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News in Brief: It’s not too late to join the Solar Tour on Saturday; Wilmette’s birthday party is on; Golf outing on a stroll

Go Green Wilmette is leading a free tour of over a dozen Wilmette homes with solar panels from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, September 25.

During the visit, GGW President Beth Drucker and other homeowners will provide information on the solar power systems installed in their homes. The tour will pass through Wilmette as shown on this interactive map.

Please note that some facilities will only offer ‘curbside viewing’.

According to a press release from Go Green Wilmette, the organization and another local environmental group, Go Green Northbrook, organized their own village-wide solar tours in conjunction with the Illinois Solar Energy Association’s annual tour on September 25.


Wilmette’s 150th birthday celebrations have begun

Village President Senta Plunkett told guests at Wilmette Beach Bash that that night, September 18, marked the start of a series of events to honor the village’s 150th anniversary.

The village of Wilmette was incorporated in 1872 and, for the next year, will celebrate the 150th anniversary of that time, according to Plunkett.

“To mark this important milestone, the Village is undertaking a series of events to educate us on Wilmette’s history, to promote special aspects of our Village and, above all, to have fun,” she reportedly told the crowd. Beach Bash. “After what we have all endured over the past 18 months, we look forward to the celebration to renew and strengthen the bonds we share as friends and neighbors. I can’t think of a better place to start the celebration than here, at Beach Bash 2021, in partnership with the Ouilmette Foundation.

According to a press release from the Village of Wilmette, the Wilmette Village Council’s 150th Anniversary Planning Committee is organizing a “celebration that will foster community spirit and unity while honoring the history of the village and looking towards it. to come up “.

The events will be punctuated by a community party on September 10, 2022, at the Center du Village.

In addition to the festival, the committee is planning a series of lectures, a winter celebration, art exhibitions and projects to improve the community’s public spaces, the statement said.

For more information, visit www.wilmette150.org, email [email protected] or call (847) 853-7529.


A quartet at the annual outing

Ramblers Golf Outing raises funds for tuition assistance

Loyola Academy supporters gathered at the North Shore Country Club on September 20 for the 27th Annual Ramblers Golf Outing.

A day of fun and fundraising included a number of contests and prizes, many of which were donated by Loyola alumni.

According to a press release from Loyola, current parent and board member Kevin Lynch, John Defraytas, Willy Hendricks and Kyler Ferguson took first place in the raw competition. On the Peoria handicap system, Doug Kadison, Chris Friedrich, Michael Zera and Jim Greco took first place.

Courtney O’Connor and Chris Burke had the longest drive on the 12th hole. Kevin Willer and Brian Callahan were closest to the hairpin on the 3rd hole.

“We are grateful to our golf outing hosts Rob Banas and the Rambler members of the North Shore Country Club,” the statement said. “Their generosity and their efforts allowed us to have the best possible experience. ”

The outing’s goal, the statement said, of raising enough funds to provide a year of schooling for a student has been met. Over the past 27 years, the golf outing has raised over $ 250,000 for the tuition program.


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Youth-led climate events around the world: live updates

Jérôme Foster II. (Rachel Ramirez / CNN)

Young climate activists marched in New York today to call for climate justice and end the burning of fossil fuels.

As the strikers made their way to the financial district of Lower Manhattan, halting traffic in New York City, the busy streets filled with chants such as “sea level is rising, so are we”, “Keep that carbon in the ground” and “There is nothing natural about natural gas.

The path followed the same route as the biggest climate strike of 2019 when Greta Thunberg made an appearance. Among the faces of the march to Battery Park, where the crowd heard speakers and musicians, were prominent young activists such as Alexandria Villaseñor, Jerome Foster II and Jamie Margolin.

Alexandria Villaseñor, on the right.
Alexandria Villaseñor, on the right. (Rachel Ramirez / CNN)

Villanseñor told CNN her goals have evolved since she started going on strike at 13.

“The movement has really changed over the past year,” she said. “The climate crisis continues to become more and more urgent. In the latest UN climate report released in August, the language changed to be more urgent, saying that we are already affected and now we just need to mitigate. It was prevention before, but now we have to mitigate.

