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Syrian opposition calls for renewed focus on political solution

The leader of the Coalition of Syrian Revolutionary and Opposition Forces (SMDK), Salim al-Muslat, on Saturday criticized the international community for focusing only on humanitarian issues and not showing the necessary interest in the political solution process in Syria, which has not progressed.

Al-Muslat, who was elected as chairman of the SMDK at the ordinary general assembly held in Istanbul on July 12, spoke to the Anadolu Agency (AA) about the issues surrounding the work the Constitutional Committee is trying to accomplish, SMDK efforts for the political process, the latest situation in Idlib, the visit of Bashar Assad to Russia and the return of the Syrians to their country.

Regarding the work of the Syrian Constitutional Committee, which has met five times since October 30, 2019, in Geneva, Switzerland, as part of the political solution process, al-Muslat said the talks ended in failure. because of the uncompromising attitude. and the frivolity of the Assad regime.

Noting that they met with the United Nations envoy for Syria, Geir Pedersen, in Istanbul on September 14, al-Muslat said: “Pedersen has not yet announced a date for the new round of Constitutional Committee talks. and we’ll wait and see what it’ll do. “

Al-Muslat drew attention to the fact that the drafting of the constitution has not yet started, although it has been almost two years since the start of constitutional studies. “No progress can be made because of the regime’s delays. International delegations and Pedersen must act more seriously on this issue,” he said. “The international community has focused on humanitarian issues rather than on the political solution that the Syrian people need.

He stressed that the international community should stand by the side of the Syrian people, adding that the activities of the WDKD contribute to the process of political solution.

“In this process, we have had meetings with many international organizations. As SMDK, we have visited many circles related to the Syrian question. In fact, we met Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu ago a few days (September 9). In addition, we had meetings with officials from other countries, “he said.

Stressing that they attach great importance to a political solution to the civil war which has been going on since March 2011, al-Muslat said: “We will have a visit to New York in the coming days before the sessions of the General Assembly of United Nations. have meetings with UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres and officials from other countries. Our pain is great and there is no more room for compliments. We have to move forward in the political process, which is a strategic choice for us. We are seeing a recession in the countries that must act and take responsibility, we do not want to accomplish something and go back. “

Stating that they are still engaged in talks on Syrian territory, al-Muslat said: “Although our headquarters are abroad, we also have centers in Syria. We want to be partners in decision-making. . This means that we meet people intensively, listening to them and working to end their suffering. “

Turkey’s support

Al-Muslat said SMDK institutions go to great lengths to meet the needs of civilians in Syria – in areas under opposition control.

Emphasizing that the Syrian interim government is doing everything in its power to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, al-Muslat said: “Brother Turkey has never denied us its support. The burden has grown heavy. Turkey has always supported us in the field of education, health and safety. “

Referring to the Syrians in Turkey, al-Muslat said: “Since the beginning of the revolution, the words we have heard from our Turkish brothers and their honorable position… have never changed.

Stressing that everyone is in favor of voluntary return to the country, al-Muslat said: “All Syrians want to return to their country if a safe environment is maintained in Syria. No one comes back to die or be detained. We must obey the laws in the countries where we are. We must obey the rules of settlement and not act against them, and no one will harm those who obey them.

Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, Turkey has supported moderate opposition groups against the Assad regime and has opened its doors to those who had to flee the country for their lives.

Today, Turkey hosts nearly 3.8 million Syrian migrants, more than any other country in the world. The country is also leading humanitarian aid efforts for Syrians in Turkey and in opposition-controlled areas in northern Syria.

“Russia has no respect for the agreements”

Referring to the situation in Idlib, al-Muslat noted that the Assad regime and its supporter Russia continue to violate the ceasefire agreement reached in March 2020.

“There is an agreement between Turkey and Russia in Idlib. However, for months we have been witnessing violations by Russia and the regime by targeting civilians. Russia does not respect any agreement. It is a sensitive subject. There are violations every day. , but the components of the National Army are ready and on alert, ”he said.

In the report released by the Syrian Network for Human Rights (SNHR) on September 9, he reported that the regime and Russia have launched intense attacks against southern Idlib since June 5. It was reported that a total of 61 civilians, including 33 children and 12 women, were killed in the bombings by Russian forces and the regime from June 5 to September 1.

Regarding the visit of Bashar Assad, the head of the regime in Syria, in Moscow on September 14, al-Muslat said: “The problems that we went through are because of Russia, Iran and the regime. We don’t know the content. of the visit, but maybe there is something on the horizon because there are talks between the United States and Russia in Geneva. We can’t predict anything, we have to see some things.


