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Chinese Army General Collaborates With Canada’s Largest Disease Control Lab, Report Reveals | World news

New Delhi: The Globe and Mail, through an excellent investigative journalistic article, uncovered a previously unknown link between a high-ranking PLA officer and the Canadian High Security Infectious Disease Laboratory in Winnipeg. There are reports that Major-General Chen Wei collaborated with former Canadian government laboratory scientist Dr. Xiangguo Qiu on Ebola research and even published cooperative papers in 2016 and 2020.

Dr Qiu is currently under investigation by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to determine whether the scientist illegally transferred Canadian intellectual property to China and the Wuhan Institute of Virology.

Major-General Wei, in particular, is a leading figure in the People’s Liberation Army and, in the recent past, has been publicly commended by Chinese President Xi Jinping for his work in developing China’s unique COVID vaccine. -19 by CanSino. Qiu was a researcher at Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) and was also responsible for the vaccine and antiviral therapy development section of the laboratory.

In the Ebola research paper where Chen and Qiu collaborated, Wei Chen was credited, but his ties to the Chinese military as his identity as the Chinese military’s top epidemiologist and virologist were not disclosed. The fact that Wei Chen and Major General. Chen’s the same person was first revealed in a book titled “On the Origin of the Deadliest Pandemic in 100 Years: An Investigation” by Elaine Dewar. This fact was also later confirmed by The Globe.

When asked if it is standard practice for level 4 laboratories like the NML to collaborate with high-ranking Chinese military scientists, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) replied that it does not There was no agreement between the LNM and the Chinese military. But he added that Canadian scientists in the past have collaborated with Chinese scientists to advance the cause of science and discover breakthroughs in research.

At this point, it must be remembered that the PLA is very different from other armies in the world. The PLA is the military wing of the Chinese Communist Party and not a national army, it is not subject to the will of the Chinese government or elected representatives. The PLA exists only to maintain the strength of the Party and fulfill its mission. While scientific research and the fight against deadly diseases are important, it is not the prerogative of the PLA. The only reason a high ranking PLA officer like the Major-General. Chen would collaborate with the now disgraced Dr. Qiu if the research and / or work somehow benefited the CCP.

The disgraced Dr. Qiu and her husband were fired from the NML in January, but in reality the couple saw their security clearances revoked in July 2019. It is not even possible to determine whether Major-General Chen visited the lab. Winnipeg because PHAC has declared visitor records to be private.

Commenting on the collaboration, Ward Elcock, a former director of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, said this kind of collaboration between a high-ranking Chinese military scientist and a Canadian scientist in a Level 4 bio-facility would not have must have been cleared in the first place and would certainly have alarmed him if he was then Director of CSIS. Just months before his security clearance was removed, Dr Qiu was tasked with overseeing the transfer of the Ebola and Henipa viruses to the Wuhan Institute of Virology in China.

Three NML scientists who had worked on the Ebola research papers alongside Dr Qiu and Major-General Chen said they had no idea their colleague (Wei Chen) was high on the PLA and was China’s top virologist. The three scientists added that Dr. Qiu did not share this key information.

According to the report, Major General Chen is not an ordinary Chinese scientist, she is a member of the National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference which directly advises top CCP leaders. In addition, Chen was congratulated by President Xi Jinping in September 2020 for his work on China’s single dose COVID-19 vaccine which was developed by CanSino Biologics Inc. (backed by the Chinese military). In 2020, the National Research Council of Canada actually granted Can Sino the license to use its biologic to jointly develop a vaccine, but then China suddenly reneged on the deal and even stopped the shipment of vaccines to Canada.

Speaking to the media, retired Lieutenant-General Michael Day, who heads the Canadian Special Operations Forces Command, said PHAC is sorely lacking in security measures. He added that it was mind-boggling that Canada’s only National Level 4 laboratory failed to properly vet scientists.

During 2020, and even now in 2021, the world has suffered and continues to suffer from the devastating effects of the COVID-19 virus. Even after a year, the world has not been able to determine with certainty the origins of this mysterious virus which first appeared in Wuhan, China. Regardless of its origin, an irrefutable fact remains true that China’s negligence and willingness to hide the spread of the COVID-19 virus allowed the virus to spread much faster and had the effect of catching dozens off guard. of country.

Over time, as Beijing’s relations with Washington and the West have deteriorated, it has become clear that the laboratory leak theory that was initially rejected is not just a conspiracy theory but a real possibility. . The theory says the virus originated from the Wuhan Institute of Virology, which is near where the first cases of COVID-19 appeared. Whether his flight was involuntary or a deliberate ploy by Beijing is a whole different matter.

The incidents surrounding COVID-19 as well as recent aggressive actions by China in the Indo-Pacific and on the border with India have opened the eyes of the international community to the extent of the threat that China really poses. . In order to deflect the blame, Beijing even launched a massive disinformation / disinformation campaign on the COVID-19 virus, including outrageous theories such as how the virus left a biological lab in the United States for being smuggled into China via Europe via frozen food. Unfortunately, this is not the first time that China has tried to hide its involvement or the involvement of its staff in scandals surrounding COVID-19 and its vaccine.

Recent revelation that a high-ranking Chinese military officer was in close contact with a scientist at a Level 4 biological lab in Canada exposed security flaws in PHAC and another Beijing ploy . The Chinese government is undoubtedly trying to sweep this newly discovered connection under the rug, but those familiar with China or its ploys are aware that Beijing is not taking any action that does not benefit it.


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Non profit living

Lewisville nonprofit ‘Haitian Pilgrims’ strive to improve living conditions in Haiti – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth

Observing the immigration situation of more than 10,000 Haitian migrants at the Texas border is difficult for a local missionary group.

“They are doing their best with what they have,” said Haitian Pilgrims President Sue Ogle. “They are a wonderful, loving and hardworking people and I really love the people of Haiti.”

Ogle is president of the Lewisville Haitian Pilgrims Missionary Group. It was founded by some members of St. Philip the Apostle Parish in Lewisville in 1999.

Ogle has been traveling for work in Haiti for 20 years.


