemic.

Additionally, Selfhelp social workers provided virtual programs, phone calls and home visits to help address the increased isolation of survivors during the lockdowns.

Jacobs said it’s difficult to gauge how much of the funds received this year will go to support Holocaust survivors living in Queens, given that Selfhelp runs other Holocaust survivor programs in the area. from New York.

Selfhelp’s programs for Holocaust survivors support about 5,500 Jews outside of Queens, she said.

Since 1952, the German government has paid more than $90 billion in compensation to victims who were persecuted by the Nazis, mostly through negotiations with the Claims Conference.

This year, Claims Conference is receiving $720 million from the German government, which it will distribute to more than 300 nonprofit and social service organizations around the world.

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History organization

History, theme and significance announced by WHO

On World Hearing Day, WHO called on governments to raise awareness about safe listening.

March 3 is celebrated as World Hearing Day by the World Health Organization (WHO). It aims to raise awareness for the prevention of deafness and hearing loss and to promote ear and hearing care around the world.

Every year WHO decides on the theme and prepares brochures, leaflets, posters, banners and presentations to raise awareness of the day.

These materials are shared with government and civil society partners around the world as well as with WHO regional and country offices.

History of World Hearing Day

According to the WHO, the day was created in 2007 with the aim of raising awareness about deafness. It was then called International Ear Day, but the name was changed to World Hearing Day in 2016.

This year’s theme

The WHO has chosen “To hear for life, listen carefully” as the theme for this year’s World Hearing Day. It emphasizes the importance and ways to prevent hearing loss through safe listening.

The global health body also seeks to spread the following message with the theme: that it is possible to have good hearing throughout life thanks to ear and hearing care, many Common causes of hearing loss can be prevented and “safe listening” can mitigate the risk of hearing loss associated with exposure to recreational sounds.

Importance of World Hearing Day

WHO has sought the cooperation of governments, industry partners and civil society to raise awareness about safe listening. He said this year will mark the launch of the global standard for safe-listening entertainment venues and the mSafeListening handbook.

Highlights

The WHO has said that by 2050 almost 2.5 billion people are expected to have some degree of hearing loss and at least 700 million will need hearing rehabilitation.

He further stated that more than a billion young adults are at risk of permanent and preventable hearing loss due to unsafe listening practices.

The WHO has further stated that more than five percent of the world’s population needs rehabilitation to remedy their “crippling” hearing loss.

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Canadian army

Ukrainian student in Saskatchewan. calls on Ottawa to lift visa requirements as family flees war

A 20-year-old Ukrainian student living in Saskatoon is asking the Canadian government to ease visa requirements as he struggles to bring his family members, most of whom are fleeing the Russian invasion, to Canada.

In November, Bohdan Titorenko left Ukraine to pursue a wrestling scholarship at the University of Saskatchewan. He called his father, Oleksandr Titorenko, on Thursday to tell him Russia was invading. He said his father didn’t believe him at first.

“He called me 20 minutes [later] to say “Bohdan, they are attacking,” Bohdan said. His father sent him videos and said the Russians had attacked a military base about three kilometers away.

“I see the forest around my burnt house…I hear how my mother is crying, I hear how my little sister is scared.”

On Wednesday, Russia continued its assault on Ukraine’s second-largest city, Kharkiv, despite expecting another round of peace talks on Thursday morning.

How can I help my family? How can I help my country?-Bohdan Titorenko

It’s unclear how many people have died in the week-long war, but Ukraine’s emergency services released a statement Wednesday morning saying there had been more than 2,000 Ukrainian civilian casualties, according to a report by the ‘Associated Press.

Titorenko said his mother and two siblings crossed the Polish border while his father stayed behind to fight off the Russian attackers. Titorenko’s longtime friends also enlisted, he said.

“I just wonder, ‘How can I help my family and how can I help my country?'” Titorenko told CBC host Leisha Grebinski. Saskatoon morning.

Bohdan Titorenko with his eight-year-old sister, Anfisa. He said she had just entered Poland with her mother and 16-year-old brother. (Submitted by Bohdan Titorenko)

Titorenko said there were times when he couldn’t eat or sleep, worried about his family. He said he could be in Ukraine fighting for his country, then stopped, sniffling and composing his voice before adding: “But I have a responsibility to protect my family here.”

LISTEN | Ukrainian university student wishing to bring his family to Canada

13:41Saskatoon man tries to bring his mother and siblings from Ukraine to Canada after the bombing of their family home

Leisha Grebinski speaks with Bogdan Titorenko, a University of Saskatchewan student whose family has already suffered devastating losses in their Ukrainian village 13:41

A house hit by missile fire

For three days, his mother, Irina Titorenko, and two siblings, David and Anfisa, huddled on the bathroom floor, wary of bombs that could obliterate their home. Titorenko said that without a basement or shelter, the bathroom was the best option for his family.

Shortly after he decided to flee their home, located near a military base in northern Ukraine and just outside a town called Zhytomr, the neighborhood was bombed, he said. .

Titorenko says his friend, Oleksandr Khomich, sent him this video of his Zhytomyr neighborhood on fire. He thinks his house might be involved in the sinking. (Chans Lagaden/CBC Saskatchewan)

On Tuesday, four people were killed in Zhytomyr when homes were hit by a Russian cruise missile targeting the nearby air base, according to Ukrainian Interior Minister Anton Gerashchenko. reported by Reuters. Reuters said it was unable to verify the information.

Hearing about the attack near his home and seeing videos of people’s tearful responses, Titorenko felt “a lot of pain, a lot of pain for my civilian people, for my country”.

“I will protect the country, you must protect the family”

According to Titorenko, his family was able to cross the Polish border, except for his father, Oleksandr Titorenko, a wheat and soybean farmer who stayed to join the army.

In a separate interview with CBC, Titorenko said his father told him “I will protect [the] country, you have to protect the family. You have a responsibility.”

Titorenko was conflicted over how to handle the invasion of his country. He said he donated all his money to the Ukrainian military and recently created a GoFundMe page asking for money to bring his family to Canada.

Bohdan Titorenko has created a GoFundMe page asking for help in bringing his family, who recently crossed the border from Poland, to Canada. (GoFundMe)

So far, the fundraising page has raised nearly $1,000 of the $10,000 goal.

He is also calling on the government to introduce visa-free travel to make it easier for Ukrainians to enter Canada. However, her family still had to meet other requirements, such as having enough money to stay in Canada.

At a news conference on Monday, federal Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Minister Sean Fraser said the government was working on a plan to allow more Ukrainians to enter Canada.

“We are working with the Ukrainian Canadian Congress to develop the best way forward, and also working with different provincial counterparts, to understand the opportunities to do this in the right way and in the most efficient way,” he said. .

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International headquarters

Why the Ukrainian Invasion Was Predictable: ‘It’s time the world finally learned a lesson about Russia’ | FIU News

Through a series of opinion pieces, FIU News shares the expertise and diverse perspectives of members of the university community. In this article, Besiki Luka Kutateladze, an associate professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice and a native of the Republic of Georgia, examines how many experts saw the attack on Ukraine coming — and even warned the world about its probability.

By Besiki Luka Kutateladze

The Russian invasion of Ukraine is finally getting some deserved attention. From financial penalties to direct military aid, the West unites to confront Putin’s imperialism. Along with this development comes the realization that the benefits of resisting Russian aggression outweigh the economic and security risks posed by such actions. While it’s certainly refreshing to see the West finally throwing a punch, much of this could have been done sooner.

I remember 2008, standing in front of the United Nations headquarters in New York as an international student from Georgia, shouting at the top of his lungs: If the West ignores the Russian invasion of Georgia, this would encourage further Russian military expansion both south and west. As in 2008, the opportunities still seem endless, from Kazakhstan to the Baltic countries, even if the latter are members of NATO.

Russia occupies 20% of Georgiaand continues the process of creeping annexation land surrounding the occupied territories. Russia has also orchestrated frozen conflicts in Nagorno-Karabakh and Transnistria.

Still, the move to Ukraine seemed to fetch the biggest prizes for the post-Soviet era. The invasion was intended to deter the Euro-Atlantic integration of Ukraine, as well as Georgia and Moldova. Putin has always considered Ukraine to be part of the historical territory of greater Russia. The illegality of 2014 annexation of Crimea and eastern Ukraine tamed the unbridled appetite of the imperialist monster for nearly eight years, but those who thought Putin would stop there were wrong.

The ground for an invasion of Ukraine could not have been more fertile.

The rise of the European Union energy dependence on Russia has made many Europeans, and in particular Germans, prefer today’s egg to tomorrow’s chicken. While Russian natural gas, crude oil and solid fuels kept European cars running and buildings warm, many European politicians blamed Ukrainians (and also Georgians) for not being ready to join the EU or NATO.

At the Bucharest summit in 2008, NATO created a path for Ukraine and Georgia to join NATO, but no major steps have been taken, leaving these fragile democracies in danger of slipping back into the Russian orbit.

The abandonment of Ukraine and Georgia has stalled pro-democracy reforms throughout the post-Soviet sphere whose leaders are watching Georgia and Ukraine pay a heavy price for looking west.

Russia has been undeterred for far too long. The ongoing war in Ukraine is being waged on behalf of the entire region. The Ukrainian people are being punished for their commitment to building a free democratic society, a society that their eastern neighbor still hates. Offering NATO and EU memberships is the least we can do to thank these fighters for their commitment to a free world.

Professor Kutateladze experienced first-hand Russian aggression in the 1990s when Russia took control of the Georgian regions of Abkhazia and South Ossetia. During the 2008 Russo-Georgian War, he joined his fellow Georgians in New York and Washington DC to protest the occupation and warn against possible future aggression from the Putin regime. From 2008 to 2013, he played a crucial role in the development of the United Nations Rule of Law Indicators. In 2002, he was a US State Department Fellow in the Republic of Georgia. He holds a law degree from Georgia and a doctorate in criminal justice from the United States.

Besiki Luka Kutateladze

Map of Russian conflicts

Map of Post-Soviet Era Conflicts (Source: Warsaw Institute)

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Non profit living

Myron Tarkanian Obituary (2022) – Pasadena, CA

May 13, 1940 – February 12, 2022 Myron George Tarkanian was born May 13, 1940 in Euclid Ohio to Armenian immigrants George and Rose Tarkanian, survivors of the Armenian Genocide. Myron was the third of three children, 10 years younger than his brother Jerry and 13 years younger than his sister Alice. George and Rose operated a small grocery store 7 blocks from Lake Erie during the middle of the Depression and the start of World War II. George, a generous and caring man, died of tuberculosis in 1940, six months after Myron was born. Rose remarried Vahan Derderian, whom Myron considered her father. Together, they all embarked on a cross-country road trip, intending to move to Fresno, California, but stopped in Pasadena to visit friends and relatives. Rose fell in love with the San Gabriel Mountains, often saying that Pasadena “reminds her of the old country”. With the exception of a few years early in his coaching career, Myron has never left the San Gabriel Valley. Pasadena was his home for the duration of his childhood and his workhouse for most of his life. A graduate of Longfellow Elementary, Wilson Middle School, and Pasadena High School, Myron grew up as a budding athlete and developed many lifelong friends, including his best friend, Harvey Hyde, whom he met in 3rd grade. Myron adored his mother Rose. She died in 1964. Vahan died in 1966. Myron’s brother Jerry, a Hall of Fame basketball coach and legendary sports personality, died on February 11, 2015. Myron’s sister Alice, known for his extraordinary loyalty to his older and younger brothers, died. on September 19, 2015. Myron attended the University of Redlands, where he earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree, and developed many close friendships that lasted a lifetime. He played football, earned a degree in education, and graduated as a teacher. Most importantly, Myron met the love of his life, Anna Fagerlin, who became his wife of 59 years. After graduating from the UofR, they got married. Together they had 4 children, Bill, the eldest, and Rose, Jane and Kendra. Myron was hired as head football coach at Moreno Valley High School right out of college, creating winning teams at the newly created school, and was named head football coach at Mt. San Jacinto College , launching their football program. In 1967, he left to become an assistant football coach at the University of Hawaii, where he and his family lived for a year. In 1968, Myron returned to Pasadena to become co-head football coach at Pasadena City College, along with his childhood friend, Harvey Hyde. Together they built a Junior College football dynasty that lasted nearly three decades, although Myron quit football to focus on his family, health and business 8 years later. He has the distinction of being the head coach of the last undefeated team (10-0-1) and the CCP National Championship in 1974. He continued to teach physical education and coach other sports ( men’s and women’s tennis and men’s and women’s football) for five years. decades, retiring in 2004 as the most winning coach in CPC track and field history, including conference titles in men’s tennis in 1992 and 1998, and men’s soccer in 1999, 2000 and 2001 He was inducted into the CCP Sports Hall of Fame in 2018, joining his famous brother, Jerry Tarkanian. During his five decades at the PCC, Myron developed many friendships with colleagues, players and students that have stood the test of time. Family was Myron’s highest priority and greatest source of pride. Her four children are all college graduates with graduate degrees. His daughters, Rose, Jane and Kendra, became accomplished educators like their father. Bill became a lawyer and is currently the director of a non-profit behavioral health organization, LA CADA. Myron and Anna were present for their 4 children at all their games, recitals and school activities. Rose, Jane and Kendra collectively had 8 grandchildren, and the children and grandchildren were the pride of Myron and Anna’s life. Summers included family reunions and long vacations. Anna Tarkanian, like her husband, was also a career educator. They lived in the same house in Arcadia, California for 50 years. They were the epitome of a happy, loving marriage and successful parenting. Myron was diagnosed with heart disease in his mid-thirties and survived a battle with cancer in his early sixties. In response, he hiked several miles a day, ran marathons, and became a vegetarian. He always saw himself as living on borrowed time, and in the last years of his life, Myron expressed a sense of deep gratitude for being husband, father, brother, uncle, grandfather, the coach and friend adored and respected by all who knew him. . He is survived by his beloved wife Anna, his children Bill, Rose, Jane and Kendra; sons-in-law, Clark Longhurst, Randy Wilson and Dave McGrath; and grandchildren, Randirose Wilson, Annalee Longhurst, Chris Wilson, Myron Longhurst, Kennan Wilson, Charlotte McGrath, Tark McGrath and Georgia Longhurst. A memorial service and celebration of life will be held Saturday, March 5 at 2:30 p.m. at the south end of the Rose Bowl in Pasadena. At the request of the family, a donation in lieu of flowers to LA CADA’s Myron Tarkanian Legacy Fund is appreciated. Go to LACADA.com.

Published by Pasadena Star-News on March 2, 2022.

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History organization

The history of Bottega Veneta – WWD

It’s hard to imagine Bottega Veneta, which last year surpassed the 1.5 billion euro mark and achieved global brand status, as a struggling, understated and on the verge of bankruptcy in 2001 – and many may have forgotten that the acquisition of the brand was led by Tom Ford and Domenico De Sole, who then ran the Gucci Group.

Gucci Group takes the reins

De Sole then revealed that Bottega Veneta was at the top of his list of acquisition targets and, together with Ford, realized that the brand’s strong heritage of high-quality leather accessories and footwear and craftsmanship Italian had enormous potential. He thought the brand could exponentially increase its revenue, which in 2000 was around $50 million.

Ford did not become involved in the design of the collection, as it took over the design of the Yves Saint Laurent Rive Gauche rtw line, which Gucci Group acquired in November 1999. Instead, Tomas Maier was appointed to the position of creator. director of Bottega Veneta.

Initially, Gucci Group purchased a 66.67% stake in Bottega Veneta through a capital investment of $96.2 million and the purchase of shares from its shareholders for $60.6 million, for a total of $156.8 million. The remaining 33.33% was in the hands of its shareholders – the Moltedo family.

The beginnings of Bottega Veneta

The company was founded in 1966 in Vicenza, Veneto, by Michele Taddei and Renzo Zengiaro. Shortly after Zengiaro left Bottega Veneta in the late 70s, Taddei handed the business over to his ex-wife Laura Braggion, who ran the business with her second husband Vittorio Moltedo and was the brand’s creative director. . She would contribute to the brand’s early success in the United States by becoming Andy Warhol’s assistant, whose studios made the short film “Bottega Veneta Industrial Videotape” in 1985, and opened the first store there in New York in 1972.

The brand had enjoyed success in the 60s and 70s as an expression of high quality, understated elegance and craftsmanship. At the time of the acquisition, Bottega Veneta had 12 directly operated stores in the United States, five in Europe and four in Asia, and the Italian luxury group has developed its strategy of controlling distribution in Japan, a historically strong market for the brand. , including the operation of 19 stores.

The Moltedos left Bottega Veneta shortly after the acquisition of Gucci Group and Patrizio di Marco was recruited from Céline, where he was president of US operations, to join Bottega Veneta as general manager in May 2001. The following month, he was promoted to CEO, while at the same time Tomas Maier was hired as the brand’s creative director, preparing Bottega Veneta for its reinvention.

Thomas Maier codifies the Bottega plan

Germany’s Maier, who had spent nine years at Hermès and previously worked at Guy Laroche and Sonia Rykiel, was an unlikely savior for a company steeped in Italian tradition. But the principles he established – no logos and no compromises – redefined Bottega Veneta in an era of luxury brand gone mad.

Tomas Maier
Billy Farrell/BFA/REX/Shuttersto

The women’s rtw line debuted in October 1997 and was briefly discontinued by Gucci. Maier reinstated it and in 2004 the company introduced menswear and quickly established its signature look: refined, realistic and ever-changing, never out of style.

Starting from the brand’s signature Intrecciato woven leather bags and leveraging the strength of its artisans, the history and cultural context of the region itself, Maier set out to create a style brand of life. As the ’90s logo craze raged, he was drawn to the brand’s slogan that resonated with the designer, who favored sophisticated designs that advocated individualism: “When your own initials are enough.”

Di Marco was tasked with repositioning Bottega Veneta in the luxury range, which was a difficult task as the brand had moved away from its roots and diluted its brand DNA by adopting a flashier and less luxurious identity and he did not much remained of the old archives.

Clarity of vision and disciplined execution paid off, and after structuring its global organization and distribution, increasing its revenue more than tenfold in six years, in 2009 di Marco left the company on a high. and was called upon to lead the Gucci brand. , succeeding Mark Lee as CEO.

Bottega in the years

In January 2009, Marco Bizzarri, previously at Stella McCartney, was named President and CEO of Bottega Veneta, and although his arrival coincided with the global recession, he was also able to lead the brand through another phase of growth.

Bottega Veneta Knot pouch in Intrecciato satin

Bottega Veneta Knot clutch in Intrecciato satin.
Courtesy picture

He continued to build the brand on understated luxury and craftsmanship, establishing a new 108,000 square foot headquarters in Milan and investing in the company’s human resources by offering its employees a new headquarters in 2013 – the majestic 18th century Villa Schroeder-Da Porto. , nestled in a park about 25 km from Vicenza, in the Veneto region of northern Italy. The site has obtained LEED certification at Platinum level developed by the Green Building Council, helping Bottega Veneta to become the first Italian company to achieve this level in the fashion and luxury sector.

The building included the workshop, management and administration offices, storage of precious skins, archives including 5,000 bags, a museum, a restaurant and its own artisan school, which was internalized. Bottega Veneta has conservatively restored the 54,000 square foot villa, which is protected by the Italian government’s Department of Historic Buildings and Monuments, retaining its local stone facade, portals, columns, statues and fountains . He drove growth in Asia and further expanded the brand’s commercial footprint by opening a flagship store in Milan.

Bottega Veneta

Villa Schroeder-Da Porto in Montebello Vicentino
Courtesy of Bottega Veneta

Adapt to the landscape

In 2014, Bizzarri became CEO of Kering’s new Couture and Leather Goods division, directly overseeing most of Kering’s luxury brands. Former Valentino and Ermenegildo Zegna Group executive Carlo Alberto Beretta was appointed CEO of Bottega Veneta in January 2015 and left a year later, replaced by former Hugo Boss CEO Claus-Dietrich Lahrs, at a when the brand was hit by the luxury downturn, as analysts lamented a lack of product innovation, lopsided pricing architecture and overreliance on Chinese and tourist clientele and limited brand awareness. brand in developed markets.

In 2018, after 17 years, Maier left Bottega VenetaUnder his tenure, revenues grew from 48 million euros to almost 1.2 billion euros in 2017, but the brand had struggled to keep up with rapid changes in the consumer landscape, as demand dwindled on its key market, Asia, and which it was unable to exploit in a millennial audience.

He was replaced by Daniel Lee, previously director of ready-to-wear at Céline, who followed earlier stints at Maison Margiela, Balenciaga and Donna Karan.

In September 2019, Bartolomeo Rongone, who goes by the name Leo, previously COO at Saint Laurent, took over from Lahrs.

Lee helped revive the brand, turning it into a hot-selling ticket and an influential, fashion-forward brand, infusing a new, youthful spirit into the collections. Her designs, especially the accessories – from the signature Pouch bag, which was introduced in her debut collection in 2019, to the Cassette bag and the Lido sandals – all flew off the shelves. He built momentum for the brand with disruptive strategies such as deleting his Instagram account and hosting traveling fashion shows in places including London, Berlin and Detroit.

The best Bottega Veneta creations by Daniel Lee

Bottega Veneta’s Jodie bag
Marcus Tondo/WWD

In a surprising split, Lee left the company last November, which was seen by multiple sources as a layoff, given the designer’s complex personality. Sources say Bottega Veneta was losing key figures within the company, ranging from prized and highly skilled veteran craftsmen at the company’s headquarters in Vicenza to pivot managers who clashed with Lee, often described as uncommunicative. .

A new era

Matthieu Blazy, until then design director, was promoted internally a few days later and held his first show as creative director on February 26. The event marked the brand’s return to Milan Fashion Week and did not disappoint retailers and the press, as the was hailed for respect while evolving house codes and its precise, chic cuts. and its strong accessories.

Rongone helped Bottega Veneta in 2021 record a 24.2% increase in revenue compared to 2020, surpassing the 1.5 billion euro mark. Compared to 2019, revenues increased by 32%. The CEO and Blazy plan to move the company’s new headquarters to Palazzo San Fedele in Milan, where the show was held, before the end of 2023. The executive has further strengthened the exclusivity of the brand by eliminating all markdowns and streamlining brand wholesale. accounts — by increasing the number of dealerships and also taking on online partners.

Matthew Blazy

Matthew Blazy
Willy Vanderperre/Courtesy of Bottega Veneta

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Canadian army

Smol: Canada ignores Russia’s militarized Arctic at its peril

Like Ukraine, the region is perceived by Vladimir Putin as an integral part of his country. Several modern Arctic warfare bases house, operate and test some of Russia’s most advanced weapons.

Content of the article

As the war in Ukraine escalates, it might be prudent for Canada to finally make a serious strategic assessment of Russia’s other major military buildup. It is a militarized front which, like Ukraine, involves contested territorial and maritime claims, pitting Vladimir Putin’s Russia against democratic countries within and outside NATO. Like Ukraine, it is also seen by Putin as an integral part of Russia. It is of increasing strategic importance in trade, defense and resource extraction, and it is a front where Russia has amassed unprecedented levels of military equipment and personnel.

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Content of the article

This is the Arctic in 2022. And we ignore at our peril this militarized and contested region around, above and in front of our northern territory and our maritime claim.

On the Russian shores of this disputed sea and land border with Canada, Scandinavia and the United States are new or expanded and modernized Russian Arctic coastal military bases at Rogachevo, Pechenga, Severomorsk, Tiksi, Zvyozdny, Sredny Ostrov, Nagurskoye and Temp, to name a few. These modern Arctic warfare bases house, operate and test some of Russia’s most advanced weapons, such as the MIG 31BM fighter jet and the Poseidon 2M39 stealth nuclear torpedo, as well as TOR-M2DT missiles.

This reality has not been lost on NATO members Denmark and Norway, or allied countries like Sweden and Finland which, like the United States, have improved and expanded their military presence in the region. with professionally trained combat personnel and newly acquired equipment.

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Content of the article

Canada, with its ill-equipped and emasculated military, remains largely absent from the region.

Let us momentarily abandon the common (and I dare say naive) assumption underlying Canadian defense policy: that the United States is at Canada’s disposal, to expend whatever is necessary in American military resources and American military lives to defend every square mile of Canada, at no cost or corresponding effort to Canadians.

Where would we be if our defense depended above all on us?

The answer is: as prepared and combat ready as an administrative headquarters in Yellowknife can be alongside a company-sized detachment of part-time Army Reservists nearby. As martially worthy of Putin’s fear as 440 Squadron, Canada’s only permanent air force squadron in the Arctic with a “fleet” of four non-combat CC-138 twin-otter aircraft. As firm in our will to stand firm as the 55-person (non-military) Signal Station (CFS Alert) on Ellesmere Island. A match as worthy of Russian warships and nuclear submarines, with their increasingly sophisticated weaponry, as our heavy police arctic patrol vessels (only one in service so far), each designed to boast a single machine gun mounted on her deck.

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This is the extent of Canada’s professional “boots in the snow” military capability in the Arctic.

Yes, we have about 5,000 local Canadian Rangers in the North – ready to do just about anything, but actually go to war for Canada. On a professional level, this is a good thing since these non-combatant reserve auxiliaries from northern communities sponsored by the Department of National Defense receive almost no military training. They have rendered invaluable service on occasion when community assistance was needed in operations such as search and rescue. And, especially during this pandemic, these temporary reinforcements have stepped up to provide needed aid to beleaguered communities. The Canadian Rangers are worthy civil defense volunteers, but they are by no means soldiers.

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Content of the article

So let’s not portray them as somehow being at the forefront of Canada’s supposed determination to assert its sovereignty over the Arctic.

Of course, since we are members of NATO, any attack on Canada is considered an attack on all members of NATO. Certainly, in a possible maritime stalemate in the region, Canada can expect some protection and assurance from the United States as well as better armed and equipped armies from Denmark and Norway, not to mention our former colonial masters, France and the United Kingdom.