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History organization

Carl Nassib made history, but also a great game

One of the most significant cultural milestones in recent North American sports history has occurred with as much pomp and circumstance as a shrug.

No openly gay player had ever played in a regular season game in the 102-year history of the NFL until September 13, when Las Vegas Raiders defensive end Carl Nassib entered the field. as he had done in every game of his six years. professional career.

Amid the pageantry of a Monday night football game, Nassib’s barrier-breaking moment overtook the Raiders’ opening ceremony of their new $ 2 billion jet-black stadium to fans. . The greatest recognition of Nassib’s achievement came from some of the participants wearing his # 94 jersey, not some other orchestrated gesture.

On Sunday, he will do it again as the Raiders play against the Steelers, with Nassib and the team making a concerted effort to take what he accomplished in stride and leave it to others to discern and dissect whether a significant cultural change has occurred in the league.

Experts on diversity and inclusion in sport have said that is how it should be.

“I think the fact that it wasn’t a distraction is a very positive sign,” said Richard Lapchick, director of the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport. “It’s a sign of how much this has been accepted and that there hasn’t been a lot of noise.”

On June 21, Nassib came out as gay in a video posted to his Instagram account, claiming he had internalized his sexuality as a secret for 15 years. The one-minute video, filmed outside his home in West Chester, Pa., Sparked a wave of congratulatory messages on social media, including from his NFL peers, celebrities and the President Biden. Nassib’s jersey became the NFL’s top seller in 24 hours, according to Fanatics, the league’s e-commerce partner.

Before Nassib, 15 players in league history identified as gay or bisexual, according to Outsports, a news site that covers LGBTQ athletes and sports issues. But unlike Nassib, they either announced their sexuality after their playing days were over or had never appeared in a regular season game.

Before the start of the season, Nassib announced that he would donate $ 100,000 to the Trevor Project, a crisis intervention organization for LGBTQ youth. He contacted his organization about two months before his Instagram post to discuss a plan, said Amit Paley, executive director of the Trevor Project. In their conversations, Paley said Nassib wanted to raise awareness of LGBTQ issues rather than just focusing on himself.

Forty percent of the more than 60,000 LGBTQ youth polled in a Trevor Project 2020 survey said they had considered suicide, and 68 percent of those polled in another survey conducted by the organization released this month said they did not participate in sports for their school or community club. for fear of discrimination.

As Nassib’s message spread, traffic to Project Trevor’s website increased by over 350%, and the organization received at least $ 225,000 in pledged donations by the end of this week. .

“I think Carl really didn’t want it to be a big deal, and I hope someday it’s not a big deal when someone goes out,” Paley said in an interview. “But it was clearly a big deal to go out and be the first in this way.”

Things calmed down when training camp started a month later. Nassib’s jersey is no longer at the top of the league’s sales, but it remains in the top five of the Raiders’ players, according to Fanatics.

He declined several interview requests and only spoke publicly once before the first game. Against the Baltimore Ravens, Nassib played 44% of defensive snaps in a rotating role, making three tackles. But in overtime, he collided with Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson for a sack and forced a fumble that the Raiders defense recovered. The offense scored a touchdown to win the game, 33-27, two games later.

Nassib, now in his third team since the Cleveland Browns drafted him in 2016, led the nation with 15.5 sacks at Penn State as a senior and won the Lombardi Award for the country’s best lineman. He tries to remember things from every game, he said, but mostly he relished Monday night’s win.

“It was really special,” Nassib said at a post-match press conference. “I’m really happy that we got the victory on the day that made history a little bit.”

His teammates did not mention Nassib’s historic role in the victory. Coach Jon Gruden only complimented his performance on the pitch. Defensive end Maxx Crosby did it too, saying simply, “Carl is a ball player and I’m proud of the guy.”

ESPN, the network that broadcast the game, also subtly dealt with Nassib’s feat. He released a 28-second video in the third quarter with clips from his Instagram video and a few photos. On an alternate show on ESPN2 featuring retired NFL quarterbacks Peyton Manning and Eli Manning, former NBA player Charles Barkley appeared as a guest and wore Nassib’s jersey.

The cover’s nonchalant demeanor in some ways mimicked the reception of other male professional athletes who played their first games after coming out. Former NBA player Jason Collins received modest applause from the opposing crowd when he entered a game for the Nets in 2014, 10 months after announcing he was gay. But there was no other form of recognition inside the arena, and Collins and his teammates downplayed the media’s importance of the moment.

Robbie Rogers, the first MLS player to appear in a game when he was openly gay, said things looked “normal” in an atmosphere typical of a 2013 Los Angeles Galaxy game.

Nassib said in August that his teammates had supported him since his exit. The Raiders haven’t left any players available for comment, but quarterback Derek Carr, who said his record was just a few points behind Nassib’s, said during training camp that he had seen nothing to dispute it.