Haitian pilgrims

“In fact, I lived in Haiti and taught in a school that we built there in 2014, period 2015,” Ogle said.

Ogle saw the struggles in Haiti with his own eyes.

“The situation is extremely desperate,” Ogle said. “Over the years, the economy has declined at a rate of about 2% per year.”

Ogle added: “People are on their feet and the children get up very early in the morning to go to the wells to get water to take away so the family can have water to cook for a day and clean themselves for a while. a day.”



Haitian pilgrims

Ogle said even some organizations trying to help can cause problems.

“Unfortunately, some very large nonprofits send a significant amount of food up for sale, which undermines farmers who cannot sell at the price the larger organization can sell,” Ogle said.

Ogle and Haitian pilgrims strive to improve life in Haiti, especially in rural areas. They have built schools and teach agricultural programs among their other initiatives including health, clean water and leadership.



Haitian pilgrims

Ogle said the situation on the Texas border is just a glimpse of the desperate situation in Haiti and what is fueling their migration.

“Desperation gives them strength,” Ogle said. “They don’t have opportunities in Haiti and of course we are the land of opportunities.”

Haitian pilgrims will continue to share this opportunity to try to make things better in Haiti.

To learn more about the mission of Haitian pilgrims and ways to donate, click here.


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History organization

For Latinx Heritage Month, Celebrate Our “Achievements and Moments of Joy”

Vice-Chancellor for Equity and Inclusion Dania Matos sent the following message to the campus community on Friday:

Each year we celebrate National Latinx Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15. The past twelve months have been particularly difficult for many Latinx communities, but there have also been wonderful accomplishments and times of joy.

Dania Matos is the new Equity and Inclusion Manager at UC Berkeley. (Photo courtesy of Dania Matos)

For those I haven’t met yet, I’m Dania Matos, the new Vice-Chancellor for Equity and Inclusion. I recently came from UC Merced where I was the first Associate Chancellor and Director of Diversity. I have a background in law, racial justice and intersectionality and look forward to working with you to increase inclusion, belonging and justice on our campus.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionate effect on Latinx communities across the country, resulting in greater impacts on our health, finances, and well-being. In fact, a recent survey by UC Berkeley’s Institute of Governmental Studies, led by co-directors G. Cristina Mora and Eric Schickler, found that people in Latin American and Native American communities were less confident about their finances and of their health problems than other groups. And our UC alumnus and faculty member Dr David Hayes-Bautista recently released a report with UCLA’s Center for the Study of Latin American Health and Culture that explores the number of Disproportionate deaths for communities of color, especially for the elderly in Pacific Island communities and Latinx.

The strength of Latinx communities is demonstrated from the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, to student activism on campus. UC Berkeley students have a long history of organizing space on campus: from the creation of the César E. Chávez Student Center to the creation of the Multicultural Community Center in the Martin Luther King Jr. building. continues and students have worked hard to establish a new Latinx Student Resource Center (LSRC) which will open in early 2022. The “phase 1” space of the LSRC will be located at Hearst Gym and will be managed by the office Development Center for Chicanx / Latinx Students. , directed by director Lupe Gallegos-Diaz. Students will co-create programs and create a familia y comunidad that increases their sense of belonging to UC Berkeley.

UC Berkeley is committed to becoming an Institution Serving Hispanics (HSI) by 2027. The HSI Initiative is UC Berkeley’s plan to increase the number of Latinx students and create sentiment membership where Chicanx / Latinx students can flourish academically, personally and professionally. Campus speakers, led by Co-Chairs Dr Oscar Dubón and Dr Kris Gutierrez, completed the HSI Working Group Preliminary Report in Spring 2021. The university is delighted to announce that our new Fall 2021 class is again exceptionally diverse and brings us closer to our HSI goals. The university increased the number of admitted students from underrepresented communities in higher education, including Chicanx / Latinx students, by almost 7% from fall 2020. We welcomed our newcomers. students with the shared book for new freshmen and transfer students, The Undocumented Americans, by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio. The author gave a talk at Golden Bear Orientation last month and more book programming is planned for this fall.

Increasing the number of Latinx professors at Berkeley is also an institutional priority and will be a key component in becoming an HSI. The university has adopted the strategy of “recruiting faculty clusters” as a means of creating intellectual communities and diversifying the faculty. The Latinx Communities and Democracy cluster will begin the recruitment process this academic year 2021-22.

Research by and on Latinx communities continues to thrive in Cal. The Latinx Research Center continued to host important programs throughout the pandemic year, including “Decolonizing Epistemologies: A Conversation with Latinx Philosophers” and a new podcast by poet Alán Pelaez Lopez titled “What’s In a Name? Where they explore the term “Latinx”. The Latinxs and Environment Initiative provides students with research opportunities focused on issues of climate change and environmental justice. Representatives recently attended the Second Annual Agriculture and Technology Conference in Stockton, Calif., Hosted by the Environmental Justice Coalition for Water, led by Cal’s former student Esperanza Vielma.

We are delighted to announce that we have ten UC Berkeley Award winners who have received the Northern California Chicana Latina Foundation Fellowship. The organization’s mission is to empower Chicanas and Latinas through personal, educational and professional advancement.

To help commemorate the important role that the students, faculty, and staff of Chicanx and Latinx have played on this campus, the Department of Ethnic Studies, the Chicanx Latinx Student Development Center, and the premier learning program cycle have teamed up to launch the Legacy Timeline project. This project researches and documents the role and history of the Chicanx and Latinx community on the UC Berkeley campus. For more information, please contact Lillian Castillo Speed ​​or Lupe Gallegos-Diaz.

Please join me in welcoming the California Alumni Association (CAA) to its new president, Alfonso Salazar. Alfonso is a UC Berkeley ’90 alumnus who was a student activist in organizations such as MEChA and United Students of Color. He is committed to working with student leaders and continuing to diversify the leadership of CAA. To continue building a pipeline of Latinx leaders across the system, the Chicanx Latinx Advisory Board will host the Chicanx Latinx Leadership Summit on Monday, September 20. Chancellor Juan Sánchez Muñoz of UC Merced will introduce President Drake, who will speak with Moderator Stephanie Reyes-Tuccio, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Educational Partnerships at UC Irvine.

