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Non profit living

The logic of Cori Bush’s fight for the moratorium on evictions

Cori Bush knows the violence that can stem from homelessness – and how it so often begins with deportation. Local surveys have found that from 12% to almost half of people living on the streets blame the eviction for their homelessness. Bush, who is now the Democratic Representative of the United States from Missouri, lived in a Ford Explorer with her then husband and two young children for three months after the family was deported in 2001.

It considers the right to housing to be a central principle of environmental justice. Homelessness and housing insecurity, she argued, hamper families’ ability to access the resources – clean water, fresh food, heating and air conditioning – needed to survive. The past year has been particularly deadly for homeless people, as relentless heat waves, poor COVID-19 precautions and unhealthy air quality levels exacerbated by wildfires and pollution have made life on the streets even more dangerous. At the same time, cities across the country have decided to criminalize housing settlements and limit the rights of the homeless.

“I don’t want anyone else to have to go through what I’ve been through, ever,” Bush told The Associated Press. So when the White House said last week it couldn’t extend the federal moratorium on evictions – which has banned evictions since March 2020 to curb the spread of COVID-19 – by possibly letting it expire, it took the fight in hand. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities estimated that 11.4 million adult renters were on the verge of eviction.

For four nights, Bush slept outside the United States Capitol, demanding that President Joe Biden extend the moratorium. In the end, she and her congressional allies won. On Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, issued a new moratorium on evictions that will last until October 3. which would cover areas where 90 percent of the US population lives. The CDC’s new moratorium comes after the Biden administration claimed it did not have the power to extend the eviction ban – and after some localities have already started resuming evictions. (Despite the moratorium, declining state protections and inadequate legal services have led to at least 450,000 evictions during the pandemic, according to the Princeton University Eviction Lab.)

Representative Cori Bush speaks with supporters outside the United States Capitol to call for an extension of the federal moratorium on evictions on July 31, 2021. Photo by Joshua Roberts / Getty Images

In a column for Time last week, Bush denounced the “consequences of our government’s failure to provide the basic necessities that people need to survive.” On the same day, she introduced a “Homeless Bill of Rights,” which calls on Congress to end homelessness in the United States for good by 2025 by investing in affordable housing, universal housing vouchers and social services for people most likely to live on the streets.

While many environmental activists, including the Sunrise movement, have called the new moratorium a victory for climate justice, Bush and other housing advocates argue that protection is one of many that must be instituted to ensure housing and environmental justice for America’s most vulnerable .

Julian Gonzalez, a water policy lobbyist with nonprofit group Earthjustice, says issues such as unaffordable public services are another front in the fight to ensure housing security. (Disclosure: Earthjustice is a Grist advertiser.)

“The affordability of utilities, especially the affordability of water, is a big part of the housing crisis and environmental justice,” Gonzalez told Grist. “Eventually the moratorium on evictions is going to be lifted and people are going to be grappling with bills, and they are going to have their water and electricity cut off – with that comes displacement and eviction.”

This is especially important, according to Gonzalez, because while there are state and national programs to provide assistance for energy bills, there are none for water. Households across the country face billions of dollars in utility debt, and hundreds of thousands of homes face utility cuts. Earthjustice and other organizations across the country are calling for the inclusion of water and utility assistance programs in the next congressional infrastructure bill, which in its current version only includes a pilot low-income rural water assistance program in 40 towns without authorized funding.

Courtney McKinney, director of communications at the nonprofit Western Center on Law and Poverty, said the United States should create a system that permanently limits the prevalence of evictions. The center is working to create state-based legal aid funds, dubbed the “homelessness prevention fund”. Across the country, only 10 percent of tenants who go through eviction proceedings have legal representation, compared to 90 percent of landlords.

The eviction creates an endless cycle of substandard housing, McKinney argues. According to Princeton’s Eviction Lab, 70% of evicted tenants experience serious quality-of-life issues in the next home they move into.

“Across the country, the climate is making the situation even more dire,” McKinney told Grist. “In the West, in particular, climate change, substandard housing and homelessness are a deadly reality in the future.”




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A Q&A with The Wilderness Society’s New Mexico Deputy Director – High Country News – Know the West

Kay Bounkeua discusses Lao-Chinese childhood in the state, its connection to the landscape, and the future of the conservation movement.

In the mid-1980s, when Kay Bounkeua was a toddler, her family moved to Northeast Heights, a historically white-only neighborhood in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Her parents had moved to the city from a refugee camp in Thailand more than a decade earlier, after war flooded their landlocked home Laos. When neighbors learned that a Lao-Chinese family was moving in, they signed a petition warning that immigrants would bring the crime with them and devalue local real estate. It was one of the many incidents of racial harassment that plagued Bounkeua’s childhood.

Growing up the way she did, worried about discrimination, financial hardship, and feelings of not belonging, Bounkeua enjoyed biking and hiking in the Sandia Mountains with her family. There they could just be themselves. She fondly remembers speaking with her parents in Lao and Mandarin while contemplating the desert landscape. They all found solace outside, she said. They didn’t worry about “speaking bad languages” and “eating bad food”.

In 2010, Bounkeua joined the Asian Family Center in New Mexico, where he later served as Executive Director. She has led initiatives to provide language access to newcomers and has championed community concerns in local and national politics. But over a year ago, she changed careers: she became the New Mexico deputy director of the Wilderness Society, focusing on working with underrepresented communities in the outdoors and in conservation. .

