close
International headquarters

Aro Biotherapeutics Expands Management Team and Plans to Move to New Philadelphia Headquarters to Drive Next Phase of Growth

PHILADELPHIA CREAM – (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Aro Biotherapeutics, a pioneering biotechnology company in the development of genetic tissue-targeted drugs, today announced the appointment of three new executives, including Scott Greenberg as COO, Jeffrey Staiger as as Senior Vice President of Finance and Business Development, and Michael Tortorici, PharmD, Ph.D. as Vice President of Clinical Pharmacology and Non-Clinical Development. Mr. Greenberg recently served as Aro’s Commercial Director, while Mr. Staiger and Dr. Tortorici are new additions to the management team. The company also announced its intention to relocate its headquarters to Curtis in Philadelphia to accommodate the continued growth of its operations and staff.

“The expansion of our leadership team provides Aro with proven leadership expertise as we advance our first molecules into clinical development and continue to evolve our organization, ”said Susan Dillon, Ph.D., co-founder and CEO of Aro Biotherapeutics. “I am happy to welcome Jeff and Mike to Aro. They both have extensive experience in their respective functional areas which will bring great value to our organization. In his expanded role, Scott and his team will help us develop additional business capabilities that will support our future growth. ”

Mr. Greenberg joined Aro in 2019 from Roivant Sciences, where he most recently served as Vice President, Chief Operating Officer. Previously, he worked at Celgene Corporation in several roles spanning business development, project management, strategy, sales and marketing. He began his career in investment banking at Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. and received an MBA from Harvard Business School.

Mr. Staiger is an international leader in finance and business development having spent over 13 years with Celgene / Bristol Myers Squibb, in roles spanning finance, clinical development, corporate strategy, business operations, leadership alliance and business development. Mr. Staiger began his career at PricewaterhouseCoopers, becoming a Chartered Accountant, and held positions in finance at Quest Diagnostics. He received degrees in economics and accounting from Gordon College (MA).

Dr Tortorici, PharmD, Ph.D. has 15 years of experience in the pharmaceutical industry in the field of clinical pharmacology for small molecules and biologics in a wide range of diseases. He was most recently Executive Director and Head of Clinical Pharmacology at CSL Behring, leading the team responsible for clinical pharmacology for all programs in the portfolio. Prior to that, he worked at Pfizer in clinical pharmacology. Dr Tortorici received his PharmD and Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences from the Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Pittsburgh.

Beginning in October 2021, Aro will begin moving operations to the Curtis in downtown Philadelphia. The Curtis is one of the best places for the scientific community to develop and perfect life-saving therapies and attract world-class talent to achieve their goals. The expanded space will be customized to Aro’s needs, providing an ideal location for the development of Centyrin’s proprietary Aro platform – siRNA drugs. Aro plans to complete the move to The Curtis in the first quarter of 2022.

“We couldn’t be happier to move to the historic Curtis Building as we enter our next phase of growth, ”said Dillon. “Lab and office spaces will help us create a world class facility, and with other building amenities and attractions nearby, The Curtis is ideal for Aro to hire and retain top talent.

About Aro Biotherapeutics

Philadelphia-based Aro Biotherapeutics is a pioneering biotechnology company in the development of tissue-targeted genetic drugs with a platform based on a proprietary protein technology called Centyrins. The company is developing a wholly owned pipeline of Centyrin-based therapeutic candidates and is working with industry partners to leverage Centyrins for tissue-specific targeting of therapies for a diverse set of diseases. For more information visit www.arobiotx.com.


Source link

read more
Canadian army

IDF Facing Israel’s Next Major Threat: Climate Change

The Israel Defense Forces has started to consider how to incorporate the dangers of climate change into their threat assessments, although some are urging the military to do much more and recognize that global warming is a major strategic threat to the country.

Netta Blass, an officer in the military’s strategic division, told a meeting of the Ministry of Environmental Protection on Monday that her unit was working with her counterparts in the IDF planning unit to examine the possibility a climate-related work plan and the creation of a special unit.

These two divisions, she said, also liaise with the Department of Environment’s Climate Change Preparedness Directorate, which held the sixth meeting on Monday since its inception in 2018, opening up part to more of 100 external people.

“The subject is on our agenda,” she said.

Michael Herzog, international researcher at Washington Institute and a retired IDF brigadier general who headed the army’s strategic planning division, was involved with a small team of academics and others in trying to get the defense establishment to recognize and adapt to the enormous implications of global warming.

Brigadier General (Retired) Michael Herzog. (Courtesy)

He told The Times of Israel on Tuesday that he thought the military was “waking up,” but, he said, “there isn’t enough awareness at the top.

“It’s good that they appointed someone down there, but I think what we really need to see is top executives taking care of it and the budgets are allocated and then you know that it is serious, ”he added.

The IDF’s work is still in its infancy, officials said.

In June, former IDF chief of staff Gadi Eisenkot told the Institute for National Security Studies (INSS), where he is now a senior researcher, that unlike the US military, where climate change was an integral part, it was “not discussed” within the IDF and relegated to the “most marginal” place among all issues handled by the military.

This despite the potential of global warming to have an impact on runways and aircraft formation, he said during a confab held (in hebrew) to launch the INSS publication “Environment, Climate and National Security: A New Front for Israel”. The military was already changing training schedules to make sure soldiers were not outside during the hottest hours, he added.

An abandoned watchtower near a military road, Judean Desert, January 4, 2018 (Dario Sanchez / Flash90)

Gideon Behar, the Foreign Ministry’s special envoy for climate change and sustainability, has also been actively involved in the attempt to have climate change recognized as a threat to national security.

Gideon Béhar. (Courtesy)

“We have to go much faster,” he urged attendees at Monday’s meeting. “The rhythm of [climate] change is faster than expected and impacts are increasingly difficult to predict. No one else will correct the things that we ourselves don’t do today. This is our shift and we need to work day and night to strengthen preparedness, as well as mitigation. “

Stressing the importance of regional cooperation to ensure that neighboring states can build their resilience against the effects of global warming, Behar revealed that two years ago, Cyprus launched a regional climate cooperation initiative between countries Mediterranean and Middle Eastern (excluding North Africa).

Despite a business disruption during the coronavirus pandemic, 12 working groups have been set up and a regional meeting is scheduled for mid-October, in which Israel will participate, he said.

The IDF could look to the US military for advice, with the Pentagon leading the way in mainstreaming climate change, Dr Yehuda Troen of the Knesset’s Research and Information Unit said at the time. from the same meeting.

Work on the plans began in 2014 in light of the U.S. military’s need to be more active at the North Pole – where melting glaciers have enabled a higher Russian presence, and to provide humanitarian assistance, conduct operational activities, intelligence gathering and training, in a warming world.

In this file photo from July 22, 2017, a polar bear comes out of the water to walk on the ice in Franklin Strait in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. (AP Photo / David Goldman, on file)

Two years ago, the U.S. military presented Congress with a comprehensive climate preparedness report at 148 military bases, detailing the risks of events such as recurrent floods, droughts and wildfires today and 20 years to come, Troen said.

Last year, it published a Climate Resilience Handbook, outlining measures that must be implemented.

The Israeli military has already experienced these problems.

At the start of last year, flooding of a number of underground hangars caused damage estimated at NIS 30 million (9.3 million) to eight F-16 fighter jets and their infrastructure.

However, it does not appear to have prompted the military to take major action.

“It is not really clear what the IDF is doing,” Troen said, adding that “the National Security Council has said it is not really dealing with the matter, although it would be ready to cooperate.”

An F-16 fighter jet sits in a flooded hangar at Hatzor Air Base in southern Israel in January 2020 (Social media)

The current director of the NSC, Meir Ben-Shabbat, is due to retire at the end of August. He will be replaced by the 45-year-old former Mossad officer Eyal Hulata.

Environmental Protection Minister Tamar Zandberg is also trying to get the government to recognize climate change as a national strategic threat.

The climate crisis and responsible journalism

As an environmental reporter for The Times of Israel, I try to convey the facts and science behind climate change and environmental degradation, explain – and criticize – official policies affecting our future, and describe the Israeli technologies that can be part of the solution.

I am passionate about the natural world and disheartened by the dismal lack of awareness of environmental issues of most of the public and politicians in Israel.

I am proud to do my part to keep The Times of Israel readers properly informed on this vital topic – which can and must lead to policy change.

Your support, by joining The Times of Israel community, allows us to continue our important work. Would you like to join our community today?

Thank you,

Sue surke, Environment Journalist

Join the Times of Israel community

Join our community

Already a member? Log in to no longer see this

Are you serious. We appreciate this!

That’s why we come to work every day – to provide discerning readers like you with must-see coverage of Israel and the Jewish world.

So now we have a request. Unlike other media, we have not set up a paywall. But since the journalism we do is expensive, we invite readers for whom The Times of Israel has become important to help support our work by joining The Times of Israel community.

For as little as $ 6 per month, you can help support our quality journalism while benefiting from The Times of Israel WITHOUT ADVERTISING, as well as access to exclusive content reserved for members of the Times of Israel community.

Join our community

Join our community

Already a member? Log in to no longer see this


Source link

read more
International headquarters

Flexicon expands global headquarters in Pennsylvania

Flexicon Corp. expanded its manufacturing space in Bethlehem, Pa., by 50,000 square feet to meet growing demand for its bulk handling equipment and systems.

The new space is mainly intended for the storage of sub-assemblies, the crating and the staging of the assembled equipment. This includes stocking Quick-Ship models of flexible screw conveyors, bulk bag unloaders and bulk bag conditioners for immediate shipment, freeing up the main facility for increased fabrication and assembly capacity.

Founded in 1974 in Fairfield, NJ, the company purchased its first manufacturing plant in Lodi, NJ in 1978, quintupled with the purchase of a plant in Phillipsburg, NJ in 1988, and added a satellite plant in Easton, PA in 1995 U.S. operations were then consolidated and expanded with the construction of the company’s global headquarters in Bethlehem, PA in 2001.

“In 2014, we doubled the size of our headquarters in Bethlehem, maximizing the coverage of the existing site, so we are fortunate that a facility adjacent to our main building is available this year,” said David Boger, vice president executive.

International factory expansions include the establishment of a manufacturing facility in the UK in 1994, one in South Africa in 2001 and another in Australia in 2008.

The company’s technical sales staff also grew with the addition of 26 factory direct sales offices located in US, UK, Chile, Spain, Germany, France, Africa. South, Australia, Singapore and Indonesia.

“All of the company’s locations can easily rely on Flexicon’s 25,000 installations around the world to find existing solutions to most bulk handling problems,” added Boger.

The company holds 36 patents reflected in the designs of its flexible screw conveyors, tube cable conveyors, pneumatic conveying systems, bulk bag unloaders, bulk bag conditioners, bulk bag fillers, bag emptying stations, drum / box / container tippers and batch weighing systems. A separate project engineering division. integrates large-scale systems in all industries in which bulk materials are handled.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Bloomington tent residents face ‘eviction’ as restaurant prepares to open

Jamie stands shirtless on a vacant lot on the west side of Bloomington. He is wearing jeans that his brother gave him. Behind him are flattened tents, blankets and clothing sprawled out on an asphalt, concrete and weed floor as the sun dries out these essentials after recent torrential rains.

The Indescribable Lot is what Jamie and about half a dozen other people call home. It will soon house a Panda Express restaurant. Bloomington City Council has approved plans to build the restaurant at the location along West Market Street.

The property runs along a busy highway not far from the highway. It is surrounded by gas stations, restaurants and other shops. It is not a residential area at all, with the exception of this tent city.

Some McLean County social service providers say tent towns have been a problem in Bloomington for decades. Advocates say the plight of the tent dwellers points to a bigger problem that has not been addressed.

As state and federal governments lift moratoriums on evictions related to the coronavirus pandemic, these residents will soon face their own type of eviction.

Jamie is 33 years old. He does not give his last name. He has lived in a tent in this vacant lot for almost three years.

Jamie’s brother checks him regularly and gives him clothes and a place to shower.

“He came over here and (said) ‘Jamie get in the car’, where are we going, Disneyland? ‘ Jamie asked. “No, we are going home. You’re going to get cleaned up.

Jamie said he was staying at the Salvation Army’s Safe Harbor shelter in Bloomington. He said he went to work in Texas and had to come back to Bloomington to help his brother. He said the Salvation Army would not take him back. Jamie has other people looking after him.

Her cousin Chris has been living in the camp for a few weeks. “I came here and found my cousin and I’m not going to leave him alone here,” Chris said.

Chris said he was worried about his cousin’s safety. He said he sent Jamie to the hospital three times due to seizures. Chris said there were always people looking for trouble there. Jamie said he had been doing drywall since he was 14 and believed he had a chance to return to work.

“I have my old boss’s number and he told me that once I got together and got my meds and stuff, he said he would put me back to work,” he said. Jamie said.

Jamie said he was taking medication for the seizures and for his mental health. Now he says his old boss no longer works for himself. Jamie is not optimistic, he will call back.

Jamie said he made do with his father’s monthly Social Security check and all the money he could get by begging. Jamie said he already won $ 80 in 20 minutes.

Bob is basically in the same situation as Jamie. Bob is 58 years old. He stands next to Jamie, sporting a graying beard, a face mask under his chin, and a vintage Chicago Cubs t-shirt. Bob said he had been living in the tent camp for a few years. He has done flooring for a living but cannot access the ground floor of the job market.

“Give me a rug, I can put it up,” beamed Bob, but said he couldn’t find a job either. He said shelters would not take him because of his criminal record. He said he received monthly disability checks. He said he needed a place to clean up for a job interview.

Homeless Services

These services are available at Bloomington-Normal, including from a religious organization that feeds them. Bloomington’s Abundant Life Church delivers non-perishable food weekly to the homeless population of Bloomington-Normal. The church also maintains a pantry and clothing and serves hot lunches daily.

Pastor Roy Koonce said he’s worried about whether those living in Tent City will have a place to go.

“That’s a great question and I don’t have an answer for what they will do,” Koonce said. “I know that if they come here, we’ll do our best to help them.”

Koonce said the church had no shelter but would offer all possible help to anyone who came to its door. Koonce said the church has rules but will not permanently reject anyone.

“I’m 68 and for the first time in my life, I feel like I have my goal,” Koontz said. “I like to do what we do. I like helping people. I like the success rate.

“It breaks my heart when I see someone who can’t.”

Bloomington’s two homeless shelters, Safe Harbor and Home Sweet Home Ministries, have said they don’t reject anyone who needs a place to stay, unless their history or behavior suggests it is. a threat to staff or other residents. But both shelters have had limited capacity for much of the past year due to pandemic restrictions.

Roy Koonce of the Abundant Life Church has said he would like the city of Bloomington to do more to help its homeless residents. He said the police are generally trying to avoid the problem.

“A lot of wanderers and homeless people sleep in the parking lot because they all get some heat to keep the ground from freezing (in winter). The police, all they do is go through there and chase these guys away. They don’t stop them, ”Koonce said.

Police intervention

Koonce suggested that an arrest would help some homeless people begin a process to seek medical attention and other treatment.

Town of Bloomington

Greg Scott

Bloomington Acting Police Chief Greg Scott said officers can’t arrest anyone if homeless residents don’t commit a crime.

“What they’re doing there isn’t specifically illegal,” Scott explained. “The State of Illinois and even the Supreme Court of the United States have made decisions that have said it is their First Amendment right to do these things.”

Scott said homeowners must file a trespass report before police arrest anyone. In the case of the proposed restaurant, Scott said no one had filed a complaint. Scott said the homeless population needs social services, not police intervention.

“It really doesn’t help anything,” Scott said.

Accommodation possibilities

A Bloomington City Council member said he would agree that jail is not the solution for people with no roof over their heads. Jeff Crabill said the goal should be permanent housing. Crabill said he was not sure what the city could do to better facilitate this, other than calling attention to the problem and encouraging more landlords to rent to people through a rapid relocation program.

“They just don’t want to have someone in their apartment or their house who is homeless. There is a stigma to this. I think some owners want to avoid this if they can, ”Crabill said.

Jeff Craybill speaking into the microphone

Emilie Bollinger

Jeff Craybill

The PATH Crisis Center in Bloomington recently launched the relocation program. The association secured funding from the CARES Act to provide short-term housing for people during the pandemic to limit the risk of the spread of COVID-19.

Karen Zangerle recently retired as Executive Director of the nonprofit group. She said tent cities have been around in Bloomington for decades. Zangerle said that there is often a certain culture in these wanderer communities that can make relocation difficult.

“People who live in tent cities like it because they don’t have anyone to tell them what to do, they have no responsibility to follow,” Zangerle said. “It’s a bit like a big camping trip.

Zangerle said PATH has asked outreach workers to meet with tent dwellers and other homeless people to discuss their options for a permanent place to stay. She said some will welcome the aid and some will not.

“What ultimately happens is that a certain group of them will find a new place and they will leave,” Zangerle said, adding that a large part of the tent city’s population is moving to the south when the weather gets colder.

Where to go from here

Bob, a resident of Tent City, said he plans to move soon, regardless of the restaurant’s schedule. “When it’s cold we have to go somewhere,” he exclaimed, but added that he was not sure where he was planning to move.

Jamie said once the proposed restaurant moves in, it will likely end up across the street behind the McDonald’s where he lives.

“It’s the only other place we can go,” Jamie said.

Jamie and Bob both laugh at the feeling that they don’t want help.

“We’ve tried and tried and tried and tried and they avoided us,” Jamie said.

“We’ll get there one way or another,” Bob said.

Where and how they will do it remains an open question. These two tented city dwellers think they’ll have to rely on their experience and survival instinct when their home from the last few years is uprooted for a fast food franchise.

It is not known when Panda Express plans to take over the West Bloomington site to begin construction. The company did not return any messages seeking comment.


Source link

read more
Canadian army

Global Military Land Vehicle Industry Expected to Reach $ 31.6 Billion by 2031

DUBLIN, August 03, 2021– (COMMERCIAL THREAD)–The “Global Military Land Vehicle Market to 2031 – Market Size and Drivers, Major Programs, Competitive Landscape and Strategic Outlook” report was added to ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

The global military ground vehicles market is valued at US $ 21.9 billion in 2021 and will grow at a CAGR of 3.74% to reach a value of US $ 31.6 billion by 2031.

The cumulative global military ground vehicles market is expected to reach US $ 292.8 billion during the forecast period. The demand for military ground vehicles is expected to be driven by the European region, especially in countries like France, Russia and the UK. The North American region will occupy the second place in the world, showing a steady growth rate during the forecast period with a CAGR of 2.34%. Major military forces around the world are now undertaking modernization efforts to replace their old platforms in the face of modern threats. These efforts will support market growth over the next decade.

Heightened geopolitical tensions, the need to deploy forces to regions around the world and the demands for standardization under alliances such as NATO are some of the reasons that push military forces to acquire military ground vehicles. modern. In addition, tensions with Russia in Eastern Europe are pushing other countries in the region and NATO to improve their conventional capabilities with new platforms capable of countering the heavy armored and mechanized formations of the United States. Russian army. In addition, the old Soviet equipment currently in the stocks of the armies of Eastern Europe must be replaced with new platforms, which further stimulates the growth of the market in the region.

The global military land vehicle market is expected to be dominated by Europe. Major European countries have increased their defense budgets and tried to maintain them even during the pandemic. This will allow them to implement large-scale procurement projects without major delays. North America will follow the European market. This growth is attributed to the implementation of a wide range of supply programs by the US Army and the US Marine Corps. The most notable programs are the JLTV and the Stryker, which will standardize the country’s vehicle fleet and provide increased protection for its deployed forces. The Canadian military also contributes to regional growth through the implementation of a series of programs covering several market segments.

Highlights

  • The global military land vehicles market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 3.75% during the forecast period.

  • The global military land vehicles market is categorized into different categories; Armored personnel carrier, infantry fighting vehicle, main battle tank, multipurpose armored vehicle, tactical truck, armored support vehicle, armored engineer vehicle and light utility vehicle.

  • The global military land vehicle market is expected to be dominated by Europe with a revenue share of 41.1%. The growth of the European market is attributed to spending by countries such as the UK, Russia and France, among others.

  • Armored personnel carriers are expected to be the largest segment of the military ground vehicles market during the forecast period.

Reasons to buy

  • Determine potential investment areas based on a detailed analysis of global military ground vehicle trends over the next ten years

  • Gain an in-depth understanding of the factors underlying the demand for different segments of military ground vehicles in the world’s heaviest spending countries and identify the opportunities offered by each of them

  • Strengthen your understanding of the market in terms of demand drivers, industry trends and the latest technological developments, among others

  • Identify the major channels driving the global Military Land Vehicle market, providing a clear picture of future opportunities that can be exploited leading to increased revenue

  • Channel resources by focusing on ongoing programs undertaken by defense ministries of different countries in the global military land vehicle market

  • Make the right business decisions based on an in-depth competitive landscape analysis consisting of detailed profiles of the major military ground vehicle vendors around the world. Company profiles also include information on key products, alliances, recent contracts awarded, and financial analysis where applicable.

Main topics covered:

  • Summary

  • Global Military Land Vehicle Market – Overview

  • Market dynamics

  • Global Military Land Vehicles Market – Segment Analysis

  • Global Military Land Vehicles Market – Regional Analysis

  • Global Military Land Vehicle Market – Trend Analysis

  • Analysis of key programs

  • Competitive landscape analysis

Companies mentioned

For more information on this report, visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/a6e7e2

View the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210803005491/en/

Contacts

ResearchAndMarkets.com
Laura Wood, Senior Press Director
[email protected]

For EST office hours, call 1-917-300-0470
For USA / CAN call toll free 1-800-526-8630
For GMT office hours, call + 353-1-416-8900


Source link

read more
History organization

PH lockouts: a brief history

Police checks, like last year’s one, have become commonplace when the lockdown is enforced. FILE PHOTO / NINO JESUS ​​ORBETA

MANILA, Philippines — The latest looming lockdown in the National Capital Region (NCR) is believed to be the fourth in the capital, which accounts for more than half of the Philippine economy.

As more than 12 million residents wait for the latest round of restrictions that will begin on August 6 and end on August 20, they are told that limiting their movement is the price to pay to avoid a greater tragedy: coronavirus infections get out of hand.

The measures appear to tilt in favor of one aspect of the crisis – health – and neglect the other: the economy and livelihoods. Some experts say that protecting people from disease and the loss of their livelihood is not necessarily a choice proposition.

Disease experts have shown that keeping people separate is an effective way to slow down the transmission of the virus for one basic reason. Humans are the main carriers of the virus.

“The primary mode by which people become infected with SARS Cov2 is exposure to respiratory fluids carrying infectious viruses,” the United States Centers for Disease Control has said in its numerous COVID-19 advisories.

According to the CDC, people are mainly infected with:

  • Inhalation of microscopic respiratory droplets and virus-carrying aerosol particles
  • Getting the virus into the mouth, nose, or eyes from a splash or spray of virus-laden particles from an infected person
  • Touching mucous membranes or contaminated surfaces

There are still inconclusive studies indicating that the virus is suspended in the air, which could be alarming, but it has not been shown to be certain.

Experts are sure of one thing, however. Close human contact increases the risk of infection, which would make containment an essential weapon in the fight against SARS Cov2.

During one of his briefings on the government’s response to COVID, President Rodrigo Duterte blurted out how difficult it would be to keep people at a safe distance in a place as populated as Metro Manila.

On this point, Duterte was right. Metro Manila is one of the most densely populated urban areas in the world. In Manila alone, there are at least 71,263 people per square kilometer, according to 2015 census data. In Mandaluyong city, the density is 41,580 people per square kilometer. In Pasay City, it’s 29,815 people per km².

Locking down these densely populated areas could mean keeping people locked in very tight spaces, which could defeat the goal of preventing transmission of the Delta variant.

Delta, who was previously known as Indian, was as contagious as chickenpox, according to the US CDC. To get an idea of ​​how contagious Delta is, a person with chickenpox is 90% likely to pass the infection on to people close to them who are not immune, the CDC said.

Why resort to confinement in places where you cannot separate people like in congested poor urban communities? According to Socio-Economic Planning Secretary Karl Kendrick Chua in a statement last year, the lockdown or strengthened community quarantine would prevent 323,262 additional COVID cases, of which 9,698 are serious or critical.

But the blockages have taken place and will happen soon. They are now part of the package against COVID-19 around the world.

NCR lockdown episodes would show numbers that may or may not lead to a conclusion about the effectiveness of restriction of movement as a measure to slow the transmission of the virus.

Graphic by Ed Lustan

When the first lockdown, or Enhanced Community Quarantine (ECQ), was imposed from March 14 to April 30, 2020, according to the World Health Organization, there were 196 cases of COVID on the second day of the lockdown, March 16. On March 23, there were 768 cases. As of March 30, there were 2,019 cases. As of April 6, two days after the expiration of the ECQ period, there were 1,334 cases.

Graphic by Ed Lustan

During the second lockdown, which moved to the modified ECQ (MECQ) from August 4 to 18, 2020, the WHO said there were 2,463 cases of COVID on August 10, six days after the start of the locking. On August 17 or a day before the MECQ expired, there were 29,305 cases.

A third cycle of ECQ was implemented from March 29 to April 4, 2021. On the day the ECQ went into effect, there were 71,606 cases of COVID, according to the WHO. As of April 5, the day after the ECQ expired, there were 69,164 cases.

Graphic by Ed Lustan

It is not yet clear to what extent blockages in the NCR have been successful in achieving its primary goal of protecting people from infection. But it has come at a cost.

Unemployment in 2020 climbed to 17.7 percent, or 7.3 million people, according to the Philippines Statistics Authority’s April 2020 Labor Force Survey.

In the results of a survey carried out in November 2020, Social Weather Stations (SWS) said 48% of the Filipino population considered themselves to be poor. At least 12 million families have declared themselves poor, according to the SWS poll. The striking figure is that 2 million of these families are considered “newly poor”.

This next ECQ from August 6, millions of families are again facing an uncertain outcome. Duterte had asked the Ministry of Budget and Management to identify sources of funds for cash assistance after repeatedly saying in the past that the government lacked funds for this purpose.

The Department of Labor and Employment, quoted by the Philippine Daily Inquirer, has forecast the loss of more than 167,000 jobs.

Senatorial Minority Leader Franklin Drilon, and several other senators, call on the government to stop fundraising and simply turn to the National Task Force to End Local Communist Armed Conflicts (NTF-Elcac), which in 2021 alone gets more than 19 billion pesos in funding.

The task force had already released billions of pesos in villages, supposedly for development projects that would pit communities against communist rebels. An audit of the projects is requested although the Ministry of Interior and Local Government (DILG), which transferred the funds to the villages, has provided a list of project descriptions.

If funding was found, the government planned to distribute P 1,000 in cash per person and up to P 4,000 per family during the two-week ECQ August 6-20.

It was, according to Bayan chief Renato Reyes, misleading to give hope for help but not to be sure of the source of funding.

Meanwhile, people with cash have formed long lines at grocery stores and supermarkets to stock up on supplies. Shopping centers, with the exception of stores considered essential, have turned dark again, restaurant after restaurant closed on August 1.

Millions of people hope there will be light at the end of the seemingly endless tunnel.

Read more

Don’t miss the latest news and information.

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to access The Philippine Daily Inquirer and over 70 other titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download from 4 a.m. and share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.



Source link

read more
International headquarters

REE Automotive to Open US Headquarters in Austin, Texas

Zero-emission technology company REE Automotive has named Austin, Texas, the new headquarters for its US headquarters. The Israel-based electric mobility company is now looking to capitalize on a growing market in North America by opening a headquarters in Lone Star State, alongside an integration center for assembly and testing of its proprietary technologies.

REE Automotive is an electric mobility solutions company based in Tel Aviv, Israel, with additional subsidiaries in the US, UK and Germany.

The company specializes in the development and manufacture of modular EV platforms for B2B transactions in addition to its proprietary REEcorners. This year alone, REE announced collaborations with Magna International and Toyota’s Hino Motors.

Last February, REE announced an ongoing SPAC merger with 10X Capital Venture Acquisition Corp. ($ VCVC), raking in $ 500 million in gross revenue to accelerate mass production in 2023.

Yesterday, the business combination has been approved by shareholders and officially closed. This morning, REE debuted on the Nasdaq under the ticker $ REE.

REE Automotive is now launching into the running following its approved merger by announcing a new head office on American soil.

A REE corner module / Source: REE Automotive

REE Automotive’s new headquarters will be in Austin, Texas

In A press release this morning, REE Automotive shared plans for a U.S. headquarters in the booming city of Austin, Texas, promising more than 150 jobs over the next few years.

Additionally, Austin will house REE’s first asset light integration center, where it will assemble and test its REEcorner technology and modular electric vehicle platforms.

The new integration center brings REE’s technology to current and future North American automotive partners. REE co-founder and CEO Daniel Barel shares his thoughts on the city:

Establishing our US headquarters in Austin, Texas best positions us for rapid growth and expansion. Austin is fast becoming a global hotbed for elite tech professionals. REE must continue to grow and prosper, and Austin’s drive and entrepreneurial spirit fits perfectly with REE’s culture and values. Our presence in the United States will allow us to capitalize on the incredible opportunities in the United States market and to connect with our customers and partners based in North America, including Magna International and JB Poindexter, as we work together to develop and deliver modular electric vehicles (MEV).

A representative from REE Automotive said Electrek the company will inaugurate the new headquarters and the new integration center this year.

Construction is expected to be completed in the second half of 2022 and has an annual capacity of 40,000 modular EV platforms.

FTC: We use automatic affiliate links which generate income. Following.

Electrek T-shirt

Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.


Source link

read more
History organization

Salinas students stand up for ethnic studies – Voices of Monterey Bay

Zaira Hernandez testifies at school board meeting | Zoom screenshot

| YOUTH BEAT

By Karen Dorantes

On June 22, parents and grandparents arrived at a meeting of the Salinas Union High School District Governing Board to express their disapproval of the ethnic studies program currently taught in high schools in the district.

That night, no student was there to defend him.

Mike Lipe, one of the adults who came forward to oppose the curriculum, told the board that “there is absolutely no room for activists in our school boards and administrations. . These principles are deeply rooted in radicalism and racism. They promote division and hatred within society.

But the board members who voted for ethnic studies as a condition for a one-semester graduation in 2019 – to be implemented for the class of 2024 – held on.

The council’s support for ethnic studies contrasted with a 2012 decision in Tucson, Arizona, where one of the most popular and successful Mexican-American ethnic studies courses was banned by a law banning any course that ” advocates ethnic solidarity ”.

Enlarge

Diego Puga Escobar speaks at school board meeting | Zoom screenshot

Carissa Purnell, who has taught ethnic studies in Salinas for the past six years, defined ethnic studies as “courses that use an interdisciplinary approach to analyze historical and contemporary issues and experiences associated with race, class and genre “.

She said ethnic studies were first introduced in the fall of 1968, when the Black Student Union led a student strike at San Francisco State University to demand more representation on campus.

School board president Phillip Tabera said it took five years of discussions to approve the district’s one-year ethnic studies course in 2018. It has become an option for all five high schools in Salinas this year. -the. The council approved a one-semester ethnic studies course in 2019 that will become a graduation requirement for the freshman class of 2024. District officials said the curriculum was developed with input from students. teachers, parents, students and the board.

Enlarge

CarissaOffice provided-by-Alisal-Union-School-District

Carissa Purnell | Photo provided

Students defend ethnic studies

After the controversy at the June 22 meeting, about half a dozen young people came to the July 13 board meeting to express their support for the ethnic studies program. Many other students attended the meeting, hoping to speak, but public testimony was limited by the council. The most notable group of students was from La Cosecha, a youth organization that is part of the Building Healthy Communities initiative. (Disclosure: I am a member of La Cosecha.)

Seeing a group of students come together and stand up against adults telling them what they should and shouldn’t study in schools is something new to this generation.

Young people in La Cosecha, who are mostly Latino, said they supported ethnic studies because they wanted professionals to teach them about their own history. “My story should be taught, my story should be shown in these schools,” said Diego Puga Escobar, a member of La Cosecha and entering his last year at Alisal High School.

Escobar said after the meeting that he chose to speak to the board because he wanted to be the voice of those who might have been afraid to stand up for ethnic studies. Without ethnic studies, he said he believed there was a much bigger “gap” between people of different cultures, nationalities or ethnicities.

“If we are constantly taught a [side of history], then we’re going to be made to believe that there is only one truth, ”Escobar said. “All we’re trying to do is provide the resources to our people and be able to see that there are many truths on one side. “

Maraly Escalante introduced herself but was unable to speak at the July 13 meeting due to lack of time. She recently graduated from North Salinas High School and took an Ethnic Studies course at Hartnell College. She said the class allowed her to see Mexicans and Latinas in history, but she also learned about the history of other ethnicities and races.

Escalante said she believes ethnic studies gives students a better understanding of where members of their community come from, what their cultures are like, and what challenges they may have.

“I feel like ethnic studies unites us more because we have a new understanding,” she said. “A friend of mine used to tell me that throughout his school career he was ashamed of being African American and he didn’t know why he should be ashamed of it. In a way, ethnic studies help us understand why certain stereotypes exist in our communities and how to correct them.

To those who oppose ethnic studies, Escalante replied, “Yes, a lot of people can identify as Americans, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they see themselves everywhere. [the version of] American history they teach in high schools.

Enlarge

Philip-Tabera-supplied-by-Carlos-Castro

Philippe Tabera | Photo by Carlos Castro

Meaningful conversation

Alma Cervantes, regional education equity manager for Building Healthy Communities, said her goal is to give young people a platform and “critically challenge a system that has prevented them from learning truth about this country, a system that has not provided a space for them to talk about their history, their history, their cultures.

Cervantes said ethnic studies creates a transformative space where students can engage in meaningful conversation not only with teachers, but with each other as well.

“Ethnic studies is beyond a curriculum,” she said. “It’s a transformative way for students to feel like they belong to the class. It supports their self-esteem, it supports their academics, good attendance and it allows us to see each other in the classrooms. “

Purnell cited three articles that support Cervantes’ point. She said research shows ethnic studies have been “proven to increase grade points, credits, attendance, graduation, and college education, as well as lead to better test scores,” she said. grades, math, reading, writing, science and social studies ”.