“When he walked in I just like to watch, and not a single person from my perspective treated him differently,” Carr said.

Amy Trask, the former Raiders general manager, said this fits in with the tradition of a team that has historically embraced diversity. In 1997, she became the first female NFL general manager Tom Flores, who is of Mexican descent, was the first Latino NFL coach to win a Super Bowl, winning two with the Raiders, over the seasons. 1980 and 1983. The team also drafted Eldridge Dickey, the first black quarterback taken in the first round, in 1968, when the Raiders played in the AFL.

Trask said she didn’t focus on the story she made on her first day or how her coworkers would change the way they act towards her. She’s not surprised at how Nassib and the Raiders fared last week.

“This is an organization that has a history of hiring regardless of race, gender or any other individuality that has no bearing on whether one can do a job,” said Trask said in an interview. “It’s very, very special, from my perspective, that Carl is a Raider.

“He came out and did his job, like everyone would want a player to do their job,” she added.

If he continues to do the job well, said Wayne Mabry, arguably the Raiders’ most recognizable fan, Nassib’s sexuality wouldn’t change the way he views the player. For nearly 30 years, Mabry, nicknamed “The Violator,” attended nearly every Raiders home game dressed as a pirate with black and silver face paint, leather boots and spiked epaulettes.

He said it was a tribute inspired in part by the team’s familiar reputation as the league’s “Bad Boys”. It is irrelevant, he said, that a gay player is part of a team with such a historically gritty perception.

“Warriors come in all shapes and sizes,” said Mabry, 64. “It’s about what you bring to the table. As long as he can help us win, he’s a warrior for me.


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Non profit living

San Antonio nonprofit train provides guide dogs for visually impaired Texans

San Antonio – Since 1989, Guide Dogs of Texas, a non-profit guide dog provider, has worked to train and supply guide dogs for the visually impaired in Texas.

This group professionally breeds, trains, and pairs guide dogs with owners statewide. It is a service that brings friendship, freedom and mobility to those who need the help of guide dogs.

Judy St. Clair has been legally blind since 1993, and she has said that only her ability to travel independently with a guide dog has positively impacted her life.

“We trust each other and that’s a factor of trust. With a wand you basically have to know where you’re going, but that’s great because you can still hurt yourself. The dog will see something in advance and protect you, ”said Sainte-Claire.

According to the Guide Dogs of Texas, puppies are placed with volunteer puppy breeders until they are 14 to 16 months old. The San Antonio group said it had been successful in dealing with the future number of guide dogs, even in a pandemic, and needed a “puppy breeder” to support the program.

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Patty McCauley is a puppy breeder who has lived with her dog “nugget” since she was eight weeks old. She said she had played with the idea of ​​volunteering for a while, then decided how much her service would help those in need.

“I just raised a puppy, gave it love, took it out and introduced it to people, the environment and what the average person encounters every day, and I know you give back to someone. ‘a. I think it’s pretty awesome to know that you can help someone on your own, ”said McColly.

According to the group, “No previous experience is required and all training is provided. “

“Puppies are responsible for teaching puppies etiquette and providing them with a social experience for the first year of their life,” a nonprofit said.

Puppies also attend monthly meetings to share ideas and information, work on training techniques, and participate in social gatherings.

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Guide dog instructor Amy Samora said dogs do more than just increase mobility and independence.

“The dog brings a lot of happy faces, and it really encourages people to go to our customers to get involved with them, and it also brings all of this great social relationship.” Said Samora.

Guide dogs are obedient and friendly, but the instructor said it was important not to pet the guide dog. Guide dog owner St. Clair says he will not allow the dog when wearing the harness.

“If I let someone touch her with the harness, she would want to go too far and play. It would be fun, and the general idea of ​​working with a guide dog would be a distraction. But they will continue to focus, ”said St. Clair.

Guide dogs in Texas charge only $ 1 per specially trained dog, but the cost of breeding and training guide dogs can run as high as $ 50,000.

For more information or to register for the program, please visit www.guidedogsoftexas.org, call 210-366-4081 or email @ guidedogsoftexas.org.

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KSAT Details:

San Antonio dog owners share tearful reunion with lab that disappeared 10 years ago

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San Antonio nonprofit train provides guide dogs for visually impaired Texans

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Canadian army

“Belfast” Wins Audience Award at Toronto International Film Festival

The idea of ​​decreased immunity has gained momentum in recent weeks, with some countries using it to justify rolling out third-dose COVID-19 vaccine boosters to their populations. But immunologists say the concept has been largely misunderstood.