UC Chicanx Latinx Alumni Association, the new collective organization for UC’s ten campuses, was recently recognized by UC President Michael V. Drake, MD, as the “first” group of alumni. system-wide in over 150 years of UC history! The group’s mission is to advocate and represent the collective interests of Latinx alumni on UC’s ten campuses to the Office of the President of the University of California. And our current UCB Chicanx Latinx Alumni Association (UCB CLAA) is gearing up for its Homecoming event on October 2, which will feature a speaker, scholarship ceremony, and alumni class reunions.

Alumni are also kicking off the Legacy 2022 event which will feature three days of alumni celebrations, networking and campus engagement.

We invite you to learn more about Latinx Heritage Month here at UC Berkeley and to read, listen, learn, participate and engage with the many communities and activities highlighted this month.


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Canadian army

Milley: Calls to China were “perfectly” within the scope of work

Grief and guilt are all Zakia Zarifi has felt since returning home to Ontario from Afghanistan.

“I’m happy to see my family here, but it’s torture for me because I couldn’t bring my parents with me,” the Brampton realtor said over the phone.

“It was the toughest farewell ever, but deep down I hope I can get them here.”

The single mom says she was beaten, shot and barely dodged a bomb outside Kabul airport during the chaotic journey. All she thinks about now is helping the people left behind.

“(A) genocide… is happening in Afghanistan right now and no one is talking about it. That’s why I’m here, but my mind is still here.

Zarifi, 50, arrived this week with tears and warm hugs from her three grown children. They worked frantically to bring their mother home after the Taliban took control of Afghanistan in August. She had been there to try to get her aging parents out of harm’s way.

Before going out herself, Zarifi criticized Canada’s evacuation of its citizens from the region.

She told The Canadian Press while stranded in Afghanistan that she made two attempts to escape before the August 31 deadline for the US-led military mission, but had beaten by members of the Taliban and pushed back from the airport gates.

She was angry with the Canadian authorities who told her and others to meet in dangerous places, while other countries helped their citizens to get on military planes using airplanes. safer routes. Ten days after the Canadian Forces left the region, and as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was criticized for mismanaging the evacuation, Zarifi received another call from Global Affairs Canada, she said. This time the plan was better. “They told me to be at (Kabul) the Serena hotel and then from there the Qatari government was in charge of taking us to the airport. We had a flight with the Qatar airline (to Qatar). ” On Tuesday, she was on a plane from Doha in Canada.

“The first flight that left Afghanistan (had) all different citizens around the world. On the second flight … there were, I believe, 10 Canadians.

She said others on the return flight were telling horrific stories of the Taliban knocking on their families’ doors and taking their men away.

“They took their birth certificates and took them there. They are all gone, ”she said.

“Someone even knocked on my parents’ door. The guy who takes care of them (said), ‘No one lives here’, and they left.

Zarifi said his parents are a target as they are from Panjshir province in the northeast, at the heart of the military resistance in Afghanistan and where his father fought the Taliban regime.

While she waited for a flight, she and her family helped other Afghans, she said.

They donated items to their home, distributed 120 blankets and provided food to 500 families. Many of the Afghans they have helped are among the thousands of religious and ethnic minorities who fear the Taliban’s return to power will lead to oppression or death.

Zarifi recalled a similar trip she made in 1987 during the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan. She fled from Kabul to Pakistan. Two years later, she moved to Canada.

“The Afghans… the majority of them are refugees and they all found a way out before and during much worse times,” said Zarifi’s daughter, Marjan.

“When my mother first came to Canada, she had to walk two days, two nights to get to where she needed to go. They were shot directly at them. So she did it twice.

“She keeps a lot of strength and says, ‘It’s going to be fine,’ but every day we can’t think clearly… Everyone’s still living, but my spirit is constantly with my family and what’s going on.”

Despite her frustration with the Canadian government, Zarifi said she was grateful Trudeau had not forgotten her and other citizens.

“I just hope the liberal (government) will do their best to bring people in because their lives are in danger,” Zarifi said.

“When I moved here, I was working 20 hours a day. I worked as an accountant, I did bookkeeping, night shifts at Walmart. I worked hard. I made my living for myself.

She said she prayed that other Afghans would have the same chance to have a new life. For her part, she plans to continue helping people in Afghanistan in any way she can.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on September 17, 2021.

___

This story was produced with the financial assistance of Facebook and the Canadian Press News Fellowship.

Fakiha Baig, The Canadian Press


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International headquarters

Boeing sells land for $ 200 million in plan to cut holdings

Boeing has closed the sale of 310 acres of undeveloped land next to its Frederickson manufacturing plant in Pierce County for $ 200 million, according to property tax returns.

The deal finalized this week is the latest in a large-scale local real estate sale by Boeing, which, due to the downturn in activity, has set itself a target of reducing the total by 30% from the real estate of the company, reported the Seattle Times.

Boeing spokeswoman Jessica Kowal said the sale of the Frederickson land, which the company has owned for about 30 years, will not have a direct impact on the manufacturing site’s operations or its employees.

Approximately 850 workers at the site machine metal linings and wing spars for all Boeing aircraft and also manufacture the carbon composite vertical tail of the 777 and vertical tail components of the 787 Dreamliner.

The buyer is the commercial real estate company Panattoni Development Company, which owns large industrial properties in the southern area of ​​Puget Sound.

Earlier this summer, Boeing sold a warehouse in Everett for $ 35 million and seven office buildings in the Eastgate area of ​​Bellevue for $ 139 million. The company leased the latter buildings for two years.

Among Boeing’s local properties still in the market is its commercial aircraft headquarters at Longacres in Renton.


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Non profit living

How parents can find their strength and resilience

Parents facing issues such as violence, drug addiction, and food or financial insecurity often feel blamed, humiliated and judged by society. Even well-intentioned initiatives designed to help them focus only on the issues and challenges they face, as if that was their entire story.