Zaira Hernandez, another La Cosecha member and recently graduated from Alisal High School, who spoke at the July 13 board meeting, said: “These young students are supposed to know who they are. , where they want to go and what they want. do for the rest of their lives, but how can you expect them to know who they are, who they are, without taking a course like this, which shares their history and culture? “

Beyond Salinas, on July 17, Gov. Gavin Newson signed a bill requiring freshmen at California State University to take an ethnic studies course to graduate.

Hernandez said pursuing ethnic studies has helped her discover people who may be more like her, not only in terms of race or ethnicity, but also gender. She disagrees with the claim that the program encourages hatred.

In fact, she says, it helps students respect others better. “It’s not trying to divide people.”

Do you have something to say about this story? Send us a letter.

SUPPORTING NON-PROFIT JOURNALISM

GET OUR FREE WEEKLY NEWSLETTER


Source link

read more
Canadian army

Defense Minister urged military to create controversial aid role in Vancouver: Documents – National

Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan called on the military to create a post possibly occupied by a reserve officer from his former unit who had been suspended from Vancouver Police for an inappropriate relationship with a subordinate, according to notes from recently published information.

Sajjan also wanted the military to upgrade the post less than two months after Major Greg McCullough was hired, as the minister wanted even more support in his Vancouver constituency, the notes say, although that request has not come true. .

The briefing note comes amid lingering questions about how and why McCullough found himself in the unique position before his dismissal last month following revelations about the complaint and the disciplinary action taken against him while he was sergeant in the Vancouver Police Department.

McCullough was hired to support Sajjan in March 2020 despite an external investigation that found him guilty in 2018 of two counts of misconduct for his relationship with Const. Nicole Chan, who later committed suicide in January 2019.

The story continues under the ad

READ MORE: Sajjan’s assistant had an inappropriate relationship, suspended while with Vancouver Police

It also follows opposition calls for Sajjan’s resignation for his handling of allegations of sexual misconduct involving senior military commanders. Global News first reported allegations against retired General Jonathan Vance in February – which he denies – and since then concerns about an “Old Boys Network” protecting top brass have sparked a military sexual misconduct record.

Defense experts have described the case as an institutional crisis for the military.

Vance was charged earlier in July with one count of obstructing justice. Military police brought the charge but turned the matter over to civilian court, citing the “limitations” of the military justice system.


Click to play the video: “Gén.  Jonathan Vance accused of obstructing justice '







General Jonathan Vance accused of obstructing justice


General Jonathan Vance charged with obstructing justice – July 15, 2021

The story continues under the ad

Sajjan’s office acknowledged that the Minister and McCullough knew each other as officers of the British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own) and that they both served concurrently with the Vancouver Police Department.

But he says the military was responsible for the process that led to McCullough’s hiring, and neither the minister nor his staff were aware of the complaint and disciplinary action taken against him while he was a sergeant. in the Vancouver Police Department.

READ MORE: Officer suspended for inappropriate relationship no longer working as Sajjan’s assistant

The Department of National Defense announced last month that McCullough was no longer working as Sajjan’s assistant, although he remains a member of the Canadian Army Reserve.

Prepared for Jonathan Vance, then Chief of the Defense Staff, dated May 6, 2020, the briefing note obtained by The Canadian Press through access to information does not mention McCullough’s name, but shows the minister personally led the charge for a new assistant in Vancouver.

While Sajjan at the time already had four military assistants in Ottawa, and the Defense Ministry says he has no record of such a post being created outside the capital, the memo reads: “The Minister has determined that additional full-time support is needed while in Vancouver.

He goes on to say that a “suitable candidate” was selected in March 2020 and was currently working with the minister, but that “based on the recent direction of the minister” Sajjan would need even more support and therefore the position should be reclassified from part-time to full-time role.

The story continues under the ad

Such an upgrade would have represented a significant pay rise for whoever held the post.

READ MORE: Sajjan censored by House of Commons for dealing with military sexual misconduct

The briefing note recommends that the post be reclassified and filled through an “open, fair and equitable” competition, although Defense Ministry spokesman Daniel Le Bouthillier said the reclassification no. had not taken place because such full-time positions only concern exceptional circumstances.

Sajjan spokesman Daniel Minden defended the creation of the post of military assistant in Vancouver, saying in an email: “In order to avoid the high costs of moving military personnel based in Ottawa to Vancouver, a post of military assistant Vancouver-based military assistant was created.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, Minister Sajjan spent part of the last year working remotely from his constituency of Vancouver, where this support was even greater. “

The pandemic is not mentioned in the briefing note.


Click to play video:







Military Ombudsman blames Ottawa for inaction on sexual misconduct


Military Ombudsman Blames Ottawa for Inaction on Sexual Misconduct – June 22, 2021

Le Bouthillier said the post remains vacant.

The story continues under the ad

“Military assistants from Ottawa travel to Vancouver as needed to perform these tasks,” he added in an email.

“The function is still required, but an updated feasibility and effectiveness analysis (after several months of COVID-19 restrictions) is underway by the Canadian Armed Forces to make a decision on how best to structure the office of the military assistant. “

Reached by phone Thursday, McCullough declined to comment, saying he had gotten into trouble for previously speaking to The Canadian Press and was not allowed to speak further.

“Minister Sajjan had nothing to do with my hiring process,” he said last month. “He needed a military assistant on the west coast because of the time he’s spending here, and that’s it. I have not spoken with Minister Sajjan about this process, and I serve the Canadian Armed Forces.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau insisted that Sajjan, who has been Canada’s only defense minister since the Liberals took office in late 2015, is the right person to lead the charge when it comes to change military culture and eradicate sexual misconduct and hatred.

© 2021 The Canadian Press


Source link

read more
International headquarters

Soldo raises $ 180 million for its professional expense management platform – TechCrunch

Managing expenses has long been a headache for employees and accounting departments. For many, tracking and analyzing how money is spent on behalf of businesses is stuck in legacy software that is not well equipped to handle the latest demands. Today, British startups building solutions to bring the process into the 21st century are announcing a major funding round to double their growth.

BalanceProvide employee prepaid corporate card issuance platform linked to automated expense management system, achieved $ 180 million funding. Soldo currently has around 26,000 customers, from small and medium businesses to large multinationals in 30 countries, with Mercedes-Benz, GetYourGuide, Gymshark, Bauli and Brooks being popular. It’s a. Those.In addition to that, through the API, it also integrates With popular accounting packages used in organizations today – Ability to connect NetSuite, QuickBooks, Zucchetti, Xero and Soldo to over 50 expense management platforms, including Concur and Expensify.

The Series C cycle is led by Temasek of Singapore, with participation from Sunley House Capital, Advent International’s Crossover Fund, City Ventures, and former backers Axel, Battery Ventures and Dawn Capital. Silicon Valley Bank also provided a private amount of debt financing.

London-based company Sold was also unclear in its latest investment statement, but for reference, when it started raising funds in December, the company had around 278,800 people. It was valued at $ 10,000. PitchBook Data.. At the event, Sold said the tour was oversubscribed in the context of the company’s strong growth. Platform spending has quadrupled compared to the B-Series. $ 61 million for the 2019 round.. (Note: Soldo’s main business is in London, but it has a small head office in Dublin. Electronic Money License Part of the Brexit coverage in Ireland in 2019.)

More generally – and maybe because a lot of us spend more time away from headquarters, or maybe because some of us end up going out to meet people – the expense Management currently receives a lot of money. Warning. Earlier this month, Danish Pleo, one of Soldo’s biggest competitors, Raise $ 150 million at a valuation of $ 1.7 billion..

It’s a big market. The company claims the European expense management market is $ 170 billion.

At the heart of the challenge Soldo is trying to solve, spending is typically a very fragmented, undigitalized business, and the employees who rack up the spending aren’t usually accountants. In short, properly managing expenses is not one of our key skills. .. On the other hand, the costs themselves have evolved to cover all the by-products that have become easier to buy online, the way we work today, and much more. This can include memberships, travel and entertainment, home office supplies, etc. Purchase on behalf of the company for marketing campaigns, online advertising, etc.

If expenses are incurred digitally, tracking is easy, but often for services or goods purchased from IRL. This causes other problems. People often forget to get a receipt or lose it before filling out a report. Or pay for things out of pocket.

In addition, expenses are incurred by company card or bank transfer. The former is expensive and can be difficult to manage, while the latter has its own challenges. The process is slow and often requires several people to settle the payments.

Soldo’s approach to remedy this is first of all to facilitate the issuance of prepaid cards to employees in order to better manage their expenses. Then link the card to the application. The app will create an automatic prompt that will appear every time you make a purchase with your card, notifying you to get a receipt and download it.

“Soldo’s vision is to manage total business expenses, including advertising, software subscriptions, travel and entertainment, vendor management and payroll for all payment methods. Cards are just one of the many ways businesses can send money to their vendors, ”Email TechCrunch told TechCrunch. Carlo Guualandri, CEO and founder of Soldo. Unlike competitors like Pleo, he said: It’s important. This is because as the largest share of business expenses is transferred there, it becomes more valuable to customers using the expense management platform. “

Without a doubt, the growth of the company since its inception five years ago has seen a big slowdown in the form of Covid-19. The resulting recovery is proof that even the current market has found its place.

“The pandemic has almost completely wiped out travel and spending as a use case for corporate spending, given that a limited number of workers have traveled and had lunch on blockades,” Gualandri said. said sir. “It was very shocking to see Europe as a whole in the first weeks of March last year as people stayed at home due to the blockade. As a result, the trip is the number one company card. a. Due to its popularity and widespread use, a significant portion of financial services revenue was also lost. “But then two things happened. He continued.

“The number of spend use cases for other businesses has grown dramatically. There has been a global transition to e-commerce and the digitization of the financial sector. From supporting homeworkers to other business activities. There is a definite shift towards online shopping and you need a card to pay, ”he said. “In addition, many companies have started to distribute their products and services online, shifting most of their spending to online marketing. This is an example of a large expense that is usually paid for using a card. There have certainly been instances where some categories of spending have decreased and others have increased rapidly. I realized that many issues related to the pandemic have arisen and can be resolved. “

“Our experience with software and payment technologies gives us in-depth insight and Sold is at the forefront of financial digitization,” said Simon Lambert, director of Sunley House, Advent International’s cross-fund, in a statement. I’m sure I’ll stay on my feet. “The company operates in a large and rapidly growing market and is excited to join forces with a strong management team looking to create the leading payroll and expense automation platform in Europe. “

Soldo raises $ 180 million for its professional expense management platform – TechCrunch Source link Soldo raises $ 180 million for its professional expense management platform – TechCrunch


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Some residents oppose new plan to provide safe camping for homeless people in Los Angeles city parks – NBC Los Angeles

LA City Council is considering a plan that could separate parts of public parks for safe and secure camping sites for people who are homeless. And the news is not well received by locals.

Westchester Park and Mar Vista Park are two of the locations suggested in a feasibility study commissioned by LA City Councilor for District 11, Mike Bonin. Neighbors in Westchester point to picnic tables, ball fields and parking lots all cramped with tents that have grown exponentially during the COVID pandemic.

“No matter where they set up a safe campsite in Westchester Park, it’s going to affect us,” says Beth O’Rourke, director of youth sports for West Side rugby clubs. “We witnessed urinating in public, we saw excrement on the ground, around the field. The toilets are unusable for an adult and even less for a child.

The City of LA Parks and Recreation Department has been renovating the fields in recent weeks, but some residents say the tents lining the perimeter prove the priority is not on the kids using the park, but on the homeless people who abuse it.

“I don’t feel like they respect the fact that it belongs to everyone. Just for them, ”says Becca Prismantis, a Westchester resident who says she had to take her kids to nearby towns for their lacrosse teams.

Earlier this year, Bonin requested a feasibility study for an alternative to encampments and suggested part of Westchester Park and Mar Vista Park. NBC4 viewers shared photos showing campsites had invaded the softball fields.

“What we are proposing is to allow those who are here now to be in a certain section,” Bonin explained at a city council meeting in May. “Give them security, sanitation, services, install them in housing while restoring the rest of the park for general and public use. “

But some parents say the damage is done; teams have had to move to other parks, parents have had to leave their home neighborhoods to take their children to play – and all because they don’t feel safe in their own local park.

“I see things are taken care of, I see it’s just out of control,” says Prismantis.

But Stephanie Tatro says she has two young children whom she often brings to the park and feels very safe, even at night.

Tatro is a co-founder of the local Grass Roots Neighbors nonprofit and says she has gotten to know many of those who call Westchester Park home.

“I see a lot of uses happening in this park as well as the people who live here who are not housed and who are trying to take the next step in their lives and improve the circumstances,” Tatro says.

She believes the park is big enough for children and the homeless and denies any danger lurking nearby.

“I don’t see how the tents prevent access. Full access is available, ”she said.

But as the NBC4 I-Team first reported on May 20, crime is on the rise near parks and schools in Los Angeles where homeless settlements abound. NBC4 cameras caught brawls, weapons used to harass and threaten homeless people and angry parents over what they say is the city’s lack of interest in addressing the root causes of roaming.

Six days after the NBC4 report, Bonin lobbied city council to provide park space for homeless neighbors.

“I will gladly take all of these things off the table if people can come up with better solutions,” he told voters and colleagues at the May meeting.

Westchester parents say they have an idea.

“A different solution would be to send them or move them to a place that doesn’t take the kids away,” says O’Rourke. “It’s like homeless people are allowed to live here, but children are not allowed to play here.

The results of the feasibility study are expected in early August. Some residents argue that this will not be enough because the study does not take into account the community impact of such a plan, which they say would be a failure.


Source link

read more
History organization

The Space Collectibles Display and Sale takes place August 14 at the Sands Space History Center at the Cape Canaveral Space Station

the ree event is open to the public and features memorabilia related to space

The annual Space Collectibles Display and Sale is scheduled for Saturday, August 14, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Sands Space History Center, outside the Cape Canaveral Space Station. The free event is open to the public and features space-related memorabilia including unique and historical pins, badges, models, toys, mail envelopes, artwork and more.

BREVARD COUNTY • CAPE CANAVERAL, FLORIDA – The annual Space Collectibles Sale is scheduled for Saturday, August 14 from 10 am to 3 pm at the Sands Space History Center outside the Cape Canaveral Space Station.

The free event is open to the public and features space-related memorabilia, including unique and historical lapel pins, patches, models, toys, mail envelopes, artwork and more.

The US Air Force Space and Missile Museum Foundation, Inc., a nonprofit organization, hosts the event and proceeds are donated to museum programs and activities.

The Sands Space History Center is located just outside the main entrance to the Cape Canaveral Space Station at the end of State Road 401 on the north side of Port Canaveral at 100 Spaceport Way in Cape Canaveral.

For questions or more information, contact Sharon Rodriguez at 321-698-5854 or by email at [email protected]


Source link

read more
Canadian army

Smoke from wildfires in the west causes air pollution across the country

July 20 (Reuters) – Raging wildfires across the western United States and Canada, including a two-week “monster” fire in Oregon, spewed smoke and soot on Tuesday which blew eastward and caused harmful air pollution to New York City.

In 13 western states, more than 80 large active wildfires have charred nearly 1.3 million acres (526,090 hectares) of vegetation desiccated by drought in recent weeks, an area larger than the Delaware, according to the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) in Boise, Idaho.

Several hundred more fires have burned in western and central Canada. They included 86 classified as uncontrollable on Tuesday in British Columbia alone, which led authorities to declare a state of emergency.

The jet stream and other transcontinental air currents carried smoke and ash thousands of kilometers. Residents of remote towns felt the contamination of the air in their eyes, noses and lungs.

In New York City, where a gray haze enveloped the Manhattan skyline, the Air Quality Index (AQI) for fine particles reached 170, a level considered harmful even to healthy people and nine times higher than World Health Organization exposure recommendations. Philadelphia reached 172.

Other northeastern cities, including Boston and Hartford, Connecticut, had readings in the unhealthy zone above 150. Residents were advised to wear face masks outdoors to limit exposure.

Smoke from Canadian wildfires in Manitoba and Ontario in the United States likely pushed the AQI in Detroit and Cleveland above 125, considered unhealthy for sensitive people, the NIFC meteorologist said, Nick Nauslar. Smoke from forest fires from the western provinces of Canada has reached east to Ontario, triggering broad government air quality warnings.

In the western United States, parts of Idaho and Montana suffered unhealthy levels of air pollution from 40 nearby large fires and smoke from the Bootleg fire in southern Oregon, currently the largest in the United States.

Heavy exposure to smoke from wildfires has been linked to long-term respiratory consequences for firefighters, including a significantly elevated risk of developing asthma, according to a University of Alberta study released this week. week.

The general population also faces serious health effects.

The Bootleg Fire burns through vegetation near Paisley, Oregon, USA, July 20, 2021. REUTERS / David Ryder

Read more

“Exposure to smoke from wildfires (…) increases susceptibility to respiratory infections, including COVID, increases the severity of these infections and makes recovery more difficult,” the Federal Councilor said by email. Margaret Key Air Resources.

THE “MONSTER” FIRE ENTERING THE 3RD WEEK

The forest fires themselves posed a more direct risk to life and property.

The Bootleg Fire has blackened 388,600 acres (157,260 hectares) of dry brush and wood in and around the Fremont-Winema National Forest, about 250 miles south of Portland, since July 6. Only three other forest fires in Oregon in the past century have burned more territory.

As of Tuesday, an army of some 2,200 people had succeeded in digging containment lines around 30% of the outskirts of the blaze, as the blaze spread further east and north.

Incident commander Rob Allen said in his daily report that the dry fuels in the fire area “will continue to burn and smoke for weeks.”

“Fighting this fire is a marathon, not a sprint,” Allen wrote. “We’re in there for as long as it takes to contain this monster safely.”

At least 67 houses were destroyed and 3,400 others were listed as threatened, with around 2,100 people ordered to evacuate or to be ready to flee at any time.

Western conflagrations, marking a heavier-than-normal start to the wildfire season, coincided with record heat that has ravaged much of the region in recent weeks and left hundreds dead.

Scientists said the increasing frequency and intensity of forest fires is largely attributable to prolonged drought and increased episodes of excessive heat that are symptomatic of climate change.

The Bootleg fire is so large that it sometimes generated its own climate – towering clouds of pyrocumulus of condensed moisture sucked through the fire’s smoke column from the burnt vegetation and of the surrounding air. These clouds can create thunderstorms and strong winds capable of starting new fires and spreading flames.

Reporting by Peter Szekely in New York and Steve Gorman in Los Angeles; additional reporting by Nia Williams in Calgary; Editing by Cynthia Osterman

Our standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


Source link

read more
History organization

Hackensack University Medical Center Foundation Welcomes New Trustees – Network News, Press Releases

July 20, 2021

From left to right: Stephen Martinez, Tom Evans and Tom Geisel. Not in the photo, Behnaz Baker.

Hackensack Meridian The Hackensack University Medical Center Foundation is pleased to announce the addition of Behnaz Baker, Thomas Evans, Stephen J. Martinez and Thomas X. Geisel to its Board of Trustees.

“These new directors are all great additions to our board,” said Clare Ward, Interim Executive Director, Hackensack University Medical Center Foundation and Vice President, Principal Giving, Hackensack Meridian Health Foundation. “Tom Evans and Stephen joined us at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic and immediately stepped up to help Hackensack University Medical Center through its most difficult time in its history. Behnaz joins us as the pandemic appears to be ending, but she has been involved in medical center-related child-related causes for several years and is eager to use her time and talents as Hackensack University Medical Center continues. its expansion and recognition as one of the best hospitals in the country. Tom Geisel’s extensive experience in regional and national organizations, combined with his leadership experience, involvement in many leading industry associations and passion for extending his expertise to business organizations and the local community make him a wonderful addition to our board of directors.

Baker is the CIO and Executive Director of Integration at Riverside Medical Group, which is part of Optumcare. As a member of the leadership team, she leads several divisions of the practice to execute Riverside’s vision and strategy to provide the best possible care to New Jersey residents through partnerships with internal and external stakeholders. through growth and acquisitions. In 2018, Baker was recognized as one of New Jersey’s “50 Best Business Women” by NJBIZ. She and her husband, Omar Baker, MD, established the Dr. Omar and Behnaz Baker Patient Assistance Fund at Hackensack Meridian Children’s Health at Joseph M. Sanzari Children’s Hospital to provide financial assistance to children and families. faced with chronic health problems. Additionally, she was a member of the Hackensack Meridian Health Children’s Hospital Advisory Committee for the past two years. Baker resides in Manhattan with her husband and three children.

Evans retired from PwC after a 38-year career where he helped develop the organization’s best leaders and teams at all levels. He began his career at PwC in 1977 as a Chartered Accountant in the firm’s insurance practice before joining the Leadership & Development team to launch his industry-specific training efforts where he quickly rose to prominence. through the ranks, eventually becoming the firm’s first Chief Learning Officer, followed by the Development Leader for PwC West businesses in Canada, Brazil and Mexico, as well as in other Latin American and Caribbean countries. He is a member of the Association of the US Army (AUSA), the Association for Talent Development (ATD) and the AICPA. He is also very active in his community and is deputy mayor and commissioner of revenue and finance in his hometown. Evans lives in Nutley.

Martinez is an architect at RSC Architects, a full-service architectural firm specializing in healthcare, education and municipal works. Previously, he worked in New York for Kohn Pedersen Fox, an international architectural firm specializing in skyscrapers in New York and Asia. Martinez is a registered architect in the state of New Jersey and a member of the American Institute of Architecture and the National Council of Architectural Registration Board. He received his BA from Lehigh University and his MA in Architecture from the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Recently married, Martinez lives in Ridgewood with his wife Burgess.

Geisel is President of Corporate Banking at Sterling National Bank, where he leads corporate banking strategic, innovation and execution activities. His responsibilities include strategic planning, mergers and acquisitions, capital allocation and overall execution of revenue generation. In addition, Geisel is a member of numerous committees of the bank, as well as a number of major professional societies in New York and New Jersey. He was named one of New Jersey’s “50 Most Influential People in Banking” by NJBIZ and his ideas have been featured in many leading media outlets.

To learn more about how you can support the Hackensack University Medical Center Foundation, please contact Clare Ward, Acting Executive Director, Hackensack University Medical Center Foundation, at [email protected] or visit hackensackumc.org/givenow.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Mother whose son was shot and killed offers help to families affected by gun violence

HAMPTON, Virginia – A mother who lost her son to gun violence has founded a non-profit organization to help other grieving parents after losing a child.

The support group is called MM2K, which stands for “Mommies Matter to Kyyri”.

Sevhn Doggette’s son Kyyri was 25 when he was shot and killed in August 2017. It happened in Charlotte, North Carolina, where Doggette now lives.

She tells News 3 that she is from Hampton Roads and comes here often, and when she heard about the recent violence involving young people, she felt compelled to publicize her organization.

Doggette says MM2K initially provides a listening ear to grieving moms and dads. She also said they have licensed therapists who volunteer their time.

“As for the different mechanics to help them go through, basically every day because it’s like a roller coaster ride for us,” Doggette explained.

As part of the support services, they sometimes even accompany parents to court in the face of the person (s) accused of having killed their child.

“Now you have to deal with this,” she added. “I’m also facing a life sentence and haven’t even committed a crime.”

Related: Norfolk Mother Who Lost Son To Gun Violence Hosts New Podcast to Help Grieving Families

Doggette says that while MM2K is active in Charlotte, she also hopes to host community events in Hampton Roads. She encourages families affected by gun violence to reach out.

More information about MM2K can be found here.

read more
History organization

Bible Society’s New Philadelphia Museum Tells American History with a Religious Lean

The first iteration of Independence Mall was such a dud that many blocks along the park went untapped for years and then ended up becoming sites for high-security government offices. But after the mall was renovated in the early 2000s with more greenery and a new visitor center, the three-block expanse became a popular destination for specialist museums keen to partner with the ideals. founders of the nation. Now everyone wants a place in the mall to tell their side of American history.

This summer, Faith and Freedom Discovery Center became the mall’s latest star-seeking attraction, joining the Jewish National Museum and the President’s House Memorial to Enslaved Africans. The center was created by the American Bible Society, the organization responsible for storing Bibles in nightstands in hotel rooms around the world. The Bible Society had long been headquartered in New York City, but decided to move its operations to Philadelphia in 2015 when offices overlooking the Fifth and Market mall became available. As part of the deal, the company also obtained the rights to the ground floor of the building.

The Bible Society immediately knew they wanted to expand their mission by opening an exhibition space around the corner. In addition to distributing thousands of Bibles in dozens of languages, the company had amassed an impressive collection of historical Bibles, including the one used by William Penn. What better place to present its history, the group thought, than the city where Penn established a colony based on religious tolerance and where the American Republic was born.

»READ MORE: American Bible Society’s Faith and Freedom Discovery Center opens across from Independence Mall

While the location was great, the space was a challenge. While Fifth and Market should be a welcoming gateway to the Old Town, the dismal 1970s office building has turned its back on the mall. The downstairs retail space, which once housed a bank, was hidden behind a dark archway and the views were blocked by an oversized SEPTA entrance. It didn’t help that the Jewish Museum, just across the street, was built in 2010 with an equally unappealing ground floor. This museum, designed by James Polshek, doesn’t even have a door to the mall and looks as fortified and austere as the US Mint, just up the street.

After a complete renovation of the ground floor, the Faith and Liberty Discovery Center began operating at full capacity on Independence Day. The Bible Society doesn’t want you to think of the center as a museum of Christianity or a museum of religion – or even a museum at all. The goal, according to director Pat Murdock, is to show how religious faith of all kinds has shaped America’s basic operating system and remains the bulwark of all our freedoms.

While this premise may appeal to some ardent believers, most mainstream historians would argue that this claim distorts and oversimplifies American history and is at odds with the founders’ efforts to keep religion out of the discussion. But because the Faith and Liberty Center preaches a message of tolerance – something that’s welcome in these polarized times – I couldn’t wait to see how it linked its exhibits to the mall’s evolving narrative and used them to activate this corner. dead.

With the help of architect David Searles of JacobsWyper Architects and Local projects, the exhibition designer responsible for the National September 11 Memorial, the company greatly enhanced the building’s street presence. The corner is still covered in SEPTA stairs, including one that has been inexplicably styled with AstroTurf. But now a sloping walkway leads from Market Street to a gleaming glass entrance pavilion on Fifth Street. The path is lined with benches which invite passers-by to relax. At the glass pavilion, a swirling white sculpture nicknamed Lighthouse emerges from the roof, helping to mark the place. At night, the sculpture, designed by Local Projects, becomes a real beacon. The corner almost feels alive for the first time.

Almost, but not quite. Like all of the other attractions that have taken root in the mall (with the exception of the open-air President’s House), the Faith and Liberty Center needs darkness to run its high-tech exhibits. As a result, two of the three bays in the building facing the shopping center on Fifth Street were covered with white panels. Searles arranged them in a curved shape to make the panels more interesting. But a white wall remains a white wall.

These boarded up windows say a lot about the entire company. Just as the centre’s facade isn’t as transparent as it should be, neither are its exhibits.

As soon as you arrive at the box office, you are given a digital wand and encouraged to anoint (er, type) your favorite texts and images, just like you would light a candle in a church. It is not just a sign of approval. By touching the wand on the text panels, you can download the information to your computer after leaving the museum. Just as the company places Bibles in hotel rooms, it now has the ability to place these exhibits directly into your personal digital space. Like Facebook and Google, the Bible Society is eager to collect your metadata.

Despite the company’s biblical collection, books are not the main show. In fact, you can barely see them because the lighting has to be low for the interactive displays in the center. As you enter the main hall, you are greeted by a series of video interviews with ordinary people who tell their personal stories around the faith; it is the technological version of witnessing in a church. The exhibit ends in a circular theater where the exhibit’s designers recreated William Penn’s stormy journey across the Atlantic on the Welcome ship, with virtual rats scurrying under your feet.

The Bible Society has gone to great lengths to ensure that exhibits appear non-denominational and include non-Christian religions. Murdock told me he wanted people of all faiths to feel comfortable at the center. So you won’t find the name Jesus anywhere in the center. Quotes from Ben Franklin and James Madison – two skeptics of organized religion who called themselves deists – abound. In a section titled “Changemakers,” there are tributes to Catholic, Jewish and Black social justice activists including Dorothy Day, Cesar Chavez, Sojourner Truth and Rebecca Gratz of Philadelphia. Yet despite all the ecumenism and the struggle for inclusion, the framing and choice of words struck me, a non-Christian, as deeply Christian.

Much of the story told at the center revolves around Penn, a devout Quaker whose great contribution to American life has been his belief that people should be free to worship any faith they choose. By invoking Penn, the Bible Society attempts to equate faith with tolerance. Of course, we know that faith is just as often used to justify intolerance. The Bible Society itself has recently started requiring employees to adhere to a strict set of conservative evangelical mores, making it impossible for members of the LGBTQ community to work in it openly. Nonetheless, the exhibits assert that all the freedoms Americans hold dear today stem from freedom of religion. Without faith in a higher force, they claim, there would be no America.

It’s not exactly the standard story. “The story they tell is essentially a fairy tale,” said Jonathan zimmerman, professor of educational history at Penn.

READ MORE: A year after the American Bible Society issued an ultimatum, nearly 20% of its staff have quit

One might as well argue that America was born in response to the rationalist and humanistic ideas of the Enlightenment. Or that American tolerance is a product of our mercantile culture, as practiced by the Dutch in New Amsterdam. This is the thesis of the excellent history of New York by Russell Shorto, The island at the center of the world. In this proto-capitalist era, only the Benjamins counted. The French political philosopher Montesquieu also observed the strong link between trade and the desire for freedom.

Either way, America’s record on tolerating non-white, non-Protestant groups is quite poor. The Faith and Liberty Center could never have moved to Boston, Zimmerman noted, because the founding Puritans “were very intolerant” of all other religions.

To its credit, the center recognizes the many sins America has committed in the name of faith and the Bible, from the slaughter of Native Americans and slavery, to anti-Catholic and anti-Semitic bigotry. But the contrition of the center is woefully insufficient. From the examples presented, you might be forgiven for thinking that we gave up our intolerant habits at the end of the 19th century. Like everything else in the exhibit, the facts are generously handpicked to support the centre’s narrative. There is no mention of 20th century efforts to suppress Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Communists and members of the LGBTQ community, or current efforts in cities across the country. use zoning to prevent American Muslims from building mosques.

It may not be a museum of Christianity, but it is a museum of Judeo-Christianity. On the centre’s website, its exhibition manager, Alan Crippen, argues that “the Good Book has been an influential and positive spiritual source and cultural force for what is good in America.” Sadly, this leaves out a large number of Americans whose religions do not use the Bible as the basis of their teachings, let alone those who identify as atheists. Marci Hamilton, a constitutional law scholar who began her career as a law clerk for Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, told the Inquirer earlier this year that “the Bible did not play the part. disproportionate that they are trying to give him ”.

By being located opposite the Jewish Museum, the Faith and Freedom Center tries to put the two attractions on the same level. There is a big difference, however. The Jewish Museum simply suggests that American democracy created the conditions that allowed immigrant Jews to flourish. The Faith and Freedom Center asserts that religious faith, mostly Christian in type, is what made our democracy possible in the first place.

For all of its flaws, America has come to be more tolerant than most nations and with a greater commitment to freedoms of speech, assembly, and religion. But if you want to understand why, you’d better walk to the other end of the mall and visit the National Constitution Center.


Source link

read more
Canadian army

Letters to the Editor: July 20: “How many people … would vote for a party that does not recognize climate change as real?” Verification of curators as well as other letters to the editor

Keep your opinions sharp and informed. Receive the Opinion newsletter. register today.

Legal process

Re This is a crime scene. When will Canada take responsibility for delivering justice? (July 16): How we deal with all of these crimes is far from clear.

It is true, as one letter writer tells us (Things To Come – July 15), that the federal Crown has constitutional responsibility and has fiduciary obligations to Indigenous peoples. It is also true that the Crown is also responsible for others in Canada and has duties to them. The need to balance different functions like these, when they come into conflict, is one of the reasons we have a justice system.

The story continues under the ad

I find that indigenous peoples have, on the whole, been well served by the judiciary, and the author of the letter is wrong to suggest that the government should stop using the courts to resolve these issues fairly.

Pierre Amour Toronto

You and what army?

Re Former High General Vance Charged with Obstructing Justice (July 16): There is an old adage that every country has a choice of two armies – their own or someone else’s. A strong army is vital, but it is quite obvious to me that the army in this country is broken.

Maybe someone else’s army is better.

Douglas Cornwall Ottawa

Conservative confusion

Re The conservative temperament is repulsive (July 14): It is especially politics that prevents me from voting conservative. It is a mystery to me why we do not have a socially liberal and fiscally conservative party in Canada.

Maybe the pollsters know this better, but I would like a party to be selective about what the government does, make sure it does these things well and make it clear why it does not go above and beyond. I have seen the Conservatives spend too much energy getting the government to interfere in the lives of citizens on social issues.

The story continues under the ad

When they were in government I think they spent way too much money on subsidy programs like home renovations in the name of job creation. What about infrastructure, the encouragement and regulation of competitive markets, effective and efficient plans to tackle climate change, a good balance between public and private health care options and public services? effective?

So maybe over 41 percent of the population would consider voting Conservative.

Gord flaten Regina


Given our recent historic heat wave, I wonder how many people in Lytton, or anywhere in British Columbia, would vote for a party that won’t recognize climate change as real?

Arlene Churchill Surrey, BC

Careful examination

Re Liberals Bank on Urban Votes with Affordable Child Care Plan (July 16): Child care is not just an urban issue. Evidence shows that quality child care is important to rural / remote / suburban families, but its delivery is hampered by the approach to the child care market in Canada.

The story continues under the ad

Is the Liberal child care program expensive? Not when compared to spending by peers at the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, or astronomical child care costs paid by Canadian parents.

Intrusive? Not with the evidence-based program elements of Ottawa and the provinces willingly collaborating in the development of their own programs.

Inflexible? A federal role should not mean a “one size fits all” outcome. Responsive public policy is the best way to meet a diversity of child care needs – shaped by diverse cultures, abilities, needs and schedules – using a pan-Canadian approach similar to Medicare. .