While the antibodies – proteins created after infection or vaccination that help prevent future invasions of the pathogen – stabilize over time, experts say this is believed to happen.

And that doesn’t mean we aren’t protected against COVID-19.

Jennifer Gommerman, an immunologist at the University of Toronto, said the term “waning immunity” has given people a false understanding of how the immune system works.

“Waning has this connotation that something is wrong and there isn’t,” she said. “It’s completely normal for the immune system to trigger a response where a ton of antibodies are made and a lot of immune cells are developed. And for now, that sort of thing is taking over.

“But it has to twitch, or you wouldn’t have room for subsequent immune responses.”

Antibody levels rise in the “primary response” phase after vaccination or infection, “when your immune system is loaded and ready to attack,” said Steven Kerfoot, associate professor of immunology at Western University. .

They then decrease from this “emergency phase”, he added. But the memory of the pathogen and the body’s ability to respond to it remains.

Kerfoot said that B cells, which make antibodies, and T cells, which limit the virus’s ability to cause serious damage, continue to work together to prevent serious illness long after a vaccine is given. Although T cells cannot recognize the virus directly, they determine which cells are infected and kill them quickly.

Recent studies have suggested that the T cell response is still robust several months after a COVID-19 vaccination.

“You could get a minor infection… (but) all of those cells are still there, which is why we are still seeing very stable efficacy when it comes to preventing serious illness,” Kerfoot said.

A pre-printed study published this week by Public Health England suggested that the protection against hospitalization and death remains much higher than the protection against infection, even in the elderly.

So the concept of declining immunity depends on whether you measure protection against infection or against serious illness, Kerfoot said.

Ontario reported 43 cases of hospitalizations among those fully vaccinated on Friday, compared to 256 hospitalized unvaccinated infections. There were a total of 795 new cases in the province that day, 582 among those who were not fully vaccinated or whose vaccination status was unknown.

British Columbia, meanwhile, has seen 53 fully vaccinated COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the past two weeks, compared to 318 unvaccinated patients.

“You will hear people say that vaccines are not designed to protect infections, they are designed to prevent serious illness,” Kerfoot said. “I wouldn’t necessarily say it’s the vaccine that’s designed to do either… that’s exactly how the immune system works.”

Moderna this week released actual data suggesting that its vaccine was 96 percent effective in preventing hospitalization, even in the midst of the more transmissible Delta variant, and 87 percent effective in preventing infection – down by compared to the 94 percent efficacy seen in the latest clinical trials. year.

Moderna CEO Stéphane Bancel said the drop “illustrates the impact of declining immunity and supports the need for a booster to maintain high levels of protection.”

Pfizer-BioNTech backed the same with its own data, and a U.S.-based Food and Drug Administration advisory group voted on Friday to approve third doses for people aged 65 and over or above. risk of serious illness.

However, the panel rejected boosters for the general population, saying the drug company provided little safety data on the additional jabs.

Gommerman said the efficacy data presented by Moderna does not indicate the need for a third dose.

“The fact that it protects 87% against infection is amazing,” she said. “Most vaccines can’t achieve this.”

Bancel said Moderna’s research, which has yet to be peer-reviewed, suggests that a booster dose may also prolong the duration of the immune response by increasing levels of neutralizing antibodies.

But Dr. Sumon Chakrabarti, an infectious disease specialist in Mississauga, Ont., Said looking only at the antibody response is misleading and could be falsely used to justify an endless number of callbacks.

Israel, which has opened third doses to its citizens, recently talked about administering fourth doses in the near future.

“This idea of ​​declining immunity is being exploited and it’s really worrying to see,” Chakrabarti said. “There’s this idea that antibodies mean immunity, and it’s true … but the background level of immunity, enduring T cells, hasn’t been emphasized enough.”

While some experts argue that boosters for the general population are premature, they agree that some people would benefit from a third jab.

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization has recommended boosters for those who are immunocompromised, who do not develop a robust immune response from a series of two doses.

Other experts have argued that long-term care residents, who were a priority when the rollout began last December, may also soon need a third dose. The English study suggests that immunity may decrease in older groups, but not much, if at all, in those under 65.

Chakrabarti said a decrease in protection among older populations may be due more to “overlapping factors” including their generally weaker immune systems and life situations for people in long-term care. .

“These are the people most at risk of hospitalization,” he said. “Could (the time that has passed after their doses) play a role? Yeah maybe. “

While we still don’t know the duration of the immune response to the COVID-19 vaccination, Gommerman said immune cells typically continue to live in the bone marrow and produce small amounts of antibodies for “decades.”

“And they can be quickly mobilized if they encounter a pathogen,” she said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on September 19, 2021.