But should that happen in our current deplorable state of military readiness, let us have the honesty and integrity to refrain from clinging to the absurd illusion of an international “middle power” that many Canadians still harbor.

Robert Smol is a retired military intelligence officer who served in the Canadian Armed Forces for over 20 years. He is currently working as a paralegal and security professional while completing a doctorate in military [email protected]

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International headquarters

Lauren O’Neill-Butler on Hilma af Klint

Hilma af Klint’s bright and far-sighted output never fails to illuminate. She believed that her art would only be understood by people from the future. Perhaps that’s why his 2018-2019 retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York was the institution’s most attended exhibition. never. Miraculously, af Klint (1862-1944) always had more to give. Consider the eight delicate drawings from the Swedish artist’s 1913-15 “Tree of Knowledge” series, a recently unearthed body of work that made a rare public appearance in David Zwirner’s tony space in the Upper East Side of Manhattan. An inscription on the back of an image indicates that each piece should be “considered as a prototype of a new period”. This idea came through like a bell in the show, which offered an unexpected development in the mystic’s story – a wonderful reveal of a vast body of work that many of us thought we already knew.

Af Klint produced these works as she completed her first large group of biomorphic and geometric abstractions, “The Paintings for the Temple”, 1906-1915, a hypnotic series of 193 canvases, which the artist produced between the ages of forty-four and fifty-three, which were generated in part by his spiritualist practice as a medium. In 1908, Rudolf Steiner, the head of the German Theosophical Society, visited af Klint in his studio in Stockholm, where he saw some of the first paintings of the “Temple”. Thus began a lasting association: in 1920 the artist became a life member of the Anthroposophical Society, which Steiner had founded in 1913. Af Klint made two series of drawings of the “Tree of Knowledge”, presenting one as a gift to Steiner for the Goetheanum, the seat he had designed for the Anthroposophical Society in Dornach, Switzerland. (The artist studied there intermittently between 1921 and 1930.) Steiner’s cache landed in a private collection around 1927, and in Zwirner it was to be sold to a public institution (anything less would be criminal). The other set is owned by the Hilma af Klint Foundation in the Swedish capital.

Made in watercolour, gouache, ink and graphite on sheets of paper measuring approximately eighteen by twelve inches, most of the drawings present the outline of a tree-like shape haloed by two spherical objects: one representing the terrestrial sphere, the other the divine sphere. . The orbs are united by a long vertical spine – the trunk of the tree – descending down the center of each work. In Tree of Knowledge, No. 1, a red and purple heart sits at the bottom of the plant shape. Like a germinating seed, the form sprouts blue and yellow veins, producing a looping circulatory system that runs up and down the tree. All rooms exude a geometric Art Nouveau vibe and enact Klint’s idiosyncratic patterns and symbolism. For example, blue and yellow represent femininity and masculinity respectively – two harmonizing aspects that the artist believed every human being possesses.

There was, of course, an allusion here to “the tree of the knowledge of good and evil” – one of two specific trees, along with the tree of life, named in the biblical story of the Garden of Eden of Genesis 2:3. Still, I didn’t sense Klint arguing about ethics or morality in these works, even though apocalyptic anxieties and fear of the outbreak of World War I must have been on his mind. Instead, she once again provided shelter from the storm by emphasizing grounding and grounding herself in utterly baseless times. Works such as tree of knowledge No. 3, 4, 5and 6 produce a variety of colors and lines that is so open, fantastical and joyful that I left the show believing that af Klint was truly telegraphing a more sustainable and equitable future for all of us: a “new period” of spiritual consciousness whose we all need it now more than ever.

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Non profit living

Nonprofit group home makes sacrifices to address staffing shortages: ‘I’ve never seen staffing difficulties like this’ – WCCO

MENDOTA HEIGHTS, MN (WCCO) – As group homes across the state struggle to find staff, some have been forced to close, leaving families to scramble. The facilities accommodate people with physical and developmental challenges.

To try to keep their homes open, a non-profit organization has made some changes. John Lauritsen shows us how these changes help.

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“In 35 years, I have never seen staffing difficulties like this,” said Rod Carlson of Living Well Disabilities Services.

For group homes across the state, the fight for staff has gotten so bad that there has been talk of bringing in the National Guard to help.

RELATED: Families scramble after group homes close due to lack of workers

“And certainly at some point the National Guard was suggested, the National Guard was early in COVID to help some nursing homes,” Carlson said.

It never came to this for Living Well in Mendota Heights. But sacrifices have been made to keep their nearly 40 homes in operation.

“We compete with restaurants and Costcos around the world. And all these other organizations that also need employees,” Carlson said.

To recruit more workers, Living Well raised their wages from $14.75 per hour to $16 per hour, for direct care workers. A modest increase that made a big difference.

Certified practical nurses also saw their wages increase to $17 an hour, which many group homes were unable to match. But that meant going into a budget shortfall to bring in nurses like Sunday Yengi.

READ MORE: As the March thaw approaches, pothole season officially begins

“I love it. I love working here,” Yengi said.

While the pay rise is attractive, Yengi said group homes need to recruit people who are passionate about helping others. She works in honor of her mentally handicapped brother who lives in South Sudan.

“When I work here with people who have mental disabilities, I feel like I’m helping my only brother,” Yengi said.

As part of its COVID plan, Living Well also lobbied for vaccination requirements before they were imposed.

“These are just rapid tests that we receive and are provided by the state,” said Annelies Stevens, director of health and welfare services.

They say it has made staff more comfortable working around residents with compromised immune systems.

“That’s what we were able to focus on and sustain, which I’m really happy with,” Stevens said.

Living Well said the changes have helped them hire more staff, but they are still missing a few nurses.

NO MORE NEWS: Powdered infant formula recall expanded after 2nd child dies

As the nonprofit celebrates its 50th anniversary next week, it will lobby on Capitol Hill for higher wages for group home workers.

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History organization

Disability as power: Zoom panel discussion

Join three respected disability scholars to explore how traits labeled “disabilities” can also be personal, social and cultural sites of challenge, strength and change. Speakers include: Dr. Kim Nielsen, Professor and Chair of Disability Studies and History, Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Toledo; Dr. Ally Day, Associate Professor of Disability Studies and History, Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Toledo; and Dr. Debanuj DasGupta, assistant professor of women’s studies at UC Santa Barbara. The event will be moderated by Dr. Ashley Biser. Live captioning and sign language interpretation will be provided.

Thursday March 3 at 7 p.m. on Zoom
Sign up here: https://bit.ly/3/JRo2ru
Registration is mandatory. A link to the program will be generated automatically after registration.

This is a complementary program to the Deaf Republic exhibition at the Ross Art Museum. See the exhibition online at: http://deafrepublic.rossartmuseum.com/exhibits/show/deaf-republic

This event will be recorded and available on the Ross Art Museum website after the event: owu.edu/ross

Ticket cost:

Free and open to the public

RSVP information:

Sign up here: https://bit.ly/3/JRo2ru
Registration is mandatory. A link to the program will be generated automatically after registration.

OWU Sponsoring Organization/Office: The Ross Art Museum; The Office of Accessibility Services; The Ohio Wesleyan Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Council; and the Office of the Chief Diversity Officer.
Contact: Erin Fletcher at [email protected]

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Canadian army

Canada stops broadcasting Russian propaganda

The two largest Canadian cable companies, Bell and Rogers, are removing the Russian propaganda channel RT (Russia Today) from their packages.

Minister of Canadian Heritage Pablo Rodríguez wrote on his Twitter account, reports Ukrinform

“I commend Bell for taking down RT. Russia has been waging a war in Ukraine since 2014 and an information war across the world. RT is the propaganda arm of the Putin regime that spreads disinformation. It has no out of place here. I’ll have more to say very soon,” Rodriguez wrote.

He later added that Rogers would also remove RT, replacing it with a Ukrainian flag broadcast.

Rogers has confirmed the information about RT’s broadcast shutdown.

As a reminder, Lithuania has already banned RT broadcasting, and soon such a ban will be introduced at EU level. and soon such a ban will be introduced at EU level.

On February 24, Russian President Vladimir Putin declares war on Ukraine and launches a full-scale invasion. Russian troops bomb and destroy key infrastructure. Missiles hit residential buildings.

Martial law was imposed in Ukraine and a general mobilization was announced. Ukraine has officially filed a complaint against the Russian Federation before the United Nations International Court of Justice in The Hague.

According to the General Staff of the Armed Forces of Ukraine, the losses of the Russian army reached about 4,500 people.

me

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International headquarters

UN Security Council votes to refer Ukraine issue to General Assembly

FIFA announced on Sunday that Russia must play all future international matches at neutral venues under the name ‘Russian Football Union’, as part of an initial sanctions list due to the invasion of Russia. Ukraine by country.

“Above all, FIFA wishes to reiterate its condemnation of the use of force by Russia in its invasion of Ukraine. Violence is never a solution and FIFA expresses its deepest solidarity with all those affected. by what is happening in Ukraine,” world football’s governing body said in a statement.

“FIFA calls again for the urgent restoration of peace and the immediate initiation of a constructive dialogue,” the statement continued. “FIFA remains in close contact with the Ukrainian Football Association and members of the Ukrainian football community who have requested assistance to leave the country as long as the current conflict persists.

In coordination with UEFA and the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the Bureau of the FIFA Council has decided that all of Russia’s home matches in international competitions should be played on neutral ground and without spectators.

The member association representing Russia must also play all international competitions under the name “Football Union of Russia (RFU)” without a permitted Russian flag or anthem.

Although the initial sanctions list does not completely ban Russia, FIFA said in the statement that it “will continue its ongoing dialogue with the IOC, UEFA and other sports organizations to determine any additional measures or sanctions. , including a possible exclusion from competitions, which will be applied in the near future if the situation does not improve soon.”

The Bureau of the FIFA Council “remains ready to take either of these decisions”, the statement said.

FIFA also acknowledged that it is in contact with the Polish Football Association, the Football Association of the Czech Republic and the Swedish Football Association to find appropriate and acceptable solutions regarding the upcoming FIFA World Cup qualifiers. FIFA 2022.

Russia are currently set to host Poland in a playoff semi-final on March 24. The match is scheduled to take place at the VTB Arena in Moscow. The winner of the Poland-Russia match will host either Sweden or the Czech Republic on March 29 in the final of their World Cup qualifying run.

In response to FIFA’s sanctions against Russia, Cezary Kulesza, president of the Polish Football Association, issued a statement calling FIFA’s decision “completely unacceptable”.

“We are not interested in participating in this game of appearances. Our position remains intact: the Polish national team will NOT PLAY with Russia, regardless of the name of the team.”

Along with Poland, the Czech Republic, Sweden and England have all said they will not face Russia in any of the upcoming World Cup qualifiers next month.

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Non profit living

Lexington Nonprofit Sends Funds to Ukraine: How You Can Help

LEXINGTON, Ky. (FOX 56) – Non-profit organization, Christian Mission Ebenezer (CME) joins the fight overseas by helping to send resources to their home country.

CME opened in 1999, and two years ago they opened their bookstore on Old Harrodsburg Rd where they buy books wholesale and give 100% of donations to missionaries around the world.

“That’s why we have this bookstore – we raise money by selling books,” said Alex Chubaruk, owner of CME. “The profits we take and give to different parts of the country.”

In Ukraine, CME is connected to about 30 mission stations, including their own family members, and their active search for monetary donations, so that locations can be supplied with funds to purchase mattresses, blankets, pillows, food baskets, etc.

“So we raised funds on our website and so on to give them funds to be able to buy blankets, food, firewood, food boxes for people in need,” said Chubaruk. “In addition, we are raising funds for people trying to escape, for people fleeing to western Ukraine and Poland.”

Chubaruk’s uncle is in eastern Ukraine and is a bishop in a church that opened as a refuge for refugees. Chubaruk spoke with his uncle earlier on Saturday.

“And so he’s like, ‘I’m not leaving my herd, I’m going to be there with him, stay with them, and so he’s trying to be that leader, and to be that support for the people who live in that area. Chubaruk said, “I asked them what you all need, and they asked us to pray that God might send redemption to the nation.”

When news of the war broke, the Chubaruks immediately took to their website and Instagram page to raise awareness.

Larisa Chubaruk, Alex’s wife, said: “The first thing we did was change everything on the homepage, set up the form, make sure people have a place to donate .”

Chubaruk said she tries to gather facts, not only for their website, but also for her children.

“So it was mostly about trying to figure out what was happening, why it was happening, we didn’t tell our kids about it on the first day,” Chubaruk said. “Mostly because we didn’t want to get emotional talking about it.”

They also wanted to be aware not to break the news to their children in a way that would make them resentful of the Russians.

“Because we know there are good people everywhere, and it’s not just Russians, we don’t try to categorize them and we don’t want them to have anything against Russians when someone mentions their name,” Churbaruk said.

Instead, they want to spread a message of love.

She said: “The one thing I think everyone can take away, Ukrainians, Americans, Russians, cherish what you have when it’s good.”


To connect with them on Instagram, click here: https://instagram.com/cm.ebenezer?utm_medium=copy_link

To donate to the Ukraine crisis through Christian Mission Ebenezer, click on the following link: Christian Mission EBENEZER – Christian Mission EBENEZER – Until now, the Lord has helped us. (cmebenezer.com)

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History organization

News, weather, sports on all platforms

With family in Ukraine, the last 3 days have been hell for the UIC PhD. RaisedIt’s hard to imagine what it feels like to watch your country in absolute turmoil from thousands of miles away, but Hanna Deiqkun is experiencing exactly that. She spoke with CBS 2’s Sabrina Franza.

The scene on the ground in war-torn UkraineKiev is besieged, but the Russian ground assault has met with fierce resistance from Ukrainian forces – and not just around the capital, but also in other parts of the country. Reporting by CBS News’ Charlie D’Agata.

Kane County Sheriff’s Office Introduces New K9 Officer, AmicaThe Kane County Sheriff’s Department stopped by GreenFields, the senior community in the western suburbs of Geneva, on Saturday to introduce their new K9 officer.

Chicago Ray Records set to close permanently on SundayIt was a fast and furious vinyl search at Chicago Ray Records in Rogers Park on Saturday.

First weather alert in Chicago: finally a little warmerCBS 2 meteorologist Robb Ellis has your first-alert weather forecast at 10 p.m. for Saturday, February 26, 2022.

An organization raises awareness of the disappearance of black and brown womenThis past weekend of Black History Month, a local group has drawn attention to the growing number of missing and murdered women in black and brown communities.

Annual 16th Ward Luncheon Honors Local Military VeteransAldus. Stephanie Coleman hosted the 16th Ward’s annual Valentine’s Day Appreciation Luncheon on Saturday, with a tribute to military veterans and local seniors.

Street signs honor slain CFD Lt. Dwain WilliamsRetired Chicago Fire Lt. Dwain Williams was murdered in an attempted carjacking in late 2020, and on Saturday he was memorialized with an honorary street name.

Man crashes after being shot in WoodlawnA man was left in critical condition after being shot in Woodlawn and then crashing his sport utility vehicle on Saturday morning.

Unmarked police SUV crashes into car in LawndaleSome Chicago police officers were recovering late Saturday after an accident in Lawndale.

A man stabs another during an argument outside Marina CityTwo men stabbed each other during a fight outside Marina City in broad daylight on Saturday.

2 children and their mother saved from a fire in EnglewoodA fire broke out at a house in Englewood on Saturday night and firefighters were seen rushing children out of the house to safety.

UIC PhD Student fears for her family living on the frontline in UkraineAs the war in Ukraine unfolds in what may seem like a world apart to some, it hits close for a PhD student in Chicago. Reporting by CBS 2’s Sabrina Franza.

US and European allies impose sanctions as Russian troops advance towards KievUS and European allies targeted Russia on Saturday, striking with unprecedented new sanctions to punish the Kremlin for invading Ukraine. Meanwhile, Russian troops bombard Ukrainian cities with heavy artillery and close in on the capital Kiev.

Chicago’s first weather warning: clear skies and warming weatherCBS 2 meteorologist Robb Ellis has your first-alert weather forecast at 5 p.m. for Saturday, February 26, 2022.

Protesters gather at Millennium Park, truckers rally downtown in support of UkraineAs Ukrainian troops held off Russian forces trying to seize the capital Kiev on Saturday, crowds once again filled the streets and highways of Chicago in support of Ukraine. Shardaa Gray reports from CBS 2.

Russia heads for Kyiv as Ukrainian troops hold backAir raid sirens sounded in Kiev as Russian troops continued, and Ukraine’s president vowed to keep fighting. Reporting by Michael George of CBS News.

Lane closures later tonight as the city undergoes bridge checks near the lakeAs spring approaches, the city begins its bridge checks to make sure boats can get back to the lake when it’s time – that means lane closures for us.

The Garfield Park Conservatory’s Spring Flower Show is now openAfter the cold and the snow, it is easy to dream of spring. but you can fully immerse yourself in those fresh, blooming sensations at Garfield Park Conservatory this weekend.

Chicago’s first weather warning: temps soar over weekend leading to 40 over weekA very silent model will allow a subtle and slow heating.

Chicago Park District to host a North Island Polar Adventure DayWith temperatures warming up, it’s the perfect winter weather for a polar adventure.

Paws Pet of the Week: TobiasTobias is a very special one-year-old Catahoula Leopard dog looking for a loving suburban home.

Russia steps up attacks as Ukraine invasion continuesThird day of the Russian invasion in Ukraine. The latest surveillance video shows a missile hitting a building in Kiev.

On the slopes with Art Clay, Chicago’s skiers and sports pioneerArt Clay is the co-founder of the National Brotherhood of Skiers and a proud member of the Sno-Gophers – an African-American ski club that is one of the oldest ski clubs in the United States. As we celebrate Black History Month, at CBS 2, photojournalist Tamott Wolverton took us down the slopes with them.

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Canadian army

Ukraine has the will, but Russia has the power: how their military forces fit together

By all accounts, the battle for Ukraine was never going to be a fair fight.

The invading Russian Federation commands the second most powerful military in the world, behind only the United States, having spent an estimated US$61.7 billion on defense in 2020, according to figures compiled by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute.

Ukraine spent a tenth of that amount, or just US$5.9 billion.

And this disparity appears in almost every possible comparison.

  • Russia has nearly 900,000 active military personnel to rely on in its war of aggression, compared to about 200,000 permanent Ukrainian military personnel.
  • Ukraine has far fewer attack planes – 146 compared to Russia’s 1,328 – and helicopters; only 42 against 478.
  • The Russian tanks rumbling towards the capital, Kiev, are part of an overall armored corps of 31,000 vehicles, compared to Ukraine’s 5,000.
  • The Russian Navy has 605 ships, including 70 submarines, which can be deployed in the Black Sea off the coast of Ukraine. While the Ukrainian fleet has only 38 ships and no submarines.

The unbalanced list goes on and on.

“The Russian army is powerful, there is no doubt about it, much more powerful than Ukraine’s,” the retired lieutenant general said. Andrew Leslie, former Chief of the Land Staff of the Canadian Armed Forces.

“The Russians have a vast technological advantage, in terms of quality, in terms of training time – which gives you experience on the different war machines – and in terms of numbers.”

A Ukrainian soldier is injured after coming across gunfire inside the city of Kiev on February 25, 2022. (Emilio Morenatti/Associated Press)

Russian advantages that will be virtually insurmountable for Ukrainian defenders – at least early in the war, Leslie said. But pacifying the country’s 44 million people could prove a much tougher task for Russian President Vladimir Putin.

  • What questions do you have about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine? Email [email protected]

“Mr. Putin is going to have to go to the cities and he is going to have to occupy Ukraine for years against a bitter and vengeful population that has tasted freedom,” predicts Leslie. “And they’re not going to forget, and they’re not going to allow the Russians to have an easy job, or to stay very long.”

Do not underestimate the will of the Ukrainian people

The Ukrainian leadership seems to have already moved on to the next fight. Russia’s official military reserve force is estimated at 2 million soldiers. But the Ukrainians are now busy trying to increase their core of 900,000 appeals, having now ordered all men between the ages of 18 and 60 to stay in the country, and arming anyone willing to pick up a gun.

On Friday, former President Petro Poroshenko was on the streets of Kyiv, brandishing an AK-47 and touting the country’s numerical strength.

“It’s the long line of people who want to join the battalion, but we don’t have enough guns… they’re normal, ordinary people [who] sometimes [have] was never in the army, now I’m lining up to join us,” Poroshenko told CNN.

“Putin will never catch Ukraine despite how many soldiers he has, how many missiles he has, how many nuclear weapons he has. We Ukrainians are a free people with a great European future.”

WATCH | NATO will supply more weapons to Ukraine:

NATO announces more weapons and air defense systems for Ukraine

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg announced that the alliance would provide Ukraine with more aid and weapons, including air defense systems, while warning Russia that it would pay a heavy tribute for years to come. 28:19

Hanna Maliar, Ukrainian Deputy Defense Minister, Facebook Friday to urge citizens to resist Russian forces in any way possible, even with homemade weapons. Advocacy apparently had an impact, as online searches for Molotov cocktail recipes reportedly increased in the capital.

The Ukrainian people’s will to resist should not be underestimated, said Ihor Kozak, a former Canadian Forces officer who has been training and advising the military in his native Ukraine since 2014.

“Ukrainians are now fighting for their freedom, for their families, for their homeland,” Kozak said. “The morale is very, very high. And I think that’s going to be a deciding factor in this war.”

Nor should anyone doubt the professionalism of its heavily armed but well-trained military, Kozak added.

Eight years ago, when Russia first invaded Ukraine, annexing Crimea and backing a separatist uprising in the Donbass region, the country’s military was almost non-existent.

“There was really no money spent, no training, no modern weapons, no ammunition. So the people who went to fight were the young volunteers, and the not so young volunteers of the revolution Maidan, often in running shoes, with obsolete weapons,” recalls Kozak.

What Ukraine needs are weapons

All that changed with the establishment of a modern fighting force, trained to NATO standards by Western advisers, including members of the Canadian military. Now, what Ukraine desperately needs is not so much manpower as weapons.

“They need more [anti-tank] javelins, more [anti-aircraft] darts, more ammunition, more weapons so they can defend themselves and they can defend us. So I strongly encourage the Government of Canada and Western leaders to do this now before it’s too late,” Kozak said.

Big demand as Russia makes rapid inroads, with its troops already on the streets of Kiev.

Especially since the Ukrainian army ranks 22nd most powerful in the world — a place ahead of Canada in 23rd place.

PICTURES | ATTENTION: This photo gallery contains graphic images:

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International headquarters

People around the world protest against Russia’s invasion of Ukraine

From Washington, DC to Paris to Tel Aviv, people around the world protested Russia’s invasion of Ukraine this week, waving the Ukrainian flag and highlighting its blue and yellow national colors.

the Brandenburg Gate in Berlinthe Colosseum in Rome, Downing Street in London and the European Union headquarters in Brussels were lit up in yellow and blue this week to show solidarity with Ukraine after Russia invaded the country, The Washington Post reported.

Protesters held signs reading “No War” in Tokyo and “Hands Off Ukraine” in Berlin. Protester protesting outside the Russian Embassy in Tel Aviv set her Russian passport on fire, CBS News reported.

“We have been trying to build peace on this continent for 70 years,” French consultant Goery Mourez told The Post. “It’s important to say no to [Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinTrudeau announces sanctions on Putin, Russian foreign minister Overnight Defense & National Security — Ukraine hangs in the balance Capitals’ Ovechkin calls for ‘no more war’ with Ukraine MORE]this is madness.

In Russia, however, the response to similar protests staged in St. Petersburg and Moscow has been markedly different, with officials detaining hundreds in St. Petersburg alone, according to CBS News.

White House Press Secretary Jen PsakiJen PsakiTrudeau announces sanctions against Putin and Russian Foreign Minister Overnight Defense & National Security — Ukraine is at stake On The Money — Inflation held steady in January as omicron raged MORE said Thursday that it was “deeply courageous” for Russians to protest the invasion.

“Despite Putin’s crackdown in the country, dissenting opinions remain, and I think it’s important to note that,” the White House press secretary said. “To publicly protest President Putin and his war is a deeply courageous act. Their actions show the world that despite the Kremlin’s propaganda, there are Russians who deeply disagree with what he is doing in Ukraine.”

Athletes around the world have become some of the most prominent figures to speak out against the Russian invasion as well, including Russian Washington Capitals player Alex Ovechkin who declared, “Please, no more war. It doesn’t matter who is at war – Russia, Ukraine, different countries – we have to live in peace.”

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Non profit living

Elizabeth Hartman’s story continues in the lives of others | Bakersfield life

Elizabeth Hartman struggled with health issues for years. She died in Bakersfield in 2016, just a week before her 52nd birthday.

But the story of this beloved wife and mother did not end there. More than 300 people showed up for his funeral. She was covered in memories of his generosity and kindness. His latest generosity was to save and improve the lives of many people through the donation of his organs and tissues.

“They told me at the time that Liz had helped at least eight people,” her husband, Brian Hartman, told a KGET reporter. “I know someone had their kidneys, someone had their corneas, they couldn’t use their lungs because of scoliosis, but I think they used the heart and a bunch of other stuff. .”

But Elizabeth’s story didn’t end there either.

The Lake Isabella woman was featured in January on “Courage to Hope,” the 2022 Donate Life Rose parade float.

The float included four walkers, who were living donors, as well as organ and tissue recipients; 15 runners, who were organ and tissue recipients, as well as living donors; and 35 “florographs”, or floral portraits representing organ, eye and tissue donors.

Elizabeth was nominated to appear on the float by JJ’s Legacy, a Bakersfield nonprofit created in memory of 27-year-old Jeffrey “JJ” Johns, who suffered severe brain damage in a 2009 car accident.

“He loved life. And he had the most beautiful smile. He loved smiling. He loved people,” JJ’s mother, Lori Malkin, told The Californian.

Recognizing the extent of his son’s injuries, Malkin agreed to donate JJ’s organs.

“He saved five lives, which is a miracle,” Malkin recalled. One person received a liver and a kidney, and another received Jeff’s pancreas. His donated tissues have improved the lives of 50 people and he has also donated his corneas.