We now have a much better understanding of the importance of quality child care for children, families, women and the economy, and the best ways to ensure that this becomes a reality.

Martha Friendly Childcare Resource and Research Unit Toronto

Lack of food

Re Indoor Dining Is Back – But Restaurant Staff Are Not (July 15): Maybe if restaurants offered safer working environments, more staff would be willing to come back. I have been disappointed by the negative reactions of many restaurateurs to any pandemic restrictions.

The story continues under the ad

My advice: make vaccination compulsory for staff and customers, then workers would be more willing to come back and the still vulnerable elderly would feel at ease in catering establishments.

Glen morehouse Washago, Ont.


As sympathetic as I am to contributor Stephen Beckta’s cry for a feedback from his staff, I can’t help but think back to those first months, about 20 years ago, after quitting my job as a professional cook in some of the best restaurants in Toronto. .

Two weeks later, I noticed that the arch of my foot was returning to normal, I was well rested with no 12-hour workdays, and most notably, I had a social life again.

I can’t help but think of all the cooks who are suffering without work, but it seems the pandemic has given them a reason to reconsider their career choice. As long as bad hours and most importantly terrible money play out in the restaurant job in the back of the house, I think we can expect a talent shortage to continue for some time.

David Roy Toronto

The story continues under the ad

Medical memory

Re Remembering Our Front-line Heroes (Editorial, July 16): I can understand and sympathize with nurses in this country.

Imagine working long hours with all the stress of COVID-19 and having to deal with thousands of people who are hesitant to vaccinate or those who think it’s a hoax. They put their lives on the line for people who don’t care.

After 15 months they had had enough, especially when the provincial governments praised them but refused to raise wages. Indeed, praise is not enough and we now have a nursing shortage in Canada.

What a tragedy, and so easily resolved.

Robert Tremblay Gatineau, Que.


Alberta Health Services recently returned to the bargaining table with the United Nurses of Alberta and demanded much denigration and a 3 percent pay cut!

The story continues under the ad

All frontline healthcare workers should receive bonuses, not pay cuts. It is a shameful treatment.

Dorothy Watson Toronto

Re New Toronto Park Honors Frontline Heroes of the 1840s (July 16): Perhaps pandemic memorials should be as common as those of our politicians.

Over the past 400 years, dozens of pandemics have ravaged North America. Smallpox, measles and influenza ravaged the northern half of the continent in the early 1600s, and several times thereafter. Typhus, tuberculosis and polio followed.

Each of these pandemics had more serious consequences than COVID-19. Entire generations have been marked and orphaned, especially among indigenous communities. We forget this story because of our modern successes in public health, especially through vaccination and the provision of clean water.

Maybe now is a good time to remember a little more of our medical history, teach it and commemorate it.

John riley Mono, Ont.


Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Globe and Mail. Include your name, address, and daytime phone number. Try to limit the letters to less than 150 words. Letters can be edited for length and clarity. To send a letter by e-mail, click here: [email protected]


Source link

read more
Canadian army

‘Unknown Blackfoot Warrior’ receives burial ceremony where River Old Man meets River Belly

CALGARY – A skull that has been determined to be a prehistoric native was buried on June 26, more than 40 years after it was found in the waters of the Old Man River west of the Monarch Bridge on Highway 3A in the southern Alberta.

This happened in 1979 when someone found a skull and turned it over to the Fort Macleod RCMP detachment.

In October 1979, with the help of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Alberta, it was determined that the skull was from a man over the age of 60 and of prehistoric – and therefore Aboriginal – origin.

Fort Macleod RCMP handed the skull over to the researcher for safekeeping, and that seemed like the end of the story until 2017, when someone handed it over to the local detachment.

In March 2021, members of the detachment consulted with the Blackfoot Elders Council to determine a way to re-bury the skull in an appropriate and respectful manner.

The ceremony consisted of wrapping the box containing the remains of the skull in a traditional blanket, followed by a ceremony of purification and internment.

Songs and prayers were sung for this Blackfoot ancestor as he was buried in a small tomb near the confluence of the Old Man and Belly rivers.

The grave is marked with a white bleached stone which reads “Unknown Blackfoot Warrior”.

Kainai Spiritual Elder Joe Eagle Tail Feathers was consulted with other Spiritual Elders and Sundancers, and a traditional burial ceremony was held on June 26, 2021 on the Blood Nation.

The funeral was presided over by Elder Martin Eagle Child and several other Elders and Blackfoot Sundancers.

A military style salute was delivered by ex-Sgt D. Vernon Houle (Canadian Armed Forces) and Mr. Alvin Many Chief, retired (Canadian Armed Forces / US Army Infantry).

Blood Tribe Police Chief Kyle Melting Tallow, Sgt. Bryan Mucha and Const. Benjamin Stubbe from the Fort Macleod RCMP Detachment was also present.


Source link

read more
International headquarters

Raleigh County Large-Scale Solar Project Has New Owner | Energy and environment

One of West Virginia’s first large-scale solar projects is moving forward under new ownership.

Enel Green Power, a global renewable energy developer headquartered in Rome, has taken over the project to build and operate a 90-megawatt solar farm in County Raleigh approved by county officials and officials. state utility regulators last year.

Enel Green Power purchased a 100% stake in the project as part of a portfolio of 3.2 gigawatt solar projects from Dakota Renewable Energy.

Operations are scheduled to begin in 2023 on a solar farm consisting of 250,000 solar panels on 530 acres in the Grandview area.

“What made it very appealing about this particular site was the major overhead power grid lines,” Raleigh County Administrator Jay Quesenberry said. “It’s very easy for them to put this electricity directly into a substation and put it directly on the grid.

Enel Green Power said the project will be the first of several developing solar projects in the state. Projects under development in West Virginia, including the Raleigh County project, will include paired battery storage to add resilience to the electricity grid as the country develops more renewable energy.

“In West Virginia, I think we have a huge opportunity,” said Nick Coil, senior director of regional development at Enel Green Power, whose North American branch operates 58 power plants of over 6.6 gigawatts powered by gas. renewable wind, geothermal and solar energy.

Coil said the lack of large-scale solar power generation facilities in West Virginia makes the state ripe for development that could generate tax revenue for counties and school districts, even though the mountainous terrain of the state may ultimately limit the state’s appeal to an industry that values ​​flatter land for laying down blocks of solar panels.

“Hopefully Raleigh will be one of the first of many projects in the state,” Coil said. “We are delighted with this opportunity to enter a new market. “

Coil declined to say how much Enel Green Power paid to purchase the solar project.

Raleigh Solar I, LLC, a subsidiary of Dakota Renewable Energy, estimated the project would cost $ 90 million before the West Virginia Civil Service Commission approved a site certificate for the project in October.

The Civil Service Commission order granting this certificate applies to all subsequent owners of the project, approving a decommissioning agreement with a minimum initial guarantee of $ 50,000 and requiring that construction begin within five years and be completed. complete within 10 years.

The Raleigh County Commission in September approved a payment in lieu of taxes deal with Raleigh Solar to inflate the county coffers by more than $ 2 million, with the bulk going to the Raleigh County Board of Education .

The project will create three to five permanent jobs which Coil says are “mostly local” and 150-200 jobs throughout the construction process which could take anywhere from eight months to a year.

Coil estimated that the 90-megawatt solar farm’s capacity is generally sufficient to power around 16,000 homes. The County of Raleigh’s projected power generation is about average among Enel Green Power’s lineup of solar projects, Coil said.

West Virginia lawmakers opened up the state’s solar market during the 2020 legislative session by passing bills creating a solar services program and favorably adjusting the business and trade tax for solar power.

In statements released by Enel Green Power, West Virginia Governor Jim Justice and U.S. Senator Joe Manchin, DW.Va., praised the state’s solar business and development while clearly indicating their continued support for the fossil fuels in addition to renewable energies. .

“I am incredibly excited for all the good that Enel Green Power’s acquisition of the Raleigh Solar Project will do for our great state and our people,” Justice said. “As I have said many times, West Virginia is an ‘all-in’ energy state. We abound in a diverse range of natural resources unlike anywhere else on Earth. Not only will this project continue to diversify our state’s energy production and enable us to power people’s homes in a sustainable manner, the ripple effects on our economy and our workforce will be phenomenal.

“The announcement of a major solar project in West Virginia is great news for our state as it highlights, once again, the abundant natural resources there,” said Manchin, Chairman of the Senate Energy Committee. and natural resources. “From coal and natural gas to wind, solar and hydropower, the Mountain State has been – and will continue to be – the backbone of the U.S. economy, and investments like this These allow us to continue to use all of the above for power generation and job creation while deploying innovative energy technologies and maintaining our country’s position as a global energy leader.

The Solar Energy Industries Association ranks West Virginia 49th in the country for installed solar power capacity.

Another large-scale solar project is planned in Berkeley County, which County Council announced in January that a renewable energy development company plans to install a $ 100 million solar power generation facility. dollars in a former explosives plant at DuPont Potomac River Works.

Bedington Energy Facility, LLC, a Delaware subsidiary of Colorado-based Torch Clean Energy, plans to invest $ 100 million to build a 100-megawatt solar installation on 750 acres of land on a site that has been designated as a wasteland. industrial “unsuitable for most commercial enterprises.” and industrial uses, ”according to a payment in lieu of tax agreement between Berkeley County Council and Bedington Energy Facility.

Coil predicts tremendous growth in the solar industry over the next five years, in line with current market forces, and claims that Enel Green Power will share the wealth by sponsoring STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education and d other initiatives that rural communities identify as priorities.

“We’re not just going to come in and be a silent observer in the community,” Coil said. “We want to be an active participant and help the community. “


Source link

read more
History organization

Merrick Garland blocks federal prosecutors from searching for journalists’ files

WASHINGTON – Attorney General Merrick Garland severely limited the ability of federal prosecutors to obtain tapes of journalists’ contacts when they investigated leaks of sensitive government information on Monday, curbing a long-standing practice that had sparked offenders. criticism in recent weeks, especially from President Biden.

In a note to federal prosecutors, Mr Garland said the agency’s past policies had failed to properly weigh the national interest in protecting journalists from forced disclosure of their sources, saying they needed to such protection “to inform the American people of how their government is working.”

Mr Garland had vowed he would prevent prosecutors from seizing information from reporters after recent revelations that former President Donald Trump’s Justice Department secretly searched for and obtained 2017 phone records from Washington Post reporters , CNN and The New York Times while trying to identify their sources. This sparked outrage from lawmakers, press freedom organizations and Mr Biden, who said he would no longer allow such tactics.

Mr Garland, who as a federal judge has taken a strong stand in favor of journalists ‘rights and First Amendment protections, told lawmakers in June that the new policy would be the “most protective of journalists’ ability to do their job in history “. He has met with information officials to discuss their concerns at least twice in recent weeks.

The new policy includes exceptions for cases involving an agent of a foreign power or a member of a foreign terrorist organization, or where measures must be taken to “prevent an imminent risk of death or serious bodily harm,” said the memo.

The three-page memo also said the ministry would support legislation codifying protections for journalists into law, going beyond the efforts of previous administrations, and giving Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco the responsibility of consulting others to develop new regulations on the matter.

Such legislation has not been a priority for lawmakers in recent years and would face an uncertain fate in Congress. Without becoming law, any rules passed by the Justice Department under Mr Garland could be overturned by a future administration.

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS

Should prosecutors be allowed to search for the sources of journalists’ leaks? Why or why not? Join the conversation below.

Media advocates applauded the decision. “The Attorney General has taken a necessary and critical step to protect press freedom at a critical time,” said Bruce Brown, executive director of the Journalists’ Committee on Press Freedom. “This historic new policy will ensure that journalists can do their job of informing the public without fear of federal intrusion into their dealings with confidential sources,” said Mr. Brown.

Some former national security prosecutors said that while existing guidelines already made it difficult to subpoena journalists’ files and provided for the tool as a last resort, they expected the new memo to further limit such investigations.

“I think this will make leaks of classified information more difficult to investigate, but it was a compromise the department is prepared to make in order to provide greater privacy protection for journalists and their sources,” he said. said Kellen Dwyer, a former district attorney who was deputy. Assistant Attorney General in the National Security Division of the Department of Justice and now works at the law firm Alston & Bird.

For years, prosecutors have used subpoenas and court orders to obtain journalists’ files in leak investigations, often after exhausting other options to identify suspects. Under the Obama administration, for example, the Justice Department used the tool for investigations involving reporting from the Associated Press and Fox News. Several former government employees and senior officials have been sued by the Obama Justice Department.

In one notable case in 2010, former Attorney General Eric Holder personally approved the seizure of the phone records and personal emails of Fox News Channel reporter James Rosen, who reported on a secret government report on Korea. North. An FBI search warrant request identified Mr. Rosen as a possible criminal “co-conspirator”.

In response to a backlash from media advocates and others, Holder added in 2013 new hurdles that prosecutors had to overcome before they could get subpoenas and search warrants targeting journalists. The measures included requiring prosecutors to give notice to a media organization before a subpoena could be issued to seize cases, unless the attorney general certifies that doing so would interfere with the investigation.

At the start of the Trump administration in 2017, then Attorney General Jeff Sessions pledged a crackdown on classified information leakers and said the Justice Department would review policies on subpoena news organizations. At the time, Mr. Trump had repeatedly complained about leaks related to contacts between Russia and figures from his 2016 election campaign and the investigation by then-Special Advocate Robert Mueller, on these links. In June 2021, a Treasury Department official was sentenced to six months in prison for leaking sensitive financial information about former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and others.

Mr Trump’s second attorney general, William Barr, continued the practice, tasking a New Jersey federal prosecutor to work on the half-dozen leak cases he inherited.

Unsealed court documents last week show the Justice Department searched the files of three Washington Post reporters on December 22, the day before Mr Barr resigned, in a bid to identify sources in three articles . Prosecutors identified them by their publication dates: a May 2017 article detailing conversations between Mr. Trump’s adviser and son-in-law Jared Kushner and Sergey Kislyak, Russia’s ambassador to the United States at the time; a June 2017 report on the Obama administration’s struggles against Russian electoral interference; and a July 2017 story about conversations between Mr. Kislyak and Mr. Sessions, which had the discussions when he was a United States Senator.

Prosecutors said in their court order request that they believe a member of Congress may have provided the newspaper with details of Mr. Kislyak’s conversations.

Trump’s Justice Department also seized communications records from some Democratic lawmakers in 2018, a revelation that sparked outrage from Democrats. Lawmakers themselves were not the target of the investigation, the Wall Street Journal previously reported, and their records were obtained because they had been in contact with one or more assistants that prosecutors suspected of having. disclosed classified information to the media.

Senior Justice Ministry officials have long questioned how forcefully prosecutors should press for the files of journalists looking for the sources of the leaks. For example, even as Mr. Sessions stepped up investigations into the leaks, behind the scenes some ministry officials rejected a more aggressive stance, the Journal reported.

In 2017, for example, law enforcement discussed with Mr. Sessions whether to relax the requirement that investigators exhaust other options to obtain information as part of prior leakage investigations. to subpoena journalists’ files, the people said. Mr Sessions asked his deputy, Rod Rosenstein, to review the policy, which officials ultimately refused to change.

Telephone recordings

More WSJ coverage of Trump Justice Department policy, selected by editors.

Write to Sadie Gurman at [email protected] and Aruna Viswanatha at [email protected]

Copyright © 2021 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All rights reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8


Source link

read more
History organization

This week in history: July 19 to 25

25 years ago: bombing of LTTE train kills dozens of workers in Sri Lanka

On July 24, 1996, a bomb attack by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) at Dehiwala station outside Colombo killed 64 commuters. 400 other people were injured. LTTE agents placed suitcase bombs containing more than 200 pounds of explosives in four cars during the height of the rush hour. The act deliberately targeted workers going to the suburbs of Sri Lanka’s capital. The train, which was due to leave Colombo Fort station after 5 p.m., was supposed to take city workers home after the day shift. The train was known as the “office train” and was extraordinarily crowded. More than 2,000 people were on board the day of the attack.

Sri Lankan soldiers and spectators stand near the exploded train in Dehiwala. (AP Photo / Eranga Jayawardena)

The Revolutionary Communist League (RCL), the Sri Lankan section of the International Committee and forerunner of the Socialist Equality Party, issued a statement condemning the brutal attack by the LTTE on the working class, while explaining that the incident was the direct result of the racist war. against the Tamil people, stepped up by the Sri Lankan government.

President Chandrika Kumaratunga’s “People’s Alliance” consisted of her own Sri Lanka Freedom Party, one of Sri Lanka’s two main bourgeois parties, along with the Lanka Sama Samaja Party, which broke with Trotskyism. in 1963-1964, and the Stalinist Communist Party. Sri Lanka Party, as well as several small bourgeois-populist parties. While using populist language, the Peoples Alliance pursued a chauvinistic policy towards the Tamil minority, which fueled support for the LTTE, and carried out vicious attacks on poor workers and farmers.

The link between the war and attacks on working class conditions was illustrated on the same day as the bombing when Kumaratunga addressed a meeting of small tea growers. She declared her government’s determination to remove economic subsidies and threatened to fire workers who are fighting for wage increases. “Lethargic civil servants and teachers who continue their old wars without being aware of the needs of the moment and of changes in society will face heavy penalties, including dismissal,” she said.

The RCL urged workers not to get drawn into the racist anti-Tamil campaign that was unleashed following the bombing by the ruling class. The party called on workers to establish their own independent defense committees to organize the safety of workers and their families. He urged them to oppose the government’s racist war and the government’s growing militarization.

The bombing, a previous bombing of Central Bank employees, and the continued harassment of Sinhala peasants in the Tamil-populated northern and eastern provinces demonstrated the LTTE’s opposition to the unity of the Sinhalese and Tamil masses. The LTTE sought to prevent the development of a movement of workers and the oppressed against the Sri Lankan regime.

50 years ago: failed Communist Party coup in Sudan

On July 19, 1971, the Sudanese Communist Party (SCP) attempted a coup against the government of the Democratic Republic of Sudan and ousted the country’s leader, Jaafar Nimeiry, from power. The blow was short lived, less than a week. On July 23, Nimeiry would be released and returned to power.

Years of immense political crisis in Sudan preceded the coup. Following a coup d’état in 1969 by the Free Officers Movement, Nimeiry led the North African country as chairman of the National Revolutionary Command Council (RCC), the ruling junta where all the political power has been consolidated.

Initially, the SCP had given some support to the RCC government after the 1969 coup. However, fearing the development of a revolutionary movement among Sudanese workers, the RCC began an anti-Communist crackdown in March 1971. Nimeiry had announced the creation of a state-controlled political party called the Socialist Union of Sudan, which would essentially dissolve all parties, including the SCP, into a tightly-run organization. The RCC also forcibly seized control of the unions, where the SCP gained most of their support.

Many SCP leaders went underground, with most of the party’s operations going underground in the spring and early summer of 1971. Under these conditions, the SCP began to prepare for the coup. Status as of July 19. Under the leadership of the Stalinist bureaucracy in Moscow, the SCP turned not to the working class, but to its supporters within the nucleus of Sudanese military officers. The most prominent of this layer was Major Hashem al-Atta who would lead the coup and briefly serve as the commander-in-chief of the armed forces after surrounding the presidential palace with tanks and arresting Nimeiry.

Coup leader Hashem al-Atta

The SCP was the largest communist party in the Arab world, but its coup met with hostility, not only from the RCC in Sudan, but from all surrounding nations. Egyptian Anwar Sadat and Libyan Muammar Gaddafi opposed the SCP coup and supported Nimeiry and his return to power. These bourgeois nationalists, who balanced themselves between the Soviet Union and the imperialist powers, feared that the establishment of a Stalinist-led government in the region would destabilize their own fragile regimes.

Outside of members of the SCP itself, which had been substantially shattered by Nimeiry’s repressions, the coup had little popular support. Atta was unable to bring the army under his control, with the vast majority of generals and other officers continuing to support the RCC.

After a few days, forces loyal to Nimeiry released him from prison and arrested Atta and the other coup plotters, who were court martialed and shot. In the process, Nimeiry intensified his persecution of the SCP, arresting and executing its leaders and banning all unions and other communist-led organizations.

75 years ago: Zionist Irgun group bombs King David hotel in British Palestine

On July 22, 1946, the Zionist organization Irgun bombed the King David Hotel in British-controlled Palestine, killing 91 people and injuring 46 others. The terrorist attack was part of a series, based on the prospect of forcing Britain, or other great powers, to approve the creation of a Jewish state in the region. Among those who died were 41 Arabs, 28 British citizens, 17 Jews and members of several other national groups.

British forces in Palestine

The attack received wide international coverage, not only because of the large number of casualties, but also because the King David Hotel was the seat of the British mandatory authorities who oversaw the occupation of Palestine. It was conceived as a retaliation for a security crackdown carried out by the British authorities against militant Zionist organizations.

Well-organized Irgun agents planted bombs in the hotel’s basement, as well as in a cafe next door and on a nearby street. Some spectators who gathered to see the aftermath of the explosion at the latter location were touched by the detonations that followed. While members of the Irgun claimed that a warning was sent to the hotel nearly half an hour before the attacks, details were disputed and no evacuation was carried out.

The attack had apparently been discussed beforehand within the wider Zionist community. However, its aftermath and the international response resulted in the breakdown of the alliance between the Irgun and several other groups, including the Haganah, the military wing of the Labor Zionists, which took a nominally leftist stance.

Unlike some of the other Zionist organizations, the Irgun only began hostilities against the British after it was clear that the Allied Powers would be victorious over Nazi Germany. His perspective was not based on any form of anti-colonialism, but included scathing denunciations of the “Arabs,” including calls to expel them from the region or to subdue them.

At the time of the bombing, the Irgun was led by Menachem Begin, who would later become Israel’s sixth prime minister, from June 1977 to October 1983.

100 years ago: Major military defeat of the Spanish in occupied Morocco

On July 22, 1921, the Berber rebels (known as the Rifis after the Rif mountain range), led by Abd el-Krim, inflicted a major defeat on the Spanish imperialist troops at Annuel in the northeast of the Morocco, triggering the Rif war. The Spaniards, who controlled areas along the coast including the enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla, sought to push inland and east, ignoring Abd el-Krim’s warnings.

Abd-el Krim on the cover of TIME magazine

A Spanish general, Manuel Fernández Silvestre, had occupied the village of Annual in January with several thousand Spanish soldiers. Silvestre’s lines of communication were poor, and his army ran out of ammunition in the summer. Five thousand Spanish soldiers clashed with 3,000 irregular fighters from the Rif on July 21.

The Spaniards began a retreat, which turned into a rout. Spain sent reinforcements but these were also defeated by the Rifis. In total, Spain lost more than 20,000 soldiers as well as large quantities of arms and ammunition. Abd el-Krim reportedly remarked: “In one night, Spain provided us with all the equipment we needed to wage a great war. Silvestre was reportedly killed, although his remains have never been definitively identified. Abd el-Krim established a Republic of the Rif.

The Rif War has its origins in more than 20 years of aggression in North Africa by the imperialist powers, which was a source of persistent inter-imperialist conflict. During the Algeciras conference of 1906, France and Spain had claimed Morocco and distributed the areas of influence. Despite attempts to modernize its army, the Sultanate of Morocco, which had ruled a unified state since the 17th century, collapsed under European incursions and retained control of only six cities.

Germany also had claims on Morocco, which almost led to a war between the great powers after the Agadir crisis of 1911, when a German gunboat entered a French-held port on Morocco’s Atlantic coast. and raised the possibility of war. The incident sparked mass anti-war protests in Europe led by social democratic parties. The crisis was part of a series of inter-imperialist skirmishes that led to World War I.

In 1912, Spain established, with French and British agreement, an official protectorate in Morocco.

After World War I, Spain and France both renewed their colonial ambitions in Morocco, sparking the rebellion of Abd el-Krim.

The Rif War of 1921, which the French joined, lasted another five years. In a retaliatory war for the defeat of Annual, the Spanish indiscriminately used chemical weapons against civilians. Some Berber organizations claim today that the residues of these weapons still poison the inhabitants of the region. The war ultimately ended with the defeat and capture of Abd el-Krim, who died in exile in Cairo in 1963.


Source link

read more
Canadian army

Why Canada Matters to Texas

For over 150 years, Canada has been more than just a neighbor: we are your best customer, your closest security partner and your largest energy supplier. Texas is an important part of all of these mutual benefits.

Texans may think of other countries first when considering international trade and cooperation. We understand that, but we think we should go against the grain and brag a bit about Canada’s contribution to the Texas economy.

Canada is often seen as friendly, polite, and snowy. We own them all, but we also have a fascinating economic and business story to tell in Texas – we are Texas’ second largest export market after Mexico. Texas exported $ 27.8 billion in goods and services to Canada in 2020, and nearly 700 Canadian-owned companies operate right here in Texas. These companies represent nearly 57,000 jobs statewide.

Beyond our common North American geography, we share values ​​and interests, as well as economic ties on many levels. Here are the adjectives I would use to describe our bilateral relationship and the importance of Canada:

Prosperous. Canada and the United States share the world’s largest trading relationship. Our trade is balanced, fair and supports growth and innovation in our two countries. Every day, nearly US $ 2 billion in goods and services cross the Canada-US border. This thriving economic partnership supports well-paying jobs in both countries. More than 5,500 Canadian companies in the United States support nearly 900,000 jobs. We buy more goods from the United States than China, Japan and the United Kingdom combined.

Integrated. Canada and the United States don’t just sell each other, we make things together. Since the start of the pandemic, our countries have worked hard to maintain the two-way flow of goods, especially medical supplies and essential inputs across our borders, while protecting our communities from COVID-19. On average, over 25% of a finished product that we sell to you is US content. Just like most imports from Canada are used in production that puts Americans to work. These long-standing bi-national supply chains have not only kept us secure, they have also kept us competitive globally.

Reliable. Canada’s energy – more than any other country – contributes directly to the economic prosperity, security and environmental goals of the United States. We are your largest and most secure supplier of all forms of energy, transported by 71 oil and gas pipelines and 35 transmission lines across our shared border. We are also investing in new technologies and infrastructure to become a global leader in clean energy and innovation. Canada is developing its energy resources; in a way that creates prosperity and engages communities, while reducing emissions and preserving the environment.

Closed. Canada fought alongside the United States to defend our shared values ​​during World Wars I and II, the Cold War, Korea, the Balkans, the Middle East and Afghanistan. In fact, officers from the Canadian Army, Navy and Air Force are integrated throughout the United States Army and within the Binational North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) at all levels – protecting and defending our common continent in search and rescue operations, banning illegal narcotics, intercepting unallied military aircraft, and humanitarian aid and disaster relief missions.

Canadian tourists contribute millions to the Texas economy every year. Canadian snowbirds, who feel welcome when their neighbors in Texas call them “Winter Texans,” contribute significantly through real estate investments, business sales and tax revenues.

On July 1, as we mark the first anniversary of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), Texas businesses continued to access Canada’s duty-free supply chains. Formerly known as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the updated agreement preserves key elements of NAFTA, modernizes arrangements to meet 21st century trade challenges, cuts red tape at the border and provides increased predictability and stability for workers and businesses in Texas. .

Being more than 1,000 miles from the tip of the Texas Panhandle may make America’s neighbor to the north forgetful, but our common values ​​and interests, and our deep ties, coupled with powerful economic ties on many levels are certainly reasons for which Canada should be kept in mind as we move forward together towards economic recovery.


Source link

read more
International headquarters

OPEC and allied nations agree to end dispute that has skyrocketed energy prices: NPR

In this file photo from January 8, 2020, UAE Minister of Energy Suhail al-Mazrouei attends the UAE Energy Forum 2020 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Al-Mazrouei said on Sunday that OPEC and allied countries had reached a “full deal” after a previous dispute that rocked oil prices.

Kamran Jebreili / AP


hide caption

toggle legend

Kamran Jebreili / AP


In this file photo from January 8, 2020, UAE Minister of Energy Suhail al-Mazrouei attends the UAE Energy Forum 2020 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Al-Mazrouei said on Sunday that OPEC and allied countries had reached a “full deal” after a previous dispute that rocked oil prices.

Kamran Jebreili / AP

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates – OPEC and allies agreed on Sunday to possibly increase production limits on five countries, ending an earlier dispute sparked by the United Arab Emirates that has rocked world prices for energy.

The disagreement, sparked by a demand from the UAE to increase its own production, temporarily disrupted a previous cartel meeting. In a statement on Sunday, the cartel said Iraq, Kuwait, Russia, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates would see their limits increased.

“What binds us is far beyond what you imagine,” Saudi Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said. “We differ here and there but we relate.”

Prince Abdulaziz declined to say how they came to this consensus, saying it would see the cartel “lose our advantage of being mysterious and intelligent”. But he clearly bristled at previous reports on the dispute between Saudi Arabia, long the heavyweight of the Vienna-based cartel, and the United Arab Emirates.

Prince Abdulaziz then referred to the start of a press conference in al-Mazrouei as a sign of respect.

“The UAE is attached to this group and will always work with it and within this group to do their best to achieve market balance and help everyone,” al-Mazrouei said. He hailed the deal as a “full deal” between all parties.

Outside of OPEC, however, tensions persist among neighboring nations. The UAE has largely withdrawn from the Saudi-led war in Yemen, while diplomatically recognizing Israel. Saudi Arabia has also reopened in Qatar after a multi-year boycott, although relations between Abu Dhabi and Doha remain frigid. Saudi Arabia has also aggressively sought an international trade headquarters, which could affect the UAE’s business hub, Dubai.

Abu Dhabi’s powerful Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed, the country’s de facto ruler, and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman have, however, been close over the years. The two leaders will likely meet in Saudi Arabia on Monday.

Under the new production limits, the UAE could produce up to 3.5 million barrels of crude oil per day as of May 2022. This is lower than the 3.8 million barrels per day they would have sought. Saudi Arabia’s limit of 11 million barrels per day would increase to 11.5 million, as would Russia’s. Iraq and Kuwait saw smaller increases.

In its statement, OPEC acknowledged that oil prices continued to improve.

“Economic recovery has continued in most parts of the world thanks to the acceleration of vaccination programs,” the cartel said.

Oil prices collapsed amid the coronavirus pandemic as demand for jet fuel and gasoline fell amid lockdowns across the world, briefly seeing oil futures trading in the negatives. Demand has since rebounded as vaccines, while still unevenly distributed across the world, reach guns in major global economies.

Benchmark Brent crude was trading around $ 73 a barrel on Friday.

Once tough enough to stop the United States with its 1970s oil embargo, OPEC needed non-members like Russia to force a production cut in 2016 after prices collapsed below $ 30. $ per barrel in a context of increasing American production. This agreement in 2016 gave birth to OPEC +, which joined the cartel by cutting production to help boost prices.

OPEC + agreed in 2020 to withdraw a record 10 million barrels of crude per day from the market to raise prices. It has slowly added some 4.2 million barrels over time.

Starting in August, the cartel said it would separately increase production by 400,000 barrels per day each month. This will allow it to phase out its current production of 5.8 million barrels of oil by the end of 2022, as provided for in the original agreement.

OPEC member countries include Algeria, Angola, Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Iraq, Kuwait, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. OPEC + members include Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Brunei, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Mexico, Oman, Russia, Sudan and South Sudan.

Prince Abdulaziz, praising Sunday’s deal, offered a cheerful assessment of the future despite the recent turmoil.

“OPEC + is here to stay,” proclaimed the prince.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Beloved Alabama Officer Surprised By Wheelchair Accessible Van

OPELIKA, Ala. (WRBL) – The eastern Alabama community continues to rally around Mike “Robo” Roberson, a former Auburn and DARE police officer who served nearly three decades before catastrophic strokes didn’t force him to retire.

Soon, a $ 40,000 home improvement project with the Chattahoochee Fuller Center funded by your donations will provide a wheelchair-friendly bed and bathroom for Robo and his wife. Another blessing hit their Opelika driveway on Thursday.

“We’ve taken care of your house and needed some wheels for you, so here’s your new pickup truck,” Josh Datnoff, president of the Auburn Firefighters Association, shared the fantastic news to Robo and his family. Tears of joy and hugs followed the surprise announcement. The Gunners Motorcycle Club, Auburn Firefighters Association, Franklin Tire, CP Wrecker, Tiger Body and Paint have collaborated to donate a wheelchair accessible van.

“Very exciting because now he’s mobile he can go out and do the things he wants to do and live with ease,” said Jacquelyn Roberson.

Robo’s wife, Jacquelyn, is his dedicated caregiver. The couple can no longer sleep in the bedroom of their Opelika house because Robo cannot go upstairs. Instead, Robo sleeps in his wheelchair, Jacquelyn by his side on another chair in their living room on the first floor. Robo says it would be great to rest comfortably in a bed and take a shower, which he hasn’t been able to do for several months. It was difficult for them to travel as it was difficult to get Robo out of his wheelchair and get him into a vehicle. He needed a van with a ramp.

When Josh Datnoff of the Firefighters Association heard about Robo’s situation, he began raising money for the Fuller Center remodeling project of adding a bed and tub on the ground floor for the couple. . Datnoff then began looking for a way to help Robo and his wife travel more easily to see friends, family, and doctors as he continued his recovery.

“The van was my uncle’s van and he passed away. So we gave it to a close family friend, and she had it for about three years. She got better and didn’t need the ramp anymore, so they donated her to the Auburn Firefighters Association so we could get her ready for Robo, ”Datnoff said.

The Gunner’s Motorcycle Group helped secure repairs and maintenance to the pickup truck, in addition to raising money for the home improvement project. So on Thursday when the van was handed over to Robo and his family, it was hard to say who was happier – Robo or the friends who gave him the keys.

“When you see a grown man cry, it brings tears to your eyes. Especially since it’s a surprise. I’ve been wiping my eyes since I’ve been here, ”said Cody Post, owner of CP Wrecker Service.

On the back of the van, Gunners Motorcycle Club President Ruben Garza asked Robo if it would be okay to put three tribute stickers to late Auburn Police Officer Will Buechern on the back. Robo readily agreed. Buechner was a Gunner brother and loved his biker family. The Gunners are known for their generous hearts and ongoing community service. Garza says Buechner would have loved to see Robo, his former Auburn police brother, receive a van to help him.