Melissa Couto Zuber, The Canadian Press


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History organization

Local historical society gets national recognition for its work with the Pioneer Courthouse – St George News

ST. GEORGEFor more than 150 years, the Pioneer Courthouse has stood at the corner of St. George Boulevard and 100 East, serving as a county courthouse and administrative building for nearly a century before falling into disrepair in the 1960s.

The winners pose with the leaders of the Daughters of the American Revolution. From left to right: Jesse Stocking, Kathryn Asay, Jeanine Vander Bruggen, Valerie King and George Cannon. St. George, Utah September 14, 2021 | Photo by Ammon Teare, St. George News

After being threatened with demolition in 1970, St. George City stepped in and took control of the historic building, handing over its operation and use to four local historic organizations in 2019.

One of these organizations, the Washington County Historical Society, has attracted the national attention of the Daughters of the American Revolution through their work in restoring the building.

“The Washington County Historical Society was willing to ensure that we preserved one of St. George’s most iconic historic buildings,” said Valerie King, president of the local Daughters of the American Revolution. “I have great admiration for what they do and have done, and for what they preserve here not only for current citizens, but also for generations to come.”

Following a rigorous nomination and approval process, the Color County Chapter of the Women’s Organization presented the National Historic Preservation Recognition Award to representatives of the historical society on Tuesday afternoon.

Color Country Chapter President Valerie King with Daughters of the Utah Pioneers (right) pins recognition to Jeanine Vander Bruggen, coordinates operations of Pioneer Courthouse, St. George, Utah September 14, 2021 | Photo by Ammon Teare, St. George News

The contributions of Jeanine Vander Bruggen, coordinator of the Pioneer Courthouse and a nearby museum, have been particularly noteworthy. Holder of a dual membership in historical society and the Daughters of the American Revolution, Vander Bruggen has been recognized individually with society.

She has also led the operation and management of space within the courthouse, balancing exhibits and events planned by the four organizations that share stewardship: Sons of Utah Pioneers, Daughters of Utah Pioneers, Arts to Zion and the historical society.

Within the walls of the courthouse, organizations tell the story of the region through historical artifacts, personal stories, public documents, photographs and more.

These historic organizations see the courthouse as more than just an old building, said Vander Bruggen. For them, it is a monument to those who have inhabited this region in the past and a symbol for their values ​​and their heritage.

“I think there is a great need for people to appreciate what it took to have what we have today,” said Vander Bruggen. “This area was seen as inhospitable and uninviting, but people who move here now don’t understand what it took to create this beautiful place where everyone wants to live. We must teach that it took effort to get to where we are. “

The historical society’s efforts weren’t limited to the courthouse, alone. In fact, the organization has several projects underway, including field trips to local historic sites and preparing to offer walking tours in downtown St. George.

The historical society is also months away from installing a statue of Juanita Brooks in the new Statue Garden on Tabernacle Street (located around the gazebo between the school district buildings).

Since 2019, the courthouse serves as a historic landmark housing local archives and artefacts from the area’s past, St. George, Utah, September 14, 2021 | Photo by Ammon Teare, St. George News

Brooks was a famous author, educator, and historian who played a pivotal role in publishing details of the Mountain Meadows Massacre that had been omitted from official Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints accounts and stories. local.

“She is famous for her courage and resistance to community reaction,” said Jesse Stocking, special projects manager at the historical society. “She wanted to bless her society by going against the instructions and preferences of the LDS apostolate by making known (the details of the historic massacre).”

The historical society has secured funding for the statue, and it is expected to be installed within the next six months, Stocking said.

The Pioneer Courthouse and the nearby Pioneer Museum are open to the public and free. Details on opening hours can be found on the Pioneer Corner website.

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Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2021, all rights reserved.


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International headquarters

The bike collection helps turn the wheels to a better life

Dozens of used bikes, in a variety of sizes and conditions, filled the parking lot at South Dartmouth Congregational Church on Saturday.

They would soon find new uses that could change their lives.

The church’s outreach committee organized the drive in conjunction with Bikes Not Bombs, a Jamaican lowland nonprofit that uses donated bicycles as a vehicle for social change and economic mobility.

More than 80 bikes had been collected, in person and via a pickup service, starting at noon.

“People are so happy that they have a determined way to get rid of their bikes,” said Alice Root, Outreach Committee member.

Some of the bikes collected will be sent to communities in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, said Marty Andrews, who works with Bikes not Bombs at Jamaica Plain headquarters.

People in these countries can use bicycles to get around and also learn how to repair bicycles, which provides them with a valuable profession, he said. In particular, they are working to ensure that women learn bicycle mechanics, he said, so that they can be empowered.