“These people who were blind can now see sunrises and sunsets,” she said.

To promote local organ donation, Malkin created JJ’s Legacy. The year JJ died, the young man from Bakersfield was featured in the Rose Parade in a floragraph prepared by his family and included on the Donate Life float.

Recalling how moving and empowering the Rose Parade experience was for her and JJ’s family, Malkin pledged to honor a family of local donors in the same way each year.

Elizabeth’s family encourages others in Kern County to register as organ donors and provide life to those in need. Register as a donor with the DMV when you apply for or renew a California driver’s license or ID card. Simply check the box marked “YES!” on the application form. You can also go to https://register.donatelifecalifornia.org/register

Using a black-and-white photo as a guide, Elizabeth’s family got together and worked for nearly eight hours on her floral portrait, before the iconic New Year’s Eve parade began rolling down Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena. . Brian admits the experience was very emotional.

Elizabeth’s Rose Parade fluorograph, decorated with natural seeds, flowers, cream of wheat, chocolate and coconut, will be on display April 30 at the JJ Legacy fundraising gala. Go to www.jjslegacy.org.

In 2021, OneLegacy worked with 591 organ donors and facilitated 1,688 organ transplants in a seven-county region that includes Kern. OneLegacy is one of 57 nonprofit organ procurement organizations nationwide. Each is assigned a federally designated region to serve. In just Kern, OneLegacy had 31 donors and 85 transplanted organs last year.

Many people pre-declare their intentions on state and national registries to donate their organs when they die. But where such a guideline does not exist, OneLegacy works with families to understand how the donation of an organ or tissue by their loved ones can save and improve lives.

Tom Mone, CEO of OneLegacy, said: “Fifty to 60% of families say yes to organ, eye and tissue donation because they understand that more lives can be saved and they have the hope of know that their loved ones live in others through donation and transplantation”.

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History organization

RI Community Service and Educational Organizations Celebrate Black History Month

As Black History Month draws to a close, community service and education organizations in Providence and Rhode Island have held several events to celebrate and continue advocacy efforts for the Black community.

The Herald spoke to five organizations about how they commemorated the month.

Providence Children’s Museum

The Providence Children’s Museum presents an annual play “MLK: Amazing Grace,” which took place this year on February 19. The piece tells the story of Martin Luther King, Jr. and highlights the civil rights movement in a way that focuses on children, said Caroline Payson, the museum’s executive director.

“It starts from the perspective of a little boy trying to make sense of justice and injustice as he sees it,” Payson said. “Our hope for this piece is that they see themselves, regardless of background, as children who can ask questions about things in the world that might trouble them.”

The museum is also offering recorded books each week with its partnership with the Rhode Island Black Storytellers Association this month, Payson said.

“I want the kids’ experience at the museum to be what they need,” Payson said, whether it’s running up the ramp, exploring the laser cutters and 3D printers in the studio. innovation or to discover the story of a Dominican. immigrant through the reconstruction of the Fefa market.

The museum’s programming and exhibitions have been impacted by the pandemic. According to Payson, the museum had about 180,000 to 190,000 patrons a year before COVID, but currently sees 70 to 75 percent fewer visitors.

The day of the “Amazing Grace” play saw 725 visitors, the most on a single day since 2019, Payson said, but the museum would see double that before the pandemic hit. As a nonprofit that doesn’t have a large endowment, the museum is slowly starting to return to more physical exhibits and hopes visitor numbers will recover.

Redwood Library and the Athenaeum

Redwood Library and the Athenaeum in Newport, RI hosted a series of virtual Black History lectures in honor of the month, said Executive Director Benedict Leca, PhD’04. These included lectures by Rhode Island Civic Chorale & Orchestra Conductor Edward Markward, Wellesley College History Professor Brenna Wynn Greer, RISD Assistant Professor Christopher Roberts, and Stages of Freedom co-founders Ray Rickman and Robb Dimmick. .

The Redwood also opened an art installation Feb. 16 that features a sculpture by contemporary artist Nari Ward, Leca said. Ward redesigns large case clocks with West African wood carvings, and the piece is on permanent display in the library.

For both libraries, the pandemic has brought both downsides and upsides. Although unable to host in-person presentations, libraries quickly pivoted in August 2020 to using Crowdcast for online programming. They also created a YouTube channel and revamped their website. The Redwood also hosts an annual gospel choir concert with singers from two black churches in Newport, which was canceled last year for the safety of performers and audiences.

The Redwood and Athenaeum are both partially reopened, with reduced hours from the pre-pandemic schedule, but accommodations can be made for researchers who need access to equipment.

When it comes to Black History Month and the work of the library, “you celebrate accomplishments and you retain a certain element of criticality because the struggle isn’t over,” Leca said.

Leca added that she hopes visitors will make an effort to understand “the richness and intricacies” of the library’s collections.

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“You want to consider your sources…and weigh the material you critically absorb,” she said.

Providence Community Library

On February 24, Rochambeau Library Clerk Khamry Varfley led a Women in Business panel to educate attendees on the importance of supporting Black-owned businesses and giving entrepreneurs a platform to share advice and stories. COVID-19 has disproportionately affected Black-owned businesses. Supporting these businesses encourages other entrepreneurs, which helps diversify the economy, Varfley.

“I really want people to have a better idea of ​​how small businesses and black businesses work,” she said.

Systems Coordinator Dhana Whiteing runs the monthly Conversations Book Club, which features books written by people of color and marginalized groups. On March 16, the Mount Pleasant Library will host a Black Photographers Showcase featuring four local black photographers, one of whom volunteered at the library as a child, according to Whiteing.

“There just aren’t enough days (in Black History Month), but we’re doing our best,” she added.

Other events at the library include an annual jazz concert in April or May, a market scheduled for April 30, recurring author talks, and the Seed Program, which “highlights the leadership of farmers and educators of BIPOC,” according to the library’s website. The outdoor-focused market is designed to showcase small businesses and serve as a networking opportunity, said Varfley, who is also a small business owner.

It is also hoped that the increased number of events this year will attract more visitors and support for events in the future, and Patrons of Varfley and Whiteing hope to take advantage of the programming and resources available.

“Come to your local library,” Whiteing said. “It’s one of the few free places.”

Newport Historical Society

The Newport Historical Society strives to highlight archival research, such as with the “Know Your History” webpage. The webpage is a compilation of resources and blog posts that includes a collection of BIPOC history and heritage in Rhode Island. There was also a “Creative Survival” walking tour on February 20, which highlighted the history of POC in Newport.

“There’s no history without black history, so if we’re not telling it year-round, we’re deliberately excluding a central piece of our local history,” chief executive Ruth Taylor said. The band is also interested in trying “to highlight and uncover authentic POC voices from the past,” according to Taylor.

A group of scholars are currently working remotely to sift through archival documents and incorporate references to people of color from history into a database. According to Taylor, the goal is to construct biographies by cross-referencing in order to “speak more fully of the authentic experience of people in early Newport”.

“It’s an effort, but it pays off,” she said.

The pandemic has displaced some of the work being done by the NHS as more resources have been uploaded to the website. Online events and programs have also helped reach a wider audience, Taylor said, as it hosts around 200,000 people a year.

“I really hope the world starts to recognize that history isn’t a purely academic pursuit… understanding history, how we got here, can be hugely helpful in understanding where we’re going from here. ‘here, how we fix things,’ she said. . “History is like this gigantic database of human behavior, and why would we ignore that?”

Freedom Steps

Ray Rickman and Robb Dimmick, co-founders of Stages of Freedom, a heritage museum in Providence, hosted a virtual event with Redwood Library and the Athenaeum on “Disappearing Ink,” a newly released bibliography of writings by and about African Americans Who Reviews the Black Press. “We want to bring this story to white and black people here in Providence and inspire young people who are interested in journalism to consider starting their own newspaper,” Dimmick said.

Rickman and Dimmick also bonded with Amiri Nash ’24, who founded The Black Star Journal, The Herald previously reported. The first issue of the new publication is expected to be released on Friday.

Rickman and Dimmick spoke in five one-minute segments for public radio Martha’s Vineyard, with each episode spotlighting a prominent African American in Rhode Island. Rickman has also given two talks — one at Middlebridge School in Narragansett and the other at Barrington Congregational Church — on the Stages of Freedom’s Swim Empowerment program for black youth.

“Our theme is to really bring to the fore significant African Americans in Rhode Island and their contributions to shaping culture and discourse,” Dimmick said. The two email 12,000 people daily, highlighting events, resources and information about the pandemic. They are also providing 1,000 COVID test kits per week to the local community. Stages of Freedom is also continuing to work on a new museum, which is expected to open later this year.

Stages of Freedom has compiled the “On the Road to Freedom” database, a virtual guide to sites associated with black history in Rhode Island. The organization’s website features further information and updates on programs and events.

“What we really hope is that people see the breadth, richness and depth of African American history in Rhode Island, not limited to 28 or 29 days a year, but throughout the year,” Dimmick said. “The bottom line is recognizing that black history is a shared history.”

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Canadian army

The Rebel to Rabble Review: The Aftermath of “Insurrection”

The convoy of trucks protesting the mandatory COVID vaccination that turned into a nearly month-long occupation of downtown Ottawa may have left, but the search team from Tap Progress still refers to its ties to other right-wing movements on the far right – including “a nationwide network of right-wing evangelical Christian pastors”, according to a dispatch filed by “Prairie reporter” Emily Leedham.

“Pastors, many of whom have previously been fined for holding church services in violation of public health orders, are part of a group called Liberty Coalition Canada (LCC),” notes Leedham, which “was founded in January 2021 to oppose COVID-19 restrictions on churches, but has since launched campaigns to oppose vaccination mandates and capacity limits in workplaces, schools and universities.

More recently, the LCC “wrote an open letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau condemning his use of the Emergency Powers Act in response to the three-week occupation of Ottawa by the far-right convoy, saying to Trudeau that they are “concerned” that he does not appreciate “the significance of God’s wrath on a rebellious and lawless nation. ”

The letter, which was sent two days after the emergency order was issued, went on to “implore” Trudeau to “step back, restore the constitutional freedoms of the people, respect the God-given rights to our citizens and, above all, to humble yourself and kneel before Christ the King, lest you perish on the way.

Leedham also cites a Global News report which “indicates the blockade has ties to libertarian groups in the United States and notes the presence of American supporters in Coutts, AB.”

In a separate room, Mitchell Thompson, PP Ontario reporter strong points a recently unearthed photo of Ontario MPP and vocal convoy supporter Randy Hillier’ posing with the flag of a far-right secessionist group linked to charges of conspiracy to murder and firearms seized en route to the Coutts border blockade”.

According to PP, the photo “was originally posted on a far-right TikTok account” and “shows Hillier wearing a ‘No More Lockdowns’ t-shirt while holding an open beer can next to a flag. of the ‘Diagolon’,” which, Thompson notes, “is the symbol of a neo-fascist group called the ‘Plaid Army’, which has been spotted at the center of chaos in downtown Ottawa.

Meanwhile, Mob Contributors Ish Theilheimer and Marc Zwelling have suggestions for “how not to talk about the insurgency”, starting with the assertion that “illegal squatters in Ottawa are well-funded far-right extremists, which is good to call them, because it’s undeniably true” .

According to them, “the great victory of the insurgents in the media is to appropriate the word ‘freedom’ for their cause”.

Their recommendation, then, “for those who want to cancel the rioters (is) not to inadvertently give them free publicity using the rioters’ own words,” the duo wrote.

“This advice is at the heart of the concept of framing. Like a frame around a painting, a verbal frame outlines a debate. If you say winning Ottawa “has nothing to do with freedom,” you’re repeating the frame. By doing so, you conjure up images of freedom in your audience, when you really want them to think about oppression, a war against peaceful citizens, and an attack on democratically elected governments.

Elsewhere on the site, National political journalist Rabble Stephen Wentzell turn his attention on Canada’s response to rising tensions on the Ukrainian border, and the announcement earlier this week that Trudeau had approved “millions more to export lethal weapons to Ukraine” even as “all major parties except (the) Conservatives” – in this case, New Democrats and Greens – called for “a non-violent response”.

It is worth noting that The scoundrel essayist Marusya Bociurkiw offers a distinctly different grip on the tensions in his “lament for Ukraine” on February 22.

“The newspaper, online journals, even the alternative media space of the left, are full of crude anachronisms and xenophobic assumptions,” she writes.

“A left-wing broadcaster features a Russian ‘expert’ chastising those who are ‘too’ anti-Russian, as if this autocratic theocracy could still be redeemed by the long-disavowed progressive ideals of early communism. My leftist community is largely disinterested in Ukraine, asserting its ignorance with elaborate shrugs.

In response, she writes, “I find myself throwing out facts and statistics like so many baseball cards to anyone who will listen: that Ukraine was the first post-Soviet country to legalize homosexuality; the only country in the world to renounce its nuclear arsenal without violence; (a) leader in artistic, culinary and technical innovation; and that her feminist and queer organization is a model for the tottering state of North American feminist and queer politics.

More than Canadian Dimension, Oliver Boyd-Barrett warns that “Western media continue to press the ‘imminent Russian invasion of Ukraine’ narrative, claiming it has happened before and citing the alleged pressure Moscow is supposed to apply on Ukraine. »

In fact, he suggests, “even if Russia withdraws its forces from its own border with Ukraine – and even if all parties agree that full membership (in) NATO will not be extended to Ukraine at any time in the immediate future – NATO will maintain its dangerous passive-aggressive “victim” posture. This is because “Washington only wants one kind of development in Ukraine: a neoliberal paradise that will give Western capital total freedom to do whatever it wants with Ukrainian land and resources”.

Ultimately, Ricochet writer Christopher Curtis explore Quebec City’s “Hostility Merchants”, otherwise known as “Trash Radio”, the “talk radio hosts (who) set the agenda, determine elections and traffic in fear and mistrust », in particular Dominic Mrais from Radio X.

“Radio X is part of what its detractors call junk radio, or junk radio – a collection of conservative talk radio stations for which controversy is a business model,” he wrote. But it’s also “a glimpse into what looks like a unique moment of anger in Canadian politics.”

Centre-Right Trends in the Canadian Political Media Universe:

  • Ezra Levan, commander of Rebel Newsyou take a closer look to “whom Trudeau entrusts with his emergency crackdown,” beginning with “Bill Blair, the disgraced ex-cop who ran Toronto police during the G-20.”
  • Roberto Wakerell-Cruz of Post Millennial chronic Tory MP Colin Carrie’s attempt to ask ‘which ministers agreed’ with the agenda of the World Economic Forum, which Wakerell-Cruz describes as a ‘globalist think tank’, only to be ‘interrupted by the chairman of the Chamber due to very clear audio “being really bad”. ”
  • Rebel News reporter Alexandra Lavoie landed an exclusive interview with Candice Sero, “an Indigenous Mohawk residing in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory in Hastings County who was in Ottawa protesting vaccination mandates, when she was trampled by the Toronto Police Mounted Unit and punched kicked by other police officers while she was on the ground”.
  • True North News Contributor Harley Sims was at launch of the “4,395 kilometer march from Vancouver to Ottawa…in solidarity with Canadian truckers and workers to end authoritarian government mandates” by Canadian Armed Forces veteran James Topp.

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International headquarters

The Golfzon Leadbetter Academy settles in Reunion Resort

The world headquarters of the Leadbetter Golf Academy plans to relocate to Interstate 4 south of Orlando, after announcing on Thursday that it was moving from ChampionsGate Golf Club to relocate to Reunion Resort this year.

Leadbetter Golf Academy was acquired in 2018 by Golfzon, a South Korean company best known for its indoor golf simulators. The company is now officially known as Golfzon Leadbetter and operates 38 academies in 15 countries. Leadbetter Academies was founded in 1983 by instructor David Leadbetter, who has worked with many circuit professionals and 26 major championship winners, his most famous student being perhaps Nick Faldo.

Reunion Resort is home to three golf courses designed by Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus and Tom Watson. It is the former home of the ANNIKA Academy, which closed in 2016. Kingwood International Resorts bought La Réunion in 2019.

David Leadbetter on the Reunion Resort shooting range near Orlando (Courtesy of Golfzon Leadbetter)

“I have taught golf all over the world and there are few places more suitable for golfers to learn and play than Reunion Resort and Golf Club,” Leadbetter said in a press release announcing the move. “We share Kingwood International Resorts’ vision of providing the best golf experience in Reunion. Reunion already has three major golf courses; now they will have a golf academy to match. I can’t wait to give the first lesson of the new installation.

Reunion’s new academy will feature plenty of technology, including lesson studios with launch monitors, 3D swing analysis, radar tracking of shots on the range, club equipment, fitness and biomechanics . The facility will also include a Golfzon TwoVision simulation studio to host virtual tournaments, according to the statement. The coaching staff plans to accommodate a wide range of players, from rookies to tour stars.

“Reunion Resort and Golf Club provides us with the perfect location to grow the Golfzon Leadbetter business and provide golfers with a unique facility to work on all aspects of their game, regardless of their level of play,” said Benedict Riches. , CEO of Golfzon Leadbetter. in the release.

“This new partnership is a natural fit, bringing another legend to our resort with the world headquarters of Golfzon Leadbetter,” said Anthony Carll, General Manager of Reunion Resort. “We are absolutely thrilled to be able to offer this experience this fall with such a respected legend in the golf community.”

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Non profit living

“It’s a sanctuary”: the magic of quiet, economical and anti-allergic “passive” houses | Living ethically and green

Jhe first night Stephanie Silva spent in her new Brooklyn apartment was exceptionally quiet. It was the same the next morning and the next day. The 32-year-old New Yorker had forgotten the last time she managed to mute the city of 8.2 million.

“It’s like a sanctuary,” Silva says, but as soon as she opens the windows facing the street, bustling outside noise fills her living room. Once she closed the windows, the difference was immediately noticeable. “Since moving here, my anxiety has gone away,” Silva says, referring to the affordable 10-story apartment in Ocean Hill, part of Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. But what sets this 67-unit building apart from the rest of the city’s housing is its “passive” element.

A passive building is designed to consume a minimum of energy. To be efficient in heating and cooling, the space is sealed with airtight insulation – like a vacuum bottle – so that it can retain heat during the winter while keeping it out during the summer. . Homes, schools, offices, and other buildings built to Passive House standards typically use thicker, higher-performance windows, such as triple-glazed models, which have three layers of glass. Another key step is to use the energy recovery process in the building’s heating, ventilation and air conditioning system. Known as the ERV, the ventilator, by means of two fans, acts as the lungs of the building, drawing in clean, fresh, filtered air and expelling stale air.

Resident Manager Rich Morris opens a window in the Harry T Nance Apartments laundry room. The windows meet passive house standards.

In New York and other cities, passive design is becoming a popular option for new apartment buildings and homes, and it’s easy to see why: people love living there.

“I didn’t suffer an allergy attack like I usually would,” said Silva, who suffers from dust and seasons allergies. “The building clears the air and I can sleep through the night.”

Continuous air exchange, coupled with super-insulated construction, means no more smell of what the downstairs neighbors are cooking, no more traffic noise in the living room, and no more click-clack from old radiators. Each room in Silva’s three-bedroom apartment has its own heating and cooling unit, allowing his family to heat one room at a time instead of the entire house. “My daughter hates the heat, while I like my bedroom to be nice and warm,” Silva says. “I love that each room has its own separate temperature.”

Solar panels are embedded in the roofs of many passive buildings, including two in the Bronx developed by Bronx Pro Group, which specializes in affordable housing.

“When you walk into a passive house, the average person probably doesn’t notice a difference,” said Justin Stein, senior vice president of the Bronx Pro Group.

“Other than being quieter, it looks like any other apartment,” Stein said.

Large blue-gray ventilation systems are installed on a roof, with the city skyline in the background.
Energy-efficient heating, cooling and ventilation systems benefit residents’ well-being, but also their wallets, say passive building advocates.

The invisible health effects of cleaner air will help tenants in the long run, but the benefit of lower electric bills will be felt immediately. The annual energy demand of passive houses is estimated to be more than 70% lower than that of traditionally insulated buildings with the same parameters. Silva, who lives with her three-year-old son and her fiancé, paid her first utility bill in December, which came to $57. In his old two-bedroom apartment, charges averaged $135 a month: $60 for gas and $75 for electricity.

“I’m not that grumpy,” Silva says as she reflects on the impact lower housing costs have had on her personality. “I was living paycheck to paycheck in my last apartment and now I can buy something nice because I can afford it. Before, all the money I had left had to be used for expenses for the following month.

It took eight months from the day Silva applied for the city’s affordable housing lottery to the day she was able to move into her new home developed by RiseBoro, a Brooklyn-based nonprofit. In 2014, RiseBoro developed New York State’s first-ever affordable multi-family apartment building certified to Passive House standards. Today there are more than 30 affordable apartment buildings in New York City built to passive standards, including this first RiseBoro project in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

A trio of images shows a blue vertical pipe, a close-up image of an air vent grille, and a copper-colored air vent cap.
Passive building air ventilation systems are designed to efficiently supply fresh air while exhausting stale air.

“When you move from an older affordable home to a more efficient one, there’s a huge shift in attitude,” said Satpal Kaur, an architect who has been designing efficient buildings for more than 15 years. Kaur helped deliver the Bushwick Building while in the office of Chris Benedict, one of the leading architects in the field of sustainable design. From keeping your feet cold while working from home, to sitting by a window and not feeling the cold peeking through the glass, to reducing noise pollution and energy costs – for Kaur, the benefits of living in an affordable Passive House are conveniences that every person deserves.

“If we made it standard practice, comfort would be for everyone,” Kaur says.

Dozens of affordable passive developments are currently under construction in the five boroughs. Building a passive house usually costs about 5-10% more than a conventional house. The construction of a multi-family passive building can be approximately 3% more than a comparable non-passive building. Renovating an older building to passive standards is one of the most effective ways to reduce heat concentration and emissions from the existing housing stock.

These renovations and new construction projects can contribute to the city’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from buildings by 40% by 2030. Energy-efficient design decisions – such as moving away from gas for electricity – will also help reduce residents’ bills, Kaur said. When developers adopt passive design standards, “not only are you changing the life of the building,” Kaur said, “you’re changing the lives of the people in it.”

Close-up image of a white multi-story building facade with angular rectangular panels around its windows.
Knickerbocker Commons in Bushwick, Brooklyn is the first all-affordable-unit apartment building to be built and certified to Passive House standards in New York State. The building’s facade optimizes light and shade, contributing to energy costs that are only 20% of the average size of a New York building.

In New York, as in many places across the country, summer temperatures are highest in densely built-up areas. Adequate and efficient cooling is a priority.

New York City buildings are good at providing – and retaining – heat to keep residents warm during the winter. The challenge for homeowners is how to keep residents cool when temperatures rise and buildings heat up, says Ryan Cassidy, director of sustainability and construction at RiseBoro. He thinks that like tenants’ current right to heat, in the next 5 to 10 years New York City will likely develop a cooling policy for buildings.

Currently, the city’s building stock is responsible for 71% of New York’s greenhouse carbon emissions. The recent decision to ban gas heaters, cookers and water heaters in all new buildings may push traditional developers to follow Passive House standards.

Aramis Rosa, a slender dark-haired, bespectacled man in light gray jeans and a long-sleeved black t-shirt, sits for a portrait in his renovated attic, with three narrow windows behind him.
Aramis Rosa poses for a portrait in the attic master bedroom. An air circulation tube is visible on the wall below the windows. Photographed January 8. 2022, Staten Island, NY.

Aramis Rosa is one of the owners who does just that. In March 2020, he purchased a five-bedroom, two-story home in Staten Island with an attic and basement. An electrician, he was fixing sockets at Kaur when they started talking about architecture and how Kaur designs buildings.

“I remember he said, ‘Hey, would you mind sending me the cut sheets?'” Kaur recalled. She emailed the information and a few months later, when he returned to fix her doorbell: “He told me he had done everything, and I was completely blown away.”

Rosa applied what Kaur taught her to remodel her new family home. The boiler, the first to leave, was replaced by an ERV. Then he installed energy efficient windows, separate units in each room and solar panels on the roof, who was eligible for state tax refunds.

When it comes to insulation, working with spray foam was a turning point for Rosa. “That has got to be the best thing I’ve done, to go with spray foam insulation,” Rosa said. “Because of the amount of heat it is able to retain, now in winter, you can feel the difference as soon as you walk into the house.”

A triptych image shows Aramis Rose's two-story house, a detailed close-up of the white foam insulation sprayed into the walls, and a close-up image of Rosa's hands.
Left: Aramis Rosa used passive design elements to renovate his family’s new home. In the middle: spray foam insulation in the walls of the house reduces heating and cooling costs. Right: Rosa did most of the renovations herself.

A chemical compound that expands in seconds when applied, spray foam leaves virtually no air gaps, unlike traditional fiberglass insulation. Rosa is the fifth owner of the 1938 house and the first to do such a spectacular renovation on his own.

“I feel like when you hire someone, they’re there to do the job and then go home. They might not consider the person living there long-term,” Rosa said. “Even though it took us a little longer to be home, the fact that I’m doing it for my family means I’m not skipping any corners because I’ll be the one living here.”

In a city known for its sensory overload — whether it’s the roar of new construction, the funk of curbside trash, or the howls of the century-old subway system — being able to tune out can be a luxury. But the promise of passive architecture is that it doesn’t have to be – it can be as easy as coming home.

History organization

California State Parks will vote to rename part of Lake Folsom in an effort to inclusively acknowledge Black Gold Rush history

California State Parks is considering a new name for part of the Folsom Lake State Recreation Area called Negro Bar, after some residents said it had harmed them for decades. The potential change has sparked debate about how black history is preserved in California, even acknowledging that history isn’t always easy.

Many people have argued that while the word is a racial slur today, it didn’t always have that meaning. Michael Harris, a local black historian, said he strongly believes the discussion around the name change distracts from the larger conversation about how to remember and honor the contributions of black miners to the region.