“We should do this for anyone who needs help. But, so often, you can’t do it on your own, and we’re just happy to help in any situation. This is what we do as a club. That’s what gunners do, ”Garza said.

Meanwhile, Robo’s house renovation project will begin soon. The Chattahoochee Fuller Center Project will keep us updated on a volunteer schedule and opportunities. We hope everyone will join a community effort to help one of Auburn’s favorite officers who gave his life to serve the citizens and students within our schools. Volunteers receive a free t-shirt with Robo on the back.

The Fuller Center Project is a nonprofit group that builds and renovates homes for families in need. The group primarily serves in Chambers County, but in 2019 the group contacted families in Lee County devastated by the March 3 tornadoes and built 18 homes in 7 months for the survivors.

read more
History organization

Oregon legislature’s resume under scrutiny before explosive resignation

Nate Monson, bottom left, addresses lawmakers at a hearing in April.

Screenshot / OPB

When he resigned last month, making explosive allegations upon his exit, the official responsible for handling harassment complaints in the Oregon Legislature had reason to believe he would be out of office any longer. .

Lawmakers and human resources officials had recently learned a number of concerning things they missed when hiring Nate Monson, according to documents released by the state legislature on Thursday.

This included the fact that Monson had distorted his work history and offered misleading references. He had also quit a former job in Iowa over concerns about harassment and financial mismanagement which were not communicated to officials in Oregon until nearly two months after Monson began working here in as Interim Legislative Fairness Officer.

“I am deeply disturbed by the information shared with me today,” wrote Jessica Knieling, Acting Director of Human Resources at the Legislative Assembly, in a June 8 memo released to the OPB and officials. from the Capitol. “Frankly, when I got the first email today, I had hoped it was just a misunderstanding.”

Nothing in the memo contradicts Monson’s claims when he resigned on June 15. In his own note to lawmakers, Monson detailed a history of unpaid legal bills, delayed investigations, unethical contracts, sloppy record keeping and lax responsiveness to the Office of Legislative Fairness. d resumed. The office, established in 2019, is a kind of clearinghouse for complaints about harassment, retaliation and other misconduct.

Related: In flashy outing, former Capitol Hill official expresses top concerns about how Oregon is handling harassment

“We want you to know that we take his allegations relating to the state of the office very seriously, ”wrote the four lawmakers who chair the Joint Conduct Committee, Monson’s direct supervisors, in an email sent to Capitol Hill Thursday. “We are now taking the time to gather all the relevant facts to verify the veracity of the allegations …”

But recently released records provide more context for Monson’s sudden departure, suggesting he knew he had little future on Capitol Hill as scrutiny intensified.

Monson declined to comment on the note on Friday, citing advice from legal counsel.

It is not known what due diligence the legislative administrators performed when hiring Monson. Records released this week show that they emailed at least one of his referrals. But a simple Google search would have detected a gap much earlier in the hiring process.

Officials began to learn much more about their new recruit in June, after a fact various city his resume claim that he worked for six months at the Iowa Coalition for Collective Change.

That was not true, as a call and email made clear to legislative administration officials from Coalition Executive Director Luana Nelson-Brown. According to the memo, Nelson-Brown explained that she had been “friendly colleagues” with Monson, and that “they spoke of him coming to work for the coalition, but never anything close to what he wrote down. on his curriculum vitae “.

Nelson-Brown further explained that his board would not allow him to hire Monson because of the “problems” he encountered while working for Iowa Safe Schools, an affiliate organization that Monson had led for 13 years before she was fired in 2020. According to the memo, Nelson-Brown suggested that Monson’s “oversight and racism” had become a concern in this role and that a financial audit by the attorney general’s office Iowa was underway.

“Nate might be good for certain roles in the Legislature, but Equity is not one of them,” the note said, summing up what Knieling reported hearing from Nelson-Brown.

As he delved into the matter, Knieling learned that not all Monson’s references were what they appeared. He had listed a reference as a board member of the Iowa Safe Schools, not pointing out that this person was a high school student who acted as a student representative, but had no supervisory authority.

Another reference, listed by Monson as a board member of the Iowa Coalition for Collective Change, had never been on that organization’s board of directors, a fact Knieling said he discovered with research. Google months after Monson was hired. In fact, the person had served on the board of directors for the Iowa for Safe Schools, she wrote.

As part of its investigation in June, Knieling also spoke with current leaders of Iowa Safe Schools, who said the organization severed ties with Monson in November 2020, but declined to provide many details. . Knieling learned, she said, that Iowa Safe Schools had “discovered financial irregularities,” but gave no details.

“The [ISS] The chairman of the board said she would have serious concerns about him in such a role, ”Knieling wrote in the June 8 memo, referring to Monson’s work as head of legislative fairness. . “I asked if he had engaged in unlawful harassment or discrimination. She said she wouldn’t say illegal, but that had been very inappropriate.

In interviews while considered for the role on Capitol Hill, Knieling wrote, Monson told officials he “intentionally quit” his job with the Iowa Safe Schools.

Knieling’s memo was written a week before Monson submitted his resignation. Monson’s direct supervisors, the chairmen of the Joint Steering Committee, suggested in their email Thursday that he was aware that concerns had arisen that would prevent him from moving from an “interim” role to a permanent one.

“Given the level of trust and integrity required by the LEO position, we, as the Co-Chairs, have decided to schedule a meeting of the Joint Steering Committee to review Mr. Monson’s employment in light. of this new information, “the lawmakers wrote. , the senses. Floyd Prozanski and Chuck Thomsen, and Representatives Julie Fahey and Ron Noble. “Mr. Monson has been advised of the plan to schedule a meeting and has chosen to tender his resignation.”

The substantive concerns Monson alerted lawmakers to on his way remain – and have sparked a great deal of interest in a legislature still grappling with how to handle harassment.

“When I started, there were no records, electronic documents, scheduled training, and unpaid invoices, resulting in investigations averaging 10 months in the past year.” Monson wrote in his June 15 resignation letter. “There have been outstanding cases where individuals have tried to file a case but have received no response. The gravity of the situation means that justice is not being served to those who have come forward and can cost taxpayers millions of lawsuits due to the liability of not having proper procedures, documentation and oversight. “

In their email to officials and staff at the Capitol, the chairmen of the Joint Steering Committee said they had “taken action” to address one of Monson’s concerns: that financial constraints had driven investigators stop work, delaying harassment investigations. They also suggest that the unpaid bills had not resulted in work stoppages, as Monson claimed.

The two outside investigators who do contract work for the legislature did not answer questions from the OPB about Monson’s claims.

The email sent Thursday suggests that the chairmen of the joint steering committee were widely releasing the note on Monson in light of media requests. The documents communicated to the OPB are more complete than what has been requested.

Despite the difficult end of his term, at least one of Monson’s former supervisors has positive things to say.

“I thought Nate Monson was the right fit for the job,” Rep. Ron Noble, R-McMinnville, told OPB last week. “There were some things he obviously felt he needed to move on.”

In a job that demands confidentiality – and whose activities are often shielded from lawmakers because of it – Noble has said he believes Monson is capable of acting as an auditor of some sort for the way the office was managed before his tenure.

“I don’t think the system is broken,” Noble said. “I think Nate’s arrival exposed some of the weaknesses in the logistics of the post and the supervision of the post.”

Lawmakers are in the process of seeking Monson’s replacement.


Source link

read more
International headquarters

Patricia moves her head office to Europe.

Patricia Technologies Limited is proud to announce the relocation of its operations to the Republic of Estonia, with its headquarters now domiciled in this northern European country.

This global move is intended to strengthen their relationships with traders and agencies in the global crypto markets, while also positioning them as the leading cryptocurrency trading company in Nigeria, Africa and Europe.

With this recent development comes the launch of a new upgraded Patricia version 2 app, which features many new updates and upgrades including crypto exchange; a betting feature that allows users to use crypto to place bets; the app also introduces new cryptocurrencies (coins) to be added to the already existing Bitcoin. There is also an automated buy limit for crypto traders, and the top-up service has also been upgraded to include international transactions.

Looking at how Patricia managed to dominate the Bitcoin market in 3 years of existence, CEO and Founder Hanu Fejiro Agbodje joked that “What started as disastrous news turned out to be the cornerstone of which we needed for this global expansion “referring to the crypto trading Ban by the Nigerian government.

He also noted that “the decision to expand and relocate our headquarters to Europe is part of our plans to improve our business strategy”. “We want to play in the big league, there is no passion to play in the small, we want to be in the most sophisticated markets in the world, it is an opportunity for us to lead the Fifth Revolution”.

As one of the industry’s fastest growing financial solutions providers, Patricia’s goal is to empower brands and individuals to take control of their digital finances through an advanced cross-border payment solution provided. by Patricia Business.

They currently have an established presence in Ghana, Kenya, South Africa and China.


Source link

read more
Canadian army

Taliban will ‘hang’ me: Afghan interpreters ask Canada for help

TORONTO – As Taliban insurgents have made rapid territorial gains across Afghanistan in recent weeks, a chilling new audio from a local performer who has worked with the Canadian Forces illustrates just how much he and others like him face in their own country.

In an audio file posted to YouTube, an interpreter in Helmund province recounts how he and others risked their lives alongside Canadian soldiers to support the mission against the Taliban from 2010 to 2011. He now asks why Ottawa and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau are not moving. faster to get his family to safety.

“Mr. Trudeau, I am a father. My daughter is one and a half years old. From father to father, I beg you to please help me and my family out of Afghanistan before the Taliban don’t find us, ”he said.

“If Canada does not act immediately, my wife, daughter and brothers will be captured by the Taliban. They will hang me, shoot me and cut my head off. They will kill my wife and my daughter. They will kill my brothers … you promised me that my family would one day come to Canada [and] enjoy the peace your family enjoys every day.

Canadian veterans have expressed, with increasing urgency, the need for Canada to assist Afghan translators and interpreters who worked with Canadian soldiers during the war to come to Canada with their families.

Canadian Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Minister Marco Mendicino said the government was working on a plan to help families, but did not say when that plan could go into effect.

“We know the Afghans are putting their own lives at risk by helping the Canadian effort in the war there, and we want to do what is right for them,” he said on Friday. “And so we hope to have more to say about it as soon as possible. Near future.”

Sayed Shah is worried about his two brothers who face threats due to his work with the Canadian Forces more than a decade earlier. The Taliban know him well, Shah said, and it is certain that if they take control of Kandahar and Kabul, his brothers will die. He has already lost five family members in 2013 when they were killed by a roadside bomb set off by the Taliban.

“They are in danger because of me, because I worked with the Canadian military,” he said. “I put my family in danger. “

A former battlefield interpreter who worked with the Canadian military between November 2007 and March 2010, Shah was able to come to Canada under the original special immigration program. The soldiers who supported his visa application acknowledged that his bravery under intense Taliban fire had saved Canadian lives. Now that the Taliban is closing in on Kandahar, he is seeking similar protection for his brothers, who are now in hiding.

“If they are not evacuated from Afghanistan, they will be targeted and killed,” Shah said.

Ottawa previously announced the creation of a dedicated refugee stream for “human rights defenders,” including journalists and others who may seek asylum to escape persecution in their country.

As the September 11 departure deadline approaches, other NATO allies have already announced evacuation plans for thousands of Afghans. The United States said this week that flights for eligible Afghan citizens will begin by the end of July.

Interpreters have played a vital role in NATO operations in the Middle East, including the more than 40,000 Canadian troops who have served in Afghanistan. Many Afghans risked their lives helping on the front line.

A special immigration program put in place in 2009 and completed two years later brought some 800 former interpreters and their families to Canada, but thousands have been left behind. Many now face the possibility of being tortured or killed for their role in helping Canadian troops, advocates say.

The sudden withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan in early July after nearly two decades of fighting accelerated the movement of the Taliban across the country, with Taliban officials claiming the group now controls more than 85% of the territory – a figure which is disputed by others.

With files from CTV National News Parliamentary Bureau reporter Annie Bergeron-Oliver, CTVNews.ca editor Christy Somos and The Canadian Press


Source link

read more
International headquarters

The Last Commander – POLITICO

Two years later, Miller was serving in Iraq, fighting an insurgency the Defense Ministry had yet to recognize, when his vehicle was ambushed near Baghdad, and he was shot and wounded. He then returned to Iraq as the Deputy Commander and Commander of the Delta Force on several occasions, participating in the successful hunt for arch-terrorist Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and leading special operations forces in brutal fighting in the province. west of Anbar, where terrorists were infiltrating from Syria. This operation was part of the largely successful “wave” of US troops in Iraq and the “Anbar miracle” that seemed to herald yet another victory – until the 2011 US troop withdrawal allowed al-Qaeda in Iraq to reconstitute itself as the formidable Islamic State of Iraq. and Syria (ISIS).

Miller returned to Afghanistan during the 2010-2011 “surge”, when US forces numbered over 100,000, and returned again in 2013-2014 to serve as the commanding general of Joint Task Force in Afghanistan. He would command in both theaters of war in 2016-2018 as the Army Joint Special Operations Command Chief, operational headquarters for elite US commandos such as Delta Force and Navy SEAL Team Six.

His career has been built in part on his understanding of the dynamics of conflict on the ground. But on the eve of his departure from Afghanistan earlier this week, Miller and NATO’s Resolute Support Command had withdrawn their field liaison officers, thus losing all visibility of what is happening with the Afghan security forces. who are trying to push back the Taliban. Recent reports suggest that the Taliban now control more than 160 of the country’s 407 districts – up from around 61 in 2018 – with entire garrisons of Afghan troops surrendering, in some cases without a fight. The Afghan Defense Minister has ordered a “strategic consolidation” of his troops, concentrating them in major cities while ceding much of the countryside to the Taliban. In what some experts interpret as a sign of desperation, the Afghan government is even again forming alliances with independent armed militias with a history of Taliban animosity, in an attempt to survive in the event of an all-out civil war.

In a recent discussion with Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad, the veteran diplomat who has led the US peace talks with the Taliban, Miller referred to recent negative trend lines inside Afghanistan. The two Americans most personally identified with recent efforts to end the war have agreed that Afghanistan is a special country, where events can take a brutal turn very quickly. Miller acknowledged a certain pessimism in our talks: there are all possibilities, he said, that the Afghan security forces cannot meet.

“The almost one-unit Afghan security forces are less confident, and its leaders are obviously worried, as much of this affair is about trust – and in the face of the aggressive Taliban offensive and the surrender of some garrisons FAA shortage right now, ”he told me.

Strategic consolidations of Defense Ministry forces in major cities are tactically good, he said. “But the question is, will that be enough?”

Miller assumed command of Operation Resolute Support believing that commanders can learn more from aspects of operations that go badly than from those that go well. In 2018, that meant that the 14,000 US troops and 6,500 NATO troops and their leaders in Afghanistan, as the bulwark of Resolute Support, were learning a lot, and in a hurry.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Life Changes hosting a hygiene campaign

RENO, Nevada (KOLO) -Providing the necessities for those working towards a better future. Life Changes is looking for your donations to fuel its hygiene campaign.

The agency has grown to include 11 properties in Washoe County, helping reintegrate men and women, safe homes, sober and transitional lives and more. Many times after a person leaves the hospital, whether homeless or in prison, they often have very little to themselves.

This is where you come in. Toothbrushes, toilet paper, deodorant, feminine hygiene products, makeup and other daily necessities… your donations will be of great help!

“We get them back on their feet, we put them in school, that’s one of the positive things we try to do with each of them, and then they get a job and slowly start to re-integrate into society. and end up moving. on their side and to have their own apartment ”, explains Lisa Moore, she is the president of the association.

There are two drop-off points. Flirty Lash at 180 West Peckham Lane, Suite 1060 or at one of the Life Changes properties, 529 West Second Street, you will see a locked box to place items.

You can also donate money by donating to https://www.thelifechangecenter.org/donations/

Copyright 2021 KOLO. All rights reserved.

read more
History organization

Socrates Sculpture Park welcomes new ruler as search for permanent director continues – QNS.com

Subscribe to our Policy NewsletterNY for the latest coverage and to stay informed about the 2021 elections in your district and across New York

Socrates Sculpture Park has a new leader – for now.

Suzy Delvalle has been appointed interim executive director, succeeding John Hatfield, who held the position for almost a decade before stepping down in October 2020. The search for a new director is underway.

The Artist Oasis on Vernon Boulevard was created by a coalition of artists and community members who transformed an East River landfill and illegal landfill into an open studio and exhibition space in 1986.

“John Hatfield has grown the organization in countless ways over his nine years here, including doubling the operating budget and staff size, and opening new exhibitions that have been critically acclaimed,” said declared Delvalle. “I look forward to working with the rich family of artists, staff and collaborators of Socrates, as well as the surrounding community. “

Delvalle was most recently President and Executive Director of Creative Capital, a national non-profit organization that supports innovative and adventurous artists across the country through funding, advice, gatherings, and career development services. She is known as an “ardent defender of art and artists”.

With over 20 years of leadership experience in the cultural sector, Devalle has dedicated his career to improving the impact of mission-based organizations and creating opportunity and equity in the arts.

“The board is delighted that Suzy is taking on the role of interim director during this important time for the organization,” said Ivana Mestrovic, secretary and treasurer of the board of directors of Socrates. “Suzy brings a wealth of experience working with artists and communities, and we have the utmost confidence in her ability to lead Socrates as we continue to seek a permanent executive director.”

As the second director in the history of Creative Capital, Delvalle has overseen some of the most dramatic changes in the organization’s two-decade history. Under his leadership, Creative Capital increased its annual budget by 20% and expanded the board of directors with 12 new active members while creating a National Advisory Board. It has also expanded its services to artists by instituting Creative Capital Awards and annual retreats.

“Suzy has been a valued colleague in the field for many years, and I am delighted to hand over the reins to her,” said Hatfield. “I am extremely proud of the progress of the organization over the past nine years and of all that the board, staff and I have accomplished together.

Hatfield will be joining NYU faculty in September to teach a course for their graduate program in Museum Studies.

While exploring other activities, he will continue to serve in an advisory capacity on the Socrates Capital Project to build a permanent structure in the 5-acre park, which sits on the ancestral land of the Lenape, Canarsie and Matinecock peoples.


Source link

read more
International headquarters

Secrets Alone Won’t Save Us: Providing a ‘Decision Advantage’ on Climate Security

When I was a CIA officer, one thing I could share with my family was a museum tour at Langley headquarters. Visitors would marvel at the cover-up devices and exclaim at stories of derring-do in the name of gathering hidden information. When we got to the Analysis Branch, however, they pretended to be interested. The printed copies of the reports weren’t as interesting as the robotic spy fish exhibit.

The theft of secrets has always captured the public imagination of the intelligence profession, for good reason. Secrets were the claim to fame of the CIA’s predecessor, the Office of Strategic Services. Prior to D-Day, it was “Wild Bill” Donovan’s placement of spies in European ports and behind enemy lines that gathered the information needed to support a successful invasion. As President Dwight Eisenhower said of the Office of Strategic Services: “If (he) had done nothing else, intelligence gathered alone before D-Day would justify its existence.

Of course, the security and intelligence landscape has changed dramatically since Eisenhower’s time. More often than not, “going behind enemy lines” means connecting to a computer, not jumping out of a plane. The risks facing the United States are more complex, involving not only a mix of state and non-state actors, but also systemic factors such as climate change, which the Chief Intelligence Officer ‘s 2021 Global Trends report identified as one of the few trends “setting the parameters” of our future world. This world is a world in which temperatures and sea levels are rising dramatically, and weather conditions are becoming more and more unpredictable and extreme. It is likely that millions of people will be displaced and forced to migrate, tensions will increase within and between states as water and food insecurity increases, and governments will find it increasingly difficult to manage aggravating risks as climatic risks intersect with other stressors. There is not a single current US national security concern that will not be affected in some way by the climate crisis.

What does a security landscape shaped by climate change mean to the way the US intelligence community does business? For some, this suggests a return to first principles. Doubling down on what my family has always found most intriguing about the CIA museum – the collection of secrets – as a way to distinguish the intelligence community from the private sector and the open source world. As Joshua Rovner argued, “the comparative advantage of secret agencies is secret information.” Of course, collecting secrets about governments’ climate policy plans and intentions can be important. Special Climate Envoy John Kerry lamented the lack of climate fundraising at a conference earlier this year. He argued that if climate change is truly an existential threat, then the US intelligence community should do as much effort to collect information on the positions of US adversaries on climate negotiations as it does to pinpoint their positions on nuclear agreements.

Secrets, however, are not enough. To achieve the goal of consistently providing a strategic advantage to the United States, the intelligence community must have the ability to put these secrets into context – analyze and communicate how they intersect with other risk information. for the national security of the United States. The trick is not to give up secrets or try to duplicate what the private sector or academia is doing, but rather to marry clandestine collection with other information from all sources. This is of course not a new concept in intelligence studies. Academics and practitioners have spilled gallons of ink debating the best ways to integrate open source information. The founder of the analyst profession in the United States, Sherman Kent, argued that integrating data and consulting with outside experts was essential to a strong profession. Most of the analysts I have known in my career prided themselves on their in-depth contextual knowledge of the regions they covered – history, academic experts, local news sources, arts and culture.

However, bringing a climate lens to intelligence isn’t as simple as bringing in just one more unclassified source. It’s different because of the type of information to integrate, the skills needed to do it, and the systemic nature of the risk. First of all, it’s hard science in addition to social science. This requires a “climate-savvy” workforce with scientific knowledge. This does not mean creating large teams within the intelligence community that do climate science. This means that intelligence officers are able to regularly understand and integrate climate models and analyzes into their work.

What does it look like in practice? It can be as simple as using references like Climate Central’s “Surging Seas” tool or regularly consulting primary sources and scientific literature. It also means leveraging more complex tools and practices. Advances in machine learning and computing power are leading to new modeling tools that can provide a wealth of relevant information to intelligence analysts. One example is the use of “ensemble assessments”, which are repeated runs of the same climate model, adjusting the starting point conditions each time. Such sets allow scientists to more clearly show a range of potential regional climate trends – important information that analysts need to incorporate into their work when assessing possible future economic, political and conflict scenarios in different parts of the world. Another example is that of “high resolution” climate models, which, thanks to advances in the power of supercomputers, can better represent atmospheric processes on a small scale. These models allow greater precision in risk assessments.

Moving forward, building on existing climate modeling approaches and tools is probably not enough for the intelligence community to truly address climate security risks. As Alice Hill, a former climate adviser to the National Security Council, recently detailed, planners across the United States are desperate for more localized climate data so they can craft better adaptation responses. Intelligence analysts need this kind of information as well, but in regions around the world. For example, although scientists believe Africa will face some of the greatest risks from climate change, accurate climate data on the continent is lacking, inhibiting useful predictive modeling of climate impacts. Without more localized and robust predictive climate models for Africa, intelligence analysts will not have the information they need to answer the kinds of questions they are sure to receive from policymakers in the years to come: the continent’s conflict zones? In which geographic areas will climate impacts and extremist groups overlap to increase security risks? Will US competitors’ infrastructure support offers to African countries withstand extreme events caused by rising temperatures?

While there are opportunities for the intelligence community to partner with the private sector to develop such capabilities, the first stop should be with US government scientists. Congress has given the intelligence community some tools to achieve this by creating the Climate Security Advisory Council, designed to link US government science and intelligence agencies, and the National Academies Climate Security Roundtable, a mechanism that enables actors in the climate science to provide information. to the intelligence community. Both meetings provide a platform for the community to use to encourage and shape the development of new modeling approaches that meet their specific needs. Moreover, intelligence agencies should use these groupings to pursue truly interdisciplinary analytical reports that marry climate science with social sciences. An example of this type of analysis can be seen in a series of reports and story maps published in recent months by the Woodwell Climate Center and the Council on Strategic Risks, detailing how climate change will shape security risks in strategic regions. of the globe.

Fully realizing this type of approach within the intelligence community – a large government bureaucracy – is not easy. I have already described the ways in which new resources, new leadership and new institutional structures can help. To his credit, the Biden administration has taken many steps to make it happen, as evidenced by the Executive Order on Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad. Equally important, however, are the less immediately tangible changes in organizational culture and mindset. Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines acknowledged these challenges in a recent interview,

Climate is an urgent crisis, but it is very difficult for various institutional reasons to integrate it into your daily work in a fully successful way i.e. it is much easier to focus on climate negotiations or on what states do in their policies.

She went on to say however that she was starting to see changes, noting that she had been amazed by,

to what extent, in addition to focusing on China and all of our top threats that we talk about in our annual threat hearings, we [in the intelligence community] came to the conclusion that … investing in science and technology and the tools that allow us to be better at what we do, our institutions, our partnerships, our resilience, our ability to integrate that expertise, is what is really important at this critical moment in our history.

Time will tell if this recognition from the leaders of the intelligence community results in long-term change. If so, maybe one day a future president will sing the praises of the director the same way Ike did of “Wild Bill” Donovan and the Office of Strategic Services. As article after article on this month’s record temperatures around the world points out, the climate will only get worse. And the United States can only navigate this hotter world with an intelligence community that collects foreign secrets, but also has the full range of information, tools, and talent it needs to analyze. these challenges.

Erin Sikorsky is Deputy Director of the Center for Climate and Security and Director of the International Military Council on Climate and Security. Previously, she was Deputy Director of the National Intelligence Council’s Strategic Futures Group in the United States, where she co-authored the quadrennial Global Trends report and led the US intelligence community’s environmental and climate security analysis.

Image: US Air Force (Photo by Master Sgt Elijaih Tiggs)


Source link

read more
Canadian army

Discovery Canyon, CSU sprinter Lauren Gale, heads to Tokyo with Team Canada | Colorado Springs High School Sports

Lauren Gale, Canadian Olympic Track and Field Team.

“I’m going to put it on my Instagram bio, on my resume when I apply to dental hygiene school,” said Gale, 21, noting that these schools are difficult to access. “Maybe that will help, I don’t know.”

The former Discovery Canyon student, who just finished her junior year at Colorado State, is heading to the Tokyo Games as part of the 4×400-meter relay team.

Gale and his parents had coffee on his porch in Fort Collins in early July 3 as they waited for the life-changing email from Athletics Canada, but Gale’s former track club, the Lions d ‘Ottawa, beat him with a Tweet. Gale was the youngest member of Canada’s track and field team.

Gale’s time of 51.96 put her firmly in contention before Rio Olympian Alicia Brown tied her at the 2021 Olympic Trials. Brown handed in a 51.82 later in June, casting minor doubts on the inclusion of Gale.

She is due to leave for Japan on Saturday.

“To have to compete on the biggest stage of the biggest track event possible – that’s crazy,” said Gale. “I still can’t believe it.”

Gale was always the one chasing the ball down the field in youth football, giving her parents the idea to try athletics. Years later, at an indoor competition, they cheered on Lauren after what they thought was a good 400-yard run, but other spectators saw more.

“After all, everyone looked at us and said, ‘Wow, this is a really good time,’” her mother Lisa said. “We didn’t even know what a good time was, but apparently for that age it was super fast.

“We thought, ‘We need to look at this a bit further. “”

Lauren’s father’s work as a Canadian Army Engineer took him to Peterson Air Force Base and family in Colorado Springs for six years. Lauren arrived at Discovery Canyon in 2015. In 2016 and 2018, on both sides of hip surgery, she won the 100, 200 and 400-meter state races in 4A. She was named Gazette Preps Female Peak Performer of the Year in 2017-18.

Lauren tried out international competition at the 2017 Commonwealth Youth Games, where she competed in the 200 meters and 400 meters for Team Canada. After graduating from high school, she competed in the 200 at the 2018 IAAF World Under-20 Championships.

“I love Canada and I love representing them. I still claim it as my home even though I’ve been here for a few years now, ”Lauren said.

“But it’s always good to be able to display a Ram sign in other places. It’s cool to be able to represent them both.

She set school records in the indoor and outdoor 400 this season. She finished 13th in the NCAA West prelims on May 29, with a place to qualify for the NCAA Championships. It was a good enough time for Team Canada.

She had hoped to attend the trials, but crossing the border in Montreal from June 24-27 required a two-week quarantine. A strange season, full of mask mandates and canceled meetups, had required a creative solution – times and world rankings were factored in, Lauren said.

Lauren’s own dental hygienist’s work will be on display when she visits the stage at Tokyo Olympic Stadium.

His parents, preparing for a move across the country, will try to install their TVs as soon as they arrive. If that doesn’t get sorted out quickly, they’ll be them at a Washington DC sports bar telling everyone who their daughter is.

“She can go against the best in the world,” Lisa said.

“We’re so proud it’s crazy.”

One day, the gloved hands in your mouth might belong to an Olympian.

“If I can help build people’s confidence, then my job is done,” Lauren said.

Colorado heptathlete Annie Kunz can celebrate with family as she secures trip to Tokyo

Olympic athletes to wear their own medals at Tokyo ceremonies

How Draymond Green helped reignite Team USA’s offense to rebound from two losses


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Closure of Mary’s Kitchen, a sanctuary for the homeless, would be a “tragedy” for those who depend on it

For Derek King and many like him, Mary’s Kitchen is a sanctuary.

King, who has been homeless for almost a decade, found Mary’s Kitchen in Orange at a time when he had reached his limits. Malnourished physically and spiritually, he was ready to give up.

Mary’s Kitchen provided her with food, a shower and clothes. It helped restore something that many homeless people had to give up when they lived on the streets: dignity.

He found a new meaning in the relationships he established and the spirituality fostered by the leadership of the association.

“There are times when the fear of living for nothing strangles you,” King said in an interview this week with Mary’s Kitchen.

King’s story is not uncommon.

Charles Cousert hadn’t eaten in days before finding Mary’s Kitchen, where he was given food and clothing.

He said he would have died if it hadn’t been for the association.

“This place is literally a blessing,” Cousert said. “It’s a sanctuary.

Craig Lasky and America Sanchez are biking at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13th.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

Homeless people who rely on Mary’s Kitchen said it was the only place they could find whatever they needed. Led by Gloria Suess, the association offers three meals, six days a week, to anyone who requests them. Showers and laundry facilities are also available, and the association receives mail for hundreds of customers.

After speaking with over half a dozen homeless people this week, it’s clear anyone can approach Suess with a problem they’re having and she’ll try to fix it.

During a visit to the association this week, Michael Lohse, accompanied by his dog Mildred, approached Suess and thanked her for helping him pay for the late registration of his car. Like other visitors to the site, Lohse, a victim of three strokes, has had a hard time. He said the nonprofit gave him $ 440 for the $ 1,300 he needed so he could drive again.

“Whatever you need, you’ll get it from Gloria,” said Patrick Hogan, volunteer at Mary’s Kitchen.

But after the city sent a letter of formal notice last month ending the association’s lease, the homeless people who rely on Mary’s Kitchen are now wondering what they will do if it is closed.

On June 18, the city sent Mary’s Kitchen a formal notice terminating its lease three years earlier. The city is giving the association until September 18 to vacate the property and they’ve asked Mary’s Kitchen to provide the city with a move plan within two weeks.

The letter from the city, signed by City Manager Rick Otto, indicates that the city has been a leader in Orange County in supporting the efforts of the homeless. However, Mary’s Kitchen is the only homeless service provider listed in the city’s housing component.

Marie’s kitchen has been operating in Orange since the mid-1980s, and at its current location at 517 W. Struck Ave., since 1994. Mary’s Kitchen is a humble, non-profit organization run by donations and volunteers, some of whom are themselves even homeless.

Natalie Wolf, center, and other volunteers prepare meals for the homeless at Mary's Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday, July 13.

Natalie Wolf, center, and other volunteers prepare meals for the homeless at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday, July 13.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

While Otto’s letter praises Mary’s Kitchen, it goes on to state that the association’s actions only serve to “enable roaming and can no longer be supported by the city.”

The letter says there has been an increase in crime and police calls from Mary’s Kitchen. The city says this has created an “unreasonable demand for municipal services.”

The letter also states that the city recently approved an affordable housing project nearby, which is “incompatible” with Mary’s Kitchen, which is located at the end of an industrial dead end. An Orange Police Department headquarters is across the street. There are no houses on the street.

Suess, the association’s president and CEO, said in a phone interview that Mary’s Kitchen had already complied with city requests to install security cameras and a security guard.

“Whatever they asked us to do, we did it,” Suess said.

Suess said the city does not want Mary’s Kitchen to serve people who are not from Orange, but that is inconsistent with the nonprofit’s mission to serve all who are hungry.

“We don’t judge who deserves food or not,” Suess said. “We take care of those who really need help.

“… I don’t think Orange understands, all these people who have considered Mary their home for all these years, where are they going to go?” Where do they get their mail from? Where are they going to shower? Where are they going to eat?

Mike Harrison, a volunteer at Mary's Kitchen in Orange, cooks meals for the homeless on Tuesday, July 13.

Mike Harrison, a volunteer at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange, cooks meals for the homeless on Tuesday, July 13.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

Mary’s Kitchen and some members of the community back off.

The association hired lawyer Brooke Weitzman, who sent a letter to the city on July 9 saying the city’s notice did not include a substantial reason for prematurely terminating a rental agreement. He asks the city to cancel his letter.

“The notice does not meet substantive and procedural standards for early termination of the agreement,” the letter said. “The only reference to the lease in the notice indicates that the City can terminate the agreement, but it does not specify any reason supported by the terms of the agreement.

“Despite the recognition of the critical support Mary’s has received over the years, the letter draws baseless conclusions that are simply not supported by the facts, in effect blaming Mary’s Kitchen for the city’s failure to resolve the crisis. housing, the health care needs of its poorest residents, and everything and all other issues in the public space outside of Mary’s Kitchen property. Certainly nothing in the lease places the onus on Mary’s Kitchen to address the City’s failures to meet the needs of low-income and homeless people.

Weitzman’s letter also calls on the city to determine the environmental impact of closing Mary’s Kitchen in order to comply with California’s Environmental Quality Act.

The letter says water and soil may be contaminated by the loss of hygiene facilities at Mary’s Kitchen and other public spaces could be affected as homeless people are forced to move.

“The immediate shutdown of a service provider leaving around 150-200 people a day without this safe place to sit, receive meals to eat and clothes to wear, access mail, access hygiene facilities, use a laundromat and more will inevitably have an impact on the environment, ”the letter said.