Heidrich photography

Recently, High Country News spoke with Bounkeua about his transition from social work to conservation, and what it’s like to be one of the few Asians in conservation in the South West. Now that the Biden administration is committed to the “30×30” plan and an inclusive and sustainable future, she believes this is the perfect time to bring diverse community perspectives into the mainstream of conservation. This conversation has been edited for length and clarity.

High Country News: Can you tell me a bit about your past work with the Asian community in New Mexico?

Kay Bounkoua: In 2010, I came to the Asian Family Center as a program coordinator. At the time, it was primarily a direct service provider, providing intervention services to victims of domestic violence. Four years later, I became the managing director. As the organization grew and I dealt with what my family had been through, we created culturally appropriate programs. Just think of those who go from moving to relocating and trying to figure it all out as you build a new home.

I also thought about the future of the organization more from a social justice perspective. As young people who have felt, seen and experienced oppressive actions against our community became more politically engaged, the center has done more organizational and civic engagement work to help members of the Asian community. to exercise their right to vote. We have also started to discuss access to languages ​​in New Mexico. In this way, the Asian Family Center not only provided services to people in the community, but also implemented change at the system level.

HCN: Why did you join the Wilderness Society?

KB: Because I had my daughter, who is now 2 1/2 years old. This shift to parenthood got me thinking about the kind of life I want her to have and the kind of world we leave for our children. And I think this connection to land and place is critical.

As for my relationship with the land and what it means, I think a lot about Laos. When I visited Laos when I was little, before even going up a mountain road, we visited a shrine that people created at the bottom of the mountain, where you pray that the mountain spirits ask permission to cross the country. and guides you throughout your journey. This kind of spiritual connection reminded me that so many do have that spiritual connection with places here in New Mexico.

My dad always told me that the landscape of New Mexico is similar to that of Laos in that it is landlocked and warm. This vivid landscape made me feel connected to my parents’ homeland when I was young – but I’m afraid it will fade away and the ways I connected across the land of New Mexico are no longer. available so that I can share them with my daughter.

Kay Bounkeua and her young daughter hiked the Sandia Mountains near Albuquerque, New Mexico last winter.

Courtesy of Kay Bounkeua

HCN: How has your past community work inspired your conservation efforts at the Wilderness Society?

KB: To do conservation work, you cannot separate it from community work. We should consider the environment and its impacts on the health of communities as an ecosystem. For example, neighborhoods that have been marked in red have fewer trees and are more affected by heat waves. A higher urban heat index is also correlated with higher rates of violence. All of these contribute to the negative effects on the health of our communities.

HCN: What would you like to see changed in the Wilderness Society under your leadership to address the history of exclusion and discrimination in the mainstream conservation movement?

KB: I hope that we will continue to recognize the deep trauma suffered by communities while proposing solutions found within these communities. How can we examine environmental racism, environmental degradation and the root causes of these problems in our community? How do we invest money in Indigenous, Asian, Latin and other colored communities? For those who continue to be most impacted by climate and extinction crises, I think this is where the magic will happen. And a big part of that job is building trust and relationships, which takes a long time.

There is a lot of harm when we do not include people of color in the decision making process. So we began to conduct a series of 25 different hearing sessions with Black, Indigenous, Asian, Latinx and other people of color leaders and organizations to understand what “conservation” means to them and how to make conservation into the realm. New Mexico could be in a respectful relationship with them.

To do conservation work, you cannot separate it from community work. We should consider the environment and its impacts on the health of communities as an ecosystem.

HCN: To achieve a fair and sustainable future under “30×30”, what should policymakers and environmental organizations in the West do to involve more people of color in the movement?

KB: It is important to note that traditional knowledge and science can coexist. But so many times it feels like you can only do one or the other. If we create policies by looking only at Eurocentric science, it is a huge disservice to things that people have known for generations that could potentially support something that we are working on. And we need to welcome people who have been historically excluded from the environmental conservation movement so that they can give their opinion.

There are so many amazing indigenous led organizations across the state and across the country that we should just follow suit as they were the original and continuing stewards of this land. We can also learn from emerging groups, such as Outdoor Afro, Outdoor Asian and Latino Outdoor. They are so culturally based and understand these issues from a racial equity perspective and can provide many solutions to the issues that we are all trying to solve.

Wufei Yu is an editor at High Country News. Send him an e-mail To [email protected] or submit a letter to the editor.



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Non profit living

Jam to Low-Down Blues with Hurricane Jerry Loos at the Westerwood Blueberries and The Blues Concert

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COLUMBUS, Ohio, Aug 4, 2021 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) – The Westerwood Senior Living Community is hosting a Blueberries & The Blues Summer Concert from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Friday August 13, 2021, featuring the local blues artist Hurricane Jerry Loos. Relax in the shade as you listen to soft blues and celebrate Columbus blueberry season with chilled blueberry limoncello cocktails and savory treats created by Chef Marshall of Westerwood.

“We are delighted to welcome Hurricane Jerry and showcase Chef Marshall’s culinary skills,” said Lisa Burkhart, Executive Director. “These events are a great way for us to showcase our great community. Participants will be able to meet residents and team members, and schedule community tours.