“If we’re going to say the n-word and put a 21st-century context to it, it’s disrespectful, nobody’s going to call us Negro today, but historically that’s what we were,” said Harris, who was a strong supporter of keeping the name.

“Given the contextual nature of the period in question, 1840-1875, that’s what it is,” Harris said.

He is wary of changing the name to make some people more comfortable with the story.

“The idea of ​​focusing on the name is intentionally disrespectful, it presupposes derogatory treatment, and it certainly denies one of the contributions of people of African descent in the era of the gold rush.”

This part of Lake Folsom lies along a bend in the American River. It’s a popular launch site for paddleboarders and kayakers, and visitors can see the site where African-American miners first found gold as they made their way to the river’s edge. According to State Parks, the term Negro Bar was first documented in an 1850 newspaper article which noted that black miners had discovered gold at this site.

But in recent years, the name has become controversial. In 2018, a black woman, Phaedra Jones, was driving to deliver food to The Cliff House of Folsom when she passed the sign for Negro Bar. She was immediately disturbed and eventually created a petition to demand that state parks be renamed.

Since then, the scrutiny around the name of the entry has increased. In 2020, a coalition of Folsom residents came together to lobby for the name change.

Jenn Johnson is black and lives in town. She grew up in Folsom and is part of the C3 coalition which is pushing for change. She said that while living in the predominantly white town, she always felt uncomfortable with the name Negro Bar and therefore avoids going there.

“I’m not going to show up and go to a place called Negro Bar where all the other people are white-skinned using that term,” Johnson said. “That’s not an acceptable term to use, so why are we using it as a state park name?”

Some, like Sacramento NAACP President Betty Williams, have noted that the word “nigger” had a different meaning when it was originally given to mark this historic spot to remember the contributions of black miners.

“During that time, the word Negro was seen as a professional and a word that described professional and hard-working African Americans, Black African Americans,” Williams said.

But Williams also acknowledged that the words change meaning over time. She added that her organization had debated for years whether to push State Parks to change its name and was divided in its opinions. In the end, she says, they decided to leave it to the community.

“Now here we are in 2022, and you have a different generation, so you go from black to black to African American, and some people have gone back to black,” Williams said. “So the debate is whether we are basing it on what they felt at the time, or are we conforming to today’s times where the use of the word nigger to identify a historical area n not seen as something positive?

Now State Parks has said it will consider a name change. The California State Park Commission will address the issue in a vote in June.

Alexandra Stehl, assistant director of strategic planning and recreation services for state parks, said the discussion to rename the area is part of a larger effort to reconsider the history of state parks. .

“We build on efforts to support equity and inclusion, and this area has been requested in the past to be renamed,” Stehl said. “State Parks has agreed that renaming this area is a priority.”

Stehl said some options for a new name include Black Miners Bar, Black Freedom Bar, African American Bar and Historic Negro Bar, among others.

She adds that apart from a name change, the department will also embark on an educational campaign to help visitors fully understand the history of the park and its importance to the California Gold Rush.

“We try to keep this historic value very high, but at the same time we want to make sure we’re looking for a name that’s inclusive and doesn’t create barriers for people who want to enjoy the park,” Stehl said.

Folsom resident Jenn Johnson said she hoped a new name would be considered.

“If we try to move forward and educate ourselves and be better, we want to love our future generations, and if people like me, young people in their twenties, say and shout from the top of their hills, ‘That word has been used in this community to hurt me,’ the least we can do is bow to that and make them feel more welcome,” Johnson said. “And hopefully I can going to the park in the future without feeling completely sick because of that name.”

State Parks said renaming a park — the name of which might be considered offensive in modern times — is nothing new. They mentioned Su-meg State Park as a recent example. The park was renamed to honor the indigenous people who lived there, replacing one that honored a man who colonized the area.

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Canadian army

Creative goaltender Emile Francis introduced the trapper glove to the NHL

New York Rangers coach Emile Francis shouts after the Rangers score against the Philadelphia Flyers in the second period of an NHL hockey game in Philadelphia in April 1974.Brian Horton/Associated Press

Championships are wonderful but they are not everything.

Emile Francis never won the Stanley Cup in his professional hockey life as a player, coach and manager, but the short man who introduced the goaltender’s trapper glove remains a giant for his accomplishments and his personality. Mr Francis died on Saturday at the age of 95.

The high point of his five-decade hockey career came as the National Hockey League grew from a modest group of six teams to a business enterprise three times the size of the mid-1960s through the mid-1960s. 1970. Taking over the New York Rangers operation that had languished in the depths of the standings for two decades, Mr. Francis built a formidable team that couldn’t quite overcome more powerful teams in Montreal, Boston and Chicago.

Nicknamed “The Cat” for his speed at playing junior hockey, Mr. Francis was a goaltender who, at 5-foot-7 and no more than 155 pounds, was undersized even by the standards of the time. Even as a boy growing up in North Battleford, Saskatchewan, he made up for that with a sharp, creative mind.

“I was always a little guy, so I had to rely on my wits – and no one was going to cheat me on anything,” Mr. Francis recalled in an interview with this reporter in 2003. “Sister Mary Berchmans taught me that at École du Couvent de l’Enfant-Jésus primary school in North Battleford, I was in front of goal in an hour-long game against Connaught School for the Championship of elementary schools. Whenever I had the chance, I would throw the puck over the boards in the snow, which was okay by the rules at the time.

“We won 1-0 but Connaught didn’t want to give us the trophy because of my tactics. When we told Sister Mary about it, she took me to Connaught School in a taxi, stormed into the principal, who was also their hockey coach, and demanded the trophy. We took it back and Sister Mary declared school holidays.

Emile Francis was born September 13, 1926 in North Battleford. His teenage years were heavily affected by World War II, but the quirks of his age, the war’s effect on the NHL, and his eligibility to serve kept him away from the battlefields.

“American hockey teams needed players so badly during World War II that they recruited teenagers,” Francis said. “I was barely past my 17th birthday and I was playing one goal for the Philadelphia Falcons, then the Washington Lions, of the Amateur Hockey League East.”

Nicknamed “The Cat” for his speed at playing junior hockey, Mr. Francis was a goaltender who, at 5-foot-7 and no more than 155 pounds, was undersized even by the standards of the time.Harry Harris/Associated Press

He joined the Canadian army when he was old enough, but the war ended before he could go overseas and he was discharged in 1945. year of junior hockey eligibility, so I joined the Moose Jaw Canucks.

Moose Jaw went undefeated in the 1945-46 Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League campaign before being eliminated in the Memorial Cup playoffs. Mr. Francis was so impressive that he split the following season between the senior Regina Capitals and the NHL’s Chicago Black Hawks, where he resisted authority to make a goaltending innovation that was as important than the introduction of facial protection by Jacques Plante a decade later.

“I created the first trapper,” he said. “Until then, the two goalkeeper gloves were basically identical, blockers with just a little strap between the thumb and fingers. If you actually tried to catch the puck in your palm, it would knock hell out of your hand. So I took a George McQuinn style baseball mitt – he was a first baseman for the St. Louis Browns – and sewed it onto a regular hockey glove. No one said anything about it until my first NHL game with the Chicago Black Hawks. We are about to begin when King Clancy, who referees the game, is called to the bench by Jack Adams, the Detroit coach. Adams says something, points at me and Clancy skates towards my net.

“’Let me see this glove,’ Clancy said. He looks at my trapper and says, “It’s illegal. You cannot use it.

“’Well,’ I said, ‘you don’t have a game because it’s the only glove I have!’ I had it there. The teams have only dressed one goalkeeper and it would be foolish to bring the emergency goalkeeper down from the stands while the starter is fully healthy. Clancy lets me use the glove, but orders me to bring it to league president Clarence Campbell this weekend when we’re in Montreal so he can rule on it. Campbell endorsed it, and trappers soon became standard equipment.

In the end, Mr. Francis was unable to measure up to NHL standards over the long term. With only six teams in the league with a goaltender each, there wasn’t much of a major league future for someone who was only a Top 10. After a few seasons with the Black Hawks, he was distributed to the New York Rangers, for whom he appeared only sparingly.

“You look at my NHL career line and it’s not much: 95 games, 31-52-11 and a 3.75 goals-against-average,” Francis said. “But every year I’ve played 50 to 70 games, plus playoffs, for American Hockey League teams in New Haven, Cincinnati and Cleveland, and around the old Western Pro Hockey League. for Vancouver, Saskatoon, Seattle, Victoria and Spokane.”

Mr. Francis, however, accumulated a wealth of knowledge about coaching and team management, augmenting his hockey experience with summers as player-manager of the North Battleford semi-pro baseball team. The sport was immensely popular in his home province in the 1950s.

“Every summer I played baseball in Saskatchewan,” Francis said. “For a time the Bentley family got me to join them at Delisle, but the people of North Battleford thought my military background made me a good leader and organizer, so I became player-manager of the North Battleford Beavers . It was good baseball! Some of the best ballplayers around were NHL players like Max and Doug Bentley, Bert Olmstead at Scepter and Gordie Howe at Saskatoon.

“Our rosters were full of great black baseball players because the black leagues had disbanded and organized baseball was slow to integrate. Championship matches were great, but the really serious competition was in tournaments because finishing in the money was what kept your team from going bust.

After retiring from hockey in 1960, Mr. Francis was hired by the Rangers to coach their junior team in Guelph, Ontario. Two years later he was appointed assistant general manager in New York and in 1964 he was promoted to general manager. Early in his tenure on Nov. 22, 1964, he was the center of attention in one of the most bizarre incidents in the NHL. During a home game at the old Madison Square Garden against Detroit, Mr. Francis accosted the goal judge who signaled a Red Wings count and found himself surrounded by hostile fans.

“We end up in a fight,” Mr. Francis recalled. “I’m outnumbered three-to-one and these guys are hammering me good, tearing my face open, when Vic Hadfield sees what’s going on from the ice. He jumps onto the boards, steps over the Plexiglas, and half the team follows him. They save me and give these guys a lick. The league fined us all, but what really freaked me out was that the three guys sued me for a million dollars, and after the case dragged through the courts, they got $80,000.

Mr Francis took over the coaching reins at Rangers in 1966, resigning twice but returning behind the bench after Bernie Geoffrion and Larry Popein were unable to last more than half a season. As Rangers coach, Mr. Francis posted an impressive record of 342-209-103.

“Rangers were also lost players when I joined them, but we produced good young players like Rod Gilbert, Jean Ratelle and Brad Park, acquired goalkeeper Ed Giacomin from the minors, made good trades and became strong contenders. . We never won the Stanley Cup but we came close, especially in 1972 when everything was in place until Ratelle broke his ankle. We led the Bruins to six games in the final; I know we would have beaten them with Ratelle in there.

“Managing and coaching Rangers was aggravating because the Madison Square Garden corporation owned the team and treated it like an afterthought,” he once said, recalling they had to play playoff games on the road because the circus had priority for the April dates. The ice cream in the garden was also terrible.

“I blew my peak in 1975 when one of our best defensemen, Dale Rolfe, skated on a spot where the ice had worn out and suffered a terrible broken leg, ended his his career immediately. “I’ve seen better ice on the highways in Saskatchewan,” I told reporters, and I meant it. Bill Jennings, the Rangers chairman, didn’t like it when I said what I thought, which might have something to do with my dismissal in 1976.”

Mr. Francis was soon hired to be general manager of the St. Louis Blues, where his seven-year tenure included a struggle to keep the team financially solvent. He moved on to a six-year run as chairman and general manager of the Hartford Whalers before retiring in 1989. Neither the Blues nor the Whalers could match the winning consistency of the Rangers, and Mr Francis is denied the glory of a Stanley Cup title. .

“Of course I had my disappointments,” Mr. Francis said, “like playing all those years in the minors and never winning the Stanley Cup, but all the while I had the best time of my life. life.”

He was enshrined as a builder in the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1982. For his contributions to hockey in the United States, he was awarded the Lester Patrick Trophy and the International Wayne Gretzky Award. He was a longtime member of the Hockey Hall of Fame Veterans Committee and became an exceptional storyteller and ambassador for the game.

He and his wife, Emma, ​​who died in 2020 after 68 years of marriage, had two sons: Bob, who had a brief playing and coaching career in the NHL, and Rick. He leaves his two sons.

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International headquarters

ASOFARMA CENTRAL AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN, THROUGH ITS ADIUM HEADQUARTERS, SIGNS AN IMPORTANT AGREEMENT WITH MODERNA INC. TO COLLABORATE IN THE DISTRIBUTION AND MARKETING OF VACCINES AGAINST COVID 19 IN THE REGION

Within the framework of the agreement concluded, ASOFARMA will collaborate with Moderna in the management of supply contracts already in force, as well as in the processes of registration of vaccines, support for pharmacovigilance activities, continuing medical education, business governmental, marketing and generation of new agreements that facilitate the availability of SPIKEVAX in the region.

“We are thrilled to partner with Moderna to help patients, physicians and governments in this effort against COVID-19. Moderna is a leading company in the fight against the pandemic, and we are proud to have been chosen as partners for this task, providing all our experience and regional presence,” said Bernardo GiralaGeneral Manager of ASOFARMA Central America and Caribbean.

“This alliance confirms our goal to provide people with innovative treatments that help improve their quality of life and expand vaccination rates in the region,” Girala said.

Moderna Inc., a biotechnology company pioneering the development of messenger RNA (mRNA) therapies and vaccines, has relied on ASOFARMA to enable the arrival in the region of its COVID 19 vaccine, Spikevax .

Moderna’s mRNA platform is based on continuous advancements in basic and applied mRNA science, delivery and manufacturing technology; which has enabled the development of therapies and vaccines for infectious diseases, immuno-oncology, rare diseases, cardiovascular diseases and autoimmune diseases.

With this new agreement concluded by ASOFARMA, Moderna Inc. joins a list of international pharmaceutical and biotechnology research and development companies that ASOFARMA has represented in the region for more than twenty years.

Photo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1752293/ASOFARMA.jpg

SOURCE ASOFARMA CENTROAMERICA AND CARIBE

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Non profit living

Italian town raises funds to pay pensioners’ rising energy bills

FLORENCE, Italy (AP) — Florence is famous for its contributions to Italian art, architecture and cuisine. But these days, local leaders in the city considered the birthplace of the Renaissance are preoccupied with more mundane matters: paying the bills.

Amid soaring energy costs across Europe, officials at Palazzo Vecchio – the building that serves as both city hall and museum in Florence – have teamed up with a nonprofit local charity to help fixed-income retirees retain their power through an “Adopt-a-Bill” fundraising campaign.

“Florence is a city where you live well, and for this reason too, people live very long,” said Mayor Dario Nardella.

However, a significant number of retirees in Florence live on less than 9,000 euros ($10,205) a year and cannot afford to make ends meet with an expected 55% increase in home electricity costs and a 42% rise in residential gas bills, he mentioned.

The widower Luigi Boni, 96, confirms this. He says that by the end of February he will have emptied his bank account and spent his monthly pension check of less than 600 euros ($680) before covering the charges.

“Either I eat or I pay the rent,” Boni said as he sat on his sofa, a daily newspaper in his hand.

To help him and others of Florence’s approximately 30,000 residents over the age of 65 who live alone, the city administration launched the fundraising campaign with the non-profit Montedomini Foundation, which runs projects aimed at helping the city’s retirees.

The campaign raised 33,000 euros (over $37,000) in its first days. Private citizens, including Florentines living abroad, made more than 200 donations, according to city social councilor Sara Funaro.

“Our goal is to raise funds to ensure that every elderly person who comes to us for help can receive help to cover the increase in bills due to the increase (in energy costs),” Funaro said.

Soaring energy prices are pushing up utility bills – and driving inflation to a record high – from Poland to the UK. In response, governments across Europe are rushing to provide aid to residents and businesses as utility companies pass the costs on to consumers.

In Turkey, where economic pressure is extreme and has fueled protests, Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir are among opposition-run municipalities with similar Pass a Bill initiatives. The Istanbul municipal website says nearly 49 million Turkish liras (around $3.6 million) have been donated since 2020, covering 320,000 utility bills.

Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi’s government has passed measures valued at more than 8 billion euros ($9 billion) to help mitigate the impact of soaring energy prices for businesses and individuals.

The latest government decree, published on Friday, also had a forward-looking component: it aimed to accelerate Italy’s transition to more renewable energy sources, particularly solar power, to make the country less dependent on imported supplies. .

Italy currently imports 90% of its gas, much of it from Russia, and Draghi insisted that any European Union sanctions aimed at punishing Russia for recognizing two separatist-held areas in the east of Ukraine must exempt the energy sector.

The association of Italian mayors has said the government’s response has so far been insufficient to help cities cope with hundreds of millions of euros in additional energy costs, forcing them to choose between balancing budgets or cutting costs. services.

Florence, Rome and other cities kept their civic monuments and local government buildings dark on February 10 to draw attention to the situation.

Florence’s Adopt-a-Bill campaign has popular support. As well as being a top tourist destination, the capital of the Italian region of Tuscany has a long history of success in providing social services to poor and vulnerable residents.

“It’s a great initiative because you can help people who can’t come to pay a bill that has shamelessly reached unsustainable costs,” said Luca Menoni, owner of a butcher shop in the food market. covered with Sant’Ambrogio in Florence.

“I’m paying a (electricity) bill myself that’s double what I used to pay,” Menoni said.

Boni may be getting help with her energy bills to get her through the winter and avoid a planned move to a retirement home. But he’s still on a tight budget that doesn’t allow for a lot of luxury.

“Steaks? Me at? Let’s not even talk about it. I eat (cheap) packaged food,” he said. After the death of his wife, he said: “I became an expert in economical cooking.

___

Nicole Winfield in Rome and Zeynep Bilginsoy in Istanbul contributed to this report.

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Canadian army

Harrogate’s Stonefall Cemetery will host special guided tours for International Women’s Day and Commonwealth Day

If York had not suffered a terrible bombardment in April 1942, Private Dorothy Thompson would have expected to be married in May.

The Harrogate wife had joined the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) around 1940 and by 1942 she was stationed at York.

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However, in the early hours of April 29, 1942, the town came under attack, with bombs falling from 40 German aircraft for nearly two hours.

Sea Cadet Lucia Leeming-Sheppard places candles at Canadian Air Force graves during a Candlelight Remembrance Christmas at the Commonwealth War Graves at Stonefall Cemetery, Harrogate in December. Photo: Tony Johnson.

One of the bombs fell on a pair of semi-detached houses on Nunthorpe Grove, numbers 23 and 25. They were destroyed alongside the neighboring pair, numbers 19 and 21.

Pte Thompson lived at number 21 and was discovered several days later at the bottom of a bomb crater. Aged just 24, she was the first member of the Northern Command ATS to be killed by enemy action.

She is one of six female victims commemorated at Stonefall Cemetery in Harrogate and visitors will have a rare chance to learn more about her story and that of the other five.

To jointly mark International Women’s Day and Commonwealth Day, when the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) offers free themed guided tours of the cemetery in March.

Private Dorothy Thompson.

Guided tours for International Women’s Day (March 5 and 6, and the day itself on March 8) will highlight the six women, who also include those who served in the Territorial Army Nursing Service and sister Florrie Perst, of Bilton, who was in Dunkirk, in Africa and also on hospital ships in the Atlantic and the Mediterranean.

During Commonwealth Day tours (March 12-14, the latter being the actual day of remembrance), the public can learn about the victims from across the Commonwealth who are buried at Stonefall.

These include the Hannah brothers, who served in the Royal Canadian Air Force but died within months of each other, and Sergeant Isikeli Doviverata Komaisavai – known as “Ratu Dovi” – a descendant of the last king of Fiji, who fought for Britain. but died after being diagnosed with lung disease and was buried in Stonefall.

The tours are part of the CWGC’s “Ordinary People Extraordinary Times Around The World” campaign.

Elizabeth Smith, public engagement co-ordinator for the North East of England, said: ‘The Commonwealth War Graves Commission is looking after 170,000 war graves from both world wars at over 12,500 locations across the UK. United.

“The Air Force ground at Stonefall Cemetery is unique in the north of England due to its size and its resemblance to our sites overseas. The themed guided tours at Stonefall Cemetery will give locals the opportunity to reconnect with their history, learn more about the work of the CWGC, and discover the remarkable stories of the men and women who are buried in their community.

The Commission aims to honor the men and women of the Commonwealth forces who died in the First and Second World Wars, ensuring that they are never forgotten. Funded by six member governments, its work began with building and now maintaining cemeteries in 23,000 locations around the world.

During World War II, nearly 1,000 servicemen were buried at Stonefall Cemetery. Many of them came from across the Commonwealth and they include more than 600 Canadian and nearly 100 Australian servicemen, as well as casualties from East Africa, the Caribbean, New Zealand and Fiji.

The free thematic guided tours will take place between Saturday March 5 and Monday March 14.

Reservations can be made at www.cwgc.org/our-war-graves-your-history/what-s-happening-near-you/

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International headquarters

Chinese Cryptocurrency Exchange Huobi Plans US Back-to-School

Chinese cryptocurrency exchange Huobi plans to re-enter the U.S. market more than two years after ceasing operations to comply with regulations, one of the company’s co-founders told CNBC.

But the company may not launch an exchange and may instead focus on other areas such as asset management, after missteps last time around, according to Du Jun.

“In 2018 we tried to enter the US market but quickly pulled out because we didn’t have a strong market commitment at that time and we didn’t have a good management team in the States. States,” Du said according to a CNBC translation of his Mandarin comments.

“I expect asset management to be a bigger business than trading, which also echoes the traditional financial market,” he told CNBC, adding, “I don’t think that the exchange is a necessary element of entering the United States”.

Du did not confirm which Huobi company will launch first when it returns to the United States. A return to the US market could put Huobi in competition with companies like Coinbase. Huobi is one of the top 10 cryptocurrency exchanges by trading volume in the world, according to CoinGecko.

Huobi first launched a cryptocurrency exchange business in the United States in 2018. The following year, the company announced that it would freeze US user accounts and added that it would return to the market in a “more integrated and impactful fashion”.

Huobi Group owns an exchange business and an asset management business called Huobi Tech, which is listed in Hong Kong.

The US push is part of a larger international expansion plan after several years of tighter crypto regulations in China, the market where Huobi was founded. Last year, Beijing sought to completely eliminate cryptocurrency mining in China and crack down on loopholes that allowed Chinese citizens to trade.

At the end of 2021, Huobi retired existing mainland Chinese user accounts and chose Singapore as its headquarters in Asia.

Du said Huobi lost around 30% of its revenue due to the shutdown of users in China. But it gave the company new impetus for international expansion. It plans to set up a headquarters in Europe, in addition to its US push.

Learn more about cryptocurrencies from CNBC Pro

“Regarding the number of resources or personnel that we will deploy for the international market, we have no choice but to use all our strength to move forward in our global strategy,” said From. “In the past, we explored a new market and we could always walk out if it didn’t work out. Now Huobi has no choice but to go global.”

Chinese regulations

Du praised China’s strict cryptocurrency regulations as they tackled gambling and money laundering cases. The Huobi co-founder said the regulations protect small investors. He said, however, that other countries should not follow China’s approach as investors may be more mature in other markets.

“In China, when people lose in their investment, sometimes extreme people jump from the regulator building and investors are less mature. The government took a similar approach to Covid restriction. It sensed danger and took measures. measures to protect people’s safety,” Du said.

“In other regions, we can say that investors are more mature. They have more experience and they take responsibility for their investment decisions and therefore the governments of these markets do not need to take strict measures.”

Global regulators are considering rules for cryptocurrency, from trading to how it should be taxed. This month, India has proposed a 30% tax on any income from the transfer of digital assets. Meanwhile, the United States is still considering how to regulate cryptocurrencies.

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Non profit living

Prosecutor says racism drove men to hunt and kill Ahmaud Arbery: live updates

Credit…Nicole Craine for The New York Times

Three white men were convicted in November of the murder of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old black man, after suspecting him of carrying out a series of break-ins in their South Georgia neighborhood. The men were sentenced to life in prison in January and now face federal hate crime charges.

Here’s what we know about the circumstances of Mr. Arbery’s death.

Ahmaud Arbery, a former high school football player, lived with his mother outside of the small town of Brunswick, Georgia. He had spent some time in college but seemed to be on a drift in his twenties, testing various careers, working on his rapping skills and living with his mother. He also suffered from a mental illness that caused him auditory hallucinations.

On Sunday, February 23, 2020, shortly before 1 p.m., Mr. Arbery was running in a suburban neighborhood called Satilla Shores, when a man standing in his front yard saw him pass, according to a police report. The man, Gregory McMichael, said he thought Mr Arbery looked like a man suspected of several burglaries in the area and called Travis McMichael, his son.

According to the police report, the men grabbed a .357 Magnum handgun and a shotgun, got into a pickup truck and chased Mr. Arbery, trying unsuccessfully to cut him. A third man, William Bryan, also joined the chase in a second truck, according to the report and other documents.

In a recording of a 911 call, which appears to have been made moments before the chase began, a neighbor told a dispatcher that a black man was inside a house under construction on the block of the McMichaels.

During the chase, the McMichaels shouted, “Stop, stop, we want to talk to you,” according to Gregory McMichael’s account in the police report. They then pulled up to Mr. Arbery and Travis McMichael got out of the truck with the shotgun.

Gregory McMichael “said the unidentified man began violently attacking Travis and the two men then began fighting over the shotgun, at which point Travis fired a shot, then a second later , there was a second shot,” the report said.

Mr. Arbery was unarmed.

Shortly after the shooting, Brunswick Circuit Court Attorney Jackie Johnson recused herself because Gregory McMichael had worked in her office.

The case was sent to George E. Barnhill, the district attorney for Waycross, Georgia, who later recused himself after Mr Arbery’s mother argued he had a conflict because her son was working also for the District Attorney of Brunswick.

But before dropping the case, Mr Barnhill wrote a letter to the Glynn County Police Department. In the letter, he argued there was not sufficient probable cause to arrest Mr Arbery’s pursuers.