Weitzman also argues that the lease termination violates the city’s housing element, which requires the city to take into account the homeless, low-income people, the elderly and people with disabilities – all of whom frequent Mary’s Kitchen. Weitzman notes in the letter that Mary’s Kitchen is the only homeless service provider in the city listed in its housing element.

The letter notes that the city must “make adequate provision in its housing element for the existing and anticipated needs of all economic segments of its community, including its homeless population.”

Patrick Hogan has a glass of water at Mary's Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13.

Patrick Hogan drinks a glass of water at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

Orange City spokesman Paul Sitkoff said in an email he could not comment on the closure of Mary’s Kitchen due to a possible ongoing litigation.

Weitzman said on the phone that she wondered who in town was leading the effort to shut down Mary’s Kitchen after decades of existence.

“There was no public meeting, so I know the letter is from the city manager, but who is it? Said Weitzman. “This sort of thing would normally be a decision of city council, especially given the long history of community service. It is not clear because there has been no public involvement.

Mary’s Kitchen is currently collecting signatures from supporters to show the city how crucial it is to the community. Suess said she wanted a few thousand signatures before sending them to the city.

The community also supports the association. Several members of the public showed up at a city council meeting on Tuesday night to criticize the city and express their support for Mary’s Kitchen.

“This city has lost its soul,” resident Heidi Zimmermann said at the meeting.

Pancho Sambrano shares lunch with her cat Ice Cream at Mary's Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13th.

Pancho Sambrano shares lunch with her cat Ice Cream at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

The city declined to provide crime statistics on Mary’s Kitchen, despite its allegations of increased crime in the area. The city called the association a “nuisance” in its letter, but there was no sign of it during a visit to Mary’s Kitchen this week.

Dozens of people had lunch and chatted among themselves. Some slept in the shade.

Everything fell silent as Suess recited a prayer through a megaphone. Many stood up and some took off their hats.

“Send blessings to Mary’s Kitchen,” Suess said.

“Amen,” they said.

For those who meet regularly at the shrine, losing Mary’s Kitchen is more than losing access to food and possessions. The camaraderie and support from Suess, volunteers and others gives them hope and meaning.

“I come here more for the community than the food, even though the food is pretty good,” said Starla Acosta, who has lived in her car for about five years, the same time she comes to Mary’s Kitchen.

Acosta met his close friend Ron at Mary’s Kitchen. She calls him her little brother.

Ron, who declined to give her last name, said Mary’s Kitchen helps all kinds of people. For many, it helps support them as they go through a difficult time in life.

Since Ron was injured at work two years ago, he’s been a regular visitor to Mary’s Kitchen. He has a job now, but he keeps coming to see his friends.

Ron said he couldn’t sleep the night he heard about the potential closure of Mary’s Kitchen.

“It would be a tragedy,” he said.

Support our coverage by becoming a digital subscriber.

read more
History organization

“Everyone thought I was going to come and tear up this organization”

Behind Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen and Dennis Rodman, the Chicago Bulls won the 1996 Championship against the Seattle SuperSonics in six games, closing a historic season. They went 72-10 in the regular season, which at the time was the best record in NBA history.

Several pundits did not believe the Bulls would win the championship in 1996 due to the polarizing decision they made before the start of the season. Rodman was acquired from the San Antonio Spurs, and it was a profession that has not been rated well by critics and some Chicago fans since the Worm misbehaved with the Spurs and was part of the most hated team in Bulls history, the “Bad Boys”.

However, Rodman was instrumental in helping the Bulls win 72 games and defeat the SuperSonics, and he made sure to call out his enemies.

Dennis Rodman was proud to do his job

After the Bulls defeated the SuperSonics in Game 6 of the ’96 Finals, Rodman called out his critics perfectly for doubting he could help Jordan and Pippen win a title.

“Everyone thought I was going to come and tear this organization apart,” Rodman said. “There is a lot about me that people don’t know. I am a competitor. I stepped up and got the job done, and I’m proud of it.

Rodman was such a force on the boards in the ’96 final that SuperSonics head coach George Karl hinted Rodzilla could have won the final MVP title against Jordan: They have extra possessions and additional opportunities.

Against the SuperSonics, Rodman averaged 7.5 points and 14.7 rebounds. He took 11 offensive rebounds in Games 2 and 6 and 20 overall in Game 2. It was the same type of production Rodman had during the regular season as the Bulls won 72 games.

Dennis Rodman led the NBA in rebounds per game in 1995-96

Rodman appeared in 64 games during the Bulls’ 72-10 season. He averaged 5.5 points and 14.9 rebounds while shooting 48.0 percent from the field. The two-time defensive player of the year has led the NBA in rebounds per game, a feat he has accomplished seven times in his career.

Several Bulls fans and reporters feared Rodman might not get along with Jordan and Pippen since he was one of the Detroit Pistons who played badly against Chicago. However, Dennis the Menace fits in perfectly with MJ and Pip. In fact, Jordan called Rodman one of the smartest players he’s ever played with in The last dance docuseries, while Pippen said the rebound machine played its part perfectly and knew how to impact victory.

Rodman’s three-year run with the Bulls was historic. Although he was not on an all-star team while playing in Chicago, he added other accomplishments to his resume.

Demolition Man won three rebounding titles and three championships with the Bulls

Rodman played 199 games with the Bulls. He averages 5.2 points and 15.3 rebounds and is the franchise leader in rebounds per game. The Hall of Famer won three rebounding titles and three championships alongside Jordan and Pippen.

The Bulls have not removed Rodman’s No.91 jersey. It’s surprising since he’s won three rings and is the best rebounder in franchise history. It will be interesting to see if President Jerry Reinsdorf ever decides to honor Rodman and put his jersey in the rafters of the United Center alongside Jordan and Pippen.

Rodman ended his NBA career averaging 7.3 points and 13.1 rebounds. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011 and is arguably one of the greatest rebounders of all time. The New Jersey native is 12th in NBA history for rebounds per game.

Statistics courtesy of Basket-Reference.

RELATED: Michael Jordan & Dennis Rodman Never Speaked in Public Even though They were at the Same Restaurant


Source link

read more
International headquarters

Bach meets Suga as Tokyo virus cases near 6-month high

TOKYO – Tokyo on Wednesday reported its highest number of new COVID-19 cases in nearly six months, the Tokyo Metropolitan Government said with the Tokyo Olympics opening in just over a week.

The growing numbers came out on the same day that the President of the International Olympic Committee, Thomas Bach, paid a courtesy visit to Tokyo to Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga.

Suga and Bach both pledged that the Tokyo Olympics would be “safe and secure” despite the games opening with Tokyo and neighboring prefectures under a state of emergency imposed by the national government.

Tokyo reported 1,149 new cases on Wednesday. It was the highest since 1,184 were reported almost six months ago on January 22. It was also the 25th day in a row that cases were higher than they were a week earlier.

Suga asked Bach to make sure the Olympics are safe, especially for the Japanese public, less than 20% of whom are fully vaccinated.

A d

“To gain the understanding of our people, and also for the success of the Tokyo 2020 Games, it is absolutely necessary that all participants take appropriate measures and measures, including countermeasures against the pandemic,” Suga said. to Bach. “As the host of the games, I hope that the IOC will make efforts to ensure that all athletes and stakeholders fully comply with these measures.”

Bach replied, “We would like to reaffirm our full commitment from the Olympic community to do everything, that we are not putting the Japanese people at risk.”

Bach told Suga that 85% of athletes and officials living in the Tokyo Bay Olympic Village will be fully vaccinated. He said nearly 100% of IOC members and IOC staff were “vaccinated or immunized”. The IOC also indicates that between 70 and 80% of international medical representatives have been vaccinated.

The IOC and Tokyo organizers last week banned fans from all venues in Tokyo and three neighboring prefectures. A few peripheral venues will allow a few spectators, and overseas fans were banned a month ago.

A d

About 11,000 athletes and tens of thousands more will enter Japan for the Olympics. The Paralympic Games will add approximately 4,400 additional athletes.

Japan has attributed around 15,000 deaths to COVID-19, a low number by many criteria but not as good as most of its Asian neighbors.

The Olympic torch relay has also been taken off the streets of Tokyo, with the Tokyo government fearing the relay will draw crowds and spread the virus. The opening ceremony will take place on July 23 at the new $ 1.4 billion national stadium in Tokyo.

Bach is expected to travel to Hiroshima on Friday and his vice president John Coates to Nagasaki to use the two bombed cities as a backdrop to promote the Tokyo Olympics and the first day of the so-called Olympic truce.

The Olympic truce, a tradition of ancient Greece, was restored by a United Nations resolution in 1993.

Bach arrived in Tokyo last week and spent the first three days secluding himself in the five-star hotel the IOC uses for its headquarters in Tokyo.

A d

The IOC is pushing the Olympics forward, despite opposition from much of the Japanese medical community, in part because it relies nearly 75% of its income on the sale of broadcast rights.

___

Journalist AP Kantaro Komiya and video journalist AP Kwiyeon Ha contributed to this report.

—-

More AP: https://apnews.com/hub/olympic-games and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.



Source link

read more
Canadian army

US soldiers at NT say close contacts

A plane loaded with U.S. military personnel in the Northern Territory was declared to be close contacts after another passenger tested positive for COVID-19.

The infected woman, who is an active member of the US military, arrived in Darwin on Thursday, July 8 before being diagnosed with the virus on Monday evening.

The 22-year-old is one of some 9,000 foreign service members in Australia for the 2021 Talisman Saber military war games, which began on Wednesday.

She was quarantined at the US Navy-leased Bladin Village worker camp 36 km south of Darwin along with around 1,000 other US servicemen when she tested positive.

The woman has since been moved to the red zone at the Center for National Resilience in Howard Springs, with her travel companions now considered close contacts, according to NT Health.

“All personnel who have traveled on the plane with the member of the United States military who tested positive are treated as close contact,” said a spokesperson.

“They are undertaking quarantine procedures at the village of Bladin, including daily checks.”

A defense spokesperson said the woman did not come into contact with the community despite being contagious.

More than 17,000 military personnel from Australia, United States, United Kingdom, Canada, New Zealand, Japan and South Korea will participate in TS21.

The majority of war game simulations are expected to take place in Queensland and off the east coast of Australia.

British, Canadian, Japanese and Korean service personnel have been quarantined in Sydney. Other foreign troops have been stationed in hotels in Brisbane, a spokesperson said.

All foreign military personnel arriving in Australia for TS21 undergo a mandatory two-week quarantine.

NT Health and Defense declined to respond to the number of service personnel on the affected flight.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

New York’s plan to move homeless people out of hotels blocked by judge

The mayor’s claim that hotels should free up rooms for tourists is challenged by the industry itself.

“It is absolutely imperative for many hotels that this program continue,” said Vijay Dandapani, president of the New York Hotel Association last week. Even counting the homeless, occupancy rates are low, he said, and the lack of demand has driven down room prices in hotels open to the public.

But the hotels, many of which were concentrated in Manhattan neighborhoods in Hell’s Kitchen and Chelsea, have drawn community opposition since the start of the program. Neighbors complain that hotel residents use drugs, hang out, steal from shops and harass passers-by.

One hotel, the Lucerne on the Upper West Side, a few blocks from Central Park, has been the subject of a months-long political battle in a stronghold of liberalism after nearly 200 men, many struggling with addiction problems, were transferred there.

Some residents have welcomed the men. Many did not and strongly pressured the city, which tried to transfer them to a hotel in another affluent area of ​​the city center, to face a lawsuit there.

Last week, the men had been moved out of the hotel and back to shelters.

One of them, Mike Roberts, 36, offered a dispatch on Sunday from his new home in the East Village.

He sleeps in a room with seven or eight cabins that each house three or four men. If he reaches out from his bed, he can touch the next one.

Unlike his room at Lucerne, the one in the refuge has no air conditioning. Mr. Roberts often wakes up in the middle of the night soaked in sweat, and he cannot walk around because if he leaves the shelter between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. he loses his bed. Needless to say, his room does not have a private shower or TV.

“Here when I wake up I’m in a cabin,” he said. “It’ll be three people around me sleeping, one snoring, one probably getting high, or a guy pacing up and down. Who wants that? “

read more
International headquarters

International investors are key to delivering housing today and into the future

The Irish home buying and letting market needs more supply. This offer must meet the multiple demands that Irish society needs in the decades to come. Homeownership should be accessible to those who aspire to it, so it is right that the first-time home market is supported as part of government policy. The provision of adequate social housing is essential to underpin any claim of an equality-minded society. In addition, a deep and diverse private rental market is needed to meet the needs of a mobile workforce.

Regardless of your perspective on the problem, delivering a larger supply faster is the way to alleviate the current pressures. Supply requires investment and the good news is that there is enough capital available in Ireland and abroad to finance the 35,000 to 40,000 housing units we need each year to meet the shortage. current. To denigrate the investors behind this capital is to divert attention from the fight against more fundamental blockers that inhibit supply.

The international investment community is very keen to support the building of a vibrant and affordable housing sector in Ireland. Before the 2008 real estate crash, the market was financed almost exclusively by national banks, and then almost exclusively by debt. It is a welcome development in the market that we now have access to a more diverse pool of capital from investors such as foreign pension funds who are well positioned to finance this phase of the construction of Ireland.

Long term goal

With long investment horizons often extending beyond 20 years, pension funds focus more on return on capital than on return on capital. They may already be buying Irish sovereign bonds with an annual interest return or ‘coupon’ close to 0%, which means they are happy to get into less liquid real estate investments at just 3-4%. annual return. Attractive low-rate capital costs are available to the industry and with the right safeguards in place we can ensure that the capital serves the broadest purposes for the country’s needs.

Likewise, these investors understand that investing in real estate is a societal issue, not just a financial one, and they respond positively to sound policy on taxation, tenant rights and transparent governance. This investor profile is very different from the caricature of the “cuckoo” fund often accused of evicting first-time buyers or trapping tenants.

To date, these investors have been mainly active in the “multi-family” sector, which means that they buy blocks of apartments built exclusively to be rented out indefinitely and not for sale.

There is a significant and growing need for pure rental stock in Ireland, where we are lagging behind our European peers. Ireland has been very successful in attracting European headquarters of global companies and with them thousands of jobs with local talent and employees from abroad. For foreign employees who can reside in Dublin for periods of six months to three years without wanting to buy a house for the long term, high quality, professionally maintained rental apartments are essential. The supply of rental apartments to this cohort does not necessarily have to come at the cost of crowding out first-time buyers, but again, the answer to this problem is more supply, not less efficient capital.

Financing the future

Another development of relevance to the debate when considering the role of international investors in the Irish market is the worrying contraction of the Irish banking market. With the exit of Ulster Bank and KBC from the Irish banking sector, this will further exhaust the nationally available financing options for the wider economy, including property developers. International capital can step in to fill the void left behind to manage the pipeline of real estate developments until completion.

Bottlenecks to accelerating supply include the slowness with which planning is assigned to developers and low thresholds for forensic review, even when that planning is successful. Delays in confirming connection certificates for site services such as water and electricity are blocking the start of construction on the house. There are other bottlenecks to the development of the Irish residential pipeline, such as the shortage of construction workers and supply chain shortages linked to Brexit and Covid-19, but they will not be resolved until ‘There will not be a clear horizon for faster housing development which is currently paralyzed by an interrupted planning process.

These issues need to be addressed through the government’s fledgling policy initiative on Housing for All due to be released later this month and the terms of reference of the soon-to-be-launched Housing Commission. With sensible policy safeguards in place to protect tenants and first-time buyers, international investors can provide an attractive source of capital to help tackle Ireland’s chronic housing shortage for decades to come.

Myles Clarke is Managing Director of CBRE Ireland


Source link

read more
Canadian army

He worked with Canadian soldiers. He helped try to save Captain Nichola Goddard. Now this Afghan interpreter is waiting for the Taliban and fears being sentenced

For over two years, Kohistany served as a combat interpreter for the Canadian Forces in the Kandahar and Helmand provinces of Afghanistan.

He would translate meetings, workshops, trainings and conferences with local elders, the Afghan National Army and the police. He also participated in interrogations and investigations of prisoners and translated documents and intelligence reports from sources on the ground.

When not in combat mode, Kohistany advised his Canadian commanders on Afghan cultural, religious and tribal customs or taught their soldiers the Pashto and Dari languages.

At least twice he and the troops he was with have been attacked by insurgents, most notably in the incident of May 17, 2006, when his convoy commander, Captain Nichola Goddard, was killed in an ambush. by the Taliban. He helped his crew get her out of the turret so the medic could perform first aid.

“I was in a light armored vehicle with about nine soldiers. We’ve all been hurt, some more seriously. I had little shrapnel on my neck and pulled them out right there, ”recalls Kohistany, who worked for the Canadian military in Afghanistan between 2005 and 2007.

Considered “the eyes, the tongue and the ears of the infidels and the occupiers”, Afghans who have worked for foreign governments – and their families – have already been targeted and have received constant death threats.

Now, as the United States and its NATO allies withdraw all ground troops in Afghanistan by August 31, and Taliban insurgents reclaim many territories, Kohistany fears he will be doomed.

“The threat has increased day by day. You can easily see the Taliban slogans on the walls. You can see Taliban flags on the houses, ”said Kohistany, who asked that his full name not be released for his safety. “Targeted assassinations are escalating.”

As he sees other foreign governments such as the US, UK and other European countries making plans to resettle their former Afghan aides, Kohistany said he felt abandoned by Canada.

“If I had known that one day we would be left behind by the Canadian government, I would never have joined the Canadian military to work and fight with them, shoulder to shoulder, against the Taliban and put my life in danger. , ” he sighed.

“I feel very disappointed. “

In a letter last week to Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino, Veterans Affairs Minister Lawrence MacAulay and Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan, three retired Canadian Majors Generals called on the federal government to relaunch a resettlement program for Afghan civilians like Kohistany.

“There is an urgent need to ensure the safety and well-being of Afghan nationals who served alongside Canadian soldiers, development officers and diplomats during our intervention,” said the letter signed by the three. former task force commanders Denis Thompson, Dean Milner. and Dave Fraser.

“Many Canadian veterans come into contact with the Afghans who served alongside them, and their stories are poignant. These people are considered “comrades in arms” and their plight affects these veterans, like all Canadians. “

Specifically, veterans are calling on the federal government to immediately reintroduce a special immigration program that helped resettle 780 Afghans and their families to Canada between 2009 and 2011.

The Afghan-Canadian Interpreters – an advocacy group made up mostly of veterans, serving military personnel, and supporters – have identified at least 115 former interpreters, cultural advisers and local staff who they say are in need of the protection of the Canada.

Volunteers contacted them and compiled a list for Ottawa. Time, they say, is running out.

“The Western presence will no longer exist in the country. Therefore, there will be no protection for any of them, ”said group spokesman Dave Morrow, a retired lieutenant who served in Kandahar in 2010 and 2011.

“We don’t have a plan. We don’t have a list other than the one we created as an organization. This is where we fill the void, to hopefully provide some kind of visibility and awareness of this huge humanitarian issue that is unfolding very, very quickly.

Canada’s initial resettlement program was limited to Afghan civilians who provided 12 consecutive months of service to Canadians between October 2007 and July 2011. To be eligible, they also had to provide testimonials from their Canadian supervisors as well as proof that they were in danger in Afghanistan. .

Immigration Minister Mendicino’s office told reporters that Afghan civilians not eligible for the previous program may apply to immigrate to Canada through other immigration programs or on humanitarian and compassionate grounds.

Morrow says these options are not viable.

“If you were in a war-torn country with no internet access, no cell service, and maybe an iPhone 3 to fill out all your paperwork, no access to printers, paper, or whatever, this statement in itself was disturbing, ”he said. mentionned.

Kohistany went into hiding with his wife and children in Kabul, a relatively safer area where most of the foreign diplomats are located. They moved around several times to avoid detection and threats from insurgents, he said. Just two months ago, two bikers shot at his house with an AK-47.

“There is no option for us. Key roads and borders are all controlled by the Taliban. We are like prisoners. The only option or hope we have is to find or ask someone or a government to come and get us in a safe country, ”said the 36-year-old, a graduate in law and political science.

He was not eligible for the previous Ottawa relocation program because he left the force before October 2007.

Loading…

Loading…Loading…Loading…Loading…Loading…

“We are between life and death. The insurgents occupied more territory and found more influence in the big cities and created more threats for everyone. Life has become more dangerous than ever.

Cpl.  Robin Rickards, who served in Afghanistan on three missions before retiring in 2010, says Canadian soldiers would not be able to do their jobs without the help of local interpreters, who saved soldiers' lives at many times.

Retired Corporal Robin Rickards first met Kohistany in 2006 on the first of his three missions in Afghanistan and the two became good friends because they spent a lot of time together on the front lines.

He said the armies would not have been able to do their job without the help of these interpreters.

“The most important thing they did, to save the lives of Canadians, was that they were essential to monitor ICOM radios. All communication between the Taliban elements in the field was by two-way radio, ”says Rickards, who retired in 2010 and now lives in Thunder Bay.

“The interpreters would bring the conversations to us in real time and also add their perspective on legitimacy. … The longer a person is employed by Canadians or Coalition Forces, the better they determine if it is legitimate, but it increases the risk they face in the long run.

Rickards asserts that these civilian employees of foreign governments are considered “apostates” by the Taliban and that Canada has more than a moral obligation to save them. And they should be on the front lines for resettlement in order to save the lives of Canadian soldiers, he added.

Wherever the Canadian military is deployed, they need local translators to serve as cultural and linguistic ambassadors, he said, whether in Ukraine, Latvia or Mali.

“The plight of our interpreters in Afghanistan will be seen by people in other countries,” Rickards warned. “People in these other places where we go in the future will be wary of helping us because they will be wary of the consequences when we go. And that will hamper our ability to be successful in these missions. “

Marcus Powlowski, Liberal MP for Thunder Bay — Rainy River, has been a strong advocate for Afghan civilians.

“They risked their lives for our country,” said Powlowski.

Ottawa has an ambitious goal of welcoming 401,000 permanent residents this year, and in the past the government has resettled tens of thousands of people vulnerable to wars and violence in Syria and Myanmar, he said. he adds. According to him, the Afghan civilians in question are only a drop in the ocean.

Powlowski said his government told him any resettlement plan in Afghanistan was a logistical challenge due to Canada’s limited presence in the country as well as security concerns.

“I don’t think it’s insurmountable at all that we’re doing this in Afghanistan. It could be as simple as sending a plane, letting (in) all the people because a lot of these people are in contact with our office, ”he said.

“Now, I’m not advocating that we do this. But potentially, it could be as easy as sending a plane. There is a source to verify who they are, to make sure they don’t have guns on them, to have them stolen, and to do all the bureaucratic tasks afterward.

Sayed Shah Sharifi, a former Afghan interpreter now in Toronto, says five of his family were killed by the Taliban because of their connection to him.  Threats against former employees to foreign governments are real, he says.

Sayed Shah Sharifi, a former Afghan interpreter resettled in Canada in 2012, knows firsthand how the Taliban treat “infidels” and their families. Five of his family members – his sister and his son; his brother’s wife and two children – were killed by insurgents because of their connection to him.

“These are not just threats. These are real risks, ”says Sharifi, who served alongside Canadian troops in Kandahar between 2007 and 2010 and now works as an electrician in Toronto.

With insurgents making significant gains in recent months, he said, there are growing concerns that they will steal internal Afghan government data to track down these former Western government employees with credentials. personal.

“The Taliban may not have found those in hiding yet, but if they are found, they are dead. “

Nicholas Keung is a Toronto-based reporter who covers immigration for The Star. Follow him on Twitter: @nkeung



Source link

read more
Non profit living

Voto Latino fights Latinos’ reluctance to vaccinate against COVID

Maria Teresa Kumar, President and CEO of Voto Latino, a nonprofit organization for the Latin American community, was confused when her own mother told her she would not be getting the COVID-19 vaccine. It took two months for Kumar to convince his mother, who works in the health sector and had been vaccinated, her and her children, all her life, to make an appointment. What had held her mother back were the videos she had watched imparting false accounts, especially one that showed a man pretending to be a pharmacist, warning in Spanish not to be vaccinated, Kumar recalls, “because it was a technology never introduced to humans before. “

The spread of misinformation and misinformation surrounding the COVID-19 vaccine is common among a range of U.S. populations, including within the Latino community. In an April survey by Voto Latino, 40% of Latinos said they had received material saying the vaccine was not working. In order to urgently overcome this, especially as the Delta variant spreads, Voto Latino uses his behavioral learnings to fight far-right disinformation during elections to rally people to get shot, as he did so to register them to vote in 2020. For the organization, it is essential to maintain a large and influential electoral bloc healthy and confident in the government so that it continues to exercise its right to vote in the to come up.

Although the number is improving, the uptake of the vaccine by Latinos has been 1.2 times less than among whites in the majority of states. This is the case with other ethnic groups, such as blacks, with whom Latinos share some of the same barriers to access, such as frontline work that prevents employees from taking time off or lack of care. adequate health. Additionally, like the black community, Latinos have had their own dark experiences of being subjected to medical racism by the US government, including a history of forced sterilization of women in Los Angeles and Puerto Rico.

Misinformation around the COVID-19 vaccine compounds already existing fears. Some messages mistakenly claim that the vaccine is not scientifically reliable, and others that it causes infertility. More outlandish claims include that it contains a microchip or that it transforms you in zombie. Part of the reason these myths are so common among the Hispanic community is that Facebook doesn’t crack down on disinformation in Spanish to the same extent as it does in English. Once the information arrives on WhatsApp, it can then spread virally without any control. Of those who said they saw “harmful” information about the vaccine, 53% said it had been on Facebook and 43% on messaging apps.

The promoters of this disinformation are often individuals or groups who create digital content based on talking points from far-right cable news, radio shows or politicians, says Ameer Patel, vice president of programs. by Voto Latino. These bad actors can then receive donations from the followers, which not only fund the wide dissemination of lies, but can allow them to make a living from the practice. “One of the things we’re really seeing is there’s this great appetite to fund the flow of misinformation and disinformation,” he says. When a particular message resonates with a certain community, they tap more into that idea; for example, the myth of infertility has been particularly powerful among young Latinos, Patel says, perhaps because of popular family or religious beliefs.

With the CDC is already reporting that Latinos are 2 times more likely to be infected with the virus than whites, and 2.3 times more likely to die, Voto Latino has decided to help fight false narratives by implementing the Latino anti-disinformation laboratory with the Media Matters association. Although Voto Latino focuses on voting, Kumar says a healthy community that trusts government is essential for democracy, calling misinformation about vaccines “the most morbid form of voter suppression.” She adds, “If you don’t trust your government to take care of you and keep your family healthy with a vaccine, what’s the possibility that you can convince someone to vote?

The group is also in a privileged position to deliver its conclusions on the fight against far-right disinformation during the 2020 campaign. During this cycle, bad actors aimed to suppress the vote among certain blocs, and Voto Latino retaliated with strategies that ended up registering 426,964 voters, a record for the organization. They ran explanatory ads to educate people about the registration process, used peer-to-peer texting where volunteers sent personalized texts to people from local numbers, and encouraged people to contact likewise their friends and family. The idea was that receiving messages from people like them, whom they could relate to, would be more compelling than receiving impersonal, generic memos.

Now, the group is adopting similar behavioral techniques for the immunization campaign, with an ad campaign focusing on messages from people like them, rather than an unknown healthcare professional, for example. One of the two best-tested ads features a sixth-grade teacher expressing feelings of returning to school safe after being immunized, which Kumar says touches both educational and economic reasoning. The other features a woman who admits to being scared at first, “because it was new”, but who eventually received the photo and said it felt liberating. Importantly, both also point out that shooting is free, which a lot of people either don’t know or are told otherwise. Overall, the message is “optimistic but practical” and focuses on getting back to normal. As with his electoral strategy, Voto Latino does not laugh at any idea, however absurd it may be. “If you make fun of someone for their beliefs, they tend to turn around because they don’t mean they’re wrong,” Kumar says. “It’s the worst way to chat with someone.”

Voto Latino targets the 28% of people who said they were hesitant about the vaccine, rather than those “who are at the bottom of the rabbit hole” and more difficult to convince (again, a strategy similar to the election ). “We are entering the nooks and crannies of people’s internet,” Kumar says, referring to the targeting technique of showing their ads to people who have previously watched disinformation videos. They are currently running the ads on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

So far, they’ve been effective in calling for action: According to Google results, released last week, people who saw the ads were 54 times more likely to search for ‘get a covid vaccine’ than those who did not; and there was an overall spike in that search term of 7,171% in Florida, 5,856% in Texas, and 4,330% in California, the three states with the largest Latin American populations. And vaccination is increasing: As of July 4, 34% of people who had started their vaccination in the previous 14 days were Latin American, even though they represent only 17% of the population. Kumar says she believes the same methods could be used on other hesitant population groups, such as older whites and immigrant enclaves.

Success so far suggests that simply showing people care – to “give them love, attention and information in a non-judgmental way” – is a strategy. effective persuasion, both to promote vaccines and to maintain an active growing political voice in the long term. With her mother, what ultimately worked was the personal message of “Why wouldn’t someone want you to be healthy?” Why wouldn’t someone want you to see your grandchildren? “

read more
History organization

U.S. Muslim Leaders and Activists Tackle Opposition to COVID-19 Vaccines

Shaikh Rahman, business systems analyst in Chicago, was not a supporter of COVID-19 vaccines because he did not believe that credible information about them was being disseminated effectively and distribution appeared rushed.

“Our faith says to investigate a matter before passing it off as the truth,” he said.

But Rahman’s sentiment changed after his local imam, Shaykh Jamal Said of the Foundation Mosque in Bridgeview, Illinois, began suggesting that those who were not vaccinated could be barred from entering the mosque.

Rahman was concerned about this potential restriction on prayer services and he considered getting the vaccine. He had tested positive for the virus prior to this potential restriction. So he decided to get the vaccine to boost his immunity after the Mosque Foundation organized a Pfizer vaccination campaign.

“With the country reopening, I don’t want my family or loved ones to risk being exposed through me,” Rahman said.

While vaccine hesitancy trends continue to evolve Across the United States, a change is also underway in some Muslim communities. Vaccination rates among Muslims had been among the lowest in the country during the first months of the pandemic. But the outreach programs of mosques, community organizations and cultural centers that work with immigrant communities help dispel misinformation and promote immunization.

As they hear from trusted figures, such as imams, some Muslims are now choosing to be vaccinated.

Virtual meetings

Among the organizations making an impact is the Somali Family Service of San Diego (SFS). It has a program called the Ihsan Health Initiative, which includes a team of community health workers who provide direct outreach through events such as virtual town hall meetings.

“The virtual town hall meetings have helped to combat some of the skepticism by allowing us to invite respected community leaders, such as doctors, nurses and Masjid imams,” says Balqiso Hussein, a community health worker of SFS, which works primarily with Somalis. population. “When we were presented with scientific evidence in a culturally competent manner, we saw changes in ideologies regarding the vaccine. Many in the community even scheduled vaccine appointments for the same day.”

SFS has hired community health workers who speak Arabic, Swahili and Somali. There are plans to reach out to the Afghan community.

“Using the same [native] language to speak to my clients, coupled with Friday khutbahs [sermons] issued by local imams, had a significant impact in trying to change the mindset of people in their willingness to be vaccinated, ”said Aous Alhabbar, a health worker who engages with the Iraqi community. “While there was a lot of fear at the start of the pandemic, that is slowly changing thanks to awareness. “

Part of the hesitation stems from the racism experienced during medical visits.

“Many feel that the health care system is not working to promote their well-being,” says Hussein. “Many members of the community, especially the older groups, felt very hesitant when the vaccines were fully administered nationally. Much of the reluctance comes from personal experiences with healthcare professionals who have failed to welcome community members due to language and cultural barriers. “

Religious beliefs have also been a factor for some who are still reluctant to get vaccinated. The question of what is halal, or permitted under Islamic law, has been raised repeatedly in the Muslim community.

“At first I was hesitant because I wasn’t sure about the science, and validity was a question of the ingredients,” says Shaykh Amin Kholwadia, a Muslim scholar and founder of Darul Qasim, an institute of Islamic teachings. Traditional based in Glendale Heights, Illinois.

Following reports that at least one of the vaccines used cell lines derived from fetal tissue, many Muslims questioned whether it would be halal to be given the vaccine. Kholwadia signed a statement issued by his organization that said, “The use of cell lines, originally developed from aborted fetuses, to develop vaccines is against Islamic bioethics. Muslims cannot take vaccines that are developed in this way given the permitted alternatives. “

Kholwadia explained that under Islamic law, “No part of the human body (including fetuses) can be used for the purpose of experimentation.”

While the ruling by the Darul Qasim organization legitimized the reluctance of some Muslims, especially for vaccines related to the first vaccines developed by Johnson & Johnson, it also served as an incentive for vaccinations developed by others. companies.

“Why wouldn’t I prefer mRNA vaccines, especially if it’s not go put my akhira [afterlife] in danger? ”asks Akber Ali, attending physician at an Illinois hospital, who works with Darul Qasim.

Persistent doubts

Not everyone is convinced.

Bint Aden, a recent graduate from Southern California who earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology, says she and her family still have questions about the vaccine’s ingredients and whether they’re halal.

“Although mosques have authorized the vaccine, with my roots in Somalia, it is not clear what is authorized,” she said. “We believe in qadr [fate], what is supposed to be is destined to happen by the work of Allah (God), which involves both disease and health.

“I always want to wait and see,” Aden says. “I still don’t feel comfortable taking the vaccine. “

The National Geographic Society, committed to illuminating and protecting the wonders of our world, funded Tasmiha khanwork. Learn about the Society’s support for explorers who work to inspire, educate and better understand human history and cultures.



Source link

read more
Canadian army

As the Taliban retake Afghanistan, a disastrous sense of déjà vu

Kabul by Christmas.

This is where we were, Kabul at Christmas 2001, when the Taliban had just been overthrown, driven out by an intense campaign of bombing by American and British forces, along with the brutal regime’s Al Qaeda “guests”. routed and on the run.