RSVP today for The Blueberries and The Blues concert by calling 614-368-1209 or visiting https://www.liveatwesterwood.org/events/. And be sure to enter to win one of four Fresh Thyme Market gift certificates and a basket full of all things blueberries.

Hurricane Jerry Loos began playing guitar in the late 1960s and worked for decades at local recording studios in Columbus Ohio. A versatile guitarist, Jerry has worked with a wide range of independent artists playing styles such as Gospel, Rock, Blues, Jazz, Country and more. Jerry enjoys many styles of music but plays blues / rock in his band “Hurricane Jerry and Stormfront”

Listen to Hurricane Jerry on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaHC4215onQ.

Westerwood is also hosting a Resident Lifestyle Brunch at 10 a.m. on August 18, 2021. In addition to enjoying a delicious free brunch, residents and the dedicated team will share what makes Westerwood a great place to enjoy. the life. They will also share updates on the exciting new outdoor amenities that are being added to the 23-acre campus! RSVP today by calling 614-368-1209 or visiting https://www.liveatwesterwood.org/events/.

Westerwood, formerly Friendship Village Columbus, is a quaint 23-acre nonprofit retirement community rooted in northeast Columbus. It is minutes from downtown Westerville and the University of Otterbein. The active resident community enjoys lifelong learning, artistic pursuits, exercise, giving back and connecting with nature. Westerwood offers a full continuum of best-in-class care, including a Life Care contract.

This wooded oasis offers restaurant quality cuisine cooked from scratch, wellness classes with a personal trainer, an art studio, carpentry and gardens in a friendly atmosphere where ageless spirits can satiate their curiosity. . Westerwood is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit charitable community. It is classified as a community of choice by the Holleran group in recognition of an exemplary culture of resident engagement. Westerwood is SAGECare Platinum Certified, has received the Columbus CEO Top Workplaces Award six years in a row, and has received the Best of Business: Retirement Community award. Learn more at https://liveatwesterwood.org/.

#SummerConcert #HurricaneJerryLoos #OurCampusYourCanvas #SeniorLiving #ColumbusBlueberrySeason

NEWS SOURCE: Westerwood Life Care Community

This press release was issued on behalf of the information source (Westerwood Life Care community) who is solely responsible for its accuracy, by Send2Press® Newswire. Information is believed to be accurate but is not guaranteed. Story ID: 73980 APDF-R8.2

© 2021 Send2Press®, a press release and electronic marketing service of NEOTROPE®, California, United States.

To view the original version visit: https://www.send2press.com/wire/jam-to-low-down-blues-with-hurricane-jerry-loos-at-the-westerwood-blueberries-and-the- blues-concert /

Disclaimer: The contents of this press release were not created by The Associated Press (AP).


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Aro Biotherapeutics Expands Management Team and Plans to Move to New Philadelphia Headquarters to Drive Next Phase of Growth

PHILADELPHIA CREAM – (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Aro Biotherapeutics, a pioneering biotechnology company in the development of genetic tissue-targeted drugs, today announced the appointment of three new executives, including Scott Greenberg as COO, Jeffrey Staiger as as Senior Vice President of Finance and Business Development, and Michael Tortorici, PharmD, Ph.D. as Vice President of Clinical Pharmacology and Non-Clinical Development. Mr. Greenberg recently served as Aro’s Commercial Director, while Mr. Staiger and Dr. Tortorici are new additions to the management team. The company also announced its intention to relocate its headquarters to Curtis in Philadelphia to accommodate the continued growth of its operations and staff.

“The expansion of our leadership team provides Aro with proven leadership expertise as we advance our first molecules into clinical development and continue to evolve our organization, ”said Susan Dillon, Ph.D., co-founder and CEO of Aro Biotherapeutics. “I am happy to welcome Jeff and Mike to Aro. They both have extensive experience in their respective functional areas which will bring great value to our organization. In his expanded role, Scott and his team will help us develop additional business capabilities that will support our future growth. ”

Mr. Greenberg joined Aro in 2019 from Roivant Sciences, where he most recently served as Vice President, Chief Operating Officer. Previously, he worked at Celgene Corporation in several roles spanning business development, project management, strategy, sales and marketing. He began his career in investment banking at Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. and received an MBA from Harvard Business School.

Mr. Staiger is an international leader in finance and business development having spent over 13 years with Celgene / Bristol Myers Squibb, in roles spanning finance, clinical development, corporate strategy, business operations, leadership alliance and business development. Mr. Staiger began his career at PricewaterhouseCoopers, becoming a Chartered Accountant, and held positions in finance at Quest Diagnostics. He received degrees in economics and accounting from Gordon College (MA).

Dr Tortorici, PharmD, Ph.D. has 15 years of experience in the pharmaceutical industry in the field of clinical pharmacology for small molecules and biologics in a wide range of diseases. He was most recently Executive Director and Head of Clinical Pharmacology at CSL Behring, leading the team responsible for clinical pharmacology for all programs in the portfolio. Prior to that, he worked at Pfizer in clinical pharmacology. Dr Tortorici received his PharmD and Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences from the Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Pittsburgh.

Beginning in October 2021, Aro will begin moving operations to the Curtis in downtown Philadelphia. The Curtis is one of the best places for the scientific community to develop and perfect life-saving therapies and attract world-class talent to achieve their goals. The expanded space will be customized to Aro’s needs, providing an ideal location for the development of Centyrin’s proprietary Aro platform – siRNA drugs. Aro plans to complete the move to The Curtis in the first quarter of 2022.