Foster, currently the youngest member of the White House Advisory Council on Environmental Justice, told CNN he wore red to represent the findings of the landmark UN State of the Science on Climate Change report, which has been called a “code red for humanity.”

“Our requirements have changed. We are no longer just children who are on the streets, we are now in a position of authority, ”he said. “Now we are taken seriously, we have a seat at the table, we are going to make sure everyone at this table understands the pressing urgency and takes action.”

Jamie Margolin.
Jamie Margolin. (Rachel Ramirez / CNN)

Margolin, co-founder of the Zero Hour climate organization which joined the movement in 2016, also wore red to represent a world on fire. She grew up in the Pacific Northwest, which experienced a record-breaking heat wave this summer that scientists say would have been “virtually impossible” without man-made climate change.

“It’s been such a long journey, and it’s really overwhelming in a good way to see such joy and resilience right now because it’s been such a dark time for so long,” she said. told CNN. “Online activism just isn’t the same, especially with so many climate disasters happening.”


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Canadian army

Weekend army training in Puslinch

Reserve personnel will train near McLean Road on Saturday and Sunday

PRESS RELEASE
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
*************************
From September 25-26, Canadian Army Reserve personnel will be training near McLean Road in Puslinch Township, Ontario.

Activities will include the deployment of a C3 105mm howitzer artillery system, construction of simulated local defenses and soldiers patrolling the area. The exercise will take place in a private quarry and will be conducted with the cooperation of local authorities in officially approved locations.

All activity will take place throughout the day and night of Saturday and Sunday. Members of the public can see military vehicles and armed personnel participating in the exercise, with unloaded weapons. No ammunition firing will take place.

This important exercise is conducted to prepare members of the Canadian Army Reserve to operate in the basic capabilities of soldiers and technical artillery.

All participating soldiers will apply force health protection measures based on and in addition to public health guidelines, including the wearing of masks, additional disinfection of equipment and hands, and physical distancing in the area. as far as possible.

All measures are taken to ensure a minimum of inconvenience to those in the area, although some areas may be inaccessible during the dates of the exercise. Members of the public are urged to use extra caution when approaching military vehicles and are thanked in advance for their understanding and cooperation.

*************************


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Non profit living

Powell meets a changing economy: fewer workers, higher prices

WASHINGTON – Restaurant owners and hoteliers are struggling to fill jobs. Delays in the supply chain drive up prices for small businesses. Unemployed Americans unable to find work even with record high job vacancies.

These and other disruptions to the U.S. economy – the aftermath of the viral pandemic that erupted 18 months ago – appear likely to last, a group of nonprofit business owners and executives said on Friday. to Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell.

The business challenges, outlined during a “Fed Listens” virtual panel discussion, highlight the ways the COVID-19 epidemic and its delta variant continue to transform the U.S. economy. Some event attendees said their business plans are still evolving. Others have complained of sluggish sales and fluctuating fortunes after the pandemic eased this summer, then escalated over the past two months.

A d

“We are living in truly unique times,” said Powell at the end of the discussion. “I’ve never seen these kinds of supply chain issues, I’ve never seen an economy that combines drastic labor shortages with a lot of unemployed … So it’s an economy that evolving very quickly, it will be very different from the one (before).

The Fed chairman asked Cheetie Kumar, a restaurant owner in Raleigh, North Carolina, why she is having such a hard time finding workers. Powell’s question goes to the heart of the Fed’s mandate to maximize employment, as many people who worked before the pandemic have lost their jobs and are no longer looking for them. When – or if – these people resume their job search will help determine when the Fed can conclude that the economy has reached the peak of jobs.

Kumar told Powell that many of his former employees have decided to quit the restaurant industry for good.

A d

“I think a lot of people wanted to change their lives, and we lost a lot of people in different industries,” she said. “I think half of our people have decided to go back to school.”

Kumar said her restaurant now pays a minimum of $ 18 an hour, and she added that higher wages are likely a long-term change for the restaurant industry.