As the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks approached, the United States extricated itself from its longest foreign war – in an unseemly military race for exits – the British and NATO went offline, and Afghanistan is on the precipice of an already disastrous one. seen.

Leaving behind the vast Bagram airfield outside the capital, with thousands of civilian trucks and hundreds of armored vehicles right there. A ghost base, hastily evacuated and handed over to Afghan forces, awaiting search by the Taliban.

Also leaving behind a litany of broken promises – the West’s assurance that Afghanistan would never be abandoned again.

But, just like the Soviets in 1989, dragging their tails between their legs, militarily crippled by a grueling war against the Mujahedin that could not be – or would not be, in the long game tactically waged by the Taliban – won. With President Joe Biden claiming, in a surprising and deceptive way, that the United States has never been in the business of nation building. After some $ 133 billion (US) has been spent on exactly that, most of it on US cents. And more than 2,300 of its soldiers killed.

“I will not send another generation of Americans to war in Afghanistan without expecting a different outcome,” Biden said on Independence Day.

In the wake of the departure of the United States, the dominoes are falling rapidly.

Hours after the evacuation of Bagram, the Taliban were on the march, increasing and widening their reach, with only the Afghan Air Force to control their advance. They captured hundreds of rural districts in the north and surrounded the capital of Badakhshan, with more than 1,000 Afghan soldiers – demoralized and ill-equipped – fleeing their posts, crossing a river bridge to border Tajikistan. Hundreds more – the Afghan army, police and intelligence services – laid down their arms and surrendered when their positions were overwhelmed.

Badakhshan was once the stronghold of anti-Taliban resistance, the last stronghold of Mujahedeen fighters under the revered Ahmad Shah Massoud, assassinated on September 9, 2001, a murder allegedly committed on Al-Qaeda’s orders, by two killers pretending to be journalists. Now trade routes and checkpoints to Tajikistan are controlled by Islamist insurgents, who already collect customs revenue.

On Friday, Taliban forces entered Kandahar, Afghanistan’s second-largest city, the Pashtun heartland in the south and the birthplace of the Taliban, aided by Pakistani intelligence services. Kandahar Province, which was under the responsibility of the Canadian Forces during the NATO mission, where 158 of our soldiers sacrificed their lives.

The militants first invaded Panjwai – the lush region that Canadians had once cleared and made safe – using it as a springboard for the assault on Kandahar City, a military and metaphorical triumph.

In the western part of Afghanistan, the powerful warlord Ismail Khan, whose vast militia helped US forces topple the Taliban regime, is mobilizing loyalists to defend Herat. “We call on all remaining security forces to resist courageously,” he said over the weekend. “We hope that the men and women of Herat decide at this time to support the resistance front to defend their freedom and safeguard their honor.

Which sounds a lot like a call to arms for another civil war. The latter decimated Afghanistan and turned Kabul into rubble.

While many Western experts claim that it is highly unlikely that heavily fortified Kabul will be seized again by the Taliban by the end of the year, there is little reason to believe in such hissing assurances from the Empire cemetery. Kabul will fall, if not December 31, then quite early thereafter. And the never-ending cycle of conflict will continue in a country that has known nothing but war for the past four decades, from outside and inside.

The only silver lining for the Afghans is that the Taliban will turn out to have undergone some sort of internal reform, less determined to murder civilians and impose draconian interpretations of Islamic law. That there will always be music and schools for girls and civil rights for women and protected rights for ethnic minorities such as the eternally persecuted, predominantly Shia Hazaras bracing for a backlash.

“There are rumors circulating that the Taliban is imposing restrictions or even a total ban on the media, individuals and women in the newly liberated areas,” Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said in a statement released last week. “We reject such propaganda. All schools are fully open, the media are allowed to operate in a free and neutral manner within the framework of Islamic rules, clinics and health centers can work without any constraints. Civil servants, journalists can also live and perform their duties without fear. ”

Right. Pull the other.

It was the fundamentalist regime that banned music and television, forced men to grow beards, executed, threw suspected gays from rooftops, and carried out public executions for those caught breaking Taliban edicts.

Loading…

Loading…Loading…Loading…Loading…Loading…

There are reports of schools already burned down and teachers in hiding. The Taliban have been blamed for a wave of killings targeting lawyers, journalists and working women. Dozens of people have been shot or killed in car bombings. The Taliban denies any responsibility.

Reports also indicate that ISIS, what remains of it, is recovering in Afghanistan.

Although the central government still owns most of the country’s major cities, urban areas will inevitably come under siege. The descent into widespread violence seems inevitable and without end in sight. The Soufan Center, which provides analysis of global security threats, revealed that recent US intelligence assessments concluded that the government of besieged President Ashraf Ghani could collapse within the next six months.

As expected when Biden announced earlier this year that the US withdrawal would be completed on September 11, a date chosen for symbolic reasons, although the US exodus was likely to be completed before then, leaving behind only a thousand troops to protect diplomats. missions, the American Embassy and the Kabul airport.

Unacceptable, retorts the Taliban. All foreign troops present on Afghan soil after September 11 will be considered “legitimate targets”.

The Taliban’s territorial gains have been swift and astounding this year. In the past two months alone, they have seized at least 150 districts – they claim many more – in 34 provinces, comprising half the country. In some areas, they have been greeted by war-weary citizens and a corrupt government.

“I don’t like leaving friends in need,” admitted General Austin Scott Miller, commander of US and NATO forces, in a recent interview with ABC, acknowledging that the situation he is leaving behind is disastrous. “War is physical, but it also has a psychological or moral component, and hope really matters. What you don’t want to happen is for people to lose hope. ”

Except that there is no hope for the Afghans. They are doomed to fail, even though the Taliban say they will present a written peace proposal to the government as early as next month during the stalled negotiations in Doha. The United States has repeatedly asked for help from neighboring Pakistan in convincing the insurgents to come up with a written plan. But Pakistan is a traitor. He incubated the Taliban and his regional aspirations have long been based on the Taliban. It is, after all, the country that housed Osama bin Laden, his denials are not worth a fig.

My fixer, driver and friend for nearly two decades, sends desperate texts. “I have to get my family out. They will come first for the interpreters. Please can you help? ”

He has been an interpreter for NATO for years.

Canada’s combat mission in Afghanistan ended in 2011, transitioning to a training mission. Ottawa said it would welcome hundreds of vulnerable Afghans, interpreters, embassy staff and their families. The United States has promised to relocate thousands of interpreters by next month. Which could be too late.

I’m sorry Faramaz. I am really sorry.

Rosie DiManno is a Toronto-based columnist covering sports and news for The Star. Follow her on Twitter: @rdimanno



Source link

read more
International headquarters

QBIC organizes a virtual “demonstration day” for the 14th batch of startups

The Qatar Business Incubator Center (QBIC), founded by the Qatar Development Bank (QDB), yesterday organized its second virtual “Demo Day” with 12 startups graduated from the Lean Entrepreneurship Program and Lean Accelerator Program, presenting their innovative ideas during the event.
The following startups, Caffeine, Cybergy, iFor Build, Smart Shuttle, Souqti, StopOver, StoryDeck, The Real State CRM, Vastry, VOP, Faserly and Sparets, presented their projects to a panel of experts, angel investors, d ‘aspiring entrepreneurs and stakeholders.
They also had three minutes for a question-and-answer session with the panel of experts at the event, which focused on the theme “Qatar’s Fastest Growing Startups, Your Next Smart Investment”.
This cohort, the 14th batch of graduates from the aforementioned programs, had received weeks of training, orientation and counseling from the various incubator teams.
The Demo Day, which was hosted by entrepreneurship advisor Mahmoud al-Mahmoud, was held at the Bedaya Center and was sponsored by incubator partner, Ooredoo Network, and entrepreneurship ecosystem partners, Qatar Financial Center, Doha Tech Angels, Mansour Bin Khalifa Holding Group, and Snoonu.
Commenting on the event, Hamad bin Dashin al-Qahtani, Managing Director of QBIC, said: “QBIC, and QDB of course as the founding organization, was and still is the first and biggest supporter of entrepreneurship in the world. Qatar. Year after year, we strive to develop our programs and incubators to welcome as many startups and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) as possible in the service of our vision and that of our beloved country, Qatar.
“We strive to achieve excellence in this area in line with our goal of diversifying the local economy and helping Qatari businesses access local, regional and international markets. “
This year, QBIC has prepared a dedicated Demo Day website where investors, budding entrepreneurs and experts can view the list of participating startups and organize virtual meetings with startup owners. The site is accessible via demoday.qbic.qa.
It should be noted that despite the graduation of these startups, QBIC will remain in contact with them to continue to provide them with advice and guidance in order to ensure the existence of a robust business ecosystem and to provide an environment of sustainable business to entrepreneurs in the State of Qatar.
QBIC is the largest and largest mixed-use business incubator in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, founded by the Qatar Development Bank. To learn more about the event, visit demoday.qbic.qa.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

More Nursing Homes and Seniors’ Homes are Closing Their Doors Due to the Impact of COVID

The nursing home operated by Alaris Health on John F. Kennedy Boulevard in Guttenberg was old. Built long before there were concerns about isolating large numbers of residents to stop a virus that could spread like wildfire, it was small and could hold up to four people per room.

And now it’s closed.

The long-term coronavirus pandemic has claimed the lives of more than 7,800 long-term care residents in New Jersey.

It also had a big impact on nursing homes.

Since March 2020, three state care facilities have closed, according to state data, highlighting not only changes COVID has brought to standards of care, experts say, but also growing financial instability in the state. nationwide industry. In each of the previous two years before the deadly virus hit, there has been only one nursing home closure in New Jersey, according to the state Department of Health.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has put increased financial pressure on nursing homes and assisted living providers who already operate on very low margins,” said James McCracken, President and CEO LeadingAge New Jersey, the statewide association of nonprofit elderly care organizations.

Nationally, industry officials predict long-term care providers could lose $ 94 billion in the pandemic and warn that more than 1,800 facilities could eventually close their doors.

The closures in New Jersey, meanwhile, also suggest that the financial pressures felt by long-term care facilities due to COVID may have made nonprofits such as those represented by LeadingAge particularly vulnerable.

Medicaid, a joint federal and state program that helps pay nursing home fees, serves as a safety net for people with limited incomes and resources. But the reimbursement rate in New Jersey remains far too low, critics lament. At the same time, not all for-profit nursing homes will accept Medicaid or may limit the services and beds provided to Medicaid patients, unlike nonprofit organizations.

“Faith-based and mission-oriented organizations are particularly affected because they traditionally care for those in need, regardless of their ability to pay,” McCracken said of the financial crisis caused by the pandemic.

One of the facilities that closed in the state this year – the Armenian Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Emerson – was operated on a non-profit basis. The Villa at Florham Park, an assisted living facility and also a non-profit organization, is also closing. The establishment, which has already relocated all of its residents, has submitted a closure plan to the state, according to a spokesperson for the Ministry of Health.

More recently, the St. Francis Residential Community in Denville, a non-profit independent living facility for seniors operated by The Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother, also said it was closing for financial reasons, although it was not have not linked their problems to COVID. The closure will displace 75 people who live there, including 10 nuns of another order, the Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Conception of the Mother of God. They did not respond to requests for comment.

The Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother, owners of the property since 1895, said in a statement that as the buildings and infrastructure on campus aged, “it has become increasingly difficult to fund maintenance and operations. renovations necessary to maintain the financial viability of the community. “

Although they have not yet filed a notice of intent regarding the closure with the Ministry of Community Affairs, which is authorizing the installation, they have withheld the Springpoint, a non-profit organization that operates 27 retirement homes, to help with the closure and find suitable housing for current residents.

A Springpoint spokeswoman said they had has created a limited number of leases at one of their facilities, The Oaks in Denville, which will be made available to residents of St. Francis and the sisters who live there, based on financial need.

St. Francis Residential Community, an independent living facility in Denville that houses 75 residents and plans to close.Google Street View

McCracken said a more robust reimbursement system is needed to support providers who care for the most vulnerable.

“Nonprofit providers are resident-focused and I am saddened when faith-based organizations close because they cannot afford to continue their ministries,” he said.

Her concern was echoed by Laurie Facciarossa Brewer, the New Jersey long-term care ombudsman, who questions whether faith-based institutions and other nonprofits are having a harder time weathering the effects of the health emergency. public COVID-19, including reduction of occupancy rates.

“At least one national study has shown that nonprofit long-term care facilities are more effective at controlling COVID-19 infections,” she said. “This may suggest that these facilities had better staff ratios and provided more nursing hours, a key indicator of quality in a long-term care facility and the most important tool to combat the spread of the infection.”

The loss of such organizations, said Facciarossa Brewer, “is bad news for people in need of nursing home care in New Jersey.”

Andrew Aronson, president and CEO of the Health Care Association of New Jersey, which represents long-term care facilities in the state, said the pandemic has caused an economic crisis on all long-term care providers, “regardless of the ownership structure”.

Nationally, a recent survey by the American Health Care Association and the National Center for Assisted Living, representing more than 14,000 nursing homes, assisted living communities and other long-term care facilities across the country , revealed that most homes in living communities are now operating at a loss.

This survey indicated that only a quarter of nursing homes and assisted living communities were confident they could last a year or more, citing increased expenses or lost income. There are also fewer inhabitants.

“Even though cases of COVID in long-term care are at historically low levels, providers are struggling to recover from the economic crisis the pandemic has brought about,” said Mark Parkinson, President and CEO from the Association. “Too many facilities operate on tight budgets simply because policy makers have not committed the appropriate resources, and this can have devastating consequences.”

CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES: Live map tracker | Newsletter | Home page

To ensure the stability of the long-term care industry, Aronson said lawmakers and officials must provide short-term economic support and address the chronic underfunding of Medicaid, which only covers about 70% of the cost of caring for a patient in a retirement home.

The problem, however, goes beyond Medicaid funding.

The isolation requirements of sick and infected residents in nursing homes that were never designed to contain a virus like COVID have demonstrated the inadequacies of many older facilities that may no longer be economically viable.

The Alaris Health nursing home in Guttenberg, which looked after nearly 100 residents, was a relatively small facility. Approved for 108 beds, it had an average of 91 residents during the pandemic. But the retirement home, built in the 1960s, also needed modernization. Many of its rooms were set up for up to three and four people, and officials said it was difficult to isolate patients with COVID-19.

Even before the pandemic, the nursing facility had ongoing work issues and union officials complained that their members were working with expired contracts, many of those who had been sick on the job with the coronavirus ended up over later responsible for thousands of medical bills. Its operators had also considered a plan to demolish the facility and replace it with a 15-story residential building overlooking the Manhattan skyline.

In the aftermath of the pandemic, Alaris Health announced last year that it would close the nursing home and began moving residents to other facilities. According to the state’s health department, it closed in January.

__

Local journalism needs your support. Subscribe to nj.com/supporter.

Ted Sherman can be reached at [email protected]. Follow him on twitter @TedShermanSL.

read more
History organization

Why Haiti is still in despair after $ 13 billion in foreign aid

The streets of Haiti had been crowded for months with angry protesters who burned tires, stormed banks and robbed stores. Gangs, sometimes with the tacit permission of the police, have kidnapped nuns, fruit sellers and even schoolgirls for ransom.

And then on Wednesday, the country sank deeper into turmoil, when a convoy of armed men brazenly rumbled to the home of the president, Jovenel Moïse, in the middle of the night and shot him dead.

Almost every time Haitians think their situation cannot get worse, it seems the nation takes another disturbing turn and is now on the brink of a political vacuum, with no president, no parliament, or no functioning Supreme Court.

The country’s quagmire has for decades placed it at the top of the list of nations, like Afghanistan and Somalia, which have captured the world’s imaginations for their level of desperation. In the shadow of the richest country in the world, people wonder: how could this happen in Haiti?

Haiti’s troubled history runs deep into its roots as a former slave colony of France which gained independence in 1804 after defeating Napoleon’s forces, and then suffered more than two decades of a brutal dictatorship, which ended in 1986.

Then, after a powerful earthquake that devastated the country in 2010, an influx of foreign aid and peacekeepers only aggravated the woes and instability of the country.

Haiti’s failures did not happen in a vacuum; they have been aided by the international community, which has injected $ 13 billion in aid into the country over the past decade. But instead of the nation-building that money was supposed to achieve, Haiti’s institutions have hollowed out even more in recent years.

When the president let Parliament’s term expire last year, he left Haiti with 11 elected representatives – Mr. Moïse and 10 senators – for its population of 11 million, drawing strong condemnation but little repercussions from from Washington. For a year and a half, until his assassination, Mr. Moïse increasingly ruled by decree.

Haiti is less of a failed state than what one analyst has called an “aid state” – which lives by relying on billions of dollars from the international community. Foreign governments were unwilling to turn off the taps, fearing they would let Haiti fail.

But the money served as a complicated lifeline – leaving the government with little incentive to carry out the institutional reforms needed to rebuild the country, as it bets that whenever the situation gets worse, international governments will open their coffers, according to Haitian analysts and activists. .

The aid has supported the country and its leaders, providing vital services and supplies in a country in desperate need of large amounts of humanitarian aid. But it also allowed corruption, violence and political paralysis to go unchecked.

Although they deny it, Haitian politicians, including the government, have traditionally relied on gangs to influence elections in their favor and expand their political reach. In the last three years of Mr. Moïse’s tenure, more than a dozen massacres perpetrated by gangs linked to the government and police forces have killed more than 400 people in anti-government neighborhoods and displaced 1.5 million of people, yet no one was held responsible for the crimes.

When a political or human rights scandal erupts, the US government issues convictions similar to paper tigers.

Instead of embracing the long road of reforms and creating a system that works, supports Haitian civil society leaders, the United States has supported strong men and tied the nation’s fate to them. Many Haitians have repeatedly denounced US support for Mr. Moïse but said they had little power to stop him.

“Since 2018, we have been calling for accountability,” said Emmanuela Douyon, a Haitian political expert who testified before the US Congress earlier this year, urging Washington to change its foreign policy and its approach to assisting Haiti.

“We need the international community to stop imposing what it thinks is correct and instead think about the long term and stability,” Ms. Douyon said in an interview.

The United States must make aid to Haiti conditional on the cleansing and reform of the country’s institutions by its leaders, Douyon and other analysts said. And powerful figures must be held accountable for the violence and corruption that permeates all aspects of the country.

“There will be a lot of calls for international intervention and for the sending of troops, but it is important that we take a step back and see how the international intervention has contributed to this situation,” said Jake Johnston, researcher associated with the Center for Economic and Policy. Research Washington, which coined the term “state aid”.

“Billions of dollars have already been spent on what is called nation-building in Haiti, which has only contributed to the erosion of the state and the politicization of these institutions,” he said. Mr Johnston said. “Saying now that we need to do more, well, that won’t work. “

The assassination of Mr. Moïse on Wednesday marked a new chapter in the country’s violent decade. The assassins who raided Mr. Moïse’s compound killed a president who came to power in 2016, winning the election with just around 600,000 votes. Only 18% of voters voted, and there were numerous accusations of fraud.

Still, the United States backed the unpopular and controversial leader, backing Mr. Moïse amid calls for his ouster in 2019 when it was discovered that international aid to the government had disappeared.

Mr Moïse insisted in February that he would stay one more year as president because he had been barred from holding the post for so long while accusations of electoral fraud came under scrutiny. investigation. Despite demands from civil society leaders to step down, Washington backed him up. Critics said his retention in office was unconstitutional and anger spilled over into the streets, plunging the capital Port-au-Prince into more uncertainty and violence.

Another American nation-building failure was played out thousands of miles from Haiti, Afghanistan, where the United States tried for 20 years to wrest control of the country from the Taliban before leaving the country. country. The Afghan army either abandoned its bases or surrendered en masse to the Taliban as the United States withdrew its troops. There, the international community has provided more than $ 2 trillion in aid since 2001.

The nation-building exercises that the United States and its international partners have undertaken in Haiti and around the world have done little to create functioning states, instead creating a system where dubious actors with little national support – like M. Moïse – are supported. , the easiest way to achieve short term stability.

In Afghanistan, the United States has relied on warlords and strongmen to achieve its objectives, who often politicize and undermine institutions, leaving a vacuum when they are inevitably assassinated or overthrown.

Civil society leaders in Haiti and Afghanistan have both urged the United States to help these countries strengthen their institutions and ensure the rule of law, creating democratic systems that outlast any political leader. and ensure long-term stability.

With continued support from the United States, Mr. Moïse had become increasingly autocratic, passing an anti-terrorism law late last year so broad it could be used against his opposition.

Earlier this year, he said he would draft a new constitution, giving broad powers to the military and allowing future presidents to run for a second consecutive term. He has scheduled a referendum on the constitution and a national election for September, despite warnings that holding an election amid so much violence would suppress voter turnout and bring to power the same politicians who helped provoke the struggles. from Haiti. Yet the United States supported Mr. Moïse’s plans.

“It is difficult to see the present moment as an opportunity because it will probably create more chaos,” said Alexandra Filippova, senior lawyer at the Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti, an organization that provides legal representation to victims. of human rights. abuses.

“If the United States and other international partners really want to help Haiti,” added Ms. Filippova, “they must listen to Haitian civil society and take the difficult road: build a real foundation for democracy.


Source link

read more
Canadian army

A pine tree in London, Ontario. transmits healing lessons 30 years after the Oka crisis

Indigenous leaders invite the public to gather around a towering white pine in downtown London, Ontario. park on Sunday to reflect on why it was planted three decades ago.

The little-known tree, called the Tree of Peace, was planted in Ivey Park following the Oka crisis in Quebec which saw Mohawk protesters clash with police for more than two months.

Elders of the Oneida Nation of the Thames, and others who traveled to Quebec during the stalemate to act as negotiators in the summer and fall of 1990, want young people to understand the conflict.

“We planted it because it was a symbol of the great law of peace and how we are peaceful people still living by the precepts of peace, power and righteousness,” said Dan Smoke, who, along with his wife Mary Lou, will assist by leading a prayer circle and a sacred fire.

The colored bands on the tree represent the four Colors of Man (red, white, black and yellow), blue for Heavenly Father, green for Mother Earth and purple for the Creator. Some of the tapes were taken by vandals. (Angela McInnes)

The smoke was there, alongside hundreds of others in the London area, when the tree was planted on July 11, 1991. Although the conflict took place hundreds of miles away, it had an impact on the world. time and still today.

Also known as the Kanesatake Resistance, the armed standoff was sparked by the proposed golf course and townhouse expansion at a sacred Mohawk burial site known as the Pines. The land was not officially Kanesatake territory under the Indian Act, but it was considered sacred.

“The reason they stood up to protect the earth was because their ancestors were buried there,” Smoke said. “So there they were, protecting their ancestors.”

On July 11, the police and army were dispatched to dismantle the barricades with tear gas, resulting in gunfire from both sides and the death of an officer.

September 1, 1990: A Mohawk warrior sits in a golf cart and uses binoculars to view Canadian Army armored vehicles on Route 344 on the Kanesatake reserve in Oka, Quebec. (Tom Hanson / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Smoke said that following the shooting, the Oneida Nation sent their own skilled negotiators to advise the Mohawk people to work towards a peaceful disengagement.

“In our belief system as an indigenous people, the evil of one is the evil of all of us,” he said. “So if one of us is hurt and hurt, then we are all hurt and we are all hurt. So we have to stand up to protect him. It is our responsibility.”

For 78 days, the Mohawk people resisted law enforcement with encampments and blockades under Canadian watch. Before social media, the Oka Crisis shed light on the rights of Indigenous peoples.

“It was at this point that we and all kinds of people in Canada became much more aware of Aboriginal issues,” said John Turner.

Turner and his wife, Anita, were present when the white pine was planted in Ivey Park. “I firmly believe that if different cultures understand each other, it’s just a positive thing.”

From left to right: Mary Lou Smoke, Anita Turner and John Turner. All three were there when the Tree of Peace was first planted in Ivey Park on July 11, 1991. (Angela McInnes)

On the day the crisis ended, a soldier stabbed Waneek Horn-Miller, 14, in the chest with a bayonet as she and other protesters left the barriers, nearly killing her.

Smoke said the Tree of Peace was planted as a healing gesture after the Oka Crisis. Some of those who were at the plantation 30 years ago will return on Sunday to speak and honor the tree. There will also be veterans who were present in Kanesatake.

But Smoke said he was also eager to see new generations come to discover its history and meaning.

“I think it is time for us to pass on this knowledge and this wisdom to our young people so that they can benefit from it in a good way, so that they do not have to go through what we have experienced and what my ancestors lived, “he said.

The Tree of Peace is located beside the Fork of the Thames, off York Street, to the west of the London Labor Council sculpture, “The Praying Hands”. The ceremony begins Sunday at 6 p.m.

Mohawk director Tracey Deer’s debut film, Beans (2020), highlights the strength and resilience of Mohawk women. It finally gets its theatrical release on Friday. 5:25


Source link

read more
International headquarters

Global tax review gathers momentum as G20 backs new levies

“For the United States, this will be a fundamental shift in how we choose to compete in the global economy,” Ms. Yellen said. “Not a competition based on the lowest tax rates, but rather on the skills of our workforce, our ability to innovate and our core talents.”

Policymakers continue to question what the world’s minimum tax rate will be and what exactly will be subject to tax.

A separate proposal calls for an additional tax on the largest and most profitable multinational companies, those with profit margins of at least 10%. Officials want to apply this tax to at least 20 percent of profits exceeding that 10 percent margin for these companies, but continue to debate how the proceeds would be distributed among countries around the world. Developing economies are pushing to make sure they get their fair share.

Mr Bradley, of the House, said the details of a final deal would determine how punitive it would be for business. Representatives from Google and Facebook have been in contact with senior Treasury officials as the process unfolds.

U.S. companies are also concerned that they will be at a disadvantage by a 21% tax President Biden has proposed on their overseas profits, if their overseas competitors pay just 15%. The Biden administration also wants to increase the domestic corporate tax rate from 21% to 28%. Democrats in Congress are moving forward with legislation to make these tax code changes this year.

“If an American company is trying to compete globally with a significantly higher tax burden because of this significantly higher minimum tax on its operations, it’s a competitiveness issue to be successful,” said Barbara Angus, manager of global tax policy at Ernst. & Young.

Washington and Europe also remain at odds over how to tax digital giants like Google and Amazon.

At the G20 summit, finance ministers expressed optimism that such obstacles could be overcome. In his closing press conference after the deal was concluded, Daniele Franco, Italy’s finance minister, hailed the deal as historic and called on countries that had not yet joined to reconsider their decision.

“Accepting global rules is difficult for every country. Every country must be ready to make compromises, ”said Mr. Franco. “Having global rules to tax multinationals, to tax big business profits is a major change, is a major achievement.”

Liz Alderman contributed to the Paris report, and Eshe nelson from London.


Source link

read more
History organization

Continuity is the key to success | Business

Like most of us, park administrators have had to rotate in their roles as volunteers for the organization and in their roles as businessmen. Board meetings were spent in person remotely, budgets had to be adjusted and the group had to roll with terms of reference coming and going.

Last month, five directors who served during this tumultuous time were awaiting reappointments and several candidates competed for these positions. Galveston City Council actually re-elected these trustees – Spencer Priest, Will Wright, David Jacoby, Steven Creitz and Jason Worthen. They will join directors Maureen Patton, David Collins, Marty Fluke and Jason Hardcastle.

The list of officers also remains the same. Priest is president, Wright is vice president, and Jacoby will serve another term as secretary. This continuity of leadership, especially as the organization emerges from a pandemic, will help make the park’s board of directors a more effective organization.

The council’s work did not stop during the pandemic. In fact, the administrators and staff of the park’s board of directors have been successful in developing long-term strategic and sustainability plans and securing funding for major improvements and projects, to name a few. .

Now that it looks like Galveston and the rest of the country are heading towards a next normal and the tourism industry is experiencing a strong rebound, the park council has a lot of work to do. The administrators in place can move forward with the institutional knowledge necessary to make prudent decisions with the residents and visitors of the island in mind.

At a recent meeting to formally appoint directors and elect officers, Patton stressed that continuity of leadership on the board is an important trait.

“This group knows the history and has the experience and understanding of what the organization has done and plans to do,” said Patton. “It is important to keep the leaders in place on local boards and committees. I also see it at the national level.

At last month’s city council meeting to nominate trustees, Galveston Mayor Craig Brown praised Priest for his hard work and dedication to the organization, especially during the pandemic.

“I know Spencer has a demanding schedule in the hospitality industry,” Brown said. “As a former administrator myself, I know how much time spends on the park board, and I commend Spencer for his dedication. “

Meetings of the park board are usually held at 1:30 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of the month at 601 23rd St. in Galveston.

Mary beth bassett is the director of public relations for the Galveston Island Convention and Visitors Bureau and the park board of directors.


Source link

read more
Canadian army

Chris Dare, dental student at the University of Toronto, climbed the “Seven Summits” in his spare time

What do climbing the world’s tallest mountains and practicing dentistry have in common? Interrogate Chris Dare, a graduate student in periodontology from the University of Toronto who has climbed the “Seven Summits” – the highest peaks on each of the seven continents.

A third-year master’s candidate, Dare says the parallel between mountaineering and dental school is that you can accomplish anything if you can dream it and work hard.

“A lot of people think things are too hard and give up too soon,” says Dare. “I’m not superhuman – I’m just a hard worker. If you really want something, you have to put everything you have in it – any time of the day. I believe anyone can do this.

Dare, who grew up in Victoria, didn’t always envision a career in dentistry. He attended the Royal Military College of Canada from 2001 to 2005 and served as an Army Communications Officer for five years, including a 10-month deployment to Afghanistan.

In 2009, his mother came to visit him while on assignment in Quebec.

Chris Dare at Mount Everest Camp 3 (Photo courtesy of Chris Dare)

“My mom complained about missing a few teeth and the discomfort it was causing her,” Dare says. “She had tried dentures and other options. She wanted implants, but they were too expensive.

“As she told me about these issues, I realized I couldn’t help her. From that moment on, I decided that I wanted to be able to help her and others by becoming a dentist myself.

Dare, who was also studying for a Masters of Commerce at the time, changed course and began the Doctor of Dentistry program at the University of British Columbia. After graduating, Dare worked in the Canadian Armed Forces as a dentist, then began his Masters in Periodontology at the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Toronto in 2019.

Between his studies, Dare did something that only a few hundred people in the world accomplished: climb the Seven Summits.

He says his passion for mountaineering flared up during his time in Afghanistan. After working for weeks around the clock, Dare took a two-week break that he used to travel. He had heard of Mount Kilimanjaro and decided that it would be a great adventure and a challenge with his best friend. After conquering his first mountain, he became hooked.

“When I returned to Afghanistan, I thought about all the things I had accomplished and how amazing it is to test the limits of the human body,” says Dare. “You can push yourself and feel like you have nothing more to give, and then you can get some more out of it. “

Chris Dare working on the MV Asterix, a naval supply ship (photo courtesy of Chris Dare)

Dare says his time spent in both mountaineering and dentistry has been extremely rewarding. Each experience taught her the importance of good communication, compassion and the need to help others.

“In dentistry, it is essential to have strong communication with colleagues and patients, and to be compassionate to help understand where patients are coming from,” says Dare. “It’s the same with mountaineering – you need compassion to see yourself in another person going through something extremely difficult. In any situation, the most rewarding feeling is being able to help another person, be it a patient or a friend.

Dare says his ability to balance his studies with an adventurous lifestyle stems from his belief in saving time and using every extra ounce of the day. He notes that this sometimes comes at the expense of sleep, which has helped him prepare for another challenge: becoming a new dad.

Which of his activities does he find the most difficult?

“A new baby, because you can’t prepare for it no matter how badly you want it.” Dentistry and mountaineering are for me, but with a baby it’s a different person and a whole different ball game. No matter how tired you are, you have a baby and a partner to take care of.


Source link

read more
International headquarters

A global tax deal will be finalized very soon, according to the German finmin

LONDON – A deal on global tax reform will be finalized “very soon,” German Finance Minister Olaf Scholz told CNBC on Friday, adding that he hoped the changes could take effect by 2023.

“We are now really on the road [to a deal]”Scholz told CNBC’s Annette Weisbach.” We will come to an agreement here at the G-20 when all 20 nations agree on the same idea of ​​having international global minimum taxation. “

“It will be a process that will end very soon,” he added.

Taxation is in the spotlight this weekend as finance ministers and central bankers from the world’s 20 most advanced economies meet in Venice, Italy. Their goal is to strike a deal that will force the world’s largest multinationals to pay more taxes.

It comes after 130 countries and jurisdictions agreed last week to sign a global proposal for a minimum corporate tax rate that the G-7 introduced in June.

Under the deal, multinationals could be forced to pay a minimum tax rate of 15% wherever they operate, rather than paying the majority of duties only in the countries where they are headquartered. This has allowed giant companies to shift their profits to countries with very low tax rates or with other accounting incentives.

The change in the US administration was a major step forward in this area and I am really convinced that we will have the agreement that we need to reach at this stage here in Venice “, said Nadia Calvino, Spanish Minister of the Economy on Friday.

President Joe Biden’s administration has been pushing for a global tax deal since taking office. Taxation is seen as a way to find new financing to cope with the economic shock of the coronavirus pandemic, while also fighting against inequalities.

Wopke Hoekstra, the Dutch finance minister, also told CNBC he was “optimistic” about a deal this weekend.

“What I’m hearing from my colleagues is that everyone is actually pretty positive about this, so in all likelihood we can make some further progress,” he said.

Opposition to the agreement

However, a handful of countries are still skeptical of the deal, including Ireland and Hungary, and it’s also unclear whether Biden will be able to persuade a divided Congress on the deal’s merits.

When asked what would be offered to Ireland and Hungary to convince them to sign a deal, Germany’s Scholz said he was confident the talks would be successful. However, he did not provide any specific details.

Ireland is known to offer a low corporate tax rate of 12.5% ​​and the recent global tax deal potentially calls that into question. Hungary is in a similar situation with a corporate tax rate of 9%.

Speaking to CNBC in June, Irish Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe said he wanted to find a “compromise” with international partners.

Another open issue is the European Commission’s plan to introduce a digital tax in the near future.