“We couldn’t be happier to move to the historic Curtis Building as we enter our next phase of growth, ”said Dillon. “Lab and office spaces will help us create a world class facility, and with other building amenities and attractions nearby, The Curtis is ideal for Aro to hire and retain top talent.

About Aro Biotherapeutics

Philadelphia-based Aro Biotherapeutics is a pioneering biotechnology company in the development of tissue-targeted genetic drugs with a platform based on a proprietary protein technology called Centyrins. The company is developing a wholly owned pipeline of Centyrin-based therapeutic candidates and is working with industry partners to leverage Centyrins for tissue-specific targeting of therapies for a diverse set of diseases. For more information visit www.arobiotx.com.


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IDF Facing Israel’s Next Major Threat: Climate Change

The Israel Defense Forces has started to consider how to incorporate the dangers of climate change into their threat assessments, although some are urging the military to do much more and recognize that global warming is a major strategic threat to the country.

Netta Blass, an officer in the military’s strategic division, told a meeting of the Ministry of Environmental Protection on Monday that her unit was working with her counterparts in the IDF planning unit to examine the possibility a climate-related work plan and the creation of a special unit.

These two divisions, she said, also liaise with the Department of Environment’s Climate Change Preparedness Directorate, which held the sixth meeting on Monday since its inception in 2018, opening up part to more of 100 external people.

“The subject is on our agenda,” she said.

Michael Herzog, international researcher at Washington Institute and a retired IDF brigadier general who headed the army’s strategic planning division, was involved with a small team of academics and others in trying to get the defense establishment to recognize and adapt to the enormous implications of global warming.

Brigadier General (Retired) Michael Herzog. (Courtesy)

He told The Times of Israel on Tuesday that he thought the military was “waking up,” but, he said, “there isn’t enough awareness at the top.

“It’s good that they appointed someone down there, but I think what we really need to see is top executives taking care of it and the budgets are allocated and then you know that it is serious, ”he added.

The IDF’s work is still in its infancy, officials said.

In June, former IDF chief of staff Gadi Eisenkot told the Institute for National Security Studies (INSS), where he is now a senior researcher, that unlike the US military, where climate change was an integral part, it was “not discussed” within the IDF and relegated to the “most marginal” place among all issues handled by the military.

This despite the potential of global warming to have an impact on runways and aircraft formation, he said during a confab held (in hebrew) to launch the INSS publication “Environment, Climate and National Security: A New Front for Israel”. The military was already changing training schedules to make sure soldiers were not outside during the hottest hours, he added.

An abandoned watchtower near a military road, Judean Desert, January 4, 2018 (Dario Sanchez / Flash90)

Gideon Behar, the Foreign Ministry’s special envoy for climate change and sustainability, has also been actively involved in the attempt to have climate change recognized as a threat to national security.

Gideon Béhar. (Courtesy)

“We have to go much faster,” he urged attendees at Monday’s meeting. “The rhythm of [climate] change is faster than expected and impacts are increasingly difficult to predict. No one else will correct the things that we ourselves don’t do today. This is our shift and we need to work day and night to strengthen preparedness, as well as mitigation. “

Stressing the importance of regional cooperation to ensure that neighboring states can build their resilience against the effects of global warming, Behar revealed that two years ago, Cyprus launched a regional climate cooperation initiative between countries Mediterranean and Middle Eastern (excluding North Africa).

Despite a business disruption during the coronavirus pandemic, 12 working groups have been set up and a regional meeting is scheduled for mid-October, in which Israel will participate, he said.

The IDF could look to the US military for advice, with the Pentagon leading the way in mainstreaming climate change, Dr Yehuda Troen of the Knesset’s Research and Information Unit said at the time. from the same meeting.

Work on the plans began in 2014 in light of the U.S. military’s need to be more active at the North Pole – where melting glaciers have enabled a higher Russian presence, and to provide humanitarian assistance, conduct operational activities, intelligence gathering and training, in a warming world.

In this file photo from July 22, 2017, a polar bear comes out of the water to walk on the ice in Franklin Strait in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. (AP Photo / David Goldman, on file)

Two years ago, the U.S. military presented Congress with a comprehensive climate preparedness report at 148 military bases, detailing the risks of events such as recurrent floods, droughts and wildfires today and 20 years to come, Troen said.

Last year, it published a Climate Resilience Handbook, outlining measures that must be implemented.

The Israeli military has already experienced these problems.

At the start of last year, flooding of a number of underground hangars caused damage estimated at NIS 30 million (9.3 million) to eight F-16 fighter jets and their infrastructure.

However, it does not appear to have prompted the military to take major action.

“It is not really clear what the IDF is doing,” Troen said, adding that “the National Security Council has said it is not really dealing with the matter, although it would be ready to cooperate.”

An F-16 fighter jet sits in a flooded hangar at Hatzor Air Base in southern Israel in January 2020 (Social media)

The current director of the NSC, Meir Ben-Shabbat, is due to retire at the end of August. He will be replaced by the 45-year-old former Mossad officer Eyal Hulata.

Environmental Protection Minister Tamar Zandberg is also trying to get the government to recognize climate change as a national strategic threat.