“We can’t get by and pay people $ 13 an hour and expect them to stay with us for years and years,” Kumar said. “It just won’t happen.”

Loren Nalewanski, vice president of Marriott Select Brands, said his business was losing out to similar challenges as many former employees, especially housekeepers, left for other jobs that recently raised wages. Even the recent cut to a federal unemployment supplement of $ 300 per week, he said, has not led to an increase in the number of job seekers.

A d

“People have left the industry and unfortunately they are finding other things to do,” Nalewanski said. “Other industries that may not have paid that much … are (now) paying a lot more.”

Jill Rizika, president of Towards Employment, a non-profit workforce development organization in Cleveland, said she sees the stark disconnect every day between companies posting millions of job vacancies. and those struggling to find work and escape poverty. About 60% of the people her organization helps find jobs have criminal records, she said, and 65% have only high school diplomas. Many parents, especially mothers, are still unable to return to full-time work.

“They tried to work but because of the epidemics, the children are being sent home from daycare or school, which makes their schedules unmanageable,” said Rizika. “Where the digital divide comes in: a young mother tried remote working but didn’t have enough broadband to make it work.

A d

Small businesses are also grappling with rising costs, with little relief in sight, some participants said. The Fed has accelerated its plans to start withdrawing its low interest rate policies, in part because of concerns about rising inflation.

Larry Andrews, chairman of Massachusetts Growth Capital, a state agency that supports small businesses, said that during a recent tour of the state, a cafe owner told him that the price of a case of eggs had skyrocketed since the pandemic. Another restaurant owner said a jug of cooking oil went from $ 17 to $ 50 – “if you can get it.”

“The speed and intensity of this slowdown – and the speed of the recovery in many areas – is unprecedented in modern times,” said Powell in prepared remarks at the start of the event. “The business plans have been reworked, the outlook has been revised and the future continues to be tainted with uncertainties.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


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History organization

Six elected to the ECU Athletics Hall of Fame

GREENVILLE, NC – Six extraordinary people will be inducted into the ECU Athletics Hall of Fame on Friday November 5 at the 43rd annual installment ceremony inside Harvey Hall as part of the annual Hall of Fame / Letters Winners Weekend.

The exceptional class includes the former president of the Pirate Club and philanthropist Bill clark; former football player and head coach Ruffin McNeill, who led ECU to four bowl games in six seasons; former softball pitcher Toni Paisley and infielder Keisha Shepperson (Stewart), both of whom have won All-America accolades during their careers; and Jacob Smith, who was a member of the 1959 NAIA Pirates National Championship men’s swim team. Kelly wernert (Krainiak), a two-time all-conference artist, who becomes the first volleyball-specific player to ever be elected to the Hall of Fame.

The inductees will be publicly recognized inside Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium as part of the halftime festivities during the November 6 soccer match against Temple.

The six new inductees will bring the total membership of the ECU Track and Field Hall of Fame to 178. to themselves and to the University.

Clark (ECU ’66) is an avid supporter of ECU Athletics and has a long history of philanthropy with the Pirate Club. He pledged the principal donation of $ 1.5 million in support of the construction of a new baseball stadium that honors both Clark’s generosity and the legacy of former Pirates head coach Keith LeClair, Clark-LeClair Stadium. He also provided the main donation in support of the Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium renovation campaign, as he has been honored with the Outstanding Alumni Award and the Chancellor’s Amethyst in recent years.

McNeill (ECU ’80) was a three-year starter as the Pirates’ defensive back in the late 1970s before being named head coach in January 2010. In six seasons, McNeill led the Pirates to four appearances. in a bowl and posted the fifth highest head. Coaching victories in program history, while developing 12 first-team selections for all conferences and a trio of MVP / Player of the Year award winners. In 2013, he led ECU to just the second 10-game winning season in the program’s history.