But a new group of community parenting programs recognize the multitude of strengths and wisdom inherent in these parents. These programs help parents recognize what they are doing well, trust their own expertise, honor their resilience, and bear witness to the importance of their love for their children.

Three organizations supported by GGSC’s Raising Caring, Courageous Kids initiative have worked to help parents recognize their individual parenting strengths, promote positive bonds with their children, and improve their ability to raise caring and resilient children. Participation in these programs often causes parents, as well as children, to begin to strengthen their sense of purpose in the world and to articulate their goals and dreams for the future.

Resilient parenting at the Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota

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Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota (LSS) works with families to create stability and success in the home. LSS helps parents involved, or at risk of involvement, in the child protection system.

After listening to the concerns and needs of parents, they created the online program “Resilient Parenting” —a blended learning experience with a combination of online units, face-to-face meetings and activities. interactive learning. The program promotes character strengths such as purpose, gratitude, forgiveness, and love. For example, mindfulness activities can involve breathing, yoga, or visualization breaks that parents can try.

Woven into the program were stories voiced by real parents going through similar experiences. Hearing from other parents offered hope and helped participants trust their own parenting decisions. It also helped create what Carol Dweck, professor of psychology at Stanford University, calls a “growth mindset,” in which parents in the program came to believe their basic abilities might be. further developed through hard work and dedication.

Heather Kamia, director of metro youth and family services at LSS, says they created a parenting program that has met parents in their community “where they are.” “We had to start from the assumption that all parents were the experts on their child. That they had ideas and experiences to share, ”she said. “To develop a productive partnership with parents, we also had to recognize [that] systems they may have experienced before have left many without confidence in this ability. “

According to Andrea Hussong, professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, this kind of strength-based partnership was essential. “It is important to work in partnership with parents around the knowledge that already exists and to help them remove the obstacles that prevent them from acting on this knowledge,” she explained.

Making the program virtual allowed parents to learn at their own pace and in a safe space. “Parents talked about feeling respected. They felt that the content could be really valuable to any parent, not just families involved in the system, ”Kamia said. LSS’s culturally relevant programming, which recognizes how systemic racism and lack of access to needs such as child care, wages and essential technology can affect a parent’s confidence in their child’s education , helped parents trust their own wisdom and positioned them to be able to guide their children to do the same.

Inspiring Grace and Resilience at UCAN

Chicago’s nonprofit UCAN strives to build strong youth and families through education and empowerment. They developed the “Inspiring Grace” program for young parents between the ages of 18 and 20 living in Chicago neighborhoods with high levels of violence, family and community trauma, and a lack of resources, including education and training. employment.

Once a week for six weeks, parents participated in dinner, discussions and activities focused on building resilience and improving parenting skills. Activities included planting seeds to represent forgiveness, marking the stones with aspects of their life they wanted to keep or let go, mindfulness through guided pictures, practicing benevolence by speaking into a mirror, and (most popular activity) creating vision boards. Parents wrote down their thoughts on their life purpose and who they wanted to become and wrote those thoughts on decorative vision boards that they presented to the group.

One vision was “to buy one of the abandoned buildings in the neighborhood for my son so that he always had a place to live”, another “to teach my children what love is”.

The creation of the vision boards made it possible for parents to see themselves in a better light and envision their possible inheritances, and even led to increased happiness. “These exercises led to aha times, in which parents could say, ‘Yes, I do. Yes, I have a sense of purpose. Yes, I help people. Yes, I show love! Said Karrie Mills, co-host of the program.

Velma McBride Murry, Professor of Human and Organizational Development at Vanderbilt University and Scientific Advisor at UCAN, says for these parents, “The consequences of negative childhood experiences are long-standing and the effects can be passed on from generation to generation, with which parents interact and raise their own children. She explained that the program was designed to disrupt the ripple effects of trauma on families through love, forgiveness and purpose.

Mills says it was essential to ensure that any trauma experienced by these parents did not obscure their ability to recognize their parental potential. They were encouraged to recognize the things they did regularly that helped others and showed their ability to love.

Murry says living in a home where parents are supportive and loving creates a sense of self-worth, self-acceptance and self-esteem in children. Having this internal trust can serve as a protective factor for children, reducing their dependence on their peers as a source of validation. She adds that these protection processes are essential when young people live in communities with an increased likelihood of exposure to violence.

Citywise: mentoring and more

Citywise specializes in individual, school and community mentoring programs for 8-12 year olds living in low income urban areas of the UK. Their goal is to develop character strengths in young people, including resilience, self-control, good judgment and fairness.

To be more successful with children, program officials also recognized the importance of involving parents. To help determine what services to offer parents, “they started out by listening, hearing what people are looking for, what they are trying to accomplish with their own parenthood,” according to Hussong.

The program has evolved over time to include parents who attend and participate in mentoring sessions, receive regular communications about the child’s mentoring experiences, and get tips and suggestions for activities that families could do. together.

Hana Bútorová, Director of Citywise Glasgow, says: “Most of the time the parents of the children we worked with were only contacted if something was wrong or something was going on that was difficult. So, we just started contacting them frequently with the right stuff, with quotes from mentors telling us how awesome the kid is today… inviting parents to celebrate their kid’s progress.

Perhaps more importantly, they created informal ways for families to interact, such as “Family Fun Days” and family game and craft clubs. These interactions allowed parents and guardians to reflect on key areas of the program such as self-control and identifying emotions, things they may not have learned when they were younger. “I think that was the biggest advantage of the program: just creating a space for them to start talking more explicitly [those] things, ”Bútorová adds.

Participation in family activities has allowed the character growth of children (and sometimes adults!) To occur naturally. For example, board games allowed parents and children to discuss concepts such as taking turns, the need for patience and honesty. Citywise research found that children who participated in family activities achieved the highest level of character building.

It was especially meaningful for some parents to hear from counselors that their children wanted to participate because they had loving and engaged parents (not just because of games or snacks). When a parent had “realized his value as a parent to his child … it made him feel like his love was doing something important here,” Bútorová said. For parents living difficult lives, this recognition offered a renewed sense of purpose.