The climate crisis and responsible journalism

As an environmental reporter for The Times of Israel, I try to convey the facts and science behind climate change and environmental degradation, explain – and criticize – official policies affecting our future, and describe the Israeli technologies that can be part of the solution.

I am passionate about the natural world and disheartened by the dismal lack of awareness of environmental issues of most of the public and politicians in Israel.

I am proud to do my part to keep The Times of Israel readers properly informed on this vital topic – which can and must lead to policy change.

Your support, by joining The Times of Israel community, allows us to continue our important work. Would you like to join our community today?

Thank you,

Sue surke, Environment Journalist

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International headquarters

Flexicon expands global headquarters in Pennsylvania

Flexicon Corp. expanded its manufacturing space in Bethlehem, Pa., by 50,000 square feet to meet growing demand for its bulk handling equipment and systems.

The new space is mainly intended for the storage of sub-assemblies, the crating and the staging of the assembled equipment. This includes stocking Quick-Ship models of flexible screw conveyors, bulk bag unloaders and bulk bag conditioners for immediate shipment, freeing up the main facility for increased fabrication and assembly capacity.

Founded in 1974 in Fairfield, NJ, the company purchased its first manufacturing plant in Lodi, NJ in 1978, quintupled with the purchase of a plant in Phillipsburg, NJ in 1988, and added a satellite plant in Easton, PA in 1995 U.S. operations were then consolidated and expanded with the construction of the company’s global headquarters in Bethlehem, PA in 2001.

“In 2014, we doubled the size of our headquarters in Bethlehem, maximizing the coverage of the existing site, so we are fortunate that a facility adjacent to our main building is available this year,” said David Boger, vice president executive.

International factory expansions include the establishment of a manufacturing facility in the UK in 1994, one in South Africa in 2001 and another in Australia in 2008.

The company’s technical sales staff also grew with the addition of 26 factory direct sales offices located in US, UK, Chile, Spain, Germany, France, Africa. South, Australia, Singapore and Indonesia.

“All of the company’s locations can easily rely on Flexicon’s 25,000 installations around the world to find existing solutions to most bulk handling problems,” added Boger.

The company holds 36 patents reflected in the designs of its flexible screw conveyors, tube cable conveyors, pneumatic conveying systems, bulk bag unloaders, bulk bag conditioners, bulk bag fillers, bag emptying stations, drum / box / container tippers and batch weighing systems. A separate project engineering division. integrates large-scale systems in all industries in which bulk materials are handled.


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Non profit living

Bloomington tent residents face ‘eviction’ as restaurant prepares to open

Jamie stands shirtless on a vacant lot on the west side of Bloomington. He is wearing jeans that his brother gave him. Behind him are flattened tents, blankets and clothing sprawled out on an asphalt, concrete and weed floor as the sun dries out these essentials after recent torrential rains.

The Indescribable Lot is what Jamie and about half a dozen other people call home. It will soon house a Panda Express restaurant. Bloomington City Council has approved plans to build the restaurant at the location along West Market Street.

The property runs along a busy highway not far from the highway. It is surrounded by gas stations, restaurants and other shops. It is not a residential area at all, with the exception of this tent city.

Some McLean County social service providers say tent towns have been a problem in Bloomington for decades. Advocates say the plight of the tent dwellers points to a bigger problem that has not been addressed.

As state and federal governments lift moratoriums on evictions related to the coronavirus pandemic, these residents will soon face their own type of eviction.

Jamie is 33 years old. He does not give his last name. He has lived in a tent in this vacant lot for almost three years.

Jamie’s brother checks him regularly and gives him clothes and a place to shower.

“He came over here and (said) ‘Jamie get in the car’, where are we going, Disneyland? ‘ Jamie asked. “No, we are going home. You’re going to get cleaned up.

Jamie said he was staying at the Salvation Army’s Safe Harbor shelter in Bloomington. He said he went to work in Texas and had to come back to Bloomington to help his brother. He said the Salvation Army would not take him back. Jamie has other people looking after him.

Her cousin Chris has been living in the camp for a few weeks. “I came here and found my cousin and I’m not going to leave him alone here,” Chris said.

Chris said he was worried about his cousin’s safety. He said he sent Jamie to the hospital three times due to seizures. Chris said there were always people looking for trouble there. Jamie said he had been doing drywall since he was 14 and believed he had a chance to return to work.

“I have my old boss’s number and he told me that once I got together and got my meds and stuff, he said he would put me back to work,” he said. Jamie said.

Jamie said he was taking medication for the seizures and for his mental health. Now he says his old boss no longer works for himself. Jamie is not optimistic, he will call back.

Jamie said he made do with his father’s monthly Social Security check and all the money he could get by begging. Jamie said he already won $ 80 in 20 minutes.

Bob is basically in the same situation as Jamie. Bob is 58 years old. He stands next to Jamie, sporting a graying beard, a face mask under his chin, and a vintage Chicago Cubs t-shirt. Bob said he had been living in the tent camp for a few years. He has done flooring for a living but cannot access the ground floor of the job market.

“Give me a rug, I can put it up,” beamed Bob, but said he couldn’t find a job either. He said shelters would not take him because of his criminal record. He said he received monthly disability checks. He said he needed a place to clean up for a job interview.

Homeless Services

These services are available at Bloomington-Normal, including from a religious organization that feeds them. Bloomington’s Abundant Life Church delivers non-perishable food weekly to the homeless population of Bloomington-Normal. The church also maintains a pantry and clothing and serves hot lunches daily.