Paisley (ECU ’10) is the most decorated player in pirate softball history. She was named U.S. Conference Pitcher of the Year for three consecutive seasons (2009, ’10, ’11) as well as the league’s Freshman-of-the-Year in 2007. In 2009, she was appointed Co-C-USA. Female athlete of the year. Paisley ended her playing career with 118 wins, 23rd– most of NCAA history, while leading ECU to consecutive conference titles in 2010 and 2011.

Shepperson (ECU ’01) won NFCA All-America honors in 2000 and 2001 and was a three-time All-Region player. She was named Big South Freshman of the Year in 1998 and won first-team honors in all conferences the following season while helping the Pirates win their first conference title and first place in the NCAA tournament. Shepperson holds career records in the program for runs, hits and doubles and has the second most stolen bases.

Smith (ECU ’60) won All-America honors in five events at the 1959 NAIA Nations Championship competition, winning silver in the 100-meter freestyle and bronze in the 50-meter freestyle. He also swam at the top of the 1959 national championship free relay team. The following year, Smith won bronze in the 100 freestyle and helped the 400 freestyle relay team to finish second.

Wernert (ECU ’07) received All-Conference USA first-team honors as a junior and senior, placing third in the league in eliminations per game in 2007. She helped the Pirates record consecutive winning seasons for the first time in a quarter century in 2005 and 2006. In second year, she led ECU to her first C-USA tournament victory. Wernert set season and career records for the winning program, which placed ninth all-time in C-USA history, at the end of her eligibility.

An interactive video listing and clips of all Hall of Fame members can be found in the lobby of the Smith-Williams Center, which opened in 2013. Photos of all Hall of Fame members are now available permanently exhibited and the 2021 dedicated class will be added. at the Hall of Fame weekend exhibit, November 5-6.

All Hall of Fame members will receive an email next week with full details of the Hall of Fame ceremony. If you are currently a Hall of Fame member and need to update your contact details, please email [email protected] with the appropriate changes.


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“Ghosts of Afghanistan” Documentary Reveals Shattered Hopes | Cinema | DW

The documentary Ghosts of Afghanistan, shown at Berlin Human Rights Film Festival, follows Canadian war correspondent Graeme Smith as he returns to Afghanistan and visits various individuals who were involved in rebuilding the country or offers an insider perspective on its social and political background.

The deep divisions in Afghanistan are particularly evident through the perspectives of the various women interviewed in the film. Among them is Shaharzad Akbar, the country’s leading human rights investigator, who denounces abuses by both the Taliban and the government.

Graeme Smith also meets with Frankish students at Kabul University who discuss how the Taliban can threaten their hard-won rights and freedoms.

A particularly stark contrast is also revealed through an encounter with a group of burqa-clad women in Kandahar who live up to Taliban expectations, as opposed to the film’s other interview partner, Farahnaz Forotan, who is one of the more franks of the country. feminists.

Her house, decorated with large self-portraits of Frida Kahlo showing her breasts, would shock many conservatives.

Provocative art in an Afghan woman’s office: feminist Farahnaz Forotan featured in “Ghosts of Afghanistan”

Retrospective revelations

Current developments in Afghanistan make the film very timely, but as it was filmed in 2019, it provides insight into the structures that enabled the Taliban to retake Afghanistan.

As Graeme Smith explained at the Berlin film festival, their initial version of the film offered a hopeful end to a political settlement: modifications, “he said.” We had hoped that the Doha process could lead to a compromise between the Taliban and their enemies. “

Still from the movie 'Ghosts of Afghanistan', women wearing a burqa sitting around a table and drinking tea, a woman wears only a veil and chats with a man at the end of the table.

In the film, these women say they don’t feel threatened by the Taliban

The perspective provided by the documentary is particularly revealing. As director Julian Sher told DW, “A major point of our film is that the Taliban are much stronger than the Afghan government or Western armies would admit.”

Warnings against the Taliban were dismissed

Two interviews in the film express this idea particularly well. In one scene, Rahmatullah Amiri, one of Afghanistan’s most respected political analysts, warns that already in 2019, the Taliban had most of their country “in full control”.