Mr. Barnhill noted that the McMichaels were legally carrying their firearms under Georgia’s open carry law. He said they were within their rights to pursue what he called “a burglary suspect” and cited a state law that says, “A private person may arrest a violator if the offense is committed in his presence or to his immediate knowledge”. This so-called Citizens’ Arrest Act was largely dismantled in response to the Arbery case.

Mr Barnhill also argued that if Mr Arbery attacked Travis McMichael, Mr McMichael was “authorized to use deadly force to protect himself” under Georgia law.

Anger over the murder and the lack of consequences for the McMichaels grew when a graphic video surfaced showing the shooting on a suburban road.

The cellphone video, shot by Mr Bryan, is about half a minute long. It shows Mr. Arbery running along a shaded two-lane residential road when he comes across a white truck, with Travis McMichael standing next to the open driver’s side door with a shotgun. Gregory McMichael is in the bed of the pickup with a handgun.

Mr. Arbery runs around the truck and briefly disappears from view. Muffled screams can be heard before Mr. Arbery emerges, fighting with Travis McMichael outside the truck as three shotgun blasts ring out.

Mr. Arbery tries to run but staggers and falls to the sidewalk after a few steps.

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History organization

Science education teacher named Fellow of Linnean Society of London



Photo submitted

Professor William McComas stands next to the statue of Charles Darwin, a member of the Linnean Society, at the Natural History Museum in London.

William F. McComas, Emeritus Parks Family Professor of Science Education at the College of Education and Health Professions, was elected a Fellow at the 2021 Autumn Meeting of the Linnean Society of London. He joins a host of other scientists and scholars who have been members and fellows over the organization’s more than 230-year history.

The Linnean Society, the world’s oldest active biological society, was founded in 1788 and named for Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus, who established the system used to name and classify the biological world. The Linnaean system allows scientists “to identify baselines and track the impact of human activity on the environment around us, including the food supply, as we face the combined challenges of biodiversity loss and climate change,” according to the website.

Membership in the organization is open to professional scientists and amateurs who share an interest in natural history. “The Fellowship is international and includes world leaders in every branch of biology who use the Society’s facilities and publications to communicate new advances in their fields,” McComas said. Many notable scientists have been members, including Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace, the co-discoverers of natural selection, a key mechanism of evolution.

McComas was recommended as a Fellow because of his work in evolutionary education, Darwin studies and his writing of The American biology professorthe journal of the National Association of Biology Teachers.

The Linnean Society is headquartered in New Burlington House, a neo-Palladian mansion in the Mayfair district of London. It shares the building with four other learned societies, the Geological Society, the Royal Astronomical Society, the Society of Antiquaries and the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Since 1829, the society has safeguarded Linnaeus’s personal books, as well as his collection of flora and fauna. Additionally, it maintains an extensive library focusing on natural history, biodiversity, environment, conservation, and related topics. The society supports grassroots scholarship, public education, and informed policymaking.

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Canadian army

Russia extends military exercises in Belarus, raising fears of Ukraine invasion

Tanks move during the Union Courage-2022 Russia-Belarus military exercises at the Obuz-Lesnovsky training ground in Belarus on February 19.Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr/Associated Press

Russian troops in Belarus did not return to their home bases as planned on Sunday, instead continuing military exercises near the Ukrainian border and raising fears that Russia could soon launch a three-pronged attack on Ukraine.

The 10-day drills involving some 30,000 Russian troops, along with Belarusian forces, began Feb. 10, and their expected conclusion was one of the most watched signals of whether Russian President Vladimir Putin would choose to step up or to ease the months- old crisis around Ukraine. No end date was given for the extended exercises.

The continued presence of Russian troops in Belarus leaves open the worst case scenario of Russia attacking Ukraine from three directions, with troops in Belarus capable of pushing towards the capital of Kiev from the north. US officials have estimated that Russia now has between 170,000 and 190,000 troops in position around Ukraine. Most are massed along Ukraine’s eastern border, while large numbers are also concentrated in the south on the Russian-occupied Crimean peninsula.

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Belarusian Defense Minister Viktor Khrenin said Mr Putin and Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko had decided to continue the joint exercises due to “increasing military activity on the external borders” of Russia and Belarus, as well as “the aggravation of the situation in Donbass”, a region in the south-east of Ukraine.

“There is a conclusion – that it smells strongly of gunpowder in Europe,” Khrenin said.

On Saturday, the Russian and Belarusian leaders jointly oversaw the start of exercises to test the readiness of Russia’s nuclear arsenal, which is the largest in the world.

Russia says it has no intention of attacking Ukraine. But the Kremlin demanded guarantees that its neighbor will never be allowed to join the North Atlantic Treaty Organization – guarantees that the United States and the alliance of 30 NATO countries have said they would not give.

French President Emmanuel Macron called Mr Putin on Sunday in what the Elysee Palace described as “a last-ditch effort to avoid a Russian invasion of Ukraine”. Afterwards, the Kremlin said Mr Putin had told the French leader that the United States and NATO must respond to Russia’s demands “in a concrete and substantial way”. Moscow says NATO’s eastward expansion in the three decades since the end of the Cold War is a threat to its security.

Mr Putin believes Ukraine has been under de facto Western control since a 2014 revolution that toppled a pro-Moscow president. Mr Putin said last week he believed Ukraine’s military was committing “genocide” in the predominantly Russian-speaking region of Donbass, which is part of Ukraine but is under the control of a militia backed by Moscow for eight years. .

Fighting between the Ukrainian army and pro-Russian militants in Donbass has killed more than 14,000 people since 2014. The United Nations monitoring mission for Ukraine says that while both sides have committed human rights abuses Man, there is no evidence to support Mr. Putin’s claim. of genocide.

Since Mr Putin’s remarks, however, there have been a series of explosions and other alleged attacks in separatist-held areas, raising fears the Kremlin is manufacturing a provocation to use as justification for an invasion. pre-planned from Ukraine. US President Joe Biden said on Friday he believed Mr Putin had already made up his mind to attack.

After a visit to the Donbass frontline on Saturday, Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister Iryna Vereshchuk said the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe mission that monitors ceasefire violations had been weakened after Canada, the United States and Britain ordered their nationals to leave early. this month as concerns mounted over a possible Russian invasion.

Ms Vereshchuk said impartial reporting on what was happening in eastern Ukraine was now more important than ever and called on Ottawa, Washington and London to “review” their decision to withdraw from the mission. OSCE.

“We need to have a clear record of these situations. We have to make sure every incident is properly documented,” she told The Globe and Mail after visiting a kindergarten in the frontline town of Stanytsia Luhanska which was hit by a shell last week. injuring three staff members.

Canada and several other Western governments have also temporarily closed their embassies in Kyiv and moved staff to the city of Lviv, near the Ukraine-Poland border. Canada also withdrew the 260-soldier Operation Unifier that had been training the Ukrainian military for seven years, and Ottawa advised all Canadian citizens to leave Ukraine “now”.

Russia and Belarus, which are close military allies, say the tension in Eastern Europe has been caused by NATO, which has deployed additional troops to alliance member countries Poland, Romania and the Baltic States in response to Russian military build-up.

Andrei Sannikov, a Belarusian dissident who in 2010 ran for president against Mr Lukashenko in an election widely seen as rigged, said joint military exercises in Belarus posed a threat not only to Ukraine, but also for the sovereignty of his country.

Their extension almost certainly means that Russian troops will be in Belarus during the February 27 referendum on constitutional changes that would allow Mr Lukashenko, who came to power in 1994, to remain president until 2035.

“The referendum will be held under the presence of foreign troops, under the threat that foreign troops will be used against the civilian population,” Sannikov said.

“Russia now completely controls Belarus. You can see how Belarus is being used as a springboard… which not only threatens Ukraine, but also Europe.

Ukraine says Russian-backed separatists are to blame after a kindergarten in Stanytsia Luhanska was bombed and videos of fleeing civilians made in separatist-controlled areas of Donetsk are fabricated.

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International headquarters

Russian and Belarusian troops will continue readiness checks, says Belarusian defense minister

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. (Matt Dunham/Pool/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia is planning ‘the biggest war in Europe since 1945’, says British Prime Minister Boris Johnson told the BBC during an interview broadcast on Sunday.

“I’m afraid to say the plan we see is for something that could really be the biggest war in Europe since 1945,” he said.

He added that “people need to understand the cost in human lives that this could entail not only for Ukrainians, but also for Russians and young Russians.”

On the issue of sanctions, Johnson said the goal was to impact not just “Vladimir Putin’s associates but also all companies, organizations of strategic importance to Russia.”

“We are going to prevent Russian companies from raising funds in the UK markets and we are going, even with our American friends, to prevent them from trading in pounds and dollars, which will be very difficult,” he said.

Speaking at the Munich Security Conference in Germany on Saturday, Johnson said that in preparing to invade Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin “made a serious miscalculation”, adding that Moscow would not have “absolutely nothing to gain from this catastrophic enterprise and everything to lose”.

Johnson urged Moscow to defuse tensions before it was too late.

I fear that a blitzkrieg will be followed by a long and hideous period of retaliation, revenge and insurrection, and that Russian parents will mourn the loss of young Russian soldiers, who in their own way are just as innocent as the Ukrainians who are now preparing to attack,” he said.

Johnson said: “We don’t know exactly what President Putin has in mind,” adding that “the omens are bleak and that’s why we need to stay strong together.”

Johnson’s remarks come a day after US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin said Russia was “putting itself in the right positions to carry out an attack”.

“They’re unfolding and now ready to strike,” Austin said, speaking Saturday from Vilnius, Lithuania.

“If you look at the position he’s in today, it’s obvious [Putin] made a decision and they are moving into the right positions to carry out an attack.

Echoing US President Joe Biden’s assertion that Putin had decided to invade, Austin added that the United States would pursue a diplomatic solution “until the very last minute, until it’s not possible”.

However, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has denied increased claims by Western leaders that a Russian invasion is imminent.

Asked about the aggressive use of US intelligence to dissuade Putin from invading Ukraine, Zelensky said he was “grateful for the work that our two intelligence services have done. But the intelligence I trust is my information.

“I trust the Ukrainian intelligence services who … understand what is happening along our borders, who have different sources of intelligence and understand different risks depending on the data intercepted … this information must be used,” Zelensky told Christiane Amanpour, CNN’s chief international anchor. personal interview at the security conference on Saturday.

He continued: “We’re not really living in illusion. We understand what can happen tomorrow…just putting ourselves in coffins and waiting for foreign soldiers to come in is not something we’re prepared to do.”

Zelensky then called on international partners to support Ukraine by investing in the country. “Strengthen our arms… our economy. Invest in our country. Bring your business.

“We are not panicking, we want to live our lives,” he added.

CNN’s Ross Levitt, Karen Smith, Maegan Vazquez, Kevin Liptak, Betsy Klein, Sam Fossum, Emmet Lyons and Lauren Said-Moorhouse contributed to this post.

This post has been updated.

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Non profit living

The next affordable city is already too expensive

Mr. Silbar, the real estate agent, has sold it twice in the past three years. The first time, in November 2019, he represented a buyer who offered $168,000 and got it with no drama. This year it came back on the market and Mr. Silbar listed it for $250,000. Fourteen bids and a bidding war later, it closed at $300,000.

When Mr. Silbar got into the business, he said, his clients were “nurses and teachers,” and now they are business managers, engineers and other professionals. “What you can afford in Spokane has completely changed,” he said.

The typical Spokane-area home is worth $411,000, according to Zillow. That’s still significantly cheaper than markets like the San Francisco Bay Area ($1.4 million), Los Angeles ($878,000), Seattle ($734,000), and Portland ($550,000). But it’s dizzying (and infuriating) for longtime residents.

Five years ago, just over half of Spokane-area homes sold for less than $200,000 and about 70% of its working population could afford to buy a home, according to a recent report commissioned by the Spokane Association of Realtors. Today, less than 5% of homes – a few dozen a month – sell for less than $200,000, and less than 15% of the area’s working population can afford a home. A recent survey by Redfin, the real estate brokerage firm, showed that homebuyers moving to Spokane in 2021 had a 23% higher budget than residents.

One of Mr. Silbar’s clients, Lindsey Simler, a 38-year-old nurse who grew up in Spokane, wants to buy a house for around $300,000 but keeps losing because she doesn’t have enough money to compete. Spokane isn’t so competitive that it’s flooded with all-cash offers, like some higher-priced markets are. But prices have risen so quickly that many homes are being priced below their selling price, forcing buyers to pay higher down payments to cover the difference.

A dozen failed deals later, Ms Simler has decided to sit out the market for a while as the constant loss is so demoralizing. If the prices don’t calm down, she says, she’s considering becoming a travel nurse. With the healthcare workforce so depleted by Covid-19, traveling nursing pays much better and will hopefully save more for a down payment.

“I’m not at the point where I want to give up living in Spokane because I have family here and it feels like home,” she said. “But traveling nursing will be my next step if I haven’t been able to find a home.”

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History organization

Fernando Valenzuela becomes the first player to earn $1 million through arbitration

On February 19, 1983, Fernando Valenzuela became the first player to receive a $1 million salary through the arbitration process with the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Salary arbitration at the time was still fairly new to the league. It was first agreed to be added to the collective bargaining agreement (CBA) in 1972 after the players went on strike. The following season, the owners locked players out for this issue.

They eventually agreed that arbitration would begin after a player was in the league for two consecutive seasons.

Valenzuela pitched his first two full seasons from 1981 to 1982, so he became eligible for arbitration ahead of the 1983 campaign.

The southpaw had already established himself as one of the best pitchers in MLB, posting ERAs of 2.48 and 2.87 with nearly 500 innings pitched over the two seasons and starting what became known as the of “Fernandomania”.

Valenzuela was also named the winner of the National League’s Cy Young Award in 1981, along with the NL Rookie of the Year, so he was set to get a significant raise.

The million dollars received by Valenzuela was almost double the average player salary of $520,839 in the 1983 season and more than 28 times the minimum salary of $35,000.

In the 1983 season, Valenzuela ended up stepping back from his previous two years by pitching to a 3.75 ERA, but he still managed to pitch 257 innings in 35 starts. Valenzuela also won the Silver Slugger Award and made the All-Star Game for a third straight season.

He pitched for the Dodgers for seven more seasons after 1983, before bouncing around the league for his final six years before retiring.

Dodgers mourn the death of Don Newcombe

Also on this day in 2019, the Dodgers announced that Don Newcombe died after a long illness at the age of 92.

“Don Newcombe’s presence and life have established him as a role model for major leaguers across the country,” Dodgers president and CEO Stan Kasten said in a statement at the time.

“He was a constant presence at Dodger Stadium and players always gravitated to him for his endless guidance and leadership. The Dodgers meant everything to him and we’re all lucky he was a part of our lives.

Newcombe was one of the organization’s last ties to Brooklyn, playing with Jackie Robinson and Roy Campanella among the first African-American players in MLB history.

In seven and a half total seasons with the Dodgers organization, Newcombe won Rookie of the Year in 1949, Cy Young and MVP in 1956, and appeared in four All-Star Games.

Are you subscribed to the Dodger Blue YouTube channel? Be sure to ring the notification bell to watch player interviews, participate in shows and giveaways, and stay up to date with all the Dodgers news and rumors!

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Canadian army

What could be more surprising than the news of the war in 1944? Women allowed to drive taxis in Guelph

Someone came to the conclusion that if Rosie the Riveter could build ships and tanks, her sisters could drive taxis

On January 15, 1944, while Canada was embroiled in battle against the Axis powers, the Guelph Mercury published an article that was startling even among war reports. Magistrate Frederick Watt, chairman of the police commission, announced at its inaugural meeting that women would be allowed to drive taxis in Guelph.

Of course, there were already female drivers on Canadian roads, but they were the exception, and the notion that women were bad drivers had long been well established. Apparently, women were terrible drivers because they weren’t cut out to drive cars, being: too emotional to handle the stress of driving, too likely to pass out or pass out in a critical situation, too easily distracted, not smart enough for something as complicated as driving and knowing all the rules of the road, and not physically strong enough to comfortably operate a motor vehicle (there was no power steering or power brakes at the time).

When it came to winter driving, women were supposed to be unable to cope with the difficulties of snow and ice. Drowsy female driver jokes were commonplace for comedians. A classic George Burns and Gracie Allen comedy routine had ditzy Gracie asking for a driver’s license.

Driving a car was generally considered a man’s job. In most families, even if the wife knew how to drive, whenever she and her husband were both in the car, the driver’s seat was naturally hers. A real man wouldn’t let the little woman drive unless it was really necessary.

There were even more reasons why sitting behind the wheel of a taxi was not considered a place for a woman. Besides traffic hassles, taxi drivers also had to deal with passengers who could be impatient, angry, rude and generally uncivil. There were men who were visitors to town who expected taxi drivers to know where to take them if they were looking for a bit of “action”.

It wasn’t just that nice ladies weren’t supposed to know such places existed, let alone where to find them; there were also fears that female taxi drivers were targeted by men on the prowl.

The demands of World War II changed that. There were so many men in the armed forces that there was a shortage of manpower for jobs generally considered exclusively male. Women now did “men’s work” in factories, on construction sites and in primary industries.

Someone came to the conclusion that while Rosie the Riveter could build ships and tanks, her sisters could drive taxis. In addition, women drove trucks and jeeps for the Canadian army and ferried planes for the Royal Canadian Air Force. (A year from now, young Princess Elizabeth would be serving in the British Women’s Auxiliary Territorial Service as a driver and mechanic.)

The Mercury report said:

“Responding to a call from two local taxi companies, requesting permission to employ women as drivers due to the shortage of men, the commission agreed to accede to the request, as a temporary measure, under specific conditions.”

One of the requirements was that each applicant for a taxi driver’s license had to be approved by Guelph Police Chief Harold Nash, but this was common in all communities in Ontario. The rule was intended not only to ensure that drivers could operate a motor vehicle safely and competently, but also to protect the public from “undesirables”. Men with criminal records would generally be denied a taxi driver’s license.

Another requirement stated that female taxi drivers in Guelph would be “restricted to the daytime period of 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.” visitors to the city looking for “a bit of action”.

Of course, once women entered the driving profession, they were here to stay, in Guelph and everywhere else; not only in taxis, but also in trucks, buses and any other type of vehicle on wheels. Female passengers often specifically requested a female driver when phoning for a taxi, and there were examples of taxi companies employing only female drivers.

Statistics compiled by police departments and car insurance companies have shown that, far from being the giddy female drivers of old jokes, female drivers in general get fewer traffic violations than male drivers, are less more likely to be involved in traffic accidents than men and are less likely to drive under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Not at all the stereotypical caricature of the 1940s.

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International headquarters

Ukraine and US say vehicle explosion in separatist-controlled town was staged

French President Emmanuel Macron called on Friday for a end of military activities in the Ukrainian region of Donbassafter Ukrainian Armed Forces and separatists controlling parts of eastern Ukraine spoke of new shelling.

“In a context where Russian military pressure does not weaken, where destabilization increases, where bombardments in the contact zone have resumed, we first call for the cessation of these military actions, and for a rapid de-escalation”, Macron said at the European Union-African Union summit in Brussels. “Very clearly, there is [military] actions that have multiplied. These actions, in our view, must stop because they contravene the agreements that have been reached, the ceasefires that have been respected so far, and for which all parties concerned had recently reiterated their support.”

Macron said Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) teams should clarify the events of the past few hours and days.

In an earlier statement, the OSCE said the organization is “aware that Russia intends to create a pretext to justify an invasion” in Ukraine, and has received reports that detail “Russia’s efforts to fabricating supposed “Ukrainian provocations” and shaping a public narrative”. that would justify a Russian invasion.

“Several weeks ago we learned that the Russian government was planning to stage a fabricated attack by the Ukrainian military or security forces against Russian sovereign territory, or against Russian speakers in separatist-controlled territory, to justify military action against Ukraine,” the OSCE statement said.

“We must resolutely refute the false narrative of a Ukrainian ‘escalation’ which finds no evidence in the reports of the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission,” the statement added.

Macron echoed remarks from other NATO allies, noting that he had seen “no evidence of Russian military disengagement at this stage.”

“I welcome the statements of President (Vladimir) Putin, but I believe that if we want to be a reliable partner, it is always good that the actions are in line with the statements, and therefore we want to be able to have concrete elements that follow them, ” , he told reporters.

“We call for the reopening of constructive negotiations, as we continue to believe that this situation can be resolved through dialogue,” Macron said.

He also noted that the “next hours” would see “close coordination between European and American allies”, who will aim to provide an “appropriate response” by the end of the day.

“I heard the words of the Russian president. Now we have to take action, and we have to work with great precision and commitment to stabilize and then de-escalate the situation in collaboration with Russia,” Macron said. “It’s essential.”

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Non profit living

Hometown Alaska: Teens talk coping with COVID


Young people trying to stay connected during the Covid pandemic. Wikimedia Commons image by SGerbic,

In this week’s Hometown Alaska, teenagers in Anchorage describe how they suffered, endured and even grew while living under the Covid pandemic. We’ll hear from teens from Alaska Teen Media Institute (ATMI), Covenant House, and MHATS, which stands for Mental Health Advocacy Through Storytelling, a nonprofit organization founded and run by students in Anchorage.

ATMI students have started creating a series called “Podcast in Place, Youth Stories from Quarantine” recorded at home due to COVID constraints. Topics include individual student reactions to school closures and uncertainty, interviews with Alaska’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Anne Zink, and a multi-generational family interview (grandparents, their daughter and their grandchildren) on immunization information and engagement management.

Two Covenant House students talk about the emotional impact of isolation and job loss due to restaurant closures during the pandemic.

The MHATS teens describe their commitment to better mental health education for young people in school, and their own ups and downs throughout the pandemic.

Either way, these students were changed by the experience of living through Covid. They also represent an age group, according to the CDC, that has the lowest rate of vaccination and booster compliance.

This program has been pre-recorded for scheduling purposes, so hosts will not take your calls during the program. However, we still want to hear from you. Please call our 24/7 registered line (550-8480) and tell us about your own experience. Have you hesitated to get vaccinated or to be vaccinated? What helped you overcome this hesitation?

This program is part of Alaska Public Media’s “Talk to Your Neighbor” project, providing trusted voices and accurate information to listeners about Covid vaccination. APM has partnered with 20 community groups to help overcome vaccine hesitancy.

HOSTS: Kathleen McCoy and ATMI’s Daisy Carter

GUESTS:

  • Caelan Vossa.k.a PeanutAlliance House
  • Grace MargesonAlliance House
  • Abby LauferMHATS
  • Marshall ivyMHATS
  • Tara SkidmoreMHATS
  • daisy carterATMI and Alaska Public Media, co-host and guest

CONNECTIONS:

TO PARTICIPATE:

  • Today’s program has been pre-recorded so hosts cannot take live calls. However, we still want to hear from you. Dial 550-8480 and leave a recorded message, 24/7.
  • Send E-mail to [email protected] before, during or after the live broadcast.
  • post your comment or question below (comments can be read on-air).
  • The pre-recorded show air: Monday February 21, 2022 at 10 a.m.
  • RE-AIR: Monday February 21, 2022 at 8 p.m.
  • PODCAST: Available on this page after the program.
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History organization

Historic Sites Commemorating Black History in Every State | News

America is making further progress in celebrating black history and triumphs. In 2021, Tishaura Jones became the first black woman elected mayor of St. Louis, just as Kamala Harris was declared the first female vice president of the United States — and the first of black and Asian descent to hold that rank. That same year, Juneteenth (June 17), which signifies the end of slavery in the United States, became a federal holiday through legislation signed by President Joe Biden.

The legacy of influential black Americans has not always been recognized, so it is not uncommon for modern residents to overlook the historic sites of their own cities. While some historical black figures are more renowned than others, there are entire generations of historical black figures – dating back to the days of Jim Crow slavery through the civil rights era – who have left traces of their vision across the country. Whether it be personalities such as Robert Abbott, who founded The Chicago Defender, one of the largest African-American newspapers in the country, or more discreet initiators such as Obrey Wendell Hamlet, who, thanks to its entrepreneurial touch, has cultivated a unique vacation. experiences in the Rocky Mountains – one thing is certain: there are still many more unexplored histories of black people than we know.

In the United States, 232 sites are considered nationally significant to Black history. Using the National Register of Historic Places, Stacker identified historic sites commemorating black history in 47 states. North Dakota, Vermont, Hawaii and Wyoming had no black historic sites on the register. While some states, particularly in the South, are home to many central sites of the civil rights movement, Stacker listed the total number of sites in each state and the names of three historical sites, if any. You can visit the comprehensive Register of Historic Places and explore the Civil Rights Trail to learn about other historic sites across the United States.

Read on to explore and learn about historic sites celebrating Black history nationwide.

You might also like: 50 Black Writers Whose Impact Went Beyond the Page

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International headquarters

“I am not here today to start a war, but to prevent one”

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and US Ambassador to the UN Linda Thomas-Greenfield at the UN in New York on February 17. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said he was speaking to the United Nations about Russia and Ukraine “not to start a war, but to prevent it”.

“I am not here today to start a war, but to prevent it. The information I have presented here is validated by what we have seen unfold before our eyes for months. Alarms like melodrama and nonsense, they have regularly amassed over 150,000 troops on Ukraine’s borders as well as the capabilities to carry out a massive military assault. We are not the only ones to see this. Allies and partners see the same Blinken mentioned.

He urged Russia to use diplomacy as a solution to the crisis.

“And Russia doesn’t just hear about us. The international chorus has grown stronger and stronger,” the US official said. “If Russia does not invade Ukraine, then we will be relieved that Russia has changed course and proven our predictions wrong. It would be a much better outcome than the course we are currently on, and we will gladly accept any criticism than anyone who comes to us.”

Blinken said he sent a letter to Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov proposing they meet next week in Europe. It also offers meetings of the NATO-Russia Council and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe.

“These meetings can pave the way for a summit of key leaders in the context of de-escalation to reach agreement on our mutual security concerns. As top diplomats for our nations, we have a responsibility to do everything we can to make diplomacy succeed, not to turn the diplomatic stone unturned,” he said.