Pastor Roy Koonce said he’s worried about whether those living in Tent City will have a place to go.

“That’s a great question and I don’t have an answer for what they will do,” Koonce said. “I know that if they come here, we’ll do our best to help them.”

Koonce said the church had no shelter but would offer all possible help to anyone who came to its door. Koonce said the church has rules but will not permanently reject anyone.

“I’m 68 and for the first time in my life, I feel like I have my goal,” Koontz said. “I like to do what we do. I like helping people. I like the success rate.

“It breaks my heart when I see someone who can’t.”

Bloomington’s two homeless shelters, Safe Harbor and Home Sweet Home Ministries, have said they don’t reject anyone who needs a place to stay, unless their history or behavior suggests it is. a threat to staff or other residents. But both shelters have had limited capacity for much of the past year due to pandemic restrictions.

Roy Koonce of the Abundant Life Church has said he would like the city of Bloomington to do more to help its homeless residents. He said the police are generally trying to avoid the problem.

“A lot of wanderers and homeless people sleep in the parking lot because they all get some heat to keep the ground from freezing (in winter). The police, all they do is go through there and chase these guys away. They don’t stop them, ”Koonce said.

Police intervention

Koonce suggested that an arrest would help some homeless people begin a process to seek medical attention and other treatment.

Town of Bloomington

Greg Scott

Bloomington Acting Police Chief Greg Scott said officers can’t arrest anyone if homeless residents don’t commit a crime.

“What they’re doing there isn’t specifically illegal,” Scott explained. “The State of Illinois and even the Supreme Court of the United States have made decisions that have said it is their First Amendment right to do these things.”

Scott said homeowners must file a trespass report before police arrest anyone. In the case of the proposed restaurant, Scott said no one had filed a complaint. Scott said the homeless population needs social services, not police intervention.

“It really doesn’t help anything,” Scott said.

Accommodation possibilities

A Bloomington City Council member said he would agree that jail is not the solution for people with no roof over their heads. Jeff Crabill said the goal should be permanent housing. Crabill said he was not sure what the city could do to better facilitate this, other than calling attention to the problem and encouraging more landlords to rent to people through a rapid relocation program.

“They just don’t want to have someone in their apartment or their house who is homeless. There is a stigma to this. I think some owners want to avoid this if they can, ”Crabill said.

Jeff Craybill speaking into the microphone

Emilie Bollinger

Jeff Craybill

The PATH Crisis Center in Bloomington recently launched the relocation program. The association secured funding from the CARES Act to provide short-term housing for people during the pandemic to limit the risk of the spread of COVID-19.

Karen Zangerle recently retired as Executive Director of the nonprofit group. She said tent cities have been around in Bloomington for decades. Zangerle said that there is often a certain culture in these wanderer communities that can make relocation difficult.

“People who live in tent cities like it because they don’t have anyone to tell them what to do, they have no responsibility to follow,” Zangerle said. “It’s a bit like a big camping trip.

Zangerle said PATH has asked outreach workers to meet with tent dwellers and other homeless people to discuss their options for a permanent place to stay. She said some will welcome the aid and some will not.

“What ultimately happens is that a certain group of them will find a new place and they will leave,” Zangerle said, adding that a large part of the tent city’s population is moving to the south when the weather gets colder.

Where to go from here

Bob, a resident of Tent City, said he plans to move soon, regardless of the restaurant’s schedule. “When it’s cold we have to go somewhere,” he exclaimed, but added that he was not sure where he was planning to move.

Jamie said once the proposed restaurant moves in, it will likely end up across the street behind the McDonald’s where he lives.

“It’s the only other place we can go,” Jamie said.

Jamie and Bob both laugh at the feeling that they don’t want help.

“We’ve tried and tried and tried and tried and they avoided us,” Jamie said.

“We’ll get there one way or another,” Bob said.

Where and how they will do it remains an open question. These two tented city dwellers think they’ll have to rely on their experience and survival instinct when their home from the last few years is uprooted for a fast food franchise.

It is not known when Panda Express plans to take over the West Bloomington site to begin construction. The company did not return any messages seeking comment.


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Canadian army

Global Military Land Vehicle Industry Expected to Reach $ 31.6 Billion by 2031

DUBLIN, August 03, 2021– (COMMERCIAL THREAD)–The “Global Military Land Vehicle Market to 2031 – Market Size and Drivers, Major Programs, Competitive Landscape and Strategic Outlook” report was added to ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

The global military ground vehicles market is valued at US $ 21.9 billion in 2021 and will grow at a CAGR of 3.74% to reach a value of US $ 31.6 billion by 2031.

The cumulative global military ground vehicles market is expected to reach US $ 292.8 billion during the forecast period. The demand for military ground vehicles is expected to be driven by the European region, especially in countries like France, Russia and the UK. The North American region will occupy the second place in the world, showing a steady growth rate during the forecast period with a CAGR of 2.34%. Major military forces around the world are now undertaking modernization efforts to replace their old platforms in the face of modern threats. These efforts will support market growth over the next decade.