Courses for parents

For all parents, these community programs offer many lessons. An important concept they encourage is to reject the idea of ​​having to be “the perfect parent” before trying to raise children in any meaningful way. What parent has not felt this pressure? But the perfect parent does not exist! Children learn resilience when they have the opportunity to watch their parents make mistakes and bounce back.

Realizing that there are no perfect parents means that we are all “work in progress”. As these organizations demonstrate, being an active “work in progress” benefits children. Modeling self-reflection, discovering and leveraging inner parenting strengths, and working alongside children to develop character strengths together can be a rewarding and fulfilling family experience.

Another important lesson is not to be afraid to ask for and accept help from those around you. It is an act of courage, not weakness. When parents have a supportive community and opportunities to discover their strengths, they can better develop a nurturing environment for their children.

Hussong says experts are learning there is no big secret to parenthood; parents may need a variety of tools and habits to establish an environment that is most supportive of their children’s unique needs. “It’s not just the modeling or the communication you use or just the types of activities and things you do with your child, or how you respond to them when they are having difficulty or when they are successful. to demonstrate a positive character and virtues, ”she said. “It’s all of those things.”


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Canadian army

Chinese military epidemiologist worked with licensed scientist at Canada’s best disease lab: report

Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory | Twitter | @AnonHeel

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New Delhi: Chinese military senior epidemiologist Major-General Chen Wei, who co-developed a single-injection Covid vaccine, had collaborated on Ebola research with a scientist who was later fired from a high-security lab in Canada, a new report found.

According to the Canadian daily The Globe and Mail, Major-General Chen had worked with Dr. Xiangguo Qiu, a former scientist at Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) in Winnipeg, on two scientific papers on Ebola, published in 2016 and 2020. NML is the only laboratory in level 4 in Canada, which researches the world’s deadliest diseases.

The report, released Thursday, noted that the identity of the Chinese major-general was withheld and that instead of revealing her ties to the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), she was identified as simply “Wei Chen,” a doctoral epidemiologist who had previously worked at the Beijing Biotechnology Institute.

However, The Globe and Mail confirmed that Wei Chen and Major General Chen are the same person.

The Chinese military scientist was also recently congratulated by President Xi Jinping for her contribution to the development of CanSino’s single-injection Covid vaccine.

Meanwhile, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada, the country’s leading federal health organization, the NML did not have institutional arrangements with the LPA.

“Although the NML does not have institutional agreements with the Chinese military, Canadian scientists have collaborated with Chinese scientists to contribute to the global public health fight against deadly diseases, such as Ebola. These collaborations have produced candidate vaccines and treatments for diseases, as peer-reviewed journals show, ”said PHAC spokesperson Anne Génier. The Globe and Mail.

However, PHAC declined to release information as to whether Major-General Chen had ever visited the Winnipeg lab, citing privacy laws.

Several opposition leaders also slammed the government of Justin Trudeau for allegedly “withholding” information about the Chinese scientist and her links to the NML.


Read also : World Bank Suspends Doing Business Report After Investigation Uncovers Changed Data In Favor Of China


Dr Qiu’s dismissal

Major-General Chen’s connection to Dr Qiu was first brought to light by journalist Elaine Dewar, in her new book On the origin of the deadliest pandemic in 100 years: an investigation.

Dr Qiu and her husband, Keding Chang, were fired from their positions at NML in January. However, the reasons for their dismissal have not been officially disclosed.

Their security clearances, including some of Dr. Qiu’s students in the lab, were revoked in July 2019 – four months after the NML shipped the Ebola and Henipah viruses to the Wuhan Institute of Virology in China.

The same month, investigation was also launched by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to find out whether the two laid-off scientists had passed the intellectual property over to China, including the Wuhan Institute of Virology, according to The Globe and Mail.

This series of events has evolved into Canada’s “Winnipeg-lab conspiracy theory”, which points to an alleged link between the Covid-19 pandemic and the 2019 shipment of samples to China.

However, this theory was rejected by Dewar. “This particular conspiracy theory is nonsense, and there is absolutely no evidence to support it,” she said. Recount CBS News.

But the author commented on the cooperation between the two countries. “The cooperation raises questions about what kind of collaborations the sensitive government lab should undertake.”

“When you involve military scientists, it becomes a bigger question because it can be militarized,” she added.

Meanwhile, Gary Kobinger, an infectious disease specialist who worked with Dr Qiu until 2016 and shared an award with her, called Qiu a “very ethical person.”


Read also : Senior US general called on China over fears Trump would order military strike, new book says


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Why the news media is in crisis and how to fix it

India is all the more in need of free, fair, uninhibited and questioning journalism as it is facing multiple crises.

But the news media are in a crisis of their own. There have been brutal layoffs and pay cuts. The best of journalism is shrinking, giving in to crass spectacle in prime time.

ThePrint employs the best young reporters, columnists and editors. Supporting journalism of this quality requires smart, thoughtful people like you to pay the price. Whether you live in India or abroad, you can do it here.

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Non profit living

Afghans are likely to find Georgia a more welcoming place than former refugees

Heval Mohamed Kelli, 11, believed his family were going on vacation after crossing the Syrian border into Turkey in 1996, when his father paid smugglers to take them to safety in Germany.

He was unaware at the time of the political persecutions his father, a lawyer, was facing in Syria or how life was going to change drastically as they mostly lived in resettlement camps for the next few years in a unknown country.

Kelli eventually settled in Clarkston in 2001, where he and his family still lived in poverty, but the opportunities for better education and professional mobility sparked optimism they did not have in the camps. German refugees. Two decades later, Kelli watches with keen interest as hundreds of thousands of Afghans flee their country after the Taliban declared control when the United States ended its role in the longstanding conflict.

Kelli was 17 when he arrived in America and did not speak English. He now works at Northside Hospital as a cardiologist. It’s a piece of the American dream that started small as a teenage refugee working as a diver to support his family. Now he is inspired to help refugees and others living in underserved communities in the United States.