This statement is followed by an optimistic statement from National Security Advisor Hamdullah Mohib, who says, “We have broken the backs of the Taliban,” and adds, “We have a military path to victory in this conflict.

“This is not true at all,” is Amiri’s reaction to the news. “If the backs of the Taliban could be broken, it would be from 2009 to 2014 where hundreds of thousands of international troops there and billions of dollars poured into building and nation building and everything.” Amiri then correctly predicted that the Taliban “has not yet reached its peak.”

Broken trust

Many people were inclined to believe and put their hopes in the country’s 38-year-old Western-trained national security adviser. Hamdullah Mohib, who had been the former Afghan ambassador to the United States and was considered one of President Ashraf Ghani’s most trusted associates. They both fled the country on August 15.

From the film 'Ghosts of Afghanistan': National Security Advisor Hamdullah Mohib interviewed by Graeme Smith, a man taking notes on the sidelines.

National Security Advisor Hamdullah Mohib is interviewed by Graeme Smith in “Ghosts of Afghanistan”

Afghan journalist Khwaga Ghani, who worked as a fixer on Ghosts of Afghanistan, was among those who were deeply disappointed with Mohib, a figure she found particularly inspiring while filming the documentary in 2019.

“I had a totally different perspective and idea of ​​what he was going to do for the country. I thought he could bring about changes in society, in the security situation,” she told DW. “But in the end, he really broke not only my confidence but everyone’s confidence.”

Leaving Afghanistan

Like many others, Khwaga Ghani was forced to leave Afghanistan after the Taliban seized power. As she also worked for various media, including the New York Times, NPR, Vice and National Geographic, she managed to escape Kabul with her family thanks to the intervention of her American colleagues.

It was a complicated process. After four days of hiding in a hotel after the Taliban took control of Kabul, her family were escorted to the airport. Ghani said they had to spend two nights near the runway before being admitted to a plane filled with more than 400 people.

Their first stop was in Qatar, where they spent seven hours stuck on the plane, waiting for buses that would take them to the military base. “Children were passing out inside the plane, there was no oxygen,” she said.

Confront the ghosts

After a second stop at the US Air Force Base in Ramstein, Germany, they were finally dispatched to the Fort McCoy Base in Wisconsin, where they are still waiting. Even though Ghani has contacts in the region, she is not allowed to leave the US military facility, where they have been held for 21 days already. They do not know exactly when they will be allowed to leave, as the investigations into the various refugees must be completed.

Ghani and his family plan to eventually go to California, where his brother already lives. She was awarded a scholarship to continue her studies in journalism and human rights.

Like many other Afghans, she intends to face the ghosts of Afghanistan in the future. “I hope my country will be better, so that I can go back,” she said. Meanwhile, she added: “I want to learn things here that will help bring about changes in my country.”


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Non profit living

Expanded Child Tax Credit Means My Son Will Have More Options Than Me – Press and Guide

I remember finding out that I was about to become a mother. I felt fear take hold of me. My brain stopped. I remember crying, but I had no tears. I remember trying to run, but couldn’t move.

No one had prepared me for motherhood – my own mother abandoned me when I was not even 2 years old. The father of my child was violently abusive. My life was unstable and I was afraid that another human being would depend on me.

Things are so much better now. My son, Caleb, is entering kindergarten and he is the light of my life. We’ve been through so much together, but we’re doing it.

One thing that helps more than words can express is the expanded new child tax credit. Adopted as part of the Biden administration’s COVID-19 relief program, it puts money in our bank account – and the bank accounts of almost every parent in this country.

This credit is on track to lift half of all children living in poverty, including mine. This will help them lead safer and happier lives into adulthood.

My own early childhood was filled with trauma.

After our mother left us, my father had to take care of all of us children. He did his best, but he didn’t know how to access social services for us. When he got sick, we lost everything. We ended up living in a tent “village” under a bridge, where I had to cook for 50 people for the next seven years.

I was just a child.

I was afraid of people in the streets, of students at school, even of being with others where I lived. When I took action and skipped school, I was put in juvenile detention for truancy. The years that followed saw cycle after cycle of abuse, instability and trauma.