Heightened geopolitical tensions, the need to deploy forces to regions around the world and the demands for standardization under alliances such as NATO are some of the reasons that push military forces to acquire military ground vehicles. modern. In addition, tensions with Russia in Eastern Europe are pushing other countries in the region and NATO to improve their conventional capabilities with new platforms capable of countering the heavy armored and mechanized formations of the United States. Russian army. In addition, the old Soviet equipment currently in the stocks of the armies of Eastern Europe must be replaced with new platforms, which further stimulates the growth of the market in the region.

The global military land vehicle market is expected to be dominated by Europe. Major European countries have increased their defense budgets and tried to maintain them even during the pandemic. This will allow them to implement large-scale procurement projects without major delays. North America will follow the European market. This growth is attributed to the implementation of a wide range of supply programs by the US Army and the US Marine Corps. The most notable programs are the JLTV and the Stryker, which will standardize the country’s vehicle fleet and provide increased protection for its deployed forces. The Canadian military also contributes to regional growth through the implementation of a series of programs covering several market segments.

Highlights

  • The global military land vehicles market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 3.75% during the forecast period.

  • The global military land vehicles market is categorized into different categories; Armored personnel carrier, infantry fighting vehicle, main battle tank, multipurpose armored vehicle, tactical truck, armored support vehicle, armored engineer vehicle and light utility vehicle.

  • The global military land vehicle market is expected to be dominated by Europe with a revenue share of 41.1%. The growth of the European market is attributed to spending by countries such as the UK, Russia and France, among others.

  • Armored personnel carriers are expected to be the largest segment of the military ground vehicles market during the forecast period.

Reasons to buy

  • Determine potential investment areas based on a detailed analysis of global military ground vehicle trends over the next ten years

  • Gain an in-depth understanding of the factors underlying the demand for different segments of military ground vehicles in the world’s heaviest spending countries and identify the opportunities offered by each of them

  • Strengthen your understanding of the market in terms of demand drivers, industry trends and the latest technological developments, among others

  • Identify the major channels driving the global Military Land Vehicle market, providing a clear picture of future opportunities that can be exploited leading to increased revenue

  • Channel resources by focusing on ongoing programs undertaken by defense ministries of different countries in the global military land vehicle market

  • Make the right business decisions based on an in-depth competitive landscape analysis consisting of detailed profiles of the major military ground vehicle vendors around the world. Company profiles also include information on key products, alliances, recent contracts awarded, and financial analysis where applicable.

Main topics covered:

  • Summary

  • Global Military Land Vehicle Market – Overview

  • Market dynamics

  • Global Military Land Vehicles Market – Segment Analysis

  • Global Military Land Vehicles Market – Regional Analysis

  • Global Military Land Vehicle Market – Trend Analysis

  • Analysis of key programs

  • Competitive landscape analysis

Companies mentioned

For more information on this report, visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/a6e7e2

View the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210803005491/en/

Contacts

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History organization

PH lockouts: a brief history

Police checks, like last year’s one, have become commonplace when the lockdown is enforced. FILE PHOTO / NINO JESUS ​​ORBETA

MANILA, Philippines — The latest looming lockdown in the National Capital Region (NCR) is believed to be the fourth in the capital, which accounts for more than half of the Philippine economy.

As more than 12 million residents wait for the latest round of restrictions that will begin on August 6 and end on August 20, they are told that limiting their movement is the price to pay to avoid a greater tragedy: coronavirus infections get out of hand.

The measures appear to tilt in favor of one aspect of the crisis – health – and neglect the other: the economy and livelihoods. Some experts say that protecting people from disease and the loss of their livelihood is not necessarily a choice proposition.

Disease experts have shown that keeping people separate is an effective way to slow down the transmission of the virus for one basic reason. Humans are the main carriers of the virus.

“The primary mode by which people become infected with SARS Cov2 is exposure to respiratory fluids carrying infectious viruses,” the United States Centers for Disease Control has said in its numerous COVID-19 advisories.

According to the CDC, people are mainly infected with:

  • Inhalation of microscopic respiratory droplets and virus-carrying aerosol particles
  • Getting the virus into the mouth, nose, or eyes from a splash or spray of virus-laden particles from an infected person
  • Touching mucous membranes or contaminated surfaces

There are still inconclusive studies indicating that the virus is suspended in the air, which could be alarming, but it has not been shown to be certain.

Experts are sure of one thing, however. Close human contact increases the risk of infection, which would make containment an essential weapon in the fight against SARS Cov2.

During one of his briefings on the government’s response to COVID, President Rodrigo Duterte blurted out how difficult it would be to keep people at a safe distance in a place as populated as Metro Manila.

On this point, Duterte was right. Metro Manila is one of the most densely populated urban areas in the world. In Manila alone, there are at least 71,263 people per square kilometer, according to 2015 census data. In Mandaluyong city, the density is 41,580 people per square kilometer. In Pasay City, it’s 29,815 people per km².

Locking down these densely populated areas could mean keeping people locked in very tight spaces, which could defeat the goal of preventing transmission of the Delta variant.

Delta, who was previously known as Indian, was as contagious as chickenpox, according to the US CDC. To get an idea of ​​how contagious Delta is, a person with chickenpox is 90% likely to pass the infection on to people close to them who are not immune, the CDC said.

Why resort to confinement in places where you cannot separate people like in congested poor urban communities? According to Socio-Economic Planning Secretary Karl Kendrick Chua in a statement last year, the lockdown or strengthened community quarantine would prevent 323,262 additional COVID cases, of which 9,698 are serious or critical.