Heval Kelli, center, a Syrian refugee whose family moved to Clarkston in 2001 watches with keen interest Afghan refugees waiting to find new places to live after US troops withdraw from their home countries. Kelli is a cardiologist at Northside Hospital, Photo credit Emory University

“These Afghan refugees come from a very unfortunate situation, it is so sad to see what is happening,” he said. “They are just happy to be in a safe place for them. But I tell them, I think this is the only country in the world where you could come here. I have lived in the Middle East and I don’t think I would have become who I am if I hadn’t been here.

Approximately 123,000 people have flown from Afghanistan and 50,000 are currently undergoing security screening at military bases in preparation for reintegration into American communities.

Tens of thousands of Afghans who worked directly with the US government started leaving the country a few months ago and many arrived after a August evacuation. The majority of these refugees have special visa status which will allow them to clear basic security hurdles more quickly.

The Associated Press reported this week that officials in the Biden administration have started briefing governors and mayors in 46 states of the number of people from the first wave of 37,000 evacuees to be expected in the coming weeks, including more 1,000 refugees expected to arrive in Georgia.

A coalition of Atlanta nonprofits, including New American Pathways, will likely begin helping individuals and their families find housing, employment and other supports soon, as many relocate. in apartments and rental homes in Georgia, primarily in the Metro Atlanta area.

Larger numbers of refugees will go through an even more complicated process as they have yet to apply for permanent status as they seek to pass a more rigorous background check.

Finding enough affordable housing for those allowed to relocate to the United States will be a major challenge that will also benefit from the kindness of strangers. While resettlement groups typically pay a few months of rent, Airbnb provides temporary housing across the country to 20,000 Afghan refugees.

The Biden administration has asked Congress for $ 6.4 billion for the resettlement of Afghan refugees, with targets of 65,000 by the end of September and another 95,000 by September 2022, according to the AP.

Over 90% of people served by American Pathways and other local groups pay their own expenses within six months. There is a strong system of support from the religious community and beyond in the greater metropolitan area and among ethnic groups that depend on each other, said Emily Laney, director of development for New American Pathways.

“Even before the 1980 Refugee Act, groups were resettling refugees in Georgia,” Laney said. “It’s really so intense. There have been a lot of really traumatic events in the last few weeks, and we have the resources to support them.

“The people who have gone through some of the worst things humanity has to offer, these refugees are strong, resilient and courageous,” Laney said.

The amount of resources spent on refugee resettlement has been slashed under the administration of former President Donald Trump through federal policy changes reducing refugees admitted each year to less than 23,000 in 2018 compared to plans last year. year of former President Barack Obama to admit 110,000.

During Trump’s tenure, Muslim-majority countries in the Middle East were among the countries targeted by tighter restrictions hampering the path to a green card.

According to the New American Economy, a nonprofit refugee research organization, Afghans made up less than 2% of the total number of refugees who immigrated to the United States between 2002 and 2018.

The Biden administration has raised its goal of admitting refugees to 125,000 people this year. It’s an unrealistic benchmark due to dwindling resources, but it’s a much better direction than the previous four years, according to Jeremy Robbins, executive director of America’s New Economy.

“It’s our biggest competitive advantage that people want to come here and work hard, but it masks the fact that it’s really hard to do if you don’t speak the language, if you don’t have the network, or if you can find a job by yourself. ” he said.

“Having a big influx of people from Afghanistan right now is something you can expect to have a backlash,” Robbins said. “But one thing that’s different now is that I think the circumstances in which this happened, seeing people who risked their lives to help us win this war all of a sudden hanging on the air libre has really brought about a big change that seems to be very bipartisan. “

Georgia Republican Governor Brian Kemp signaled his willingness to take in controlled Afghan refugees shortly after the Taliban took control of their country last month. This contrasts with the stance taken in 2015 by his compatriot Republican and former governor Nathan Deal against the resettlement of Syrian refugees fleeing a bloody conflict in their country of origin.

Witnessing current events was an overwhelming experience for Muska Haseeb, an Afghan refugee turned American citizen, as the Taliban regained control after two decades of sacrificing American troops and treasures and the dashed hopes of Afghans who sought more help. opportunities in their country.

Haseeb’s family moved to Phoenix in 2012 after spending six years in Pakistan as a refugee to escape the physical abuse her mother suffered in Afghanistan for working as an administrative assistant.


(left to right) Muska Haseeb, sister-in-law Madina Haider, brother Syed Haider, niece Marwaha, nephew Sultan and mother Haseeba Aria. Photo by Kulsoom Rizvi & Andrew Oberstadt / International Rescue Committee

Today Haseb’s mother is a social worker and her 27-year-old daughter runs her own fashion business and will soon be starting school at the University of Texas in a pre-medical program.

“I really wish they could do something about this in the future because nobody wants to stay under Taliban rule,” Haseeb said. “I’m definitely going to want to be a motivation for any new refugee, whether from Afghanistan or any other country. I want them to see that (the United States) is the land of opportunity and that we can certainly pursue our dreams and goals and that we can become something here.

Clarkston from Georgia to welcome remaining Afghan refugees

Clarkston, a town in DeKalb County where more than half of its 13,000 residents were born overseas, is likely to receive an influx of Afghan refugees via New American Pathways and other resettlement agencies in the coming months.

Clarkston became a home town for many refugees, earning it the nickname of Southern Ellis Island. It offers affordable rental housing and is small enough that newcomers can walk to schools or its small downtown area, while still providing enough public transportation to get around Atlanta’s two largest counties. .

Immigrants frequently take on low-paying minimum-wage jobs and other lower-paying positions as they adjust to life in a new country.

For some refugees who settle in Clarkston, this means daily trips to Gainesville to work in the chicken processing plants.

Yet Clarkston’s leadership was not so welcoming to foreign nationals and refugees settling in the city as recently as the past decade.

In 2013, the former mayor of Clarkston helped ban the resettlement of new refugees. A few years later, when Ted Terry was elected mayor, the moratorium was lifted. He has set in motion an attitude of acceptance within government that continues to push the community toward inclusion as more refugees become citizens, vote and run for office.

“I think we finally hit a kind of critical mass of voters who were like, in fact, we think refugees are a positive thing. And we don’t want to go back in the history of Clarkston. We want to look to the future and move forward, ”said Terry, who is now DeKalb County Commissioner.