“If you have a skill, you become a lot more valued,” he said.

Others will be sent to the organization’s Win a Bike and Girls In Action programs, where teens learn bike safety and mechanical skills in the process of winning bikes to keep for themselves.

Still others head to the organization’s Jamaica Plain bicycle store, which sells refurbished bicycles and spare parts to help support the group’s activities. These stores employ many graduate programs.

The organization collects approximately 5,000 used bicycles and tons of used parts each year from supporters in New England.

For members of the South Dartmouth Congregational Church, the collection fits their purpose of helping people locally, nationally and internationally, Root said.

The event had an added benefit, she said. Because the collection took place outside, social distancing was more easily achievable.

Church volunteers did more than pick up the bikes. Andrews and senior apprentice Joseph Pires from Dorchester helped them with basic work on the bikes before they were sent to the organization’s headquarters.

It taught them new skills, Root said, but also reminded them of what they were already capable of, she said. For example, she laughed, she knew how to use an Allen wrench thanks to her work in the industrial arts, a tool she used on the donated bikes on Saturday.

Heidi Harring of Dartmouth donated her late father’s bike and another bike that was too big for her children. She supports the group and has already passed her bikes to them, she said. “I was aware of them and the purpose they serve,” she said.

Reusing the bikes also keeps them out of landfills, said Derrick Jones, a member of the church’s outreach committee. “There is a great need for these bikes,” he said, especially in places where people would otherwise have to travel long distances to get basic necessities.

Recycling is another valuable aspect of their job, Andrews said, and the group recycles as many bikes as possible if the parts are no longer viable.

Kristy Oliver donated her old bikes when she decided to buy new ones. “We wanted to give someone a chance who may not have a bike,” she said.

Andrews also hopes people will learn more about the value of the bike, he said. Horseback riding, he said, improves health, reduces traffic jams and is a cheaper transportation alternative.

“It allows people to be more independent” and less dependent on more expensive modes of transport, he said.

This sense of independence is crucial, said Pires.

“I believe most of the changes that happen to disenfranchised people come from the community and not from the government,” he said. “It shows that people can come together and make a difference on their own. “


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Canadian army

CRIME SCENE: Police arrest Niagara’s father in suspected child abduction

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A Niagara father who allegedly fled with his young twin daughters nearly a month ago has been caught at the French Atlantic outpost of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon.

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Cops say Clayton Misener, 46, is charged with kidnapping in violation of the custody order and disobeying the court order.

Working with Halifax Police, RCMP and Saint-Pierre et Miquelon Police, Misener was arrested on Wednesday.

Her two daughters, Paige and Alexandra Misener, both 12, have been found and are safe. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Niagara Regional Police Service at 905-688-4111, ext. 1009964.

Odainne Trujillo is wanted for sexual assault.  TORONTO POLICE DOCUMENT / DEPARTMENT
Odainne Trujillo is wanted for sexual assault. TORONTO POLICE DOCUMENT / DEPARTMENT

COP HUNTING SEX ATTACK

Police are looking for a predator accused of two sexual assaults in the city center.

Cops say that at around 2:22 p.m. Thursday, in the Bloor St. W. and St. George St. neighborhood, a 20-year-old woman was approached by a man who struck up a conversation. When she tried to leave, he sexually assaulted her. Ten minutes later, cops responded to a second sexual assault call in Bloor W. Street and Avenue Rd. Area. A 23-year-old woman was sitting on a bench when a man came to sit next to her and assaulted her.

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Police are looking for 25-year-old Odainne Trujillo. He is described as six feet tall with a slim build, a short dark afro haircut and a light beard. He was wearing a dark golf shirt and blue pants. He is believed to be violent and the cops fear there will be other victims.

Anyone with information is urged to contact the police at 416-808-5200 or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222-TIPS (8477).

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BRAMPTON PARK ATTACK

A man forcibly grabbed a woman by the shoulder in Massey Park in Brampton, but she managed to escape. Cops are chasing a white man, in the mid-1920s, about 5ft 9in, 180lb. with a medium build. He had brown eyes, a black beard with a mustache, wore a black hoodie with white badges on the front, a black baseball cap, black sweatpants, black and white sneakers, wearing a blue surgical mask or white. It is “associated” with a black ATV.

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Anyone with information about this incident, surveillance footage, or a dash camera is urged to contact investigators at 905-453-2121 ext 2133 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), visiting peelcrimestoppers.ca.

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COP BUST HIT AND RUN DRIVER

Hamilton Police have arrested and charged a 52-year-old man who struck a pedestrian and then fled.