But the blockages have taken place and will happen soon. They are now part of the package against COVID-19 around the world.

NCR lockdown episodes would show numbers that may or may not lead to a conclusion about the effectiveness of restriction of movement as a measure to slow the transmission of the virus.

Graphic by Ed Lustan

When the first lockdown, or Enhanced Community Quarantine (ECQ), was imposed from March 14 to April 30, 2020, according to the World Health Organization, there were 196 cases of COVID on the second day of the lockdown, March 16. On March 23, there were 768 cases. As of March 30, there were 2,019 cases. As of April 6, two days after the expiration of the ECQ period, there were 1,334 cases.

Graphic by Ed Lustan

During the second lockdown, which moved to the modified ECQ (MECQ) from August 4 to 18, 2020, the WHO said there were 2,463 cases of COVID on August 10, six days after the start of the locking. On August 17 or a day before the MECQ expired, there were 29,305 cases.

A third cycle of ECQ was implemented from March 29 to April 4, 2021. On the day the ECQ went into effect, there were 71,606 cases of COVID, according to the WHO. As of April 5, the day after the ECQ expired, there were 69,164 cases.

Graphic by Ed Lustan

It is not yet clear to what extent blockages in the NCR have been successful in achieving its primary goal of protecting people from infection. But it has come at a cost.

Unemployment in 2020 climbed to 17.7 percent, or 7.3 million people, according to the Philippines Statistics Authority’s April 2020 Labor Force Survey.

In the results of a survey carried out in November 2020, Social Weather Stations (SWS) said 48% of the Filipino population considered themselves to be poor. At least 12 million families have declared themselves poor, according to the SWS poll. The striking figure is that 2 million of these families are considered “newly poor”.

This next ECQ from August 6, millions of families are again facing an uncertain outcome. Duterte had asked the Ministry of Budget and Management to identify sources of funds for cash assistance after repeatedly saying in the past that the government lacked funds for this purpose.

The Department of Labor and Employment, quoted by the Philippine Daily Inquirer, has forecast the loss of more than 167,000 jobs.

Senatorial Minority Leader Franklin Drilon, and several other senators, call on the government to stop fundraising and simply turn to the National Task Force to End Local Communist Armed Conflicts (NTF-Elcac), which in 2021 alone gets more than 19 billion pesos in funding.

The task force had already released billions of pesos in villages, supposedly for development projects that would pit communities against communist rebels. An audit of the projects is requested although the Ministry of Interior and Local Government (DILG), which transferred the funds to the villages, has provided a list of project descriptions.

If funding was found, the government planned to distribute P 1,000 in cash per person and up to P 4,000 per family during the two-week ECQ August 6-20.

It was, according to Bayan chief Renato Reyes, misleading to give hope for help but not to be sure of the source of funding.

Meanwhile, people with cash have formed long lines at grocery stores and supermarkets to stock up on supplies. Shopping centers, with the exception of stores considered essential, have turned dark again, restaurant after restaurant closed on August 1.

Millions of people hope there will be light at the end of the seemingly endless tunnel.

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International headquarters

REE Automotive to Open US Headquarters in Austin, Texas

Zero-emission technology company REE Automotive has named Austin, Texas, the new headquarters for its US headquarters. The Israel-based electric mobility company is now looking to capitalize on a growing market in North America by opening a headquarters in Lone Star State, alongside an integration center for assembly and testing of its proprietary technologies.

REE Automotive is an electric mobility solutions company based in Tel Aviv, Israel, with additional subsidiaries in the US, UK and Germany.

The company specializes in the development and manufacture of modular EV platforms for B2B transactions in addition to its proprietary REEcorners. This year alone, REE announced collaborations with Magna International and Toyota’s Hino Motors.

Last February, REE announced an ongoing SPAC merger with 10X Capital Venture Acquisition Corp. ($ VCVC), raking in $ 500 million in gross revenue to accelerate mass production in 2023.

Yesterday, the business combination has been approved by shareholders and officially closed. This morning, REE debuted on the Nasdaq under the ticker $ REE.

REE Automotive is now launching into the running following its approved merger by announcing a new head office on American soil.

A REE corner module / Source: REE Automotive

REE Automotive’s new headquarters will be in Austin, Texas

In A press release this morning, REE Automotive shared plans for a U.S. headquarters in the booming city of Austin, Texas, promising more than 150 jobs over the next few years.

Additionally, Austin will house REE’s first asset light integration center, where it will assemble and test its REEcorner technology and modular electric vehicle platforms.

The new integration center brings REE’s technology to current and future North American automotive partners. REE co-founder and CEO Daniel Barel shares his thoughts on the city:

Establishing our US headquarters in Austin, Texas best positions us for rapid growth and expansion. Austin is fast becoming a global hotbed for elite tech professionals. REE must continue to grow and prosper, and Austin’s drive and entrepreneurial spirit fits perfectly with REE’s culture and values. Our presence in the United States will allow us to capitalize on the incredible opportunities in the United States market and to connect with our customers and partners based in North America, including Magna International and JB Poindexter, as we work together to develop and deliver modular electric vehicles (MEV).

A representative from REE Automotive said Electrek the company will inaugurate the new headquarters and the new integration center this year.

Construction is expected to be completed in the second half of 2022 and has an annual capacity of 40,000 modular EV platforms.

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