When the G-7 agreed on a global corporate tax rate last month, it was also decided that taxes on digital services would end to avoid double taxation. The EU’s executive branch – which has vowed to find new sources of revenue to pay off debt incurred during the Covid crisis – is due to present a proposal for a new EU-wide digital tax.

The commission said it would be complementary to a global corporate tax rate, but the US fears the EU plans will derail progress.

Speaking to CNBC earlier this week, French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said: “I think there is a need to explain [to] the US administration which is behind a digital tax “, adding that it” has nothing to do with the taxation of digital giants “.

– CNBC Sam meredith contributed to this report.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

COVID demonstrated the immense value of higher education communities (opinion)

When I first started quarantining, well over a year ago, I felt like I had been bowled over in a modernized Danteen hellish landscape. Not one of the deepest circles, where you’re frozen in ice and someone gnaws at your head. Just one of the upper benevolent spheres, where you wander aimlessly between your desk and the refrigerator, endlessly refreshing the New York Times home page. As usual, but on top of that.

What I felt was the strange lived experience of reverse: this literary device – famous employee in Dante Hell – where the suffering of a sinner imitates the nature of his sin. Let the punishment match the crime.

Before COVID-19 hit, modern life had already left us atomized, uprooted, addicted to our smartphones. Over the past year, that life has ironically intensified: we have spent our days locked in our one-bedroom apartments, every human connection mediated by a screen, torn from our communities.

The college classroom was no exception. Just weeks after the start of the pandemic, higher education Jeremias were already prophesying a world in which a Brady Bunch of jerky, pixelated faces would become a permanent educational standard. But despite the tribulations of the past year, I came away reassured that liberal residential education never be completely supplanted by e-learning. Screens simply cannot offer what students are looking for: the chance to live and learn with their peers in tight-knit educational communities.

I have made a career of co-creating educational communities, first at Deep Springs College, then with my own nonprofit, Tidelines Institute (formerly the Arete Project), which runs similar shorter duration programs. By tearing apart such communities, COVID-19 has highlighted their immense value. The pandemic, it seems, will pass. As we begin to think about the fall semester, now It’s time to reinvent and reinvigorate educational communities when the doors of the academy finally reopen.

What is an educational community? Part of it is a social community, as it can happen in a dormitory or a sports team. But it is also an intellectual community, with a dynamic life outside the classroom. The educational community opens up from the classroom to personal relationships, extracurricular, work, meals: lived together and oriented towards learning.

The educational community is the best thing a residential college has to offer. The two together prove that education is not just about mastery of content, but the growth of the human being as a whole. Although I am happy to remember a few things about The Divine Comedy, the truth is, I forgot a lot of material from my undergraduate years. It’s not that the content wasn’t important. It is because he played the role of second violin in the vibrant world of inquiry, debate, experimentation and social relations that have gathered around him. In college, I shared this world with a small group of peers and professors. The academic content provided a substrate and sustenance, but it was within the community that my education took place. This is where I grew up.

This is what so many young people are looking for in their college experience. That’s why every college tour guide speaks convincingly about these ramblings all night long about the meaning of life they enjoy with their roommate. This is why a former student of an intensive humanities program advised incoming students to forgo the 1 p.m. class: so that the cohort discussions started in class can continue over lunch and early after. midday.

And that is precisely what online education will never supplant. Administrators charting a post-pandemic path for their institutions would do well to consider both the scientific evidence and the financial prognosis in favor of educational communities. Substantial research links tight-knit cohorts to a range of positive learning outcomes, including literacy and critical thinking gains, improved performance in STEM courses, and perseverance in college. Online education, on the other hand, can often be associated with higher attrition rate, larger success gaps and widespread student dissatisfaction. And for numbers lovers, while the price of online education can have immediate financial appeal, alumni donations are dismal among online education beneficiaries. Alumni donate to places where they have created memories, formed friendships, and made the transition to adulthood with their peers. (Deep Springs, for example, has an enviable alumni donation rate of almost 50 percent.)

It is true that Deep Springs and Tidelines Institute are outliers, striving to bring the educational community to its most vital embodiment. We did this by creating small islands where a small number of inhabitants – students, staff and faculty – participate equally in shared work and a shared world. While not completely abjuring hierarchy or division of labor, any member of the community can chair a hiring committee or swing a hammer, analyze Hegel, analyze data, or lead a camping trip.

These two institutions exist outside of the “normal” academy, but they offer courses that can be adapted for traditional colleges. Indeed, many institutions already offer educational communities of one kind or another. For those who don’t – or want to create more – here are some general precepts.

  • Cohorts are essential. Educational communities must be porous but made up of a dense network of relationships. It must be possible for individuals to really know each other. Six could be a minimum size, while 50 could be a maximum.
  • Students must share a lasting intellectual experience. The content itself can vary widely but should include at least one ongoing course, ideally for a minimum of a year. Directed studies at Yale University is one example.
  • Experiential opportunities work wonders. They strengthen relationships with students, forge community identity, and help students integrate theory and practice. Wild nature and civilization at the University of Montana effectively coupled substantive courses and outdoor exploration.
  • Diversity is a necessity. Educational communities are at serious risk: that students may self-select from groups of peers who look alike, think and act alike. But peer learning is crucial in such communities, which means students have to come with different backgrounds and beliefs.
  • … but not always. Some students thrive in communities where they share common stories with their peers. This is especially true for students from marginalized backgrounds, for whom a strong community can be a deciding factor in college perseverance. the ScHOLA²RS House at the University of Connecticut offers one of many excellent models.
  • The shared meals are excellent. The shared living space is even better.

Educational communities do not need to be totalizing; after all, it’s not The secret story. They can include French majors and physics majors, football stars, climate change activists and classical pianists. They can manifest in the form of formal programs like those mentioned above or, more simply, they can occur spontaneously.

I know how great it is to create a new program. Faculty members without this bandwidth can still cultivate educational communities. They can encourage seminars to adjourn directly to lunch or coffee where conversations can continue informally. They may advise students to set up directed readings with a handful of their peers. They can connect students with similar interests. And, where formal programs exist, they can point students in the right direction.

The pandemic has shown us how precious and necessary educational communities are. Nowhere else in modern life do we have the spaces and structures that can support such communities, and believe me, I watched. They are the product and the pride of residential colleges alone. When we finally get out of this mundane hell, let’s be ready to help them thrive.

read more
History organization

Criminally indicted Trump CFO steps down as director of Trump Organization golf club

A week after being hit with more than a dozen criminal charges and the prospect of more than a decade in prison, Allen Weisselberg, longtime chief financial officer of the Trump Organization, stepped down as chief executive of Donald trumpfrom the Scottish Golf Club. In a thursday deposit, the company mentionned that Weisselberg was no longer “a person with significant control” over Trump International Golf Club Scotland, which, according to Bloomberg, is “the first sign that Trump’s longtime CFO has stepped down after being indicted alongside the Trump Organization, “both of whom pleaded not guilty to the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office indictment of 15 counts Cyrus Vance Jr., which detailed how Weisselberg and his employer allegedly avoided taxes on benefits worth $ 1.76 million, including an apartment, cars and tuition at a private school.

At the moment, it’s unclear what Weisselberg’s resignation means in terms of Trump’s chances of not getting out of prison. Is the company trying to distance itself from Weisselberg and set the stage to claim that he acted alone? In view of Trump long the story to pretend not to know people who could get him in serious trouble, it is quite possible! Is Weisselberg preparing to retire from the company and denounce his former boss? This could obviously also be the case. The news might also have nothing to do with the recent charges against Weisselberg and the company, although it seems somewhat unlikely.

Either way, if Trump is generally not concerned at the moment, he certainly should be. Prosecutors have been working for months to tip Weisselberg, and although he has so far remained loyal to the ex-president, there is no such thing as the possibility of many years in prison to bring a person to rethink his situation. As a former federal prosecutor Cynthia alksne Told MSNBC earlier this week, “The jury will hate [Weisselberg]. It’s not going to have a jury of people going to MAGA rallies, it’s going to have a cross section of people who live in Manhattan, who pay taxes in Manhattan, who don’t get free Mercedes, who don’t have anyone else. ‘other to pay for their children’s education and not have tax consequences for it. So I think he’s going to be a much hated defendant, Mr. Weisselberg, and I’m sure his lawyers have told him that. The former US prosecutor also weighed on the financial director’s situation. Preet Bharara, who tweeted, “I am optimistic that he will be doomed. The law is pretty clear on what is income and what is taxable. It is a sophisticated setting; the error is implausible. The company recorded much of it as income. And juries hate wealthy tax evaders.

All of this leaves Trump in a worrisome situation if there is any fear of spending his twilight years behind bars. After the indictment was unveiled, Bloomberg noted that Weisselberg’s cooperation “could lead to a broader case against the company and raise the prospect of a historic and politically charged prosecution of a former president.” With a trial unlikely before next year, the CFO will have months to decide whether to fight the charges or plead guilty and possibly strike a deal with prosecutors. A Trump executive for four decades, Weisselberg has a unique insight into the former president’s finances and trade deals.

In other words, he knows where all the bodies are buried (and has basically pointed this out in the past, describing himself as Trump’s “eyes and ears” in the business). Like her ex-daughter-in-law Jennifer Weisselberg, who reportedly handed over numerous boxes of financial documents to prosecutors this spring, said in April: “Trump doesn’t care about Allen, but Allen knows all the bad things he’s done.” And while Weisselberg remains loyal, some people think the government will still have a case against Trump:

Michael Avenatti will have plenty of time to think about what he’s been up to

The old one Stormy Daniels lawyer who once considered running for president before being arrested and charged with attempting to extort more than $ 20 million from Nike Inc., and separately accused of embezzling a customer’s money and defrauding a bank, was sentenced to 30 months in prison. Through the the Wall Street newspaper:

Avenatti, 50, was sentenced after a jury trial in February 2020 on the three counts he faced: extortion, transmission of interstate communications with intent to extortion and wire fraud. The case arose out of Mr Avenatti’s threats to expose alleged corruption in Nike’s elite basketball program, unless the clothing giant pays him to conduct an internal investigation. Before pronouncing the sentence, the United States District Judge Paul Gardephe called Mr Avenatti’s conduct outrageous and said he was acting as though the laws that apply to everyone do not apply to him. “Mr. Avenatti had gotten intoxicated with the power of his platform,” Justice Gardephe said in a Manhattan federal courtroom.

Thursday’s conviction only crowns one of Mr. Avenatti’s legal battles. He also faces a litany of tax and banking burdens in California with a lawsuit scheduled to begin next week in federal court in Santa Ana, California. A trial in New York is scheduled to begin next year on federal charges that he embezzled Ms. Daniels’ money. Mr. Avenatti pleaded not guilty to the charges and denied any wrongdoing.



Source link

read more
Canadian army

DVIDS – News – Sea Breeze Sailor Profile: Meet Lieutenant-Commander Elizabeth Eldridge of the Royal Canadian Navy

Lieutenant-Commander Elizabeth Eldridge of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) is honored and proud to share her experiences as a Naval Logistics Officer during her deployment as a mentoring staff officer for Exercise SEA BREEZE 21 in Odessa, Ukraine, June 28 – July 10, 2021 SEA BREEZE is an annual multinational exercise co-hosted by the United States Navy (USN) and Ukrainian Navy (UN) with support from the Partnership for the NATO peace, and this year’s Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) participation is part of Operation UNIFIER, the CAF’s military training and capacity building mission in Ukraine.

“As the Navy Logistics Officer, we are responsible for all logistical requirements on board the ship, from administration to finance, food, transport, supply, movement of sailors. and equipment to and from the ship, all types of port services and hospitality, to name a few, ”said LCdr Eldridge. “So we really manage the whole range of logistical support activities that allow the ship’s crew to accomplish our mission,” she noted.

Coming from a military family, LCdr Eldridge had the privilege of living in Ottawa and Halifax. Although she comes from a family spanning several generations of military service, she said, surprisingly, that was not her primary motivation for becoming a sailor. “I wanted to join because I wanted to do everything,” she said. “I first joined the Canadian Army Reserve as a clerk when I was in high school just to get a taste of it and since I’ve always wanted to be a Naval Logistics Officer, I decided to go this route when I pursued my undergraduate studies. at the Royal Military College (RMC), ”she added.

LCdr Eldridge says the most appealing part about going to RMC is that you can pursue a variety of interests and hobbies in addition to earning your degree. “Unlike other universities where students may only have the opportunity to pursue or become interested in a new interest, at RMC you are encouraged and supported to do it all – you have to show leadership. , you have to play sports, you have to do extracurricular activities, you have to do a second language – and for me that was the biggest draw. So the inspiration to join was not really on the family side, but more because of the vast opportunities offered by the military, where you can have the space, time and resources to do so, ”he said. she declared.

A proud Naval Logistics Officer, she said the most rewarding part of being a Logistician is the fact that you can make a difference every day, and you see the immediate results of what you do to support the mission.

“Whether it’s processing a travel expense claim or organizing a hospitality event during a port stopover to represent Canada abroad, you know you always have an impact. positive, ”she said.

A seasoned sailor proudly wearing the gunmetal Maritime Service Badge (SSI), he has been deployed several times in Canada and abroad. Some of its national deployments include Operation NANOOK and Operation NUNALIVUT in the Arctic. Abroad, she participated in RIMPAC in Hawaii and was deployed aboard Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Charlottetown as part of Operation REASSURANCE ROTO 5 in Europe.

During exercise SEA BREEZE 21, LCdr Eldridge is part of the CAF mentoring team. “As a naval logistics mentor in this exercise, I advise and guide Ukrainian naval logisticians on logistics planning and the importance of looking at logistics from an operational perspective,” she said. “My goal is to provide options and other perspectives in handling logistical issues related to operations. It’s about sharing our best practices and giving advice they can take into account in their problem-solving process.

Asked about her advice to aspiring sailors and those considering joining the RCN, “Logistics is cool! Never discredit the importance of logistics and the importance of the support professions that work for operations – to join the Navy as a supporter you can see and experience so much, while making a tangible difference, ”he said. she declared.

Date taken: 07.08.2021
Date posted: 07.08.2021 11:23
Story ID: 400531
Location: ODESA, UA

Web Views: 1
Downloads: 0

PUBLIC DOMAIN


Source link

read more
International headquarters

Bach from the IOC arrives in Tokyo; greeted by state of emergency

TOKYO (AP) – IOC President Thomas Bach arrived in Tokyo on Thursday to find Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihde Suga on the verge of declaring a state of emergency, which is expected to result in a ban on fans at the Olympic Games from Tokyo as coronavirus infections spread in the capital.

Bach largely avoided the cameras at Tokyo’s Haneda Airport and, on a rainy afternoon, made his way to the Games headquarters of the International Olympic Committee in Tokyo, a five-star hotel in the center of the city. He would need to self-isolate for three days.

Bach’s arrival comes just two weeks before the opening of the postponed Tokyo Olympics. The IOC and local organizers are trying to hold the games during a pandemic despite opposition from the public and the Japanese medical community.

In a meeting with medical experts Thursday, government officials proposed a plan to declare a state of emergency in Tokyo from next Monday to August 22. The Olympics are scheduled to start on July 23 and end on August 8.

The main focus of the emergency is a request to close bars, restaurants and karaoke lounges serving alcohol. Banning the serving of alcohol is a key step in easing the Olympic festivities and preventing people from drinking and partying. Tokyo residents are expected to face stay-at-home requests and watch the Games on TV from their homes.

“How to prevent people enjoying the Olympics from going out for drinks is a major problem,” said Health Minister Norihisa Tamura.

The current state of emergency ends on Sunday. Tokyo reported 920 new cases on Wednesday, up from 714 a week earlier. It was the 18th consecutive day of week-over-week increase and the highest total since 1,010 reported on May 13.

Fans from overseas were banned from attending the Olympics months ago. But just two weeks ago, the organizers and the IOC decided to allow the venues to be filled to 50% of their capacity but that the crowds not exceed 10,000 people. The state of emergency will force them to change their plans again, a decision likely to come later Thursday.

The surge in cases likely means the sites will be fanless, although sponsors and others can access them. The fanless atmosphere could include the opening ceremony at the $ 1.4 billion National Stadium.

The rise in infections has also forced the Tokyo city government to remove the Olympic Torch Relay from the streets of the capital, allowing it to operate only on remote islands off the Tokyo coast. It is not known how the torch will enter the stadium for the opening ceremony.

“The infections are in their phase of expansion and everyone in this country needs to firmly understand the severity,” Dr Shigeru Omi, one of the government’s top medical advisers, told reporters.

He urged authorities to take strict action quickly ahead of the Olympics, as the summer vacation approaches.

Omi has repeatedly called for a fan ban and said it was “abnormal” to hold the Olympics during a pandemic.

Separately, a government advisory group on COVID-19 met on Wednesday and expressed concerns about the continued resurgence of infections.

“Two-thirds of infections in the capital region come from Tokyo, and our concern is the spread of infections to neighboring areas,” said Ryuji Wakita, director general of the National Institute of Infectious Diseases.

The Olympics are pushing forward against most medical advice, in part because the postponement has blocked IOC revenue streams. It derives nearly 75% of its revenue from the sale of broadcast rights, and estimates suggest it would lose between $ 3 billion and $ 4 billion if the Olympics were canceled.

About 11,000 Olympians and 4,400 Paralympians are expected to enter Japan, along with tens of thousands of officials, judges, administrators, sponsors, broadcasters and media. The IOC says more than 80% of residents of the Olympic Village will be vaccinated.

Nationally, Japan has recorded about 810,000 cases and nearly 14,900 deaths. Only 15% of Japanese are fully vaccinated, which remains low compared to 47.4% in the United States and nearly 50% in Britain.

___

More AP: https://apnews.com/hub/olympic-games and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports



Source link

read more
Non profit living

Elderly residents will be relocated as Eventide plans to sell historic Moorhead building

Eventide Senior Living Communities announced on Wednesday, July 7 that the Fairmont store located at 801 2nd Ave. N. will close its doors. The nonprofit intended to vacate the building as part of its long-term plan, but a pipe leak that caused extensive water damage has accelerated that timeline.

“We had known for some time that the Eventide Fairmont building would ultimately not allow us to meet the needs of our residents,” Eventide President and CEO Jon Riewer said in a statement. “With the recent water damage, we have had to carefully consider the future of the Fairmont and how it aligns with our mission to better serve seniors. “

Eventide purchased the Fairmont building in 1994, said Carrie Carney, spokesperson for Eventide. It was previously the Fairmont Creamery Company, which closed in 1980. The building opened in 1924 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

It’s unclear what the next step is for the building, but Eventide said it will work to sell the Fairmont building to a local developer with experience in preserving historic buildings.

Newsletter subscription for email alerts

“We are grateful for the time we have spent at Eventide Fairmont and the fact that it has enabled us to serve many residents over the years and are confident that the new owner will take a special interest in the next chapter of the building. Fairmont Creamery, ”said Riewer. “The sale of the Fairmont allows our organization to focus on further growth and investment on our Eighth Street campus in Moorhead, which will best serve the seniors in our community today and in the future.

Eventide determined that it could not reconfigure the building’s layout to meet residential needs, particularly in the eastern addition. Other reasons for shutting down the facility include the lack of a commercial kitchen, limited areas that could be used for common areas, and a lack of amenities. Most apartments do not have kitchens and Eventide cannot renovate the building to meet regulations required by Minnesota law, the organization said.

“The investment required to make these changes goes far beyond what makes financial or programmatic sense,” Riewer said. “The needs and wants of today’s seniors continue to evolve and it is our responsibility to meet them.

Eventide plans to move the 53 residents of the Fairmont out of the building over the next 90 days. The organization has said it will not close the facility or transfer ownership of the location until all residents have new homes.

Some will be able to move to Eventide’s Linden Apartments in Moorhead, and the organization is working with other senior communities to find housing for residents, Carney said.

The 17 memory care residents will be moving to the Linden Apartments, which recently opened a memory care addition there, Carney said.

Staff will be permitted to work at other Eventide locations in the Fargo-Moorhead area. No deadline for leaving the building has been set, Carney said.

In addition to its Moorhead locations, Eventide has facilities in North Dakota at Fargo, West Fargo, Jamestown and Devils Lake.

read more
History organization

Nunes, CHS graduate, ends softball career at Concordia

“It’s a fitting way to end a remarkable career,” said Rosenthal. “She’s going off as one of the greatest in CUI softball history and this list is tough to make. I am proud of her for everything she has done and who she is. I will miss her on this pitch, but I’m so grateful that she chose to be an eagle.

Nunes was 77-15 at the pitcher with a 1.21 earned-run average, 717 strikeouts, 54 full games, 26 shutouts, six no-hitting and 11 saves during his four-year career at the l ‘Concordia University.

She ranks in the top 10 in more than 20 different categories in the Eagles’ record books.

Nunes set program records for career strikeouts (717) and career saves (11). Nunes is the only player in team history with over 700 career strikeouts.

She ranks second in career wins, shutouts and no-strike, and is tied for third with former teammate Grayson Harvey for most complete games (54).

Nunes has been named PacWest Pitcher of the Week 12 times, the second-highest total for a pitcher in conference history.

She won the NFCA Freshman of the Year and D2CCA West Region Pitcher of the Year awards in 2018.

Nunes led all of the NCAA Division II pitchers with 33 wins in the Eagles’ historic 2019 season, when Concordia University achieved its first-ever No.1 ranking in the D2 era. She totaled 266 strikeouts, posted a 1.34 ERA and threw four hits.

Nunes was an annual NFCA All-America varsity athlete and an All-PacWest academic laureate.

“We’ve been fortunate to have great teams every year, to have great pitchers, great shots all around,” Nunes said.

Nunes played three seasons of varsity softball at Ceres High.

She helped propel the Bulldogs to the Sac-Joaquin Section Division-III crown during her junior year in 2016, ending a 21-year drought between titles.

Nunes and third-seeded Ceres High were 5-1 in the playoffs.

She’s gone 20-3 with a 1.14 ERA, 239 strikeouts, two no hitting and 10 shutouts this year.

Nunes was 20-3 with a 0.52 ERA, 291 strikeouts, one hit and 11 shutouts in his last season with the Bulldogs.

She placed fourth in the state in strikeouts.

Ceres High qualified for the playoffs for the sixth consecutive year and won their fourth consecutive Western Athletic Conference championship.

Nunes won the WAC Pitcher of the Year award for the second time.

She was selected to the Cal-Hi Sports All-State Middle Schools First Team.

Nunes was 51-13 in his career with 686 strikeouts, four without a strike and 26 shutouts.


Source link

read more
Canadian army

Ministers of Veterans Affairs and National Defense mark 10th anniversary of end of Canada’s combat mission

Canada has joined the International Security Assistance Force led by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and authorized by the United Nations. Canada has provided nearly $ 3.7 billion in international assistance since 2001 and continues to support security, development and humanitarian efforts in Afghanistan. Canada remains committed to upholding the security, development and human rights gains of the past two decades, in particular the rights of women and girls.

The combat phase of Canada’s mission ended in July 2011, when it shifted to a training mission focused on curriculum design and the development of instructional skills in military and military training institutions. Afghan police officers. The Canadian Armed Forces would continue these efforts until the end of our military mission in Afghanistan in March 2014.

More than 40,000 Canadians have served in the theater of operations in Afghanistan. Canada’s first contributions came from the deployment of warships to the waters off Southwest Asia in October 2001, followed by elements of Joint Task Force 2 and the Canadian Army, which moved in. deployed to Afghanistan in December to support efforts to overthrow the Taliban regime and al-Qaeda. Additional Canadian troops would soon be sent to Kandahar province in January 2002.

From 2003 to 2005, Canadians were primarily stationed in Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan, before returning to the more volatile Kandahar region. From 2005 to 2011, the Canadian Armed Forces assumed command of international efforts to secure Kandahar Province, working with civilian colleagues to help restore stability to the Southern Province of Afghanistan while supporting major efforts. humanitarian and nation-building organizations throughout Afghanistan. In Kandahar, Canadians engaged in heavy fighting, most notably during Operation Medusa in September 2006, which was launched to oust the Taliban from Panjwai District. With the participation of over 1,000 Canadians, it was Canada’s largest combat operation in over 50 years.

A total of 158 members of the Canadian Armed Forces died in Canadian service in Afghanistan, along with seven Canadian civilians, including a diplomat, four aid workers, a government contractor and a journalist. Thousands more returned with physical and psychological injuries.

Canadians recently had the opportunity to view and share their thoughts on the five proposed designs for the National Monument to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan. When completed, this new monument in Ottawa will recognize the commitment and sacrifice of those who served and the support they received from home.

This 10e anniversary of the end of the combat mission is an opportunity to reiterate our gratitude for the efforts that Canadians have made to bring greater stability to Afghanistan and to strengthen peace and security in the world.

Quote

“For nearly a decade, Canada’s combat mission in Afghanistan was the longest in our military history, and we all have a duty to remember the bravery displayed by all Canadians who served there,” both military and civilian. Today we pay tribute to the 165 Canadians killed in Afghanistan and thank the more than 40,000 people who answered the call to serve for peace and security in Afghanistan.

The Honorable Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defense

“This month we remember the courage and resilience of the members of the Canadian Armed Forces deployed in Afghanistan. We honor those who paid the ultimate price during and after the mission. And we are thinking of all who have borne the physical and mental wounds of the battle to this day. On this tenth anniversary of the end of Canada’s combat mission in Afghanistan, we are reminded of the real costs of war and the price of freedom. We are grateful today and every day for the selflessness and bravery of the Canadian military.

The Honorable Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National Defense


Source link

read more
International headquarters

In recognition of his remarkable efforts to promote friendship between peoples and his influential fight against hatred

Muslim World League leader Dr Mohammad Al-Issa receives honorary doctorate from UN – SPA

From the United Nations Headquarters based in Geneva and in the presence of its Deputy Secretary General, Academic Honor for Dr. Al-Issa of UPEACE

UN Under-Secretary-General: Dr Al-Issa is widely regarded as a leading international figure representing religious and intellectual moderation

President of UPEACE: Dr. Al-Issa is globally respected for his commitment to educate the whole world on true religious values

Dr Al-Issa:

This UN honor means a lot and stimulates more work in the service of peace

UPEACE has made remarkable global contributions to world peace … and bases its programs on shared human values

Geneva – MWL

The United Nations, through its University for Peace, awarded an honorary degree to His Excellency the Secretary General of the World Muslim League, Sheikh Dr. Muhammad bin Abdulkarim Al-Issa, at a major celebration held at its headquarters in Geneva, in the presence of the Deputy Secretary General of the United Nations and President of the International Civil Service Commission, Mr. Larbi Djacta, and several European religious, intellectual, political and parliamentary leaders . The justifications were that this international academic honor for Dr Al-Issa through UPEACE came in recognition of his remarkable efforts to support international diplomacy, promote friendship and cooperation among peoples, and his influential struggle against hatred.

ش

His Excellency Sheikh Al-Issa delivered a speech in which he expressed his thanks and appreciation for this honor which stimulates more work in the service of peace, as it comes from a prestigious university which has made remarkable global contributions to the service of world peace, in addition to this, it was established in accordance with an international treaty specifically for this noble purpose.

Dr Al-Issa praised the university’s great role in the service of peace, benefiting from its international weight.

For his part, the Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations, Mr. Larbi Djacta, delivered a speech in which he welcomed the wide recognition of His Excellency Dr. Al-Issa as a leading international figure representing religious moderation and intellectual, continuing to work hard to get the message of moderate Islam and peaceful coexistence all over the world, and to make efforts to educate Muslim minorities.

Mr. Djacta added: “Dr. Al-Issa is a unique figure who led the largest Muslim delegation to visit the Nazi concentration camp in Germany.

In turn, Dr. Francisco Rojas, Rector of UPEACE, stressed that the awarding of an honorary degree to Dr. Mohammad Al-Issa comes in recognition of his individual contributions and his humanitarian efforts in the field of peace. , conflict resolution and the promotion of harmony.

He pointed out that UPEACE, since its inception, has awarded this honorary degree to a group of eminent personalities, including five former heads of state and others of different nationalities and faiths.

He added: “UPEACE is honored to bestow an honorary degree on Dr Mohammad Al-Issa, who is widely recognized as the global voice of religious moderation, and for his commitment to educate the entire world on the religious values ​​represented in compassion, understanding and cooperation among humanity. Dr Mohammad Al-Issa has played a pioneering role in creating partnerships between societies, religions and nations.

شش

It should be noted that UPEACE enjoys international prestige. It was established by treaty to the United Nations General Assembly in 1980, with a main campus in Costa Rica and offices in Rome, Addis Ababa, New York, Geneva, The Hague, Manila, Beijing and other. Its main mission is to serve humanity with a prestigious international higher education institution, with the aim of promoting the spirit of understanding, tolerance and peaceful coexistence among humanity, and working to remove obstacles on the way. path to world peace in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations. It provides unique international contributions to studies on peace and conflict, dispute resolution, international law, human rights, environmental protection and security. Masters and doctorates in these programs are awarded to practitioners and policy makers who constitute the target group. In addition, it has a worldwide mandate to issue scientific degrees recognized by all member countries of the General Assembly, and is chaired in an honorary capacity by the Secretary-General of the United Nations.


Source link

read more
History organization

Why Kaseya ransomware attack worries experts

The frenzy of a cybercriminal gang over the weekend of July 4 ended up infecting more than 1,500 organizations worldwide with ransomware, according to cybersecurity firm Huntress. But it’s not the number of victims that keeps experts from sleeping at night.

The gang used a level of planning and sophistication closer to high-level, government-backed hackers, rather than a simple criminal operation, they say.

The hackers behind the madness, the Russian-speaking ransomware gang REvil, have adopted two new tactics previously not used by ransomware gangs that continually hack targets around the world, but particularly in the United States. Most concerning is that they even deployed a zero day, a cybersecurity term for a vulnerability in a program that software developers are unaware of and therefore have not had time to fix.

And they didn’t target a single victim, but rather a company with a small but key role in the internet ecosystem. This gave them access to potentially tens or hundreds of thousands of victims.

“What we are seeing here are the tactics of more sophisticated adversaries, like nation states, that trickle down to these less sophisticated and more financially motivated criminal ransomware groups,” said Jack Cable, researcher at the Krebs Stamos Group. , a cybersecurity consulting firm. .

REvil, possibly best known for hacking JBS, one of the world’s largest international meat vendors, has been active since at least early 2019. Like a number of other Russian-speaking ransomware gangs, REvil has made its fortune in recent years. by hacking into individual organizations. , locking down their computers, stealing their files, and demanding payment to fix things and not disclose what they stole.

REvil has previously tried to deploy its ransomware through a so-called supply chain attack, which exploits the way internet services are interconnected. In 2019, the group succeeded pirate TSM Consulting Services, a small managed service provider in Texas that manages web services for organizations that don’t want to do it themselves. Soon 22 of the company’s customers, all from cities in Texas, were infected with the REvil ransomware. The state and federal government jumped at the deal, however, and cities were finally able to get back online without paying the ransom.

Over the weekend, however, REvil took this kind of supply chain hacking to the next level. Instead of hacking a single organization, or even a single managed service provider, they hacked into Kaseya, a company that specializes in managing software updates for hundreds of different vendors. This gave them access to a significant body of victims, potentially larger than any known criminal hack in history, according to three cybersecurity experts who spoke to NBC News.

So far, it appears that REvil has not had a major impact on American life, although it has crippled several small American businesses, caused a large Swedish grocery store to close for more than 24 hours and infected 11 schools in New Zealand. But that could be a dodged bullet, as cybersecurity experts find supply chain hacks particularly worrisome, as they can quickly give hackers incredibly wide access.

The United States discovered in late 2020 that Russian intelligence agency SVR had hacked into U.S. company SolarWinds, potentially exposing some 18,000 client organizations to elite hackers from a foreign intelligence agency. It was quickly seen as one of the biggest supply chain hacks in history. Even after it became clear that the number of confirmed casualties was likely much lower, the Biden administration berated Russia for the scale of the operation.

While the potential reach of the SolarWinds hack was enormous, there is no evidence that Russia used it for anything other than conventional espionage. The fact that REvil doesn’t appear to be directly driven by a government chain of command means its supply chain attacks could be even more dangerous, Cable said.

“The difference here is that REvil is financially motivated. They are criminals, so in many ways they have fewer limits,” he said. “Ransomware groups don’t follow the same rules, and in some ways we could see this has a bigger impact.”

It is also extremely worrying that REvil was able to deploy a zero-day vulnerability to hack Kaseya, said Brett Callow, analyst at cybersecurity firm Emsisoft. While there is no solid evidence as to how the gang acquired it – whether they discovered it, stole it from researchers, or bought it from a broker – it does show that the gang has the ability and intend to acquire and deploy elite tools to orchestrate huge hacking campaigns.

“The Kaseya incident is truly a landmark event. It shows that cybercriminals are capable of acquiring and using zero-day vulnerabilities and using them to cause disruption on an absolutely massive scale,” he said. he declares.

“Because companies keep paying millions of dollars in ransoms, so we have cybercriminals who are more determined and better endowed than ever before,” he said. “It creates predators at the top.”


Source link

read more
Canadian army

John Wilkinson: Puslinch’s Forgotten Hero of a Forgotten War

John Wilkinson was a decorated victim of a long forgotten conflict that contributed in many ways to the region

On January 6, 1903, a special reception was held at Guelph City Hall in honor of two distinguished soldiers.

One of them was Corporal John K. Minchin of Milton, paralyzed by a gunshot wound to his leg. The other, and the horseman who was truly the man of the hour, was King Sergeant John A. Wilkinson, who had lost his right arm and his right eye. Like their comrade-in-arms John McCrae, also present at the reception, they had fought in the South African War (aka the Boer War).

The South African War of 1899-1902 was not exactly Britain’s best hour. Even though the British won the war, the tough Afrikaner fighters gave the armed might of the British Empire all it could take. But it was the first foreign war in which Canadian soldiers fought. Over 7,000 men from communities across Canada, including Guelph, volunteered to fight for the crown, and 284 of them died. 252 others were injured.

In the words of Lieutenant-Colonel William Nicoll of Guelph, they stood up for the dignity of the empire and showed the world the true courage of Canadians. They were national heroes, and none more than Wilkinson.