Cops said at around 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, officers responded to a motor vehicle collision involving a 2004 Hyundai Santa Fe SUV and a pedestrian on Mount Albion Road. The Hyundai was heading north on Mount Albion when the driver lost control, causing the vehicle to climb onto the sidewalk and collide with a pedestrian. The driver then fled on foot. He surrendered on Thursday. The pedestrian remains in critical condition.

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Christopher Mulligan is charged with dangerous driving causing bodily harm, failure to stay and breach of probation.

ROMANCE SCAM TARGETED TO SENIORS

Halton Police detectives have made several arrests in a Burlington romance scam targeting seniors. According to cops, in October and November 2020, an elderly victim was contacted by someone claiming to be a retired Canadian Army sergeant (named Darren Michaelson) and started a romantic relationship online. The victim was tricked into sending $ 150,000 to a man she believed to be the former soldier.

The accused are a 21-year-old woman from Oakville, a 38-year-old woman from London, and two men from Toronto. The group faces a slew of fraud-related charges and cops expect more arrests and more victims.

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Non profit living

Fourth Live Update from Stimulus Control: Child Tax Credit Extension to 2025, New Payment in California, Unemployment Benefits …

Securities

AOC announces efforts to expand federal unemployment benefits until February 2022. (Full story)

– New projections on Social Security Cost of living adjustment for 2022 emerge. (Whole story)

President Biden fails to convince Sen Manchin to support the $ 3.5 billion spending bill

Seventeen states have seen increase in unemployment claims Last week. (Whole story)

A new bill to extend federal unemployment benefits until February 2022 emerges on Capitol Hill. (Whole story)

– How do I register a newborn baby for monthly child tax credit payments? (Whole story)

Last week, initial unemployment claims have increased for the first time in recent months. (All the details)

800,000 New Yorkers lost unemployment benefits when federal programs ended. (Whole story)

September Child Tax Credit Payments Sent, when will the money arrive in the banks (More information)

– Fourth federal stimulus check not in the $ 3.5 billion reconciliation invoice (full story)

Some US states send their own stimulus payments (More information)

Overview of the three dunning checks adopted by Congress. (Details)

Useful information / links

California Golden State Stimulus Checks:

California Tax Franchise Board to Send 2 million additional Golden State Stimulus checks Friday September 17th.

– How to Track Your Golden State Stimulus Check

– Who can receive a second Golden State Stimulus check? (Details)

– When can I expect my $ 600 Will Golden State Stimulus in California Happen? (Details)

– What state programs exist for Americans who lost their unemployment benefits? (All the details)

IRS distributes third payment of the child tax credit (Find out how you can unsubscribe from the monthly CTC)

Some of our related press articles:


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Canadian army

Young Oakville resident arrested with four others in online romance scam

Five people, including a woman from Oakville, were arrested in Operation Silver Fox by Halton Police for a $ 100,000 romance fraud and scam in Burlington.

Halton Police 3 District Criminal Investigation Bureau has laid several charges against the suspects for defrauding an elderly victim.

A romantic con artist forged his identity as Darren Michaelson, a retired Canadian Army sergeant, and contacted the victim in October and November 2020. Once he began an online romantic relationship with the victim, he tricked the victim into sending large sums of money to people they believed. would help Michaelson overcome legal hurdles and help him return to Canada.

The Halton Regional Police Service (HRPS) confirmed that the victim was the victim of fraud over $ 150,000. Police laid the following charges against the suspects:

  • Possession of criminal property over $ 5,000
  • Laundering of the proceeds of crime
  • Fraud over $ 5,000
  • Fraud under $ 5,000

HRPS is planning more arrests and believes there may be more victims of the romance scam.

According to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Center, in 2020, online romance scams defrauded Canadians over $ 7.3 million. Police stress that residents should never send money or gift cards to strangers. In addition, personal information such as identification, passwords or financial documents should not be provided when communicating online.

For more information on scams, you can visit the Anti-fraud Center website or the Halton Regional Police Service website.

HRPS urges residents with information regarding this investigation to contact Detective Constable Derek Gray of the Burlington Bureau of Criminal Investigations – Seniors Liaison Team at 905-825-4747 ext. 2344

Please note that those charged are considered innocent and can only be proven guilty by a court.

Due to the presumption of innocence, Oakville News does not publish the name (s) of the suspect (s). The Halton Regional Police Service usually displays the name (s) of suspects on their website.


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History organization

Massachusetts Empowers Awakened Activists to Build Curriculum

Protesters walk past the Massachusetts State House following the death of George Floyd, in Boston, Massachusetts on June 3, 2020. (Brian Snyder / Reuters)

Bills proposed by the state legislature would allow left-wing interest groups to determine what children learn in schools.