He said Russia will likely respond with layoffs that the United States is “fueling hysteria.”

“The Russian government can announce today without reservation, equivocation or misdirection that Russia will not invade Ukraine, make it clear, make it clear to the world – and then demonstrate it by returning your troops, your tanks, your planes, to hangars and sending diplomats to the negotiating table. In the days to come, the world will remember that commitment. Or the refusal to do so,” he concluded.

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Canadian army

Soldier On Army Course Caught With 81 Packets Of Dried Cannabis Leaves

Importing or exporting so-called Indian hemp could result in a prison sentence of at least 21 years if convicted.

Content of the article

A man linked to the Nigerian army who was on a development course was attending school when he was stopped by a highway patrolman who found 81 packets of dried cannabis leaves.

Content of the article

the from the country Indian Hemp Act Remarks it is illegal to plant, cultivate, import, export, sell, possess, use or have any related accessories.

Cultivating the plant illegally, for example, could result in death or life in prison. Importing or exporting weed is punishable by at least 21 years in prison.

Beyond the cannabis, the National Police report that the soldier’s vehicle contained an army uniform, two Michelin tires, an army helmet, a bag of clothes and some charms, all of which were confiscated.

The driver was to be handed over to Nigeria’s National Drug Law Enforcement Agency.

According to Punch, the man marched alongside others at police command headquarters earlier this week.

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History organization

Local organization sheds light on minority history in aquaculture

DELMARVA — In light of Black History Month, a local organization is seeking to expose those unfamiliar with the contributions African Americans have made on the water.

Minorities in Aquaculture hosts it virtually Chesapeake Excellence: Black History Edition Event.

Founder Imani Black says African Americans were instrumental in the evolution of commercial fishing in the Chesapeake Bay, but much remained undocumented.

She adds that since minorities are not represented in the industry, she hopes the event will help raise awareness and inspire other future water lovers to come. “I just realized that it was super important to bring that story to the forefront just with our engagement with minorities so that people can really feel safe enough to enter the industry,” Black said.

“So it really shows that this is not a new industry we are entering. Minorities in Aquaculture actually brings people home to an industry that was really part of our livelihood.

This event is Thursday, February 17 at 7 p.m.

If you want to participate in the event, click here

If you want to know more about the organization and upcoming events, click here

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Canadian army

What the Canadian Rangers are doing in the field during COVID-19

The Canadian Rangers have remained busy in northern Ontario since a spike in COVID-19 cases on the James Bay coast last month. “This may just be another resurgence, but we are ready to provide support where possible,” said Lt. Col. Shane McArthur.

McArthur is the commander of the 3rd Canadian Ranger Patrol Group, which oversees the Canadian Rangers in northern Ontario. When remote communities locked down to limit the spread of COVID-19, the rangers – who are part-time Canadian Armed Forces reservists – were there to help. Since January 2020, rangers have conducted 48 ground search and rescue and requests for assistance in the region. And during Omicron, McArthur says, they had to answer multiple calls at once.

As of February 15, the Weeneebayko Area Health Authority, a health care network covering the James Bay and Hudson Bay coasts, was reporting 259 active cases. The hardest hit communities during this pandemic wave have been Kashechewan and Moose Factory, which peaked earlier this month at 72 and 81 active cases, respectively. While cases in both communities have since declined, in Fort Albany, just south of Kashechewan, they are increasing, with 50 cases reported active Tuesday.

Our journalism depends on you.

You can count on TVO to cover the stories others don’t, to fill the gaps in the ever-changing media landscape. But we can’t do this without you.

TVO.org interviews McArthur about the role of rangers during COVID-19 and how they respond when communities need help.

TVO.org: For those who don’t know, who are the Canadian Rangers?

Shane McArthur: The Canadian Rangers are a subcomponent of the Army Reserve. They are part-time people who volunteer. They support their people, their communities, where they live.

We often use them for ground search and rescue operations in the North and their communities, as well as to assist other agencies and organizations, especially the military, with their cold weather training exercises. However, we have entered into more social aspects of our tasks, which include supporting communities during certain health crises, floods, fires, etc.

My rangers are good at navigation, coordination and command post operations. They know the language, they know the people, the communities, the terrain. That’s what they bring to an answer — those things that you can’t get from the South or from other ministries.

TVO.org: Can you give us an overview of how the rangers are currently responding to requests for assistance from the community?

McArthur: There are about 70 rangers—it goes up and down—and members of the headquarters of the 3rd Canadian Ranger Patrol Group who are currently active in operations in northern Ontario. We currently have five requests for assistance in five different communities, and we are also supporting Operation Remote Immunity, the rollout of the vaccine, this time for anyone who wants the boosters and for children ages 5-11 in all communities.

We are currently in Attawapiskat, Peawanuck, Kashechewan, Mishkeegogamang and Fort Hope [Eabametoong]. Three of them are on the James Bay coast. We are monitoring Fort Albany, but there are no requests or concerns at this time.

We got up [activated] sentinels in Pikangikum and Lac Seul because they are worried. We call them sentinels, but they are local rangers within the community who help get information to make sure we get the right information about what’s going on in the community so we can support them.

TVO.org: What does a Canadian Rangers response to COVID-19 look like?

McArthur: They transport essential goods and supplies. For seniors, they do checks, make sure people get daily necessities. When the community goes into lockdown, sometimes it shuts down the northern store down. Some of the most vulnerable people in the community cannot leave, so they provide these services to ensure that their community members are well taken care of with food, water and medical appointments, go to the clinic. They can also set up a command post as needed or be ready to advise Chief and Council as needed.

We also cut wood to bring to people, especially homes that are in confinement. Lots of general duties, as we call it. Snow removal is a good citizen.

TVO.org: How are rangers called for help?

McArthur: We are not the leader, and I am not the authority — it goes through the Province of Ontario and Public Safety. Emergency Management Ontario and federal agencies make all decisions and request CAF assistance. Depending on where it is and what the problem is, the CAF says, “Okay, Canadian Ranger Patrol Group, can you support that? We’ve already done some homework, and the staff checks and says, “Yes, we can.”

We raise the sentries to make sure we have at least three days in advance [of a request]. We try to make sure we can cut [preparation time] as possible while these approval processes are ongoing. We are not always able to fly into these communities in a timely manner due to requirements and restrictions.

TVO.org: So it’s the communities that go into the province through Emergency Management Ontario, that go to the CAF, that then contact you?

McArthur: Yes. Email traffic happens very, very quickly – almost a few minutes – but it sounds very complicated.

TVO.org: You mentioned restrictions making it difficult to respond quickly. Can you elaborate?

McArthur: We comply with all provincial and federal health protection measures. Then there are the needs of the Canadian Armed Forces, which are growing, and we will always strive to meet them. For some communities, we may need to be tested before entering – and then be tested when we enter. We are the visitors there and we do not want to be seen as the vector of contamination. We’re doing everything in our power to make sure it’s not us.

Sometimes these things take 24 hours, sometimes 48 hours, because of the type of tests used. It doesn’t always work out in our favor, which means [requests] sometimes catches us off guard, and there are delays. But we try to do everything in our power not to have these delays.

TVO.org: A particularly difficult situation in the Far North was Bearskin Lake First Nation, where more than half the community tested positive, leading to the declaration of a state of emergency on December 29. the number of rangers and the respect of deadlines of their response. Has this changed how rangers respond to COVID-related requests for assistance?

McArthur: We practice Bearskin exactly as we practice [other communities]. There are a few things that have happened that have been a disconnect in communications. It hasn’t changed our practices, because we’ve done everything in accordance with what we’ve done for the past two years. There was a misunderstanding about which resources were going to stay in the community, and when we arrived they weren’t there. It took us some time to seek approval to commit new forces. When we did that, we put those strengths out there and supported the community like we always have.

Unfortunately we were taken a bit poor so we had to rearrange. I had to go back to look for authorities, and this process took time. It also takes us time to rid people of COVID. Meanwhile, the impression was perceived differently. And, again, we regret that this happens. But the processes we’ve been using have proven themselves to us over the past two years, and we’ve done a damn good job overall.

TVO.org: Are there any individuals or groups that you have seen go above and beyond in their response?

McArthur: If you start naming a name, you will always miss someone. They do a great job in difficult circumstances. They help their communities while living in these conditions themselves. That’s no small feat, and the accolades go to all of them. I received compliments for my rangers from many community leaders. And, in particular, the NAN [Nishnawbe Aski Nation] great leader [Derek Fox]. The support we have received from the communities, from the chiefs, has been incredible, so I give them my congratulations.

This interview has been condensed and edited for length and clarity.

This is part of a series of stories about issues affecting Northeastern Ontario. It is brought to you with the assistance of Laurentian University.

Ontario Hubs are made possible by the Barry and Laurie Green Family Charitable Trust and Goldie Feldman.

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International headquarters

Doubting Russia’s exit, NATO seeks to strengthen its defenses

BRUSSELS (AP) – NATO member nations on Wednesday discussed new ways to bolster the defenses of nations on the organization’s eastern flank as Russia’s military buildup around Ukraine fuels one of the biggest security crises in Europe for decades.

For two days at NATO headquarters in Brussels, defense ministers were due to discuss how and when to quickly send troops and equipment to the countries closest to Russia and the sea region. Black if Moscow ordered an invasion of Ukraine.

US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin and his counterparts also plan to assess the possibility of stationing longer-term troops in southeastern Europe, possibly starting later this year. The troops would reflect the presence of some 5,000 military personnel who have been stationed in allied nations Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland on a rotational basis in recent years.

The United States has begun deploying 5,000 troops to Poland and Romania. Britain sends hundreds of soldiers to Poland and offers more warships and planes. Germany, the Netherlands and Norway send additional troops to Lithuania. Denmark and Spain provide jets for air policing.

“The fact that we have deployed more NATO troops on the ground, more naval assets, more aircraft, all of this sends a very clear message,” NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said. “I think there is no room for miscalculation in Moscow about our commitment to defending our allies.”

This deployment responds to a formidable challenge.

Over the past four months, Russia is estimated to have amassed around 60% of its entire ground forces and a significant part of its air forces in northern and eastern Ukraine, as well as in Belarus. neighbor. Moscow looks set to repeat its 2014 invasion of Ukraine, but on a larger scale.

Russian President Vladimir Putin wants NATO, the world’s largest security organization, to stop expanding. It demands that the US-led alliance withdraw its troops and equipment from countries that joined after 1997 – almost half of NATO’s 30 ranks.

NATO cannot agree to his terms. Its founding treaty commits to an ‘open door’ policy for European countries wishing to join, and a mutual defense clause ensures that all members will come to the defense of a threatened ally.

Ukraine, however, is not a member and NATO as an organization is unwilling to defend it.

“We have to understand that Ukraine is a partner. We support Ukraine. But for all NATO allies, we provide 100% security guarantees,” Stoltenberg told reporters ahead of Wednesday’s meeting.

That said, some member countries help Ukraine more directly, such as the United States, Britain and Canada.

“We will provide lethal and non-lethal aid to Ukraine. This is a very important issue for all of us,” said Canadian Defense Minister Anita Anand.

But the “massive costs” promised to Putin if he ordered an invasion would be economic and political, mainly in the form of sanctions, which are not part of NATO’s remit. The alliance offered Russia a series of talks on security, including arms control.

Over the past two days, Russia has said it was returning troops and weapons to bases, but Stoltenberg said the allies had seen no concrete signs of a withdrawal and fears that Russia would not invading Ukraine persists.

“They’ve always moved forces back and forth, so just that we’re seeing movement of forces, it doesn’t confirm a true pullback,” Stoltenberg said. “The trend in recent weeks and months has been a steady increase in Russian capabilities near Ukraine’s borders.”

Russia poses no direct threat to the security of any NATO country, but the alliance is concerned about the fallout from any conflict in Ukraine, such as a wave of people fleeing the fighting across European borders, or d possible cyberattacks and disinformation attacks.

___

Follow AP’s coverage of the Russia-Ukraine tension at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

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Non profit living

‘Worthy to take up space’: Jennifer Lee ’23 founds nonprofit to support disabled Asian Americans

In June 2020, after months of doctor’s appointments and medical tests, Jennifer Lee ’23 was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease. Although she had many typical symptoms of the disease, Lee said her doctors were initially hesitant to consider Crohn’s disease because of its rarity in Asian Americans.

“From the beginning of my journey with a chronic illness,” said Lee, “I began to see how my Asian American identity influenced not only the way I perceived my illness and my body, but also the way which even medical professionals perceived the disability and diagnostic processes. ”

After his diagnosis, Lee sought out communities like the Crohn’s and Colitis Young Adults Network and the National Council of College Leaders of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation. But even in groups with other young adults with disabilities, Lee felt her Asian American identity set her apart from her peers.

“I soon discovered that I didn’t see people who looked like me, and so for a very long time I thought that I was the only person who felt that way, that I had no one else to talk to. of the specificity of the cultural stigmas around disability, what it was like to be of two marginalized identities — to be both Asian American and disabled,” she said.

Although Lee may have felt lonely, she is one of more than 1.3 million Americans who identify as both Asian American and disabled. After meeting others who shared his identity during the American Association of Persons with Disabilities (AAPD) internship program in the summer of 2021, Lee decided to form a group dedicated to this intersection.

In July 2021, along with a coalition of Asian Americans with disabilities and non-disabled allies from across the country, Lee founded the Asian Americans with Disabilities Initiative (AADI), a nonprofit organization run by and for people like her who identify as both Asian American and disabled. Lee is now Executive Director of AADI and manages a leadership team of approximately 20-25 people at any one time.

“AADI’s overriding mission is to amplify the voices of Asian Americans with disabilities and provide the next generation of Asian Americans with disabilities with the tools, resources, and infrastructure necessary to thrive in a world which hasn’t always welcomed them,” Lee said.

In its short existence, AADI has already made great strides toward fulfilling its mission to increase the visibility of the disabled and Asian American community and provide resources on how to live in a world that is not not built to accommodate either group.

AADI started with what Lee calls a “three-pronged vision.” She hoped to publish a resource guide for Asian Americans with disabilities, host speaker panels and events with people involved in Asian American and disability advocacy, and build a community of peers. disabled and Asian Americans.

On all three fronts, AADI has made tangible progress.

On January 10, after months of preparation, AADI launched its Resource Guide, an 80-page document described on AADI’s website as a guide “to combat ableism within the Asian American community. disability through first-person accounts, extensive peer-reviewed research, and AADI event summaries.

The AADI Research Committee has compiled collections of academic research, alliance lessons, and profiles of Asian American and disabled activists for inclusion in the guide. AADI received support from the TigerWell Initiative and Service Focus in developing the guide.

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“We had recognized that in the academic field there is very little research that has been done on the intersection of disability and Asian American identity, and the reason it is so important is that this type of research directly informs and feeds into what policy looks like,” Lee said of the importance of the academic research section.

The audience for the research guide, and AADI as a whole, encompasses a wide range of stakeholders, according to Megan Liang, program manager at San Diego State University and AADI’s director of external relations. As an Asian American amputee, Liang got involved with AADI after seeing them highlighted on social media.

“Whether you are an Asian American with a disability, an ally, a social worker, or only identify as disabled or identify only as an Asian American, you can take away a fresh perspective on how this community is dealing with things and issues that they might face,” Liang said. “And even though it’s a small impact of change, I’m just glad we’re able to do that.”

AADI has held two speaker events so far. The first panel of speakers took place on August 13, 2021, featuring Lydia XZ Brown, Miso Kwak and Mia Ives-Rublee, three Asian American activists with disabilities. The event was virtual and included American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters and captioning services. More than 50 people attended the event, according to Lee.

“That panel kind of served as a starting point,” Lee said. “[The panelists talked] about the intersection of these two identities themselves, the difficulties our speakers might have encountered while navigating through space, as well as any advice they had for other younger Asian Americans and disabled watching.

Most recently, on January 29, AADI hosted another virtual panel focusing on the intersection of art, disability, and being Asian American. Comedian Steve Lee, poet Topaz Winters ’23 and dancer Marisa Hamamoto spoke at the event.

“I was on the panel with several other Asian American and disabled artists, so we talked a lot about how our Asian American identities fit into our disability rights work, as well as ‘to our artistic work,” Winters said.

“The three streams of my identity – being an artist, being disabled, and being Asian – aren’t really streams that intersect very often in my advocacy work or in my artistic work,” they added. “It was really special for me to be among a group of people who understood very well what it was and the unique challenges, but also the unique joys of existing in these three beautiful spaces, and simply expanding the definitions of what these spaces can be.”

The ultimate goal of forming a community of disabled Asian American peers has been achieved, so far, in a largely virtual setting. Most people involved with AADI have never met in person.

“It’s just about showcasing the community, and for me, part of what AADI does is show that Asian Americans with disabilities and our experiences deserve to take up space,” Lee said.

“I knew the second I found AADI, I had found a specific kind of community that I wouldn’t have been able to find if I hadn’t looked for it otherwise,” Liang said. “I hope we can do more community events in the future, because I understand how empowering it is to be among people who have shared life experiences.”

In the coming months, AADI plans to continue its outreach efforts and spread its mission of accessibility and inclusion for the Asian American and disabled community.

Jiyoun Roh ’24 is AADI’s Director of Outreach and is responsible for managing the organization’s social media. Roh’s brother has cerebral palsy and she became interested in disability justice after noticing how her disability had led to a lack of inclusion in the Asian American community.

“We want accessibility to be more than just a disability community,” Roh said. “We want it in other AAPI organizations.”

“We get a lot of collaborations with many other organizations and together with them, we want to build our own community because a community is made better by the people in it,” she continued.

Lee hopes the conversations started during the COVID-19 pandemic about racial justice and chronic disease will continue in the future.

“I think in this era of the COVID-19 pandemic, we face an extraordinary opportunity to redefine how we understand the experience of people with disabilities and how we understand the Asian American experience,” Lee said.

She looks forward to expanding the advocacy work AADI has done in the six months since its inception.

“The more we work in the disability, Asian American, and nonprofit space, the more our team realizes that there are many definitions of success in terms of what our mission can accomplish,” Lee said.

Naomi Hess is an emeritus editor who focuses on university politics and alumni affairs. She can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter at @NaomiHess17.

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History organization

A “unique and essential” place in the history of the Legion

American Legion Post 1 in Paris will celebrate its 103rd anniversary on December 13, 2022. It has maintained a strong presence in the city where the organization was born in 1919. Post Commander Bryan Schell and First Vice Commander Valerie Prehoda spoke with the American Legion about how the Post is building its future by drawing on its past.

What activities do you plan specifically around the history of the post?
Our research revealed the origin story of Paris Post 1 and our founding of Pershing Hall. Therefore, the most important activity will be the effective launch of our new Paris Post 1 Research Center, which will encompass our work and research, and provide opportunities for non-American Legion professionals as well as Legion members. to collaborate with us. We will also step up our efforts to save Pershing Hall from the current effort to de-memorize it, as well as focus our efforts on the Pershing Hall collection, much of which has been in storage for several decades. The Research Center will help focus the collection’s diaspora, identifying the disparate locations of artifacts and ensuring they are properly returned and preserved. As well as creating a public database regarding our Post 1 history and that of Pershing Hall across the centre, we will also work with our Post 1 families to better preserve and research the history of their loved ones who have come to France, such as the past Post Commander George Aubrey, who was killed in action in World War II after serving in World War I.

What impact has the ongoing pandemic had on your planning? Will there be virtual options for events?
The pandemic has encouraged us to do more social media sharing and video recording of our ceremonies and activities. We have also motivated our legionary and auxiliary members to write about our activities, take pictures and prepare articles so that we can share our excellent work more effectively through our newsletters. We are happy to have made Paris Post 1 almost 100% online over the past two years, and we plan to develop more in the future.

What is the current status of your position, in terms of membership and family?
For the most part we are all fine, but it has been difficult with the COVID lockdowns we have endured in France. Through careful planning and diligent effort throughout the process, we were able to hold a safe opening last November for approximately 50 Tomb Guards, their families and the leaders of the National Gold Star and Daughters of the American Revolution to make the trip to France for the centenary of the unknown soldier. pilgrimage. We were grateful to experience a smooth pilgrimage with everyone.

Thanks to our wonderful team at Paris Post 1, we were able to maintain a fairly stable number of members throughout this difficult period and were honored to receive the award for the great post office of the year for the department of France l ‘last year. We continue to work with our friends and family to attract more members for 2022 and we are enjoying success in this critical mission.

Does the City of Paris help?
The City of Paris has been a major supporter of the American Legion in Paris for many decades. During the pandemic, France has certainly offered its help to its citizens, businesses and associations. We were able to plan our ceremonies throughout the year, and we didn’t miss any! We are grateful to have the support not only of the City, but also of local mayors, especially in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, where America has many monuments and memorials located. The 16th Arrondissement and the National Office for Veterans and War Victims (ONACVG) support us for our annual ceremonies, including this year’s revive (reignition) at the Arc de Triomphe for the centenary of the Unknown Soldier.

What do you want people to know about how Poste 1 contributed to the history of the Legion as a whole?
Paris Post 1 has an extraordinary history, unique and essential to the founding of the American Legion. It is our honor to continue the duties of the legionnaires who began our post over 100 years ago and indeed the duty and service in France which covers the entire French nation. We carry forward a deep legacy of the American Legion that grew out of World War I and was solidified again in blood during World War II. We are the only Legion post in France, and we work hard to engage and connect with our American veterans and our community across the country. During the holidays, our Auxiliary traveled to Landstuhl, Germany, to bring gifts and donations, and to spend time with our wounded soldiers and their hospital staff who work endless hours. This summer, we will continue our DPAA MIA recovery mission from August 2021 in a remote area in the Calais region. And in June 2022, we will also co-host, with the American group Irreverent Warriors, a veteran suicide awareness hike from Utah Beach to Sainte-Marie-du-Mont. We are always happy when we hear from others who want to visit France or collaborate on an event with us. We welcome more opportunities in the future and are excited to share what we are doing with our new Paris Post 1 Research Center.

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Canadian army

Canada’s Trudeau triggers Emergency Act to break lockdowns – AZERTAC

Baku, February 15, AZERTAC

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Monday invoked the Emergencies Act as part of a move to lift a blockade in the capital Ottawa and other areas in connection with protests by truckers against the government’s health rules. COVID-19, according to Anadolu Agency.

It also aims to prevent a repeat blockade of the Ambassador Bridge, the main commercial artery between Canada and the United States. The law is time-limited, although the duration of its effect is unclear. It is also targeted at specific areas like the blockade of Ottawa.

“This is about keeping Canadians safe,” Trudeau told a nationally broadcast press conference, adding “we cannot and will not allow dangerous activities to continue.”

The law has never been used before, but an earlier version — in 1988, it replaced the War Measures Act — was invoked in 1970 by the late Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau, Justin Trudeau’s father , who used it to repress a Quebec separatist. organization that kidnapped British Trade Commissioner and Quebec Cabinet Minister Pierre Laporte. He was later found dead.

On Monday, Trudeau declared the Emergencies Act to deal with blockades by truckers and others who demanded the repeal of all government COVID-19 health measures. Border points were disrupted in several provinces, including Ontario, Alberta and Manitoba.

But when his father called in the army to deal with the Quebec threat and there were soldiers everywhere and tanks roamed the streets, Justin did not call the Canadian Armed Forces, which he had said at the end of last week was a last resort.

“We don’t use the Emergencies Act to call in the military,” Trudeau said. “We are not suspending fundamental rights or nullifying the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

“We don’t limit people’s freedom of expression. We don’t limit freedom of peaceful assembly. We don’t prevent people from exercising their right to lawfully protest.”

While protesters on the Ambassador Bridge were evacuated and the bridge reopened on Sunday, the city of Ottawa, which has a population of one million, remains paralyzed by protesters and hundreds of large transport trucks. The “siege,” as Ontario Premier Doug Ford called it, is in its third week. Ford declared a provincial state of emergency, but this had no effect on the situation in Ottawa.

The law is defined as a tool to deal with an “urgent and critical situation” that “seriously endangers the life, health or safety of Canadians”.

It gives the government the right to enact “temporary special measures which might not be appropriate in normal times”.

For example, under the law, the federal government can order Ottawa tow trucks to remove parked trucks that have created havoc downtown. The towing companies had refused to do so, fearing reprisals. Trudeau made the decision after consulting with provincial premiers and his caucus (elected Liberal MPs).

Meanwhile, at the Coutts Dam in Alberta, between the United States and Canada, police said on Monday they arrested 11 militant protesters and seized a number of weapons, including long guns, handguns fist, ammunition and bulletproof vests.

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International headquarters

Cambodia: Covid-19 used to justify crackdown on union

(Bangkok) – Cambodian authorities should immediately stop misusing public health measures to suppress workers’ right to strike and other basic rights, Human Rights Watch said today.

Since the labor rights-backed NagaWorld Khmer Employees Union (LRSU) went on strike in December 2021 to demand the reinstatement of workers fired earlier in the year, Cambodian authorities have arbitrarily arrested, detained and prosecuted union activists. More recently, authorities have sought to justify these criminal charges as measures related to Covid-19. On February 5, 2022, the police stopped six union members at the NagaWorld casino in Phnom Penh as they left a Covid-19 testing site and baselessly accused three of them of obstructing government efforts against Covid-19.

“Cambodian authorities are stooping to new levels by filing criminal charges under the guise of public health measures to end a strike,” said Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “The government’s persecution of labor activists appears to be aimed at blunting the growing unity and strength of the Cambodian labor movement and its support for the NagaWorld strikers.

On February 4, the Cambodian Ministry of Health order Several hundred workers went on strike outside the NagaWorld casino to take a Covid-19 test, after a member of the striking union (which last participated in the strike on January 15) tested positive. Authorities said anyone who tested negative would have to self-isolate for seven days and if they tested positive they would be sent to a Covid-19 treatment centre. Between February 5 and 6, more than 400 protesting workers appeared as ordered at the designated testing site on the Diamond Island of Phnom Penh (Koh Pich). Since the strike began, protesters have been protecting themselves and others by wearing masks and maintaining social distancing.