But eventually I found help. When I was 18 and on the run, I found a job at a homeless shelter called Covenant House and moved in. They helped me get ID and taught me about social services and how to get them.

I didn’t know there was help available for someone like me. I became a team leader there and my life began to change. Now I’m an advocate for a nonprofit called RESULTS, which trains and helps people fight for policies that help families like mine survive and thrive.

Along the way, I learned something really important: Many of us who grew up in abusive situations just don’t have access to mental health services, so we end up in abusive relationships. adulthood. And many others who experience the trauma of poverty simply don’t know how to get help.

Before the COVID-19 relief program, I would never have been able to access the child tax credit – I was just too poor. And complex paperwork and bureaucratic requirements also put other help out of reach.

But now families like mine, and all other families with children, are receiving life-changing assistance right in their bank accounts. I can’t tell you how much of a difference it makes.

Thanks to the Child Tax Credit, Caleb will not suffer the tremendous trauma I suffered as a child. His life will be better. He will have the love and economic support he needs to thrive.

We are the richest nation in the world, but too often we have abandoned our poorest children, like my mother abandoned me. But if we have the political will, we can make smarter economic choices like these to give all children a safe and secure childhood.

Not only will Caleb prosper, but we in society as a whole will.

La’Shon Marshall lives in the Detroit metro area and is a poverty advocate with the RESULTS Educational Fund. This editorial was distributed by OtherWords.org.


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History organization

Haitians see the history of racist policies in the treatment of migrants

The footage – of men on horseback, appearing to use reins as whips to surround Haitian asylum seekers trying to cross into the United States from Mexico – sparked an uproar. But for many Haitians and black Americans, they are just confirmation of a deeply held belief:

US immigration policies, they say, are and have long been anti-black.

The border patrol’s treatment of Haitian migrants, they say, is just the latest in a long history of discriminatory US policies and indignities faced by blacks, sparking new anger among Haitian Americans, advocates black immigrants and civil rights leaders.

They point to immigration data which indicates that Haitians and other black migrants routinely face structural barriers to entering or living legally in the United States – and often experience disproportionate contact with the United States criminal justice system that can jeopardize their residence or accelerate their deportation.

Haitians, in particular, are granted asylum at the lowest rate of any nationality with a consistently high number of asylum seekers, according to an analysis of Associated Press data.

“Black immigrants live at the intersection of race and immigration and, for too long, have fallen through the cracks of bureaucracy and legal loopholes,” said Yoliswa Cele of the UndocuBlack Network, an organization national defense of the rights of current and former undocumented blacks.

“Now, through the videos capturing the abuses against Haitians at the border, the world has now seen for itself that not all migrants seeking a better future are treated equally when the skin color is involved. “

Between 2018 and 2021, only 4.62% of Haitian asylum seekers were granted asylum from the United States – the lowest rate among 84 groups for which data is available. Asylum seekers from the Dominican Republic, which shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti, have an equally low rate of 5.11%.

In comparison, four of the top five American asylum seekers are from Latin American countries: El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico and Honduras. Their acceptance rates range from 6.21% to 14.12%.

Nicole Phillips, legal director of the Haitian Bridge Alliance, said racism has long been the driving force behind the US government’s treatment of Haitian immigrants.

Phillips, whose organization is on the ground helping Haitians in Texas, says it dates back to the early 1800s, when Haitian slaves revolted and gained independence from France, and continued for decades. decades of American intervention and occupation in the small island nation.

She said the United States, threatened by the possibility of its own slaves revolting, both aided the French and did not recognize Haiti’s independence for nearly six decades. The United States also loaned Haiti money so that it could, in essence, buy its independence, collecting interest while plunging the country into poverty for decades.

“This mentality and stigma against Haitians goes back to that time,” Phillips said.

The United States violently occupied Haiti from 1915 to 1934 and supported former Haitian dictator François Duvalier, whose oppressive regime left 30,000 dead and forced thousands to flee.