Refugees are known to contribute to the economy of their new country almost upon arrival. Their crime rate in their community is generally low. And they own businesses or attend college at a higher rate than the average American.

Although Kelli lived in a poorer area of ​​Clarkston while he was finishing his studies, the town offered an enclave that could have been much worse for a Muslim family who had recently arrived in America shortly after 9/11.

“We always say we got scared more than anything,” Kelli said. “I think Clarkston was such a loving community that really offered protection from the harassment we might have faced.

With the withdrawal of American forces from Afghanistan now complete, Catholic Charities Atlanta will continue to help evacuated families find new homes, as it has done for the past 20 years.

“Rebuilding your life is not easy,” said Vanessa Russell, CEO of Catholic Charities Atlanta. “These brave families escaped with just what they could take. They are courageous, resilient and optimistic about their future. We will welcome these families with a grateful heart and help them integrate and thrive in their new home here in Atlanta. “


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SLM Solutions will install two SLM® 500 at Morf3D headquarters

Above: SLM Solutions installs two SLM® 500 and the NXG XII 600 at Morf3D’s Applied Digital Manufacturing Center / Image source: SLM Solutions

GDT solutions, pioneer of additive manufacturing, announcement this Morf3D, a company specializing in additive engineering, is committed to 2 SLM® 500 and the NXG XII 600 as a world leader to facilitate series production of AMs in the aerospace industry. The machines will be delivered to Morf3D’s new state-of-the-art headquarters, the Applied Digital Manufacturing Center in Long Beach, California, in 2022. This partnership strengthens the international impact of additive manufacturing solutions.

The mission of Morf3D’s 90,000 square foot ADMC facility is to leverage partner networks to transform supply chain standards and develop the industry’s first certified production system to accelerate the industrialization of digital manufacturing. The addition of the 2 SLM® 500 and the NXG XII 600 will support Morf3D’s goal of accelerating a global production setup while improving production lead times, ordering flexibility, profitability and quality. This union of forces will enable quality and repeatability while paving the way for mass production.

“Our partnership with SLM Solutions is radically changing the landscape of mass production, enabling our customers to achieve unmatched levels of quality and performance,” comments Ivan Madera, CEO of Morf3D. “The NXG XII 600 platform is an engineering marvel that addresses many aspects of a production ready system, and the ADMC will enable new industry partnerships, dramatically taking AM to new heights. Our goal is to accelerate the qualification process by collaborating on the development of new applications and the certification of parts in the aerospace, space and defense markets.

– Ivan Madera, CEO of Morf3D

In addition to the supply of machines, SLM Solutions will also offer on-site support in the form of education, training and advice. All ADMC’s research and development partners
will work together to drive new innovations and deploy new aerospace engineering methods to increase productivity and automation. All partners will also have access to collective training, meeting and gathering spaces for customer events and business development efforts.

The NXG XII 600 is equipped with 12 1KW lasers, making it the fastest machine on the market. It is designed for use in mass production for high volume applications as well as for printing large parts. It is capable of printing at speeds 20 times faster than that of a single laser system and 5 times faster than a 4 laser machine. Allowing AM acceleration from all angles, the NXG XII 600 is the “da vinci” of modern times. Craft masterpieces on a mass production scale.

“The addition of the NXG Xll 600 to Morf3D’s SLM Solutions machines at the Applied Digital Manufacturing Center strengthens the collective digital manufacturing ecosystem, helping to improve production speed, quality and automation. He adds, “We are united in our customer-centric approach, which reflects the training and education we provide to all of our partners. “

– Sam O’Leary, CEO of SLM Solutions

The Applied Digital Manufacturing Center is located at 3550 Carson Street, Long Beach,
California. The space will house Morf3D’s business operations and is designed with a vision of innovation and growth for the AM industry.


About the Manufactur3D magazine: Manufactur3D is an online magazine about 3D printing. Visit our Global News page for more updates on Global 3D Printing News. To stay up to date on the latest happenings in the world of 3D printing, like us on Facebook or follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter.



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Evening update: pandemic dominates federal campaign after Jason Kenney’s overthrow in Alberta

Have a good evening, let’s start with today’s best stories:

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau calls the COVID-19 situation in Alberta “heartbreaking” and says Ottawa will send ventilators to the province. Meanwhile, Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole wouldn’t say if he still supports Prime Minister Jason Kenney’s response to the pandemic.

The federal campaign has been disrupted by Kenney’s decision this week to declare a state of public health emergency and introduce a vaccine passport system in the province. Trudeau on Thursday criticized O’Toole’s previous support for the premier of Alberta. In turn, Mr. O’Toole sued Mr. Trudeau for calling an election amid a pandemic, and said the $ 600 million spent on the campaign could have been sent to the provinces to fight the Delta variant. highly contagious instead. .

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“The fans are on. Anything more we can do, be it sending more health professionals like we did to Ontario a few months ago when they were overwhelmed. We’re going to make sure Albertans get the support of everyone in this country in the way they need to get through this time. “

Alberta Health Services said on Wednesday the agency will ask other provinces if they can take care of patients in Alberta’s intensive care units, as well as if they can send frontline staff.

Related:

  • Federal campaigns must do everything to get supporters to the polls
  • Saskatchewan to Require Proof of COVID-19 Vaccination to Try to Increase Adoption

This is the daily evening update bulletin. If you’re reading this on the web, or if it was sent to you as a transfer, you can sign up for Evening Update and over 20 other Globe newsletters. here. If you like what you see, share it with your friends.

Chinese PLA general collaborates with licensed scientist at Canada’s top infectious disease lab

A high-ranking People’s Liberation Army officer collaborated on Ebola research with one of the scientists who was later fired from the Canadian High Security Infectious Disease Laboratory in Winnipeg.