The six people arrested on February 5 were Seng Vannarith, Choub Channath, Sao Sambath, Ouk Sophorn, Touch Danet and Em Kunthea. Police released Sophorn, Danet and Kunthea later that night, but detained Vannarith, Channath and Sambath at Phnom Penh police headquarters. On February 9, the Phnom Penh court charged the latter three with “obstruction of Covid-19 measures” (article 11 of the Cambodian Covid-19 law), punishable by up to five years in prison. . The court ordered their pre-trial detention at the Judicial Police Prison in Phnom Penh, which in November 2020 was at around 170% capacity.

On February 5, the authorities Posted four other workers summoned for questioning over alleged obstruction of Covid-19 measures. The four had followed government orders in getting tested for Covid-19 and self-isolating after testing negative. One of four Recount VOD News that she was “shocked” to receive a summons because she said she was “not inciting people to block the tests”. Another feared she would be found in breach of Covid-19 measures if she came out of solitary confinement to appear in court.

“Throwing workers into overcrowded prisons that are hotbeds for Covid-19 as they await a criminal trial shows that the government’s concern is not public health but the end of one of the longest industrial actions in the world. Cambodia for years,” Robertson said.

On December 18, LRSU went on strike in accordance with international labor law, calling for the reinstatement of 365 previously dismissed employees in connection with the mass dismissal of 1,329 workers by Phnom Penh’s NagaWorld casino in April 2021. Among those laid off were trade union leaders. Authorities called the “illegal” strike on the basis of a court decision handed down on December 16 which violated the right to strike protected by international law. Authorities ordered protesters back to work, saying that if they failed to do so, NagaWorld would be allowed to fire them. The government failed to find a fair solution to the labor disputes between NagaWorld and the union.

Since December 31, authorities have arrested dozens of LRSU members who took part in the strike, and have already imprisoned eight, including union president Chhim Sithar, for “incitement”. They are being held in Correctional Centers 1 and 2 in Phnom Penh.

The Cambodian government passed the Law on Measures to Prevent the Spread of Covid-19 and Other Serious, Dangerous, and Contagious Diseases in March 2020. Human Rights Watch has repeatedly highlighted the threat the law poses to human rights in Cambodia, as the authorities can easily abuse them. its overly broad and vague provisions. The law also lacks independent oversight and procedural safeguards, and provides for disproportionate fines and penalties of up to 20 years in prison for alleged breaches of Covid-19 related measures.

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on Cambodia has indicated that, between March and October 2021, police have arrested more than 700 people on allegations of breaching Covid-19 measures. Some of the alleged breaches of the Covid-19 law involved people making critical comments on social media about the government’s handling of the pandemic.

Cambodia is bound by the International Labor Organization (ILO) Convention No. 87 and the United Nations International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which protects the right to strike. The ILO Tripartite Committee on Freedom of Association tenuous that strike bans during a national emergency, such as the Covid-19 public health crisis, must be time-limited, strictly necessary and proportionate. The committee also said that “the responsibility for suspending a strike for public health reasons should not lie with the government, but with an independent body which has the confidence of all parties concerned”.

Precautionary health measures taken by LRSU protesters rendered the strike refusal and subsequent arrests unnecessary, excessive, and disproportionate, violating their internationally protected right to strike, Human Rights Watch said.

“Using public health measures to suppress workers undermines public confidence in government actions against Covid-19,” Robertson said. “UN agencies in Cambodia, the ILO and foreign embassies should pressure the government to immediately and unconditionally release detained union activists and stop abusing health measures for political purposes. .

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History organization

Nasdaq Announces Retirement of Executive Vice President of Market Technology Lars Ottersgård; appoints new leadership for financial crime technology and market infrastructure companies

Nasdaq, Inc.

Consolidates legal and regulatory functions and group risk management responsibilities

Nasdaq Announces Technology Market Leadership Updates

Nasdaq, Inc. announced the retirement of Lars Ottersgørd, executive vice president of Market Technology, after 16 years at the helm of the organization.  As a result, the company is appointing two senior executives – Jamie King and Roland Chai – to advance its Financial Crime Enforcement and Market Infrastructure Technology businesses, respectively.

Nasdaq, Inc. announced the retirement of Lars Ottersgård, executive vice president of Market Technology, after 16 years at the helm of the organization. As a result, the company is appointing two senior executives – Jamie King and Roland Chai – to advance its Financial Crime Enforcement and Market Infrastructure Technology businesses, respectively.

NEW YORK, Feb. 14 10, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Nasdaq, Inc. (Nasdaq: NDAQ), today announced the retirement of Lars Ottersgård, executive vice president of Market Technology, after 16 years leading the organization. Ottersgård will transition to an advisory role on April 30, 2022, until his official retirement on August 31. As a result, the company is appointing two top executives – Jamie King and Roland Chai – to drive its anti-financial and market crime infrastructure forward. The technology companies, respectively, and both will report directly to Nasdaq President and CEO Adena Friedman.

The announced changes are not expected to impact the Company’s public financial reporting structure for the Market Technology segment, comprised of the Anti-Financial Crime and Market Infrastructure Technology businesses. Additionally, the Nasdaq continues to maintain its financial and operational performance targets for the Market Technology segment.

During a 16-year career at Nasdaq, Ottersgård presided over a near tripling of the company’s market technology franchise and was instrumental in growing the company into one of the biggest global solution providers for exchanges, clearing houses, central securities depositories, regulators, banks, and brokers. After a 20-year career at IBM, Ottersgård joined OMX AB in 2006 to lead global sales for the Nordic-based exchange company’s trading technology business and was appointed to lead the market technology business. combined following Nasdaq’s landmark merger with OMX in 2008. His vision and leadership has resulted in the provision of Nasdaq’s technology capabilities to more than 130 market infrastructure operators in 50 countries, including one of largest market infrastructure agreements in the history of the industry. Following the launch of the Nasdaq Financial Framework, Ottersgård led the company into new areas beyond traditional capital markets, including building and scaling the company’s anti-financial crime solutions for banks and brokers around the world, and played a key role in advancing the Nasdaq cloud journey.

“Lars has been an exceptional leader and colleague, having led our Market Technology segment through some of the most significant milestones in industry history,” said Adena Friedman, President and CEO of Nasdaq. “After bringing OMX to Nasdaq in 2008, his keen eye for emerging technologies led Nasdaq to acquire SMARTS Surveillance and Cinnober, cementing our leadership position in providing essential technology to over a hundred exchanges and of market infrastructure operators around the world.His recent efforts to expand our solutions and marketplaces in the cloud, as well as to serve new markets, including cryptocurrencies, puts us in a privileged position for us partner with customers across the marketplace ecosystem as we move toward an interconnected future.”

The following management changes will take effect on April 4, 2022:

  • Jamie King will be elevated to Executive Vice President, Nasdaq, and assume leadership of Nasdaq Anti-financial crime (AFC). AFC’s business includes solutions used by thousands of banks, stock exchange operators and other financial institutions to detect and combat financial crime through trade and market monitoring, as well as fraud detection solutions and Verafin’s anti-money laundering program. King is currently president and CEO of Verafin, which he co-founded in 2003.

  • Roland Chai, currently Global Chief Risk Officer of Nasdaq, will be elevated to Executive Vice President and will lead the Nasdaq Market Infrastructure Technology company, which includes products specifically designed to meet the technology needs of market infrastructure customers. Prior to joining Nasdaq in 2020, Chai served as Head of Post-Trading and Head of Group Risk at the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. He previously held the position of Equity Manager at LCH Ltd after starting his career in software development.

  • Following these changes, John ZeccaNasdaq’s Chief Legal & Regulatory Officer, will assume leadership of Roland Chai’s Nasdaq Group Risk Management team and become Legal, Risk and Regulatory Director.

“The organizational and leadership changes announced today will accelerate Nasdaq’s ability to realize its potential as a global leader in anti-financial crime solutions and as a leading, innovative technology partner to exchanges and markets around the world,” said Friedman. “Jamie and Roland are both respected leaders in their fields with deep industry expertise, proven track records of success, and a shared focus on deepening client relationships. I look forward to continued success as we are driving the next phase of growth in our anti-financial and market crime solutions.”

CAUTION REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

The information in this communication contains forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. The Nasdaq cautions readers that any forward-looking information is not a guarantee of future performance and that actual results could differ materially from those contained in the forward-looking information. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, projections regarding our future financial results, products and services and achievement of objectives, and other statements that are not historical facts. Forward-looking statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties or other factors beyond Nasdaq’s control. These factors include, but are not limited to, Nasdaq’s ability to implement its strategic initiatives, economic, political and market conditions and fluctuations, government and industry regulation, interest rate risk, competitive U.S. and worldwide, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business operations, results of operations, financial condition, workforce, or the operations or decisions of our customers, suppliers, or business partners, and other factors detailed in Nasdaq’s filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, including its annual reports on Form 10-K and quarterly reports on Form 10-Q which are available on the Investor Relations website. Nasdaq Investors at http://ir.nasdaq.com and on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. The Nasdaq undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

About the Nasdaq

Nasdaq (Nasdaq: NDAQ) is a global technology company serving capital markets and other industries. Our diverse offering of data, analytics, software and services enables clients to optimize and execute their business vision with confidence. To learn more about the company, technology solutions and career opportunities, visit us on LinkedIn, Twitter @Nasdaq or www.nasdaq.com.

Contacts for Media Relations:

Will Briganti
+1 (646) 964-8169
[email protected]

Yan-yan Tong
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[email protected]

Contact with Investor Relations:

Ed Ditmire, CFA
+1 (212) 401-8737
[email protected]

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/56fb1997-149e-4e2f-9aeb-4871b7a2fcf7

-NDAQF-

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Canadian army

US says more than 130,000 Russian troops are stationed outside Ukraine

Some airlines have canceled or diverted flights to Ukraine amid heightened fears that an invasion by Russia is imminent despite intensive weekend talks between the Kremlin and the West.

In an hour-long call Saturday with Russian President Vladimir Putin, President Joe Biden said invading Ukraine would cause widespread human suffering and that the West was committed to diplomacy to end the crisis but also prepared for other scenarios, the White House said. He offered no suggestion that the call diminished the threat of imminent war in Europe.

The two presidents spoke a day after Biden’s national security adviser Jake Sullivan warned that US intelligence shows a Russian invasion could begin within days.

Russia denies plans to invade, but has massed more than 100,000 troops near the Ukrainian border and sent troops to drills in neighboring Belarus. US officials say Russia’s firepower buildup has reached the point where it could invade on short notice.

Dutch airline KLM has canceled flights to Ukraine until further notice, the company announced on Saturday.

Dutch sensitivity to potential danger in Ukrainian airspace is high following the 2014 downing of a Malaysian airliner over an area of ​​eastern Ukraine held by rebel-backed by Russia. All 298 people on board died, including 198 Dutch citizens.

Ukrainian charter airline SkyUp said on Sunday its flight from Madeira, Portugal to Kiev had been diverted to the Moldovan capital Chisinau after the plane’s Irish lessor said it was banning flights in the country. Ukrainian airspace.

Ukrainian presidential spokesman Serhii Nykyforov told The Associated Press that Ukraine has not closed its airspace. A Ministry of Infrastructure statement said: Some carriers are experiencing difficulties related to fluctuations in insurance markets.

The Putin-Biden call, following a call between Putin and French President Emmanuel Macron earlier in the day, came at a critical time in what has become the biggest security crisis between Russia and the West since the cold War. US officials believe they have only days to prevent an invasion and massive bloodshed in Ukraine.

While the United States and its NATO allies have no plans to send troops to Ukraine to fight Russia, an invasion and the resulting punitive sanctions could reverberate far beyond the United States. former Soviet republic, affecting energy supplies, world markets and the balance of power in Europe.

President Biden has been clear with President Putin that while the United States remains ready to engage in diplomacy, in full coordination with our allies and partners, we are also ready for other scenarios, the President said. White House statement.

Yuri Ushakov, Putin’s top foreign policy aide, said while tensions had been escalating for months, in recent days the situation had simply reached the point of absurdity.

He said Biden had discussed possible sanctions that could be imposed on Russia, but that issue was not the focus of a long enough conversation with the Russian leader.

In a sign that US officials are preparing for the worst-case scenario, the United States announced its intention to evacuate most of its embassy staff in the Ukrainian capital and urged all US citizens in Ukraine to leave the country immediately . Britain has joined other European nations in telling its citizens to leave Ukraine.

Canada has closed its embassy in Kiev and moved its diplomatic staff to a temporary office in Lviv, located in the west of the country, Foreign Minister Melanie Joly said on Saturday. Lviv is home to a Ukrainian military base that served as the hub for Canada’s 200-soldier training mission in the former Soviet country.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy played down concerns about an invasion, urging the country to remain calm.

I believe that today in the information space there is a lot of information, he said on Saturday.

The timing of possible Russian military action remains a key question.

The United States has collected intelligence that Russia is considering on Wednesday as a target date, according to a U.S. official familiar with the findings. The official, who was not authorized to speak publicly and only did so on condition of anonymity, did not say how definitive the information was.

New US-Russian tensions surfaced on Saturday when the Defense Ministry summoned the US Embassy’s military attache after he said the Navy had detected a US submarine in Russian waters near the Kuril Islands in the Pacific. . The submarine refused the order to leave, but left after the navy used unspecified appropriate means, the ministry said.

Adding to the sense of crisis, the Pentagon ordered the dispatch of 3,000 additional American troops to Poland to reassure the allies.

In addition to the more than 100,000 ground troops that US officials say Russia has mustered along Ukraine’s eastern and southern borders, the Russians have deployed missile, air, naval and special operations forces, as well as supplies to support a war.

This week, Russia moved six amphibious assault ships into the Black Sea, increasing its ability to land marines on the coast.

Biden has bolstered the US military presence in Europe to reassure allies on NATO’s eastern flank. The 3,000 additional soldiers ordered in Poland come on top of the 1,700 who are on the way. The US military is also transferring 1,000 troops from Germany to Romania, which, like Poland, shares a border with Ukraine.

Russia demands that the West keep former Soviet countries out of NATO. He also wants NATO to refrain from deploying weapons near its border and roll back alliance forces from Eastern Europe, demands the West flatly rejects.

Russia and Ukraine have been locked in bitter conflict since 2014, when Ukraine’s pro-Kremlin leader was ousted from office by a popular uprising. Moscow responded by annexing the Crimean peninsula and then backing a separatist insurgency in eastern Ukraine, where fighting has killed more than 14,000 people.

A 2015 peace deal brokered by France and Germany stopped large-scale battles, but regular skirmishes have continued and efforts to reach a political settlement have stalled.

(ANI)

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International headquarters

Switzerland approves tobacco ad ban

ZURICH — Glamorous cigarette ads will soon be a thing of the past in Switzerland, after voters overwhelmingly approved legislation on Sunday banning tobacco companies from displaying them in public spaces.

Health advocates said the legislation, which was approved in a referendum, was an important step towards tightening the country’s regulations on loose tobacco.

“Many organizations have mobilized and advocated for a solution that prioritizes the protection of young people,” said Flavia Wasserfallen, member of the Swiss National Council and supporter of the initiative.

In much of the West, tobacco adverts have long fallen out of favor, but they have survived in this Alpine nation, with displays of cigarettes and e-cigarettes appearing on billboards, in cinemas and at events like music festivals.

But voters made it clear on Sunday that they were no longer interested in seeing them, and despite strong opposition from the tobacco industry and government, the tougher regulations were approved by 56.6% of voters and won received strong support from the French and Italians in the country. -languages, despite having the highest smoking rates in the country.

Steps have been taken in recent years to try to introduce stricter regulations on tobacco-related products in Switzerland. In 2015, the Federal Council, the country’s executive branch, proposed a Tobacco Products Act that would ban the sale of tobacco and related products to minors and restrict advertising.

Parliament eventually approved a watered down version of the bill, which banned the sale of tobacco to those under 18 but allowed advertising to continue almost unhindered.

The most recent initiative was launched by a group of more than 40 health organizations that formed in response to weakening tobacco laws. The new Tobacco Products Act, which includes the advertising provisions that voters approved on Sunday, is expected to come into force in 2023.

“The majority of our country has decided to correct Parliament’s decision on the Tobacco Products Act,” said Hans Stöckli, chairman of the committee behind the initiative, on Sunday. Mr Stöckli described the result as “a historic step” and a “necessary step” towards better tobacco regulation.

Opponents of the measure called the tighter restrictions extreme. And while they agreed tobacco should be age-restricted, they said the new rules amounted to a de facto ban on a legal product because children could potentially be exposed to n anywhere.

Switzerland has a long-standing close relationship with the tobacco industry. Philip Morris and Japan Tobacco International have their international headquarters in the country, and British American Tobacco also has a strong presence.

The industry employs approximately 4,500 people in Switzerland, according to the government, including in the production of high-tar cigarettes which are illegal to produce or sell in the European Union. Cigarettes rank with chocolate and cheese among the main exports.

Even after the new rules come into effect, Switzerland will continue to have more liberal tobacco regulations than many other countries. Moreover, it will still not meet all the conditions required to ratify the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, an international response to the fight against tobacco. tobacco epidemicdespite signing in 2004. The United States has not ratified the convention either.

Alain Berset, Swiss vice-president, who is also the country’s health minister, had opposed the initiative before the vote. But at a press conference on Sunday, he acknowledged that Swiss voters had spoken and said the government would move forward with the new regulations.

“The Federal Council will now tackle the implementation of the initiative,” Berset said.

The Tobacco Products Act was not the only issue of the ballot on Sunday. In a move people feared had cut Switzerland off from global medical progress, voters rejected a proposal to ban all human and animal experiments in the country.

Voters also decided against giving Swiss media more financial support, rejecting a government proposal to extend subsidies to online media as well as regional radio and TV stations.

A government-approved amendment to the federal stamp duty law that would have made it cheaper for businesses to raise new capital was also rejected, with opponents saying it would have mainly benefited big business.

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Non profit living

Covid updates: Supreme Court rejects teachers’ proposal to block New York City’s vaccination mandate

Credit…Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters

A new study on underreported coronavirus variants is a reminder that early detection and frequent genomic sequencing are among the most effective arrows in the quiver of public health officials.

But that is precisely what is not happening in many countries, putting their own populations – as well as the rest of the world – at risk.

Researchers in the United States and Nigeria examined a variant of interest, Eta, which circulated in Nigeria in early 2021, as well as a regionally rare Delta sublineage that was different from the Delta variant that circulated around the world.

Eta might have warranted the “variant of concern” designation if its growth potential had been recognized earlier, the researchers from the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University and the University of Ibadan in Nigeria wrote. Their research was published this month in Nature Communications.

“We were just lucky that this variant didn’t spread globally,” said Dr Oyewale Tomori, a virologist who heads a Nigerian government committee on Covid-19.

Judd Hultquist, co-author of the report and associate director of Northwestern’s Center for Pathogen Genomics and Microbial Evolution, said variant tracking was “incredibly uneven” across the world.

“Less than 1% of footage is from the African continent and less than 3% is from South America,” he said in an interview.

On Thursday, the World Health Organization’s Africa director, Dr Matshidiso Moeti, urged wider use of genomic sequencing technology in Africa to help speed up the detection of new variants. The technology is only available in a few middle-income countries in the region, such as South Africa and Botswana.

Researchers around the world use GISAID, the global online repository of coronavirus sequences, to share new genomes and search for mutations in its hundreds of thousands of viral genetic sequences.

Nigeria, with a population of 220 million, is the seventh most populous country in the world and the largest majority black country. It is also one of the least vaccinated: less than 3% of its population is fully inoculated, according to the Our World in Data project at the University of Oxford.

The World Health Organization has labeled Eta a variant of concern, which means it was worth studying but not as dangerous as a variant of concern. But after Eta moved the Alpha variant to Nigeria and the surrounding region early last year, researchers found it went largely unnoticed while Alpha remained at the center of much of the world. .

“Eta had all the hallmarks of a variant of concern and was able to outmatch the Alpha variant in the region before Delta arrived,” Dr Hultquist said.

And after the rise and fall of Eta, a rare Delta sub-lineage (AY.36) appeared in the region that was different from the Delta variant that circulated most of the world.

The study underscores the critical need for improved surveillance and tracking of coronavirus infections to ensure early detection of new variants in Nigeria and the West African region, said Dr Moses Adewumi of the ‘University of Ibadan, one of the collaborators.

Even now, the researchers said, there are just over 1,400 Nigerian coronavirus sequences available in public repositories. The United States, by comparison, sequences tens of thousands of specimens each week.

The variants that have been examined by researchers are no longer a threat. But at the time, the Alpha and Eta variants produced the highest spike in new infections; and the rare Delta lineage caused the second spike, according to Northwestern’s Dr. Ramon Lorenzo-Redondo, one of the study’s authors. The spikes resulted in the highest death rates of the pandemic, he said.

Africa is not fully utilizing available laboratory resources, Dr Tomori said. He said mainland labs had sequenced 70,000 viral genomes by the end of 2021.

“Sequencing is inadequate in Africa because many African governments have not appreciated the usefulness of such facilities to provide data for better epidemic control,” he said. “Furthermore, there is a lack of collaboration among African scholars, some of whom prefer to work with their former ‘colonial’ colleagues.”

One lesson is clear: it’s never too early to try to say what the impact of a variation might be. Researchers are already keeping a close eye on a new Omicron sub-variant, BA.2.

Alex Sigal, a virologist at the Africa Health Research Institute in Durban, South Africa, who helped identify Beta and Omicron variants, said: “The most important message here is that we don’t see everything, and that some of these places may not have Covid-19 control.

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History organization

Opinion: Florida’s ‘don’t say gay’ bill is cruel and dangerous

As leaders of two LGBTQ organizations, we have been amazed at the progress we have made over the past decade. But it’s also clear that the increased visibility of our community has caused a backlash. According to the American Civil Liberties Union, more than 100 anti-LGBTQ bills, the majority of which target transgender and non-binary youth, are currently pending in state legislatures across the country.
One of the most extreme examples is a bill in Florida known as the “Don’t Say Gay” bill. It states that school districts “may not encourage discussion of sexual orientation or gender identity in the elementary grades or in a manner that is not appropriate for the age or development of students.” The language, which is vague and could apply to K-12 classrooms across Florida, could be used to prohibit open discussions about LGBTQ people and issues.
If passed, it would effectively erase entire chapters of history, literature and critical health information from schools – and silence LGBTQ students and those with LGBTQ parents or family members. . It’s just one of many divisive and dehumanizing bills in Florida that use LGBTQ youth as political pawns to limit conversations about gender and sexual identity.
Let’s be clear: the Don’t Say Gay Bill will do real and lasting harm. All students should learn about the significant contributions of the LGBTQ community to United States history and culture. Landmark events, ranging from the Stonewall riots to Supreme Court rulings in cases such as Obergefell v. Hodges and Bostock v. Clayton County, should be included in any comprehensive lesson plan on modern history and the civil rights movements.

LGBTQ students deserve to see their own history and experiences reflected in their education, just like their peers. Learning about LGBTQ civil rights heroes like Marsha P. Johnson, Harvey Milk, and Bayard Rustin can inspire LGBTQ students, make them proud of who they are, and help them envision a better future.

Research from the Trevor Project found that LGBTQ students who learned about LGBTQ issues or people in the classroom at school were 23% less likely to attempt suicide in the past year. Conversely, when LGBTQ topics are taboo, this stigma is often internalized and can negatively impact a student’s mental health and self-esteem.
Learning about the LGBTQ community can also foster peer acceptance and contribute to a positive school climate, which is still much needed. Tragically, a majority of LGBTQ youth in middle school and high school said they had been bullied in person or electronically in the past year — and those who did were three times more likely to attempt to commit suicide.
And given that only 1 in 3 young LGBTQ people find their home to be LGBTQ, it is all the more important to ensure that schools – the place where young people spend a significant part of their waking hours – are as welcoming as possible.
At a time when 42% of LGBTQ youth, including more than half of transgender and non-binary youth, have seriously considered attempting suicide in the past year, according to a national survey conducted by The Trevor Project, fostering an environment Affirmative schooling is more critical than ever. That’s why lawmakers should expand support systems for LGBTQ students and encourage teachers to create safe and inclusive learning environments, without fueling stigma and shame.

Scaring LGBTQ students from discussing their identity, community or family at school is as cruel as it is dangerous.

If you or someone you know needs help or support, The Trevor Project’s trained crisis counselors are available 24/7 at 1-866-488-7386, via chat at TheTrevorProject.org/Get-Helpor by texting START to 678678.
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Canadian army

In a Ukrainian border town, children practice drills and stockpile supplies in case of a Russian attack

Residents of the Ukrainian town of Ovruch, just 15 kilometers from the border with Belarus, know that if the current crisis with Russia metastasized into a full military conflict, their community could be the first the invaders would come to.

“Teachers remind us that if there is [is] an offensive by the Russian Federation or Belarus, we shouldn’t panic,” Ivan Trostenyuk, a 14-year-old eighth grader at local school number three, said in a recent interview with CBC News as he was going home.

“Our [Ukrainian] the soldiers will help us.”

While Ovruch has a population of just 15,000, it is 200 km – or about two and a half hours’ drive – north of the capital, Kiev. The newly renovated highway south of Ovruch is one of the fastest routes to reach the political and economic center of Ukraine.

For weeks, Russia has sent troops and advanced weapons to Belarus, with some of the staging areas within 30 km of Ukraine. Military experts estimate there could now be more than 30,000 Russian troops in Belarus, and on Thursday they began moving in formation and conducting live-fire drills in exercises called Allied Resolve.

In this still image from a video released on February 11, military vehicles are seen conducting a joint military exercise between the armed forces of Russia and Belarus at the Brestsky training ground in the region of Brest, Belarus. (Russian Ministry of Defense document)

More than 130,000 Russians in total have gathered in places near Ukraine’s land border, in addition to a large naval deployment in the Black Sea.