While the United States has long treated Cubans with compassion – largely because of its opposition to the Communist regime – the administrations of George HW Bush and Bill Clinton have taken a hard line on Haitians. And the Trump administration ended temporary protection status for several nationalities, including Haitians and Central Americans.

Time and time again, the United States has passed immigration legislation that excluded black immigrants and Haitians, and promoted policies that unfairly undermined their legal status in the country, advocates said.

When they do manage to enter the United States, black immigrants say they face systemic racism in the American criminal justice system and American police brutality that is endemic for people across the African Diaspora.

The Black Alliance for Just Immigration, a national racial justice and immigrant rights group, largely defines black immigrants as people from countries in Africa and the Caribbean. Based on this definition, AP’s analysis of 2019 Department of Homeland Security data found that 66% of black immigrants deported from the United States were returned on criminal grounds, compared to 43% of all immigrants.

BAJI executive director Nana Gyamfi said crimes of moral turpitude, including theft or turnstile hopping, were used as partial justification for denying legal status to black immigrants. “We have people who are being kicked out because of train tickets,” she said.

Leaders of the Movement for Black Lives, a national coalition of black-led racial justice and civil rights organizations, have highlighted the treatment of Haitians at the border as a rationale for their broader demands for funding from humanitarian organizations. law enforcement in the United States.

Last year, following the murder of George Floyd, the coalition proposed sweeping federal legislation known as the BREATHE Act, which includes calls to end immigration detention, stop deportations due to contacts with the criminal justice system and to ensure due process within the immigration justice system. .

“Often in the immigration debate, black people are erased and black immigrants are erased from the conversation,” said Amara Enyia, policy researcher for the Black Lives Movement.

Ahead of a visit to the Texas migrant camp on Thursday, civil rights leaders called for an investigation into the treatment of black migrants at the border and an immediate end to the deportation of black asylum seekers.

The camp is “a catastrophic and human disgrace,” Reverend Al Sharpton said after an hour-long tour with several black American leaders in Del Rio. “We will continue to come back, as long as necessary. “

At the border and in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, where hundreds of people had previously been sent on flights from the United States, Haitians said there was no doubt race played a role. major in their mistreatment.

“They catch people, they disturb us, especially Haitians because they identify us by skin,” said Jean Claudio Charles who, with his wife and one-year-old son, had stayed in a camp on the Mexican side. near Texas for fear of arrest and deportation to Haiti.

Claude Magnolie, a Haitian citizen deported from the United States this week, said he had not seen border patrol officers treating migrants of other nationalities like him and others were treated: “C ‘ is discrimination, that’s what I call it, they treat us very badly. “

And in Miami, immigrant rights advocate Francesca Menes couldn’t believe her eyes as she watched images of asylum seekers surrounded by men on horseback.

“My family is under this bridge,” Menes said, referring to a cousin, his wife and their newborn baby who recently met in a small town on the Texas border. It took Menes’ cousin two months to make the trip from Chile, where he had lived with his brothers for three years, to escape the political turmoil, violence and devastation in Haiti.

“It made me sick,” Menes said. “This did not happen with unaccompanied minors. You did not see people riding horses, essentially herding people together as if they were cattle, as if they were animals. . “

Menes’ outrage only grew, as did his fears for his family. When she overheard her mother on the phone with family members this week, Menes said she wanted nothing more than to tell them to return to Chile.

“We actually tried to discourage our families,” she said. “People are looking for a better life. And we kind of try to anchor our families: do you know what it means to be black in America?

____

AP staff members Maria Verza in Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, Fernando Gonzalez in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Jasen Lo in Chicago, and Elliot Spagat in San Diego contributed. Morrison reported from New York. Galvan reported from Phoenix. Both are members of the AP Race and Ethnicity team. Follow Galvan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/astridgalvan. Follow Morrison on Twitter: https://twitter.com/aaronlmorrison.



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Canadian army

Canadian Army training in Puslinch, Ontario. this weekend – Guelph

The Canadian Army is training this weekend at a quarry in Puslinch, Ont.