Research by Major-General Chen Wei and former Canadian government laboratory scientist Xiangguo Qiu indicates that cooperation between the Chinese military and scientists at the National Microbiology Laboratory has gone much further than previously thought. previously. major-general. Chen Wei was recently praised by President Xi Jinping for developing a Chinese vaccine against COVID-19,

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major-general. Chen Wei and Dr Qiu, who until recently headed the vaccine and antiviral therapy development section at the Winnipeg lab, collaborated on two scientific papers on Ebola, in 2016 and 2020. These papers did not identify the major-general. Chen as a high-ranking officer in the military wing of the ruling Chinese Communist Party. Instead, she is identified as Wei Chen, who holds a PhD and works at the Beijing Biotechnology Institute.

Common? SpikeVax? Health Canada Authorizes Rebranding for Approved COVID-19 Vaccines

Health Canada has approved new names for the Pfizer, Moderna and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine will now carry the brand name Comirnaty, which the company says represents a combination of the terms COVID-19, mRNA, community and immunity. The Moderna vaccine will go through SpikeVax and the AstraZeneca vaccine will be called Vaxzevria.

Manufacturers said the changes followed full approval of the vaccines by Health Canada on Thursday. During the interim order, which expired Thursday, the vaccines did not carry their brand names.

Read more:

  • NHL says it expects 98% of players to be fully vaccinated before the start of the season
  • France suspends around 3,000 health workers for failing to comply with COVID-19 vaccine mandate

ALSO ON OUR RADAR

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Ontario is requiring universities and colleges to update their policies on sexual assault: The province says policies need to better support students who file complaints. The guidelines were released amid calls from University of Western Ontario students to tackle the threat of sexual violence on campus after allegations that young women were drugged and sexually assaulted in residence last week.

The world risks missing its climate targets despite the pandemic pause in emissions, according to the UN: The economic slowdown linked to the virus caused only a temporary drop in CO2 emissions last year and that was not enough to reverse the rising levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, said the ‘World Meteorological Organization, adding that there is a growing likelihood that the world will miss its Paris The deal aims to reduce global warming to 1.5C above pre-industrial levels.

Suncor is partnering with eight Indigenous communities to purchase TC Energy’s remaining interest in Northern Courier Pipeline: Suncor, three First Nations communities and five Métis communities will own a 15% interest in this approximately $ 1.3 billion pipeline asset. The partnership is expected to generate roughly $ 16 million per year in gross revenue for its partners and provide reliable revenue, Suncor said in a statement.

The Maple Leafs and Sabers will play an outdoor game in Hamilton on March 13: Buffalo is listed as the home team against the Maple Leafs in the NHL Heritage Classic, which will be played at Tim Hortons Field. Buffalo becomes the first US-based team to compete in what will be the sixth Heritage Classic.

WAKE-UP

A drop in commodities depressed the major Canadian stock index a day before heightened volatility associated with the quarterly expiration of options known as quadruple witching.

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The S & P / TSX Composite Index closed 91.69 points lower at 20,602.10.

In New York, the Dow Jones Industrial Index lost 63.07 points to 34,751.32. The S&P 500 Index lost 6.95 points to 4,473.75, while the Nasdaq composite was up 20.39 points to 15,181.92.

The Canadian dollar was trading at 78.90 US cents against 79.05 US cents on Wednesday.

Got a topical tip you’d like us to review? Write to us at [email protected]. Need to share documents securely? Contact us via SecureDrop.

DISCUSSION POINTS

Climate change puts Canada’s seniors at risk

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“If you think the pandemic has been incredibly difficult, remember that the World Health Organization and The Lancet have both declared climate change to be the number one health threat of this century. And just as we’ve seen with COVID-19, climate change won’t affect all Canadians equally. “- Amit Arya and Samantha Green

Canada’s gun violence epidemic is unlike what you might think

“Instead of just hearing an audio clip of Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole’s opinion on Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau’s semi-automatic rifle ban, it would have been nice to hear it as well, as well as other leaders, discuss the details of Bill C-21. Gun owners and community leaders have voiced opposition to the legislation, which contains many provisions that are not rooted in evidence-based science. “- Jooyoung lee

Low-income Canadian households will suffer the most from surging inflation

“If we truly appreciate the essential services that our workers provide to our economy, we should also appreciate the increase in their wages. Higher wages will cushion the impact of inflation on low-income Canadians, encourage more of these workers to re-enter the workforce, and alleviate labor shortages in businesses. – Sohaib Shahid

LIVE BETTER

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Five shows to see across Canada (and five to watch online) as theater returns to normal

Globe Theater columnist J. Kelly Nestruck says it has never been clearer than this month that theater is a local art form. As such, Canadian cities are in very different return states.

In Montreal, for example, the performing arts have almost returned to a pre-pandemic level of activity. In Toronto, on the other hand, many large theater companies wait until winter or even spring to resume in-person performances indoors.

Nestruck is taking a look at some in-person shows to look forward to this fall, but also has a few alternatives online.

LONG READING OF THE DAY

Ocean Cleanup struggles to deliver on pledge to eliminate plastic from the Pacific

An offshore supply vessel used by the nonprofit Ocean Cleanup to remove plastic from the ocean is docked in a port in Victoria on September 8, 2021.

GLORIA DICKIE / Reuters

Ocean Cleanup, a non-profit organization launched in 2013 and funded by cash donations and support from companies such as Coca-Cola, had hopes of ridding the world’s oceans of 90% of floating plastic by here. 2040. The meager transport shows how difficult the task will be.

The group’s best-case scenario allows it to remove 20,000 tonnes per year from the North Pacific, a small fraction of the roughly 11 million tonnes of plastic dumped into the oceans each year. And that amount entering the ocean is expected to nearly triple to 29 million tonnes per year by 2040, according to the Pew Charitable Trusts.

During a month’s 120-hour trip, Ocean Cleanup collected 8.2 tonnes of plastic – less than the standard haul of a garbage truck.

“I think they came from a good place to want to help the ocean, but by far the best way to help the ocean is to prevent plastic from getting into the ocean in the first place,” said Miriam Goldstein, Director of the Ocean. politics at the Center for American Progress think tank.

Read the full story here.

The evening update is presented by Rob Gilroy. If you wish to receive this newsletter by e-mail every weekday evening, go to here register. If you have any comments, drop us a line. Remark.


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