As As battles over education intensify across the country, Massachusetts lawmakers are considering a series of measures to empower left-wing militant groups to set education policy for the state. On Monday, the state legislature’s joint education committee held a hearing that discussed, among other things, a bill to institute a “critical approach and pedagogy” for a curriculum. ethnicities, “decolonization” and the teaching of “social justice”.

“Anti-Racism, Equity and Justice in Education Law” is being carried out in the Massachusetts lower house by members Nika Elugardo and Erika Uyterhoeven, both of whom identify as socialists, under the name of H.584. In the state senate (as S.365), he is supported by the chairman of the education committee, Jason Lewis.

This bill shows how the ratchet of ideological transformation works. One of the central power mechanisms for the ‘Great Awakening’ is to take charge of key political and civil society bottlenecks – from accrediting organizations to human resources offices in large companies – to to impose increasing demands on American life. With “a law relating to anti-racism, equity and justice in education,” the Massachusetts legislature would invent a commission, with members chosen by militant groups, to act as an engine of ideological agitation. perpetual in state government.

The bill proclaims “that education on the dismantling of racism be taught to all students, that teachers and school counselors be trained in pedagogy and practices that uplift students of all ethnicities and origins,” [and] that truth and reconciliation regarding slavery, genocide, land theft and systemic racism are centered ”in the Bay State agenda.

To this end, the bill would establish a “Commission for Combating Racism and Equity in Education” which could weigh in on a range of issues. An “anti-racism and equity in education trust fund” established by the bill would see its funds used with the “consultation and recommendation” of the commission. In addition, this commission would advise the State Department of Primary and Secondary Education on a multitude of issues:

(i) Develop educational material from a social justice perspective to dismantle racism and advise the department on improving the framework of history and social sciences.

(ii) Ensure that ethnic studies, racial justice, the history of decolonization and unlearning racism are taught at all school levels using a critical approach and age-appropriate pedagogy.

(iii) advise the department on how to ensure fairness in the Massachusetts Test for Education Licensure; and

(iv) Ensure that teachers and school counselors have access to professional development that promotes equitable and inclusive curriculum and pedagogy and practices that support racial justice.

The range of responsibilities of this commission would therefore cover everything from curriculum and professional development to licensing of teachers.

The bill essentially replaces a number of militant groups by giving them the power to choose the members of this committee. Teacher unions, the ACLU and other groups would determine who would sit on the “Commission to Combat Racism and Equity in Education”. According to the text of the bill, each of these groups would choose a member for the commission: the Massachusetts Teachers Association; the American Federation of Teachers of Massachusetts; the Boston Teachers Union; Massachusetts Association of School Principals; Massachusetts Association of School Boards; the Massachusetts Commission on Indian Affairs; the Collaborative of American Institutes of Asian, Native American, Latin American and African American Origin at the University of Massachusetts in Boston; the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts; the North American Indian Center in Boston; the NAACP, Boston branch; the Greater Boston Council on Jewish Community Relations; the Massachusetts Community Action Network; the Massachusetts Education Justice Alliance; the Massachusetts Commission on LGBTQ Youth; the Cape Verdean Association of Boston; the Asian American Commission; and the Massachusetts Parents Union.

This way of constituting the commission would ensure the domination of a coalition of left and nested groups. For example, three of the Massachusetts Education Justice Alliance (MEJA) member organizations are the Massachusetts Teachers Association, the Boston Teachers Union, and the American Federation of Massachusetts Teachers, each of which can also choose a commission member. Massachusetts Jobs with Justice, which is the parent organization of the Parents Union of Massachusetts, is another MEJA member.

At the time of writing, no vote on the bill has yet been scheduled. However, some large organizations have started to mobilize for its passage. For example, the Massachusetts Teachers Association has approved this offer.

This is not the only curriculum reform proposed by members of the Massachusetts legislature. “An Act Teaching Anti-Racism in Massachusetts Schools” (H.3718) would create a commission to develop a compulsory “anti-racism” curriculum that would cover most academic subjects (including science, health, English and language education). ‘story). “A law to establish an integrated cultural studies curriculum in our schools” (H.689) would create a council that would establish a statewide curriculum in “integrated cultural studies”, which according to legislation, is “the interdisciplinary study of race and ethnicity.” “This bill explicitly proposes to use racial categories to determine the composition of this committee – requiring, for example, that the board include” six teachers of color. “

These bills highlight how the formalization of “awakened” doctrines in education is often a top-down effort involving collaboration between militant cadres and the state apparatus. However, in a democratic society, the use of state power is itself a matter of public contestation. While some state lawmakers aim to install a bureaucracy that will impose various identity ideologies, Massachusetts residents – parents, teachers and concerned citizens – might have a very different point of view.



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