Putin ‘just can’t back down’

Some Western analysts say the Russian deployment to Belarus represents the largest Russian troop movement there since well before the end of the Cold War. It also gives President Vladimir Putin and his generals additional options to attack Ukraine, should they choose to do so.

“When you have this amount of troops amassed at the borders, with the amount of naval power [Putin] moved into the Black Sea, with the amount of air power he has, he has to do something. He just can’t back down,” said Canadian Mychailo Wynnyckyj, associate professor of sociology and director of the doctoral program at Kyiv-Mohyla Business School.

Putin demanded that the United States and NATO rewrite existing security agreements in Europe, refuse to admit Ukraine to NATO and withdraw all foreign troops from former Soviet republics or former members of the Warsaw Pact. , such as Poland and Romania.

Canadian-Ukrainian Mychailo Wynnyckyj teaches in Kiev. He thinks Putin is unlikely to back down from a military buildup on the Ukrainian border. (Carly Thomas/CBC)

Wynnyckyj says Putin knows such demands cannot be met, and so he and many Ukrainians are preparing for the worst. “I think he’s going to move in.”

At the school in Ovruch, and others across Ukraine, teachers trained children in emergency drills in case the conflict escalated.

“The action plan for the children depends on the signal we receive,” said headmistress Ludmyla Zalizko of school number three in Ovruch.

“If bombings or other scenarios [happen]we could move to the basement, or outside.”

Several students told CBC News that psychologists came to their classes to try to reassure them but also to prepare them in case their city was attacked.

“We are not as worried as [the grown-ups] said Ivan Trostenyuk. “I think everything will be fine.

Heed the instructions

Other students said their parents trained them on home emergency plans.

“I live in a house and we have our own basement, where we already have a stock of food and other things, and we can go down there in 30 seconds,” 13-year-old Vania Zubiychuk said.

The Transfiguration Church is the dominant monument in Ovruch, Ukraine. (Chris Brown/CBC)

“If I’m in school [when an attack comes]I have to listen to the instructions of a teacher or adults around, and if at home … [I] listen and do whatever the parents ask you to do.”

Volodymyr Kublynsky, also 13, said his parents told him the less he told people about the political situation, the better. They say, “we shouldn’t be provocative, nobody should blow this up.”

The CBC News team spent several hours one day this week driving through Ukraine’s border areas north of Kiev and saw no evidence of the country’s military or mobilization efforts to protect the capital or the border region.

Nor, apparently, many people who live in Ovruch.

Petro Levkivsky, a municipal politician, says he understands his government wants to avoid panicking people, but a show of force would make people feel better.

“I’d rather see something happen,” he said. “I would rather there was a huge fence [at the border] and there were many troops to protect us.”

Petro Levkivsky, a municipal politician from Ovruch, said citizens might feel more reassured if they saw the Ukrainian army doing its own military exercises. (Carly Thomas/CBC)

Levkivsky said the Ukrainian military has improved significantly with the help of foreign countries, such as Canada, and this gives him hope that if hostilities break out, Ukraine will have a strong defense.

“It gives me confidence that we have an experienced army,” he said. “We are truly grateful that our foreign partners are providing military assistance, and we hope this will deter the aggressor and there will be virtually no war in central Europe.”

Ongoing conflict

Ukraine’s government has released a video of its own tanks and soldiers carrying out exercises east of the capital, near the cities of Kharkiv and Kherson, and says its preparations will reflect Russia’s schedule for its exercises until 20 February.

An old Soviet T-34 tank and an artillery piece serve as monuments to Ovruch’s military history in a park near the town’s entrance. (Adrian DiVirgilio/CBC)

In addition, there have recently been almost daily flights from the United States bringing new weapons to the Ukrainian military, including Javelin anti-tank missiles and other small arms ammunition.

Most Ukrainians see the current crisis with Russia as a continuation of a conflict that began in 2014, when Putin ordered his troops to seize the Crimean peninsula.

Shortly after, separatists in eastern Ukraine – which are supplied, financed and armed by Russia – launched an offensive against the Ukrainian army, in a conflict that has left more than 13,000 people dead. combatants and civilians.

Warnings from the US, Britain and others that a Russian attack could be ‘imminent’ come as no surprise to a war-weary nation that has spent years expecting an escalation from Russia at some point.

A kiosk near a bus stop in Ovruch. (Adrian DiVirgilio/CBC)

Wynnyckyj says like others in the country, he is preparing but also determined to carry on with his life as usual.

“We have 60 liters of water, just in case. We have lots of dried food and tinned food, just in case the electricity goes out for a few weeks, which might happen.”

But, he insisted, “it’s not panic. And we don’t have panic in the streets.”

In the border town of Ovruch, there is a sense of resignation that if an invasion did occur, it might not be possible to flee.

“If the incursion happens, it would happen suddenly, so we won’t have time to leave,” said Levkivsky, the local politician. “I have three children and no car. We won’t have time to escape.”

In this case, he says the plan would simply be for him and his family to stay put and do the best they can, as other Ukrainians did when their territory was invaded.

“Our compatriots in eastern Ukraine have experienced this, the Crimeans have experienced it too, we too, we will experience it too.”

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Non profit living

Nonprofit Riverside helps those who were homeless or incarcerated regain their independence – Press Enterprise

Starting Over Inc. provides transition and reintegration services to people who have come into contact with the criminal justice system. The organization provides housing, employment, family reunification, recovery and mental health services.

Start Over housing services are available for those in need, including clients who are homeless, recently released from prison, or struggling with substance abuse. The organization has eight halfway houses in Los Angeles and Riverside counties. Transition houses provide sober living and harm reduction options. David’s House, located in Eastvale, is available for single women with children.

“We tap into the potential of people who may not have had the opportunity to succeed or give back,” said co-founder and executive director Vonya Quarles. “We offer people opportunities to give themselves, to learn and to grow.”

The organization believes that everyone is of equal value and helps clients who need help dealing with the immediate effects and root causes of homelessness. Case management specialists who have direct experience on the journey provide referrals and support to those in need. This includes immediate basic needs, obtaining health benefits, essential documents, employment, advocacy and family reunification.

By investing in prevention and addressing trauma, Starting Over believes the community will not need to invest in eliminating re-entry into the criminal justice system. Clients of the organization’s programs have gone on to form their own organizations, become advocates, work in health, and are present in the lives of their children.

Bobbie Butts, Associate Director of Family Reunification of Starting Over Inc, speaks at the Family Reunification, Equity and Empowerment (FREE) program rally in the state capitol to transform protective services in childhood. (Courtesy of Start Over, Inc.)

Community organizing and civic engagement are also a big part of Starting Over’s work. The organization has worked to elevate the voices of leaders affected by the system and build the pipeline of leaders who organize and build grassroots in the community. The organization’s Family Reunification, Equity and Empowerment (FREE) program supports families who are dealing with dependent child courts and the child welfare system. The program offers legal support, strategies for advocating for family reunification, and free resources.

On January 18, 2022, FREE held a rally in Sacramento at the State Capitol to Transform Child Protective Services. Working with CPS and other partners, Start Over helped pass SB 354 and is working to publicize the revisions it puts in place. The bill relaxes restrictions on placing children with relatives. There are 60,000 children languishing in foster care because parents are deemed ineligible for placement, Quarles said.

“I’ve met many parents who weren’t able to have the kids because of old, unrelated convictions,” Quarles said. “SB 354 opens the door to an individualized assessment to make a decision. Data shows that children placed with family members are much better off.

Recently, Starting Over received a grant from the IE Black Equity Fund through the Inland Empire Community Foundation. Start Over has grown from an all-volunteer organization to 21 staff members and welcomes contributions to support its work.

Currently, the organization relies on the help of 40 volunteers and is always looking for more. Those interested in volunteering can contact Ashley Williams, internship program manager and housing program manager for the organization.

Start Over tries to match volunteers with work that builds on their strengths. Opportunities include policy and advocacy work, writing grant applications and working with housing guests. There is also a need for fresh grocery donations for the bi-monthly Starting Over food drives. Donations of gently used clothing and accessories are also welcome and provided free of charge to accommodation hosts and the community.

“Opportunity is what we offer,” Quarles said. “Yes, we help provide direct services, but more broadly, we give people the time and space to reset and rethink their future.”

More information: https://www.startingoverinc.org or 951-898-0862

Inland Empire Community Foundation strives to strengthen the Southern California interior through philanthropy.

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International headquarters

The program for the 37th Santa Barbara International Film Festival announced

The 37th Santa Barbara International Film Festival, which runs from March 2-12, 2022, announced its schedule and unveiled its poster on Thursday, February 10 at the Sullivan Goss Gallery in Santa Barbara.

The festival provides a key platform for artists on the Oscars campaign trail, and 2022 is no exception. All of the actors receiving SBIFF Awards as part of one-night celebrity tribute programs have been nominated for Oscars this year. The list includes Kristen Stewart (American Riviera Award on Friday, March 4), Will Smith and Aunjanue Ellis (Outstanding Performers of the Year Award, Sunday, March 6), Benedict Cumberbatch (Cinema Vanguard Award, Wednesday, March 9), and Nicole Kidman and Javier Bardem (Maltin Modern Masters Award, Thursday March 10). SBIFF Director Roger Durling will announce the final individual tribute honored for the Montecito Award in the coming weeks.

This year’s opening night movie, The Phantom of the Open, is a British comedy that stars Mark Rylance as Maurice Flitcroft. Flitcroft became famous for playing major golf tournaments such as the British Open, despite being a terrible novice golfer. The film, which received a warm reception when it premiered at the London BFI Film Festival, seems like the kind of feel-good comedy we could all use right now. Sally Hawkins, who delivered a memorable performance in spencer as Lady Diana’s favorite maid, Maggie, plays Jean, Flitcroft’s patient wife.

The closing film of the festival, Dionne Warwick: Don’t do me again, tells the story of the great New Jersey gospel choir singer’s rise to international stardom as the definitive interpreter of the songs of Burt Bacharach. Warwick, a social media sensation thanks to his dry wit on Twitter, will be on hand for the screening.


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Other major festival news include the appointment of eminent film critic Claudia Puig as director of programming. There will be a 10th anniversary screening of Silver Linings Playbook with a discussion with director David O. Russell and a retrospective of films by Gregory Nava, the groundbreaking author who wrote and directed The North (1983), Selena (1997) and the TV series American family (2002-2004). American family star Edward James Olmos will be on hand to pay tribute to Nava.

In his remarks, Durling took the opportunity to highlight the passing of several people who had an impact on the festival. The 10th anniversary of the tragic death of oceanographer and documentary filmmaker Mike deGruy was February 4. Russ Spencer, a Santa Barbara filmmaker and former Independent staff member who died in 2019, is remembered as the person who successfully advocated for the inclusion of local filmmakers in the festival. Most recently, Nadine Turner, the host of the longtime festival headquarters at the Santa Barbara Hotel, died in 2021, as did Barbara Boris, the artist responsible for many years of SBIFF’s posters.

The poster design unveiled for this year’s festival features a blue-saturated beachscape by Hank Pitcher, who was there to witness the unveiling and offer some insight into his perception of what makes SBIFF special. Pitcher compared the experience of walking on the beach and looking at the ocean to the moments immediately after the lights go down in a movie theater. These two public acts “reveal us as we live our dreams and our desires,” Pitcher said.

Despite the county’s decision to lift its indoor mask mandate on Feb. 16, Durling said the festival would continue to require attendees to remain fully masked at all tributes, panels and screenings. For more information and to order tickets, visit sbiff.org.


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History organization

WKU archaeologist partners with the Max Planck Institute

Dr. Jean-Luc Houle, an associate professor of anthropology in the Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology at WKU, is teaming up with researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Germany to study early domestic livestock dispersals across Central and Inner Asia from around 5,000 years ago. Other collaborators are affiliated with the National Museum of Mongolia.

(pictured) A shepherd leads horses near ancient stone burial mounds in the Mongolian steppe.

Sheep, goats and domestic cattle were essential to the economy of the mobile herding communities that lived on the vast Asian steppe as early as the Bronze Age. Not only were meat and milk key components of the diet, but hides, wool, and bones were used for tools, shelter, and other purposes. Today, nomadic pastoralism continues to be the predominant way of life in this region.

The multi-year collaborative research projects involve radiocarbon dating and analysis of genetic material from the bones and teeth of sheep, goats and domestic cattle from archaeological sites in Mongolia and neighboring countries where Dr Houle and other archaeologists worked for several decades. These data can indicate when and where animal species were domesticated, and when and where domesticated livestock spread to other regions. Researchers are also interested in how the genetic makeup of livestock populations has changed over time and the evolutionary processes involved, as well as the genomics of pathogens associated with domestic animals.

The Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) in Jena, Germany, was founded in 2014 to target fundamental questions of human history and evolution over the last millions of years. years. It currently consists of three interdisciplinary research departments that integrate research methods and questions from the natural sciences and the humanities: the Department of Archaeology, the Department of Archaeogenetics, and the Department of Linguistic and Cultural Evolution. MPI-SHH affiliates explore major questions of the human past, such as the history of global human migrations, human modifications of ecosystems, and the impacts of environmental change on humans. MPI-SHH is one of 86 institutes of the Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science, an independent, non-profit research organization founded in 1948 as a successor to the Kaiser Wilhelm Society, established in 1911.

The National Museum of Mongolia (NMM) preserves and promotes the rich cultural heritage of a nomadic way of life as it was lived for millennia by the ancestors of Mongolia, who left an indelible mark on Mongolia and on the history of the world. Through collections displayed in nine permanent exhibition halls and virtual tours and experiences, the museum connects past and present to provide a memorable, informative and inspiring journey through Mongolia.

To learn more about Dr. Houle’s research, visit https://westernmongoliaarchaeology.weebly.com.

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Canadian army

Should the military put an end to the “freedom” protests?

It’s funny how the so-called Conservative Party of Canada and our two local Conservative MPs seem unable to tell these ‘freedom convoy’ protesters that their voices have been heard and now is the time to let others Canadians enjoy their freedoms, such as going to work and crossing the border.

No other previous prime minister, regardless of political stripe, would have endured two weeks of traffic jams in downtown Ottawa, followed by mounting protests at border crossings. Pierre Trudeau and Jean Chrétien, up to Brian Mulroney and Stephen Harper, would have put an end to this nonsense a few days ago.

They allegedly let the protests continue for a few days, then firmly told the protesters to go home and if they did not leave, they would be evicted by members of the Canadian Armed Forces.

And naturally, these protesters in Ottawa, at the border crossings and elsewhere will cry out for the violation of their civil liberties and their rights to freedom of assembly. Here’s what Trudeau the Elder had to say about it in October 1970.

“There are a lot of bleeding hearts around who just don’t like to see people with helmets and guns. All I can say is, carry on and bleed, but maintaining law and order in this society is more important than worrying about weak-kneed people who don’t like the looks of a soldier’s helmet.

“At all costs? How far would you go with this? How far would you stretch this?” the reporter asked.

“Well, look at me,” Trudeau replied.

It’s funny how the so-called Conservative Party of Canada and our two local Conservative MPs seem unable to tell these ‘freedom convoy’ protesters that their voices have been heard and now is the time to let others Canadians enjoy their freedoms, such as going to work and crossing the border.

The Conservatives have great points to argue about the validity of federal and provincial vaccine mandates and they should vigorously present them in the House of Commons. Many mandates are – in whole or in part – no longer supported by scientific developments. But Tories should also agree with fellow parliamentarians that these protests are now causing significant economic damage and must end, voluntarily or not.

From a politically cynical standpoint, which has been Trudeau’s playbook since day one, threatening to call in the military (and following through if necessary) would now be warmly welcomed by most urban voters and suburbs, with all parties serious about government formation. Needs.

Pierre said he had no choice when he called in the army and was only responding to the clear and present danger to democracy. Justin can also use this line.

There are many wrongs in the current mandates and everyone is tired of living with them, regardless of individual opinions on vaccine safety. These demonstrators, however, crossed the line between protest and anarchy. Their continued actions are statements that their love for freedom does not include the freedom of anyone who disagrees with them.

If it takes soldiers patrolling downtown Ottawa and border crossings to restore democratic law and order, this Prime Minister — or any other Prime Minister — should do it without hesitation.

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International headquarters

Job: Development and supply chain project manager – Castelli Cycling USA

Job title

Development & Supply Chain Project Manager

Company / Organization

Castelli Cycling United States

job description

Job Description
Date: February 2022
Job Title: Development and Supply Chain Project Manager
Reports to: Product Development Manager

Position Summary:
The Development and Supply Chain Project Manager will play a critical role in the development, production and shipment of premium cycling products within a global organization. The position will work with teams in the United States and Italy, as well as factories in Europe, Asia and Central America, to ensure products are delivered on time, on cost and on quality. The Development and Supply Chain Project Manager will create and implement new project management and communication tools, plan and manage development meetings.
Duties and Responsibilities:
• Responsibilities may include, but are not limited to; Creating a global schedule, implementing communication channels between global teams, responding to customer delivery needs.
• Gather information from all departments needed to move a project forward
• Map and define all assigned projects and milestones needed to complete and reach the end goal
• Create and maintain project tracking and implementation records
• Identify and resolve problems and conflicts within the project team
• Support ongoing online (retail) and custom product programs with existing global factories, as well as the development and launch of new factories
• Works closely with Product Development Manager, Senior Product Developer, Supply Chain Manager, Logistics Manager, Sales Manager and General Manager
• Organize and manage kick-off meetings with relevant stakeholders
• Historical and forecast analysis to determine product needs
• Actively participate in achieving the company’s business objectives
• Serve as a liaison between cross-functional teams to drive strategy deployment
• Develop best practices and tools for project execution and management
• Work in partnership with department heads to identify opportunities for improvement, develop business cases and drive the prioritization and delivery of eligible projects
• Ensure alignment of global internal processes to reduce complexity, increase transparency and establish clear accountability for achieving the most effective results.
• Keep all departments on track to meet the project schedule
• Identify and mitigate potential risks
• Other duties required by the position

Personal Qualifications:
• Demonstrated initiative with excellent written and verbal communication skills
• Ability to connect with internal and external team members at multiple levels, building confidence in your abilities to get the job done effectively
• Strong time management with accountability to ensure initiatives are completed and delivered on time and within budget
• Ability to work in a fast-paced environment with different international cultures
• Demonstrated success in managing multiple priorities in changing environments
• As a project manager, you will work in close coordination with operations and logistics
• Experience managing budgets and delivering initiatives
• A seasoned and strong ability to solve problems throughout the development process
• Embodies the temperament of a leader: adaptable, resilient, empathetic and assertive
• Proficiency in Microsoft Office applications including Word, Excel and PowerPoint
• Experience in Centric is a plus

Preferred Education and Work Experience Qualifications:
• Licence
• 2+ years of experience as a project manager
• Experience and/or training in the apparel industry with exposure to print production and/or custom product manufacturing as well as supply chain operations.

Please note that this job description is not designed to cover or contain a complete list of activities, duties or responsibilities that are required of the employee for this position. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable people with disabilities to perform the essential functions of the job.

About Castelli/Sportful:
VC Group is a family business operated for over 75 years with a commitment to our customers and our team members. We are a premium cycling apparel manufacturer with global headquarters in Italy and US headquarters in Portland, Oregon. We operate two clothing brands: Castelli and Sportful. Our company has a history of product innovation and performance. Our products have been used by Tour de France winners, world champions and Olympic gold medalists.

Our office and warehouse are in the Hollywood/Laurelhurst area of ​​NE Portland and close to MAX and bike paths.

Full-time positions offer competitive pay, health care, 401k, paid time off, and generous product compensation.

The Castelli/Sportful team strives to create an inclusive workplace that promotes and values ​​diversity. Companies that are diverse in terms of age, gender identity, race, sexual orientation, physical or mental ability, ethnicity, and outlook have proven to be better companies. More importantly, creating an environment where everyone, from any background, can do their best is the right thing to do. We welcome all applicants.

How to register

Please send a CV to [email protected]

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Non profit living

Recognizing Local Charities for Nonprofit Appreciation Week | bloginfo(‘name’); ?>

February 10, 2022 0 comments

By Paula Brown, Local Journalism Initiative reporter

A small group of Dufferin County organizations will recognize the work of local nonprofits next week as part of a campaign for the first-ever Nonprofit Appreciation Week (February 14-February 20) .

In December 2021, the province passed Bill 9 to create Nonprofit Appreciation Week, a motion that received unanimous support from all parties. Beginning February 14 and continuing through February 20, the week is focused on recognizing those in the nonprofit sector whose work changes the lives of individuals, families, and communities.

Michele Fisher, executive director of the Dufferin Community Foundation, said the week of appreciation had been “a long time coming.”

“Most of the other helping professions are recognized for their impact. During the pandemic, for example, healthcare workers have been rightly praised for their efforts. But frontline workers in the nonprofit sector — many of whom were also deemed essential — have flown under the radar. That’s why we like to call them ‘invisible champions’,” Fisher said. “Nonprofit Appreciation Week is an opportunity for us as a community to say ‘Thank You.’ It makes visible all they do to help some of our most vulnerable and to strengthen our communities. I hope this will allow our nonprofit professionals to feel truly recognized for all that they do. »

In Dufferin County alone, there are over 150 non-profit organizations working within the community, ranging from social services, environmental/conservation organizations, arts and culture, recreation, health, mental health, community development, housing and homelessness, food security and much more. .

The Citizen spoke with some of the local nonprofits in Dufferin County ahead of Nonprofit Appreciation Week.

Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County

For people with dementia, a consistent routine can help them thrive. As a non-profit organization focused on support, programming and education, the Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County has taken on the challenge of maintaining this routine for more than two years.

“Over the past two years we have seen a significant drop in the availability of things like day programs, community support, personal support worker support. Basically anything that would allow a person with dementia and their family to maintain a consistent routine,” said Lindsay Gregory, Outreach and Education Coordinator. “Without this structure, we are seeing an increase in complex cases, an increase in behaviors and the burnout of caregivers.

To help address the lack of structure for clients brought about by the pandemic, the Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County has begun offering online training and education sessions as well as social programs, activities and social sessions. exercises.

One program, which Gregory points to as a proud moment in the face of the pandemic, is their Bring Back Box program.

The Bring Back Box program is a Montessori approach to dementia care where clients receive personalized activity kits based on their hobbies, interests, and memories that provide meaningful stimulation and engagement.

“We see a lot of people with dementia who are bored,” Gregory said. “It’s a really nice way to connect with people in an otherwise virtual world.”

The Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County has approximately 400 people on their active caseload and while their caseload has not increased since the pandemic, they have seen more admissions seeking access to education and support .

“We talk more often with people who are now at home with loved ones and who may be noticing this cognitive decline that they wouldn’t otherwise notice,” Gregory said.

Coming out of the pandemic, Gregory said after seeing how people have connected with them, the Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County will likely continue to use their virtual opportunities in a “hybrid model.”

Community Living Dufferin for over 60 years has been providing support to adults in Dufferin County who have developmental disabilities and when COVID-19 hit, rather than accepting a hiatus from all programs, Community Living Dufferin staff shows creativity.

“It could have been very easy for us to say ‘sorry, the building is closed and the programs are over, we’re just going to get by,’ but our staff didn’t,” Karen Murphy-Fitz explained, executive assistant. . “We changed our programs from those we operated in the main building to programs we offered in each of our homes.”

One of the ways they transformed, Murphy-Fitz added, was by distributing craft boxes in their homes, which contained games, science projects and art supplies.

“Residents had something different to fill their days,” Murphy-Fitz said.

Operating 14 homes that provide housing for more than 60 adults supported by the nonprofit, Community Living Dufferin was challenged early on by isolation as family visits were cut short.

Community Living Dufferin applied for and became the recipient of a number of grants allowing them to purchase smart TVs, iPads and Google Home units so they can continue to connect with families.

“It was huge for helping the people we support stay connected with their families, giving them the opportunity to see each other face to face,” Murphy-Fitz said.

Although Community Living Dufferin has learned, like many organizations, to balance the setbacks caused by the pandemic, it is the emotional impacts that continue to be felt.

While speaking with the Citizen, Murphy-Fitz held back tears as she spoke about their adaptation as hallways and rooms remain empty.

“It’s been hard not seeing people, and it’s going to be nice to have everyone together again.”

As the saying goes, the show must go on.

As a relatively young organization that began with seasonal programming, Streams Community Hub faced the challenge of bringing the arts, a naturally collaborative and in-person discipline, into the virtual space.

“We really spent several months, like anyone working in a space that deals with a lot of in-person programming, trying to figure out what to do,” explained Juli-Anne James, co-founder of Streams Hub. “It’s hard to put on a play without a stage.”

Although not fully equipped with the technology and staff to deliver virtual programs, Juli-Anne and Andrew James have found a way to bring the arts into children’s homes – through a stand-up competition.

The Word of Mouth Monologue competition launched in March 2021 and saw local young people aged 8-17 submit online performances of various monologues and compete in a live final.

“The monologue competition was a really great opportunity that we did after it turned out to be really awesome,” Andrew said. “It made us realize it’s a good outlet and now we need to keep doing it even when things get back to ‘normal’. We recognized the importance of helping young people have another way to express themselves .

Although restricted for a year to offering arts programs to young people, the James duo note that internal work was underway to deepen their roots in the community.

“We were able to see some of the needs in our community and see how we could better meet those needs,” Andrew said.

Streams Community Hub is preparing to open its first permanent location, tentatively scheduled for early March.

“We know the importance of connection, of being together in a space and that we can never escape that need or that want,” Andrew said. “Our show must go on, to move forward creating a bigger space not only for young people, but for the artist who also needs a place to express themselves in their art, while earning a living and teaching the next generation.”

Organizations that have worked to develop local activities in recognition of Nonprofit Appreciation Week include the Dufferin Community Foundation, United Way Guelph Wellington Dufferin, Headwaters Communities in Action, DC MOVES, the Chamber of commerce of Dufferin and Dufferin County.

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