In a statement, a spokesperson said soldiers would be in the McLean Road area conducting various exercises, including the deployment of a C3 howitzer and patrolling the area.

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“The exercise will take place in a private quarry and will be conducted with the cooperation of local authorities in officially approved locations,” said Lt. Andrew McLaughlin.

“All activity will take place throughout the day and night of Saturday and Sunday. Members of the public can see military vehicles and armed personnel participating in the exercise, with unloaded weapons. No ammunition firing will take place.

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He added that the exercise helps prepare members of the Canadian Army Reserve to operate in the basic capabilities of soldiers and artillery.


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Military Appreciation Day thanks service members and their families for their patriotic service


Military Appreciation Day thanks service members and their families for their patriotic service

All soldiers will follow measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19, including wearing masks.

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The army added that all measures are taken to ensure a minimum of inconvenience to those in the area, but that some areas may be inaccessible.

Anyone in the area is urged to exercise extra caution when approaching military vehicles.

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.


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Non profit living

Haitian group in Houston seeks to help refugees coming from the border – Houston Public Media

Migrants, many from Haiti, wait to board a bus to Houston at a humanitarian center after being released from the United States Border Patrol after crossing the Rio Grande and turned into asylum seekers, on Wednesday, September 22, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas.

As the United States orders the deportation of thousands of Haitian migrants crossing Mexico to Texas, a local nonprofit is dealing with those who have already made it to Houston.

Organizers of the nonprofit Houston Haitians United this week called for volunteers to cook and translate Haitian dishes, helping to bridge the linguistic and cultural divide. The organization has looked after relief efforts and recently worked with Mayor Sylvester Turner’s office to organize supplies drives in the wake of the devastating earthquake that rocked Haiti this summer.

HHU is also using its platform to denounce immigration policies aimed at deporting recently arrived Haitians.

“Some people walked two months to come to the United States just to be deported to Haiti and start from scratch,” said James Pierre, president of HHU. “It’s heartbreaking because a lot of money, blood, sweat and tears have been invested in trying to find a better life.”

According to the Houston Chronicle, up to 3,000 additional Haitian refugees are expected to pass through Houston on their way to other destinations in the country. Most or all of those who do will have come from Del Rio, where tens of thousands of migrants were waiting under the international bridge between Del Rio and Mexico.

Florida and northeastern states like New York and New Jersey have historically been stopping places for the Haitian diaspora. There are over 500,000 Haitians living in the United States, nearly half of whom live in Florida.

Pierre is a transplant from Florida who says there are thousands of Haitians in the Houston area alone, and his organization is a way to build a community here.

“When I moved to Houston 18 years ago, it wasn’t around, you know? ” he said. “Haitians have been here since the 1970s. But the reason we created HHU was that they were here, people move here every day.

Buses arrive at a shelter in northwest Houston run by the Mormon Church since Monday evening, with two to three buses of about 65 people each, greeted by HHU volunteers, organizers said.

Rolanda Charles, the group’s secretary, helped coordinate volunteers via social media, posting a call for people who speak Haitian Creole and who can help make large casseroles of comfort food like chicken stew and Diri Kole, Haitian-style rice and beans. plate. Charles also posted the bus arrival times.

“We were there from 6:30 p.m. to almost three in the morning, distributing food, translating, putting people in touch… with their friends and families who are currently in the United States and helping them buy those bus tickets or tickets. ‘plane. to bring them home,’ Charles said.

As of Thursday, the number of Haitian migrants at the Del Rio Bridge had fallen to around 4,000, according to information from the Associated Press. About 1,400 had been returned to Haiti on 13 flights under the pandemic public health authority known as Title 42, while 3,200 others are in U.S. custody and under treatment, several thousand more returning to Mexico, according to the AP.

For those who are allowed to stay in the United States at least for the time being, Charles was hopeful that more organizations would help them along their journey, especially after seeing heartbreaking footage at the border.

“Every person, however they get to the border – whether they stay there or have to go back – must be respected,” Charles said. “They must be treated with respect, dignity and humanity. We are people at the end of the day. We are not animals. We are human beings.

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