John Wilkinson was born circa 1874 to a pioneer family in Puslinch. He grew up on a farm and attended Killean School. At fifteen, like so many other Canadian teenagers, he enlisted in the militia. Wilkinson enlisted in the “A” Battery of the Guelph First Field Artillery Brigade.

Wilkinson had clearly found his vocation in the army, especially as an artilleryman. He took an artillery course in Kingston and then won a silver medal in an artillery competition there. He was promoted to sergeant and was part of the Canadian artillery team that traveled to England in 1896 to compete for the Queen’s Prize. The Canadians won by beating teams from across the British Empire. They traveled up the Thames on the Royal Yacht Britannia to Windsor Castle where they had lunch with Queen Victoria.

By the time the South African War broke out, Wilkinson had been promoted to sergeant major. In 1899 he enlisted in the Canadian Mounted Rifles and volunteered to serve overseas. His regiment left Halifax for Durban on January 14, 1900.

Wilkinson participated in several engagements, including the Battle of Harts River, also known as the Battle of Boschbult. It was one of the last major engagements of the war, but also one of the bloodiest. On March 31, 1902, a British column of 1,800 men which included a company of Canadians faced a force of 2,500 Boers. The outnumbered British took up defensive positions around some farm buildings. In a battle that lasted over four hours, a group of 21 Canadians broke away from the main British force. Wilkinson and Minchin were with them.

Eighteen of these 21 soldiers were killed or wounded. Wilkinson received 10 bullets. An exploded bullet shattered his right arm below the elbow and a fragment of it blinded his right eye. He also lost hearing in his right ear. Wilkinson continued to fire his rifle until he ran out of ammo. Then he threw the bolt on his rifle so that it would be useless to the enemy if captured. He lay injured on the battlefield in cold rain for hours before being finally picked up by British stretcher bearers.

A doctor amazed that Wilkinson was still alive operated on him in a bell tent. The surgeon had no hot water and was working by the light of a lantern. Wilkinson and the other injured men stayed in this tent for eight days, then endured three days and two nights in mule-drawn wagons transported 98 miles to a military hospital.

In June 1902, Wilkinson was sent to Netley Military Hospital, England. There he received the visit of Queen Alexandra. Wilkinson was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, which ranked second in prestige after the Victoria Cross. On Lord Kitchener’s recommendation, he was presented to King Edward VII who awarded him the rank of king’s sergeant. Wilkinson was the only Canadian to receive this honor during the South African War.

Wilkinson returned home and in 1909 married Hattie Mae Bailey of Galt. Over the years, he served on the Puslinch Council, as Reeve of Puslinch Township and as Auditor of Puslinch and Nassagaweya Townships and Wellington County. The Wilkinson family eventually moved to Guelph, residing on Glasgow St., then Home St. and finally Mont St. They belonged to St. George’s Anglican Church. In 1938 Wilkinson opened the Wilkinson Insurance Agency on Douglas Street in downtown Guelph.

Wilkinson was introduced to royalty again on June 6, 1939, when King George VI and Queen Mary visited Guelph. After Wilkinson’s death on May 15, 1947, his widow received a letter of condolence from the King and Queen. Flags were hoisted at half mast at Guelph City Hall and Wellington County buildings in honor of the decorated South African War Veteran.


Source link

read more
International headquarters

Turkish strongman’s western charm offensive was born out of desperation

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic hit the world, Turkey’s economy was in a crisis marked by high inflation, rising unemployment and a relentless decline in the value of the lira.

Since the failed coup in mid-2016, the national currency has lost more than 220% of its value against the euro. According to official figures, annual inflation hovers around 17% and the unemployment rate was recorded at almost 14% in May, which is 1% more than the previous month.

However, experts believe the real data on Turkey’s economy is much worse and the government is manipulating the numbers to create a better picture.

The severe effects of the pandemic and the loss of significant tourism revenues for the second year in a row have exacerbated a poor economic situation.

Karol Wasilewski, senior Turkey analyst at the Polish Institute of International Affairs, PISM, in Warsaw, says the economy is behind Ordogan’s “charm offensive” against the West.

“I see this offensive as a tool to help the heavily damaged Turkish economy by calming the waters of Turkish foreign policy and showing investors that Turkey has decided to be a predictable international player again, which can be trusted. “Wasilewski told BIRN.

As part of this charm offensive, Turkey began to support NATO interests with new military deals directed against Russia, despite the controversial purchase of Russia’s high-tech S-400 missiles.

In recent months, Turkey has sold armed drones to Ukraine and Poland to counter Russia’s military presence in Eastern Europe, and Erdogan recently offered to protect Kabul airport and all Western diplomatic missions after the total withdrawal of NATO allies from Afghanistan.

Following an initial meeting with its US counterpart Joe Biden, the White House announced that the two sides had agreed to work together to ensure that the Turkish mission is established before the 9/11 deadline for the withdrawal of states- States of Afghanistan.

Turkey is also now trying to ease tensions with NATO ally Greece after years of military escalation in the eastern Mediterranean over maritime areas and sharing of energy wealth.

“These are tools to support Turkey’s narrative … about the country’s contribution to the Alliance’s deterrence policy towards Russia, and that it is the only ally that effectively balances Russia in the neighborhood of the Europe.

“This narrative is an instrument designed to convince the United States that Turkey, despite many misunderstandings, is still a reliable ally and that it is in the best interest of the United States to mend the relationship,” observed Wasilewski.

A marriage of necessity


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Chicago Palestinians have connection to distant homeland

Every time Fidaa Elaydi buys fresh falafel for $ 3.99 a dozen from a bakery in Palos Hills, she gives her three children a Palestinian cooking lesson.

Elaydi remembers longing for his father every time he eats sesame bread from Jerusalem, as it reminds him of his own childhood, when he sold loaves of this bread while living in the Gaza Strip.

“I try to make accessible to my children here the parts that were not accessible to my parents in the refugee camp, while helping them understand the nuance,” said Elaydi, 33, a Palestinian refugee from the refugee camp. third generation and an immigration attorney who lives in the southwestern suburb of Justice.

When she tells them about their Palestinian identity, she focuses on the beauty of the area her parents told her stories about when she was growing up – the oranges of Jaffa, the vastness of the Mediterranean Sea and eating figs and pomegranates. directly on the trees.

“I’m just trying to tie everything together … to strengthen their bond with their homeland,” she added.

Fidaa Elaydi with her daughter at one of the recent pro-Palestinian protests in Chicago.
Courtesy photo

This continued connection to their homeland was brought to light recently, when hundreds of people took to the streets of the Loop to show their support for the Palestinians in their conflict with Israel.

the Arab America website estimates that 85,000 Palestinians live in greater Chicago, representing 60% of Chicago’s Arab population.

The community is scattered throughout the metropolitan area, but Arabic road signs are so common in some southwestern suburbs – around Bridgeview, Oak Lawn, and Worth – that the area has been called “Little Palestine.”

“The Palestinians kind of settled in this area, and they chose to stay with each other and build this tight-knit community. If you drive into South Harlem you will see bakeries, dessert shops, jewelry stores, and small grocery stores – anything that cites the names of cities in Palestine, ”Elaydi said.

the Arab-American Action Network, a non-profit community center established in 1995 on the southwest side, is one of several centers for the community. Social services, advocacy work, education, engagement of women and youth, and cultural events are some of the outreach services and programs offered by the network.

This community is linked by a history of conflict and displacement. The region the Palestinians call home includes much of today’s Israel. American Palestinians living in Chicago are just one part of a larger network of Palestinians living in the United States and around the world who connect to their struggle through storytelling, activism, justice social and sometimes simply by existing.

Elaydi’s four grandparents were forced to leave their homes in 1948, a date known to some as Israel’s War of Independence but to others as the “Nakba,” in Arabic for disaster.

They ended up in a refugee camp in Gaza, where Elaydi’s parents grew up until his father, accompanied by his mother, moved to the United States as a student.

“Because Palestinian history is inherently a story of dispossession, displacement and exile, I never believed that my connection, or my Palestinian identity, was less than a Palestinian living between [Jordan] River and the [Mediterranean] Mer, ”she said.

Ahlam Jbara immigrated to Chicago in 1974 when she was two months old. She returned to the West Bank with her family in 1986. But the following year, six months after the first Palestinian intifada, or uprising, her family returned to Chicago.

“I always say that the two years I lived there shaped who I am today,” said Jbara, 47.

Ahlam Jbara speaks at an event organized by the Palestinian American Center at Oak Lawn in 2019.

Ahlam Jbara speaks at an event organized by the Palestinian American Center at Oak Lawn in 2019.
Provided

This 73-year conflict continues today and resumed earlier this year in Jerusalem, where Palestinians faced brutal Israeli police tactics at the Al-Aqsa Mosque during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan in April.

This, combined with threats to evict dozens of Palestinian families from their homes in the Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood of East Jerusalem by Jewish settlers, was followed by the Hamas group firing long-range rockets into Jerusalem and launching Israel from it. heavy airstrikes on the Gaza Strip.

At least 230 Palestinians were killed, including 65 children and 39 women, and 1,710 people were injured, according to the Gaza health ministry. Twelve people in Israel, including a 5-year-old boy and a 16-year-old girl, were killed.

The 11-day explosion of violence ended on May 20, with a ceasefire agreement between Israel and Hamas.

During the conflict, American Palestinians and their supporters took to the streets of Chicago and around the world.

The sense of community connection here reflects decades of organization and institution building, said Hatem Abudayyeh, executive director of the Arab American Action Network.

Abudayyeh, the son of Palestinian immigrants, is also national president of the US Palestine Community Network – a grassroots group that is also part of the Chicago Coalition for Justice in Palestine, an umbrella organization for pro-Palestinian groups in the region, including including American Muslims. for Palestine, Jewish Voices for Peace and Students for Justice in Palestine.

“We were able to react like we did with masses of people because we have institutions. Because we’ve established a tradition and history of community organizing in the city and in the United States as a whole for a long, long time, ”said Abudayyeh.

Coalition rallies closed parts of the loop as protesters demonstrated outside the Israeli consulate, waving Palestinian flags.

Aviv Ezra, Israel’s consul general in the Midwest, said the latest situation was not about the situation in Sheikh Jarrah, but rather the actions of Hamas, which he said “used every pretext … State of Israel.

Protesters hold up a banner for the Coalition for Justice in Palestine during a march through the loop on May 12, 2021. The coalition is an umbrella organization for a number of pro-Palestinian groups in the Chicago chapter.

Protesters hold up a banner for the Coalition for Justice in Palestine during a march through the loop on May 12, 2021. The coalition is an umbrella organization for a number of pro-Palestinian groups in the Chicago chapter.
Ashlee Rezin Garcia / Sun-Times

In mid-June, the ceasefire was tested when hundreds of Israeli ultra-nationalists, some chanting “Death to the Arabs,” marched through East Jerusalem to celebrate Israel’s capture of the region in 1967. The Palestinians then sent incendiary balloons into southern Israel, causing several fires in parched farmland. Israel carried out airstrikes and more balloons followed.

About a week later, there were clashes between Palestinians and Jewish settlers in an area of ​​Jerusalem where settler groups are trying to evict several Palestinian families, officials said last week.

Thousands of people demonstrate in favor of Palestine and march through the loop, Wednesday evening, May 12, 2021.

Thousands of people demonstrate in support of Palestine and march through the loop on May 12, 2021.
Ashlee Rezin Garcia / Sun-Times

The growing awareness of systemic racism in the United States sheds a different light on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict for some Americans, says Wendy Pearlman, professor of political science at Northwestern University.

“This language of rights and equality also ties into Black Lives Matter and social justice protests in a way that, at least in the American context, people are starting to see in a new light that puts rights. of man in the foreground and it is difficult for Israel and its allies to delegitimize, ”she added.

Tarek Khalil, a member of the Chicago branch of American Muslims for Palestine, said the rallies are “cries for justice, liberation and equality.”

“It is worth it that I am an activist here, because the government that represents me is the same government that provides the same entity that is the source of the oppression of my people – $ 3.8 billion a year in financial, military and diplomatic assistance, ”said Khalil, 36, who grew up in Chicago and lives in Bridgeview but spent four years of his childhood living in the Silwan neighborhood of east Jerusalem.

“It’s personal but also political,” Khalil said. “It is essential that we pressure our government to formulate policies that are not contrary to the values ​​we preach every day.

Contribution: Associated Press

read more
History organization

Texas AFT: mourn the loss of our union’s “happy warrior”

“While education negotiation remains elusive, we will have to thank Sharon’s years of training as an activist and steward at Texas AFT when we finally reach our goal of a negotiated contract.

AFT Texas President Zeph Capo

Sharon Cole

Sharon Cole, one of the early formators of what we then called the Texas Federation of Teachers, recently passed away. Sharon was the spark plug that sparked much of the organizing in our union by teaching new staff the nuts and bolts of union membership registration and guiding local union leaders. Our friend Ed Sills, communications director of the AFL-CIO of Texas, wrote him this fitting tribute.

The AFL-CIO of Texas is saddened to learn of the passing of Sharon Cole, who played an extraordinary role in the success of the Texas American Federation of Teachers.

Sister Cole and her husband, John Cole, a longtime president of AFT Texas, were one of the great couples in Texas labor history. As a reporter covering the Legislative Assembly in the 1980s and early 1990s, I witnessed this with my own eyes: John chaired press conferences and served as the public face of the union, but reporters poured in. to Sharon for more details and everything in between the lines the union could afford to disclose. It was a Mr. Outside and Ms. Inside vibe characterized by superb communication skills and determined advocacy. While Sharon Cole is formally responsible for leadership development and training, her portfolio encompasses all of AFT’s Texas operations. As the communications director of Texas AFL-CIO, I have also had the honor of attending some of the leadership training conferences Sharon has hosted at Texas AFT, and I can say from experience that these operations have been ( and are) valuable, efficient and enthusiastic. received.

The Coles’ tenure included nationally significant battles over educational reform and school financial justice – the latter a historic civil rights battle that conquered rugged hills. Their participation in the fair fundraising movement for public schools came after a setback in the United States Supreme Court. Ultimately, the Texas Supreme Court made some important court decisions and the legislature moved in the direction of funding parity for schoolchildren in the state.

Sharon Cole

Although some local affiliates of the American Federation of Teachers in Texas are older, AFT Texas was founded in 1974, at a time when public sector unions were beginning to play a much larger role in the labor movement. The AFT state was a newcomer to a state that has four organizations seeking to represent teachers and other public school employees. Two of these organizations can be qualified as non-union and / or anti-union. The third, our friends from the Texas State Teachers Association, joined with AFT of Texas to organize meetings and conferences in a number of large school districts; TSTA was founded in 1880. Under the leadership of John and Sharon Cole, Texas AFT has grown, both in number and efficiency.

A succession of Texas AFL-CIO presidents have proudly noted that the Texas AFT is the largest or the second largest union in the state federation, depending on which day you count members alongside the American Federation. government employees. The union went from “being able to meet in a closet” to the 66,000 members it has today by shamelessly declaring that the Texas AFT is a union through and through, seeking collective bargaining, opposing the a law known as the “right to work” and engaging in the kind of concerted activism expected from unions across the country. Sharon Cole was instrumental in laying the foundation for the union’s rise to power.

In addition to creating an organizational culture, the Coles have set another standard that applies to AFT Texas to date: They have excelled at recruiting staff, hiring some of the government’s best advocates. State and cultivating their talents. To this day, Texas AFT is making a mark that goes way beyond its numbers.

“Sharon Cole was a true emissary of labor sent from Ohio to guide new activists to the promised land of collective bargaining and empowering teachers and school workers here in Texas,” the president said. ‘AFT from Texas, Zeph Capo. “While education negotiation remains elusive, we will have to thank Sharon’s years of training as an activist and steward at Texas AFT when we finally reach our goal of a negotiated contract.

Any memory of Sharon Cole cannot fail to mention that the Coles were the mainstays of Corpus Christi, having started their work in Texas (after meeting while organizing in Ohio) at the local AFT branch. . (The Corpus Christi affiliate would produce another revered Texas AFT president and Cole protégé, the late Linda Bridges.) The conditions in Corpus Christi schools and the realization that other school districts were in the same situation prompted the Coles to take their activism to the state level. For years, the Coles made personal financial sacrifices as they strengthened the foundations of the union.

“It was my chance to work with and get to know Sharon Cole,” said Becky Moeller, former president of the AFL-CIO of Texas, another historic labor activist from Corpus Christi. “In addition to her advocacy for schoolchildren, she has devoted herself to educating union activists. His continuing education programs within AFT and work in general were legendary.

“John Cole and Sharon Cole were a dynamic duo,” said Moeller. “They complemented each other professionally and personally. Many members of the labor movement have been touched by Sharon’s activism and love for her work.
Sharon Cole personally recruited former AFT Texas president Louis Malfaro to join AFT Texas during his first year as a teacher.

“Sharon called me cold the same week I received a letter from an anti-union teachers’ organization that said, ‘We think strikes should be for the big old game of baseball,’” Malfaro said. . “I was livid. When she called me I asked, “Is this a real union? She assured me that Texas AFT was affiliated with the AFL-CIO and really a real union. She was at my classroom door the next morning with a membership card, convinced she had one online.

Malfaro said Sharon Cole’s belief in systemic organizing has influenced AFT affiliates across the country. He adds that she was a joy to work with: “Her saucy sense of humor, her easy way to connect with just about everyone she met and the hoarse laughter that spilled out in the halls of the hotel. AFT office in Texas are forever etched in my memory. “

Eric Hartman, the longtime legislative director of AFT Texas recruited by John Cole, described Sharon Cole as a “happy warrior”. He said the couple were “a real partnership, a team that has served the members very well.”
Hartman said Sharon Cole’s versatility was extraordinary, especially given the union’s years of being a family operation, with minimal staff. “She was the one who could do it all,” Hartman said.

Jerry Quinones, a retiree who has worked for AFT locally, state and nationally, said Sharon Cole’s role in the union’s growth is vital. “She lit up a room,” Quinones said. “She was always upbeat and positive, with so much energy and so much motivation.” Quinones said this personality carried on in the summer and winter leadership training sessions which were widely emulated and became national role models for the union.

Texas AFL-CIO President Rick Levy said Sharon Cole had played an important role in the history of the state’s Federation of Labor. “Sharon Cole was at the heart of the movement to improve public education in Texas,” Levy said. “His commitment to training, leadership development and organizational strength has left a legacy across the labor movement and has helped make Texas AFT a leader not only in education policy, but also in education policy. the full range of problems affecting working families. She will be deeply missed.

The Texas AFL-CIO offers its sincere condolences to John Cole, the Cole family and the Texas AFT. Arrangements are private


Source link

read more
International headquarters

Apollo Impact will acquire approx. 67% stake in the RDM Group,

Transaction followed by a public delisting offer for the RDM group

RDM, leader in the circular economy, represents Apollo’s first investment from its Impact platform

NEW YORK, July 05, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Apollo Global Management, Inc. (NYSE: APO) (together with its consolidated subsidiaries, “Apollo” or the “Company”) announced today that certain funds managed by its affiliated companies (the “Apollo Funds”) have entered into definitive agreements to acquire a majority stake in Reno De Medici SpA (“RDM”, or the “Company” or “the Issuer” (BIT: RM / BME: RDM), a leading producer of recycled cardboard in Europe.

Apollo Funds will acquire approx. 67% stake in RDM of the two main shareholders of the Company, Cascades inc. (TSX: CAS) and the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec at a price of 1.45 EUR per share (without adjustment, except as detailed below), i.e. a participation of 24% premium to the 90-day volume-weighted average. The transaction, which is subject to the customary closing conditions detailed below, is expected to close by the third quarter of 2021. Upon closing, Apollo will launch a mandatory takeover bid for the remaining shares, in the aim to withdraw the Company.

RDM is the leading producer of coated recycled cardboard in Italy, France and the Iberian Peninsula, and the second largest producer in Europe. With 100% of products made from recycled materials, RDM plays a central role in increasing sustainability and contributing to a circular economy by minimizing waste, emissions and consumption of raw materials and water. This year, the RDM group acquired factories in Spain, which just closed last week, and agreed to acquire factories in the Netherlands which, at closing, will expand its operations to nine factories and five specialized centers of cutting and laminating across Europe and the United States. Apollo expects the RDM Group to continue to benefit from increasing changes in consumer preferences and EU-wide regulations supporting the use of sustainable recycled fibers.

“Already one of the main European leaders in recycled cardboard, RDM is well positioned for continued growth as more companies replace plastics with sustainable packaging. We see RDM as a proven platform for inorganic growth and look forward to working with Michele and the leadership team as they evolve the business for greater positive environmental impact, ”said Marc Becker, Partner principal and co-leader of Apollo Impact. “As an inaugural investment led by the Apollo Impact platform, RDM reflects our strategy of finding good companies where we believe we can generate financial and impact performance to increase their beneficial effects on society and the planet. “

“We are delighted to be working with Apollo throughout this next phase of growth for RDM. Over the past five years, our exceptional team has made significant progress in scaling our platform and optimizing our operations across Europe ”said Michele Bianchi, CEO of RDM Group . “Looking ahead, we are also excited about Apollo’s shared commitment to the circular economy, of which we are both contributors and beneficiaries. We look forward to building on our ambitious Sustainable Development Goals to shape a better future for all of our stakeholders. “

Andrea Moneta, Apollo Senior Advisor for Italy, added: “RDM highlights the important role Italy plays in building a more sustainable global economy and Apollo’s commitment to working with the best companies , Italian entrepreneurs and management teams to support their long-term growth.

About the operation

Rimini BidCo Srl (“Rimini”), a newly formed company owned by the Apollo Funds, and the two principal shareholders of RDM, Cascades Inc. and the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec, have entered into sale and purchase agreements which provide for the purchase by Rimini of a total of 251,974,385 RDM ordinary shares, corresponding to approximately 67% of its share capital, at a price of EUR 1.45 per share, this price will not be subject to ” adjustments, except in the event of potential impairment losses (such as possible dividends, returns of capital or other similar distributions of profits or assets to sellers or, to the extent applicable, other potential leaks, better identified in share purchase agreements), provided that RDM’s 2020 dividend that was paid to shareholders in May 2021 will not be considered a leak (the “Price Per Share”).

The completion of the transaction (the “Closing”) is subject to the fulfillment of certain conditions precedent, as better described in the share purchase agreements, concerning, among other things: (i) obtaining the necessary antitrust authorizations , and (ii) the absence of orders in force by any competent government authority prohibiting the transaction. The closing is expected to take place in the third quarter of 2021.

As indicated above, at the Closing, Rimini will hold 251,974,385 Shares, i.e. approximately 67% of the Issuer’s share capital and, therefore, in accordance with Articles 106, paragraph 1 and 109 of the TUF, will be required to launch a compulsory takeover bid. (the “Mandatory Offer”) on all remaining RDM shares at the highest Price Per Share paid to one of the sellers.

The subject of the Binding Offer is the delisting of the Issuer. In the event that the delisting should not be carried out following and as a result of the Mandatory Offer, the delisting may also be carried out by a merger of the Issuer with Rimini or another company controlled by the Apollo Funds.

Rimini will finance the transaction, including any potential refinancing of the Issuer’s existing debt, through a combination of its own cash resources and fully committed debt financing from leading international banks.

Finally, it is specified that there are 241,114 convertible savings shares of the Issuer not listed on a regulated market which, in accordance with the provisions of the Articles of Association of the Issuer, are convertible into ordinary shares at the request of the holders concerned in February. and September of each year. In the event of the launch of the Mandatory Offer, the Mandatory Offer will also include all ordinary shares resulting from the conversion of the aforementioned convertible savings shares (insofar as these shares are converted before the expiration of the Mandatory Offer) .

Allen & Overy and Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison acted as legal advisers for Apollo. Jones Day acted as legal advisor and Rothschild & Co. acted as financial advisor to Cascades Inc. Latham & Watkins acted as legal advisor for the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec.

About Apollo Impact

Launched in 2020, the Apollo Impact platform draws on the expertise of the firm’s main private equity franchise. Apollo Impact seeks to differentiate itself in the market by seeking large-scale impact through opportunities in late-stage companies in five key areas: economic opportunity; education; health, safety and well-being; industry 4.0; and climate and sustainability. Apollo has a long history of ESG screening and engagement spanning over a decade. The platform is led by co-directors Marc Becker and Joanna Reiss and Impact president Lisa Hall. Earlier this year, the firm announced the creation of the Apollo Impact Advisory Board, made up of 12 diverse professionals with expertise and experience in impact investing and / or the platform’s strategic focus areas.

About Apollo
Apollo is a high growth global alternative asset manager. We seek to provide our clients with excess return at every step of the risk-return spectrum, from investment grade to private equity, by focusing on three business strategies: return, hybrid and opportunistic. Through our investing activity on our fully integrated platform, we meet the retirement income and financial performance needs of our clients, and we deliver innovative capital solutions to businesses. Our patient, creative and knowledgeable approach to investing aligns our clients, the companies we invest in, our employees and the communities we impact on, to expand opportunities and drive positive results. As of March 31, 2021, Apollo had approximately $ 461 billion in assets under management. For more information, please visit www.apollo.com.

About the RDM Group
The RDM group is the second European producer of recycled coated board, the largest in Italy, France and the Iberian Peninsula. The group is currently listed on the Star segment of Borsa Italiana SpA and the Madrid Stock Exchange. The RDM group’s headquarters are in Milan but it has a strategic international presence thanks to its manufacturing plants, sheet metal centers and a sales network active in 70 countries. The RDM group’s product portfolio mainly consists of recycled cardboard, used primarily for packaging and folding boxes in all major product sectors.

Apollo contact details

For investors
Peter Mintzberg, Head of Investor Relations
Global management of Apollo, Inc.
+1 (212) 822-0528
[email protected]

For the media
Joanna Rose, Global Head of Corporate Communications
Global management of Apollo, Inc.
+1 (212) 822-0491
[email protected]


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Joint Fundraiser for Aloha United Way Introduces New Bath and Body Collection

Image courtesy of MANAOLA Hawai’i website.

Hawaiian Electric and luxury Hawaiian fashion label MANAOLA Hawaiʻi have launched presales of a new environmentally conscious bath and body collection as a fundraiser for Aloha United Way.

Five gift options from “Lei Puakenikeni” from MANAOLAcollection – priced at $ 22 to $ 56 – is available for pre-order on the Mākeke pop-up website through July 31 and orders processed in October.

“All proceeds from sales will go to AUW’s ALICE Fund, which brings together people, resources and sustainable solutions to help make the community stronger and more resilient.”

the Lei Puakenikeni The collection uses only sustainably and ethically sourced ingredients, natural fragrances and biodegradable packaging for the special line made in Hawaii, which is also cruelty-free and vegan. Product samples will be available at MANAOLA stores in Ala Moana and Pearlridge shopping centers and pre-sale orders will also be taken in-store.

Fundraising items include a coconut and soy candle ($ 22), a bath set with shampoo and conditioner bars ($ 26), a home diffuser with bamboo reeds ($ 44 ), a gift set with a bath soap and shampoo and conditioner bars in a burlap bag ($ 50) and a gift set with a bath soap, moisturizing body lotion and a candle in a burlap bag ($ 56).

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW THE AD

“We’re always looking for new and creative ways to support AUW and our community, and we researched MANAOLA because they embrace the same commitment to communities, Hawaiian culture, sustainability, and customer service that we also value,” said said Bob Krekel, Hawaiian Electric. Director of Business Processes and Continuous Improvement and Chairman of the Employee Fundraising Committee. “MANAOLA is also known for their high quality and innovation and we are proud to collaborate with them on a new product launch and fundraising. Together, we hope for a successful campaign that will uplift our community through these trying times and help build a resilient Hawai’i. “

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW THE AD

The launch of a bath and body collection by MANAOLA marks a new venture for the innovative fashion house known for its indigenous art and an opportunity to support a small local business on the island of Hawai’i while giving back to the community. The new line also elevates the exotic and fragrant puakenikeni flower which holds deep meaning for the brand’s founder, Manaola Yap.

“The collection was inspired by fond memories of his tūtū and acts of kindness, generosity, love and aloha, which is our way of life,” said Zachary Pang, CEO of MANAOLA Hawaiʻi. “When Hawaiian Electric reached out to MANAOLA to collaborate on creative ways to kāko’o (support) our local community through Aloha United Way, the answer was simple, together is the only way to thrive as a community. It is especially important for us to support the Native Hawaiian community and through the ALICE initiative we are able to reach the non-profit agencies that serve these community members through programs that honor culture, strengthen skills and increase access to resources.

The ALICE initiative refers to employed people with limited income and limited assets who are hard-working, full-time Hawaiian residents, sometimes many jobs and still living on paychecks. Funds raised will benefit programs designed to help residents with increased income potential and / or reduced household expenses; better access to social service delivery and community resources; and the development of financial capacities and “soft skills”.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW THE AD

“These are often the first steps a family can take towards a more solid economic foundation. If we are to rebuild our communities to be better and more equitable than before, we believe it is important to help those who are struggling to make ends meet and living on the brink of poverty, ”said Emmaly Calibraro , Vice President of Resource Development and Donor Relations at AUW. She noted that before the pandemic reached Hawai’i, 42% of the population were ALICE or lived in poverty. Estimates put that number at 59% post-pandemic.

“We would like to thank Hawaiian Electric and MANAOLA for creating this fundraiser that will ultimately benefit those who need it most. We continue to be encouraged by the creativity of each organization and their total commitment to building the communities of Hawai’i, ”Calibraro added.

read more
History organization

All-time leaders in franchise history

NOT SPECIFIED – CIRCA 1969: (Photo by Focus on Sport / Getty Images)

The Cincinnati Bengals have been blessed with excellent quarterbacks in their 50+ years as an organization. Six of their former quarterbacks threw for more than 10,000 yards and, in some teams, would find themselves higher on the all-time passing yard list.

Let’s take a look at the passing Bengals leaders.

Cincinnati Bengals All-Time Leaders – No. 15: Greg Cook (1865)

Bengals Quarterback 1969-1973

In 1969, the Bengals entered their sophomore year in the NFL and found their quarterback with the No.5 pick in that year’s draft. They went with Cincinnati’s own Greg Cook, who grew up in Ohio and played for the Bearcats in college.

There was a lot to like about Cook during his college days and he gave big numbers when you consider how different the game was back then. The Bengals have decided to leave John Stofa, their quarterback in their inaugural season, and have moved on to the Greg Cook era.

Sadly, the Cook era never really saw the light of day as shoulder injuries undermined what could have been a promising career for the Ohio native. He started 11 games as a rookie in 1969 while throwing for 1,854 yards, 15 touchdowns and 11 interceptions, but could not start again until 1973 due to the severity of his injury.

When all was said and done, Cook’s career was a disappointment, but Bengals fans who were alive to watch him play have always wondered what could have been.


Source link

read more
Canadian army

C-130 crashes in Patikul, Sulu – Philippine Canadian Inquirer

FILE: The site of the C-130 crash at Patikul, Sulu on Sunday (July 4, 2021). The plane was on a troop transport mission, according to AFP chief General Cirilito Sobejana. (Photo: Bridge Bridge, PTV via Philippine News Agency / Facebook)

MANILA – A Philippine Air Force (PAF) C-130H Hercules transport plane crashed Sunday morning in Patikul, Sulu, the Chief of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) General Cirilito Sobejana confirmed.

In an interview with reporters, Sobejana said the incident happened around 11:30 a.m.

“One of the C-130s, while transporting our troops from Cagayan De Oro, n / A-Mademoiselle nya ‘yung track, trying to regain power, to hindi nakayanan, bumagsak doon sa mai Barangay Bangkal, Patikul, Sulu (One of our C-130s, while carrying troops from Cagayan De Oro, missed the trail, tried to regain power but failed and crashed at Barangay Bangkal , Patikul, Sulu), ”he said.

Sobejana has not identified the runway but the closest and unique airport in the area is at Jolo.

Efforts are underway to rescue passengers from the ill-fated plane.

About 40 passengers were rescued and are currently being treated at the 11th Infantry Division hospital in the town of Busbus.

No further details were immediately available, Sobejana said.

Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said initial reports indicated there were 92 people on board, including three pilots and five crew members.

The rest were army personnel reporting for duty.

“So far 40 wounded and injured have been rescued and 17 bodies recovered,” Lorenzana said in a statement.

The PAF also confirmed the incident.

“A Philippine Air Force C-130 plane with tail # 5125 was the victim of an incident while landing at Jolo,” PAF said.

The plane took off from Villamor Air Base in Pasay en route to Lumbia Airport and then transported personnel to Jolo, PAF spokesman Lt. Col. Maynardo Mariano said.

The aircraft was one of two C-130Hs acquired with a grant from the US government. He arrived in the country on January 29 and was officially welcomed into the PAF fleet at Villamor on February 18.

The cost of acquiring the two C-130H aircraft had previously been estimated at PHP 2.5 billion, with the Philippines contributing PHP 1.6 billion and the United States contributing around PHP 900 million.

it is a four turboprop military transport aircraft originally designed and built by Lockheed, now Lockheed Martin.

Capable of using unprepared runways for takeoffs and landings, the C-130 was originally designed as a personnel carrier, medical evacuation, and cargo aircraft.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

$ 99 million in rental assistance for returned Floridians

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) – About $ 99 million in unspent rental assistance to help Floridians living in affordable housing has been returned to the state after the agency overseeing the program struggled to shell out the money.

The Florida Housing Finance Corporation, which was established by the Florida legislature to help develop and support affordable housing, received $ 120 million in federal rent assistance funding last year as part of the CARES law. Florida used the money to create a coronavirus relief fund, intended to help tenants catch up on rent who live on properties that FHFC finances and have lost jobs or income due to the pandemic.

Taylore Maxey, press secretary for the non-profit organization, said she has distributed around $ 13.2 million to help tenants in 373 multi-family developments across the state. In total, FHFC said it received 786 requests for assistance but only 521 were approved. And about $ 99 million has been returned to the Department of Economic Opportunity to be reallocated to other pandemic programs.

“There’s no way to water it down: this strategy has been underused,” said Trey Price, executive director of the FHFC. “But all that considered, I think we did a good job with the time constraints we were facing and the resources given to us.”

Nonprofits that have tried to help affordable housing residents take advantage of rent assistance and push back eviction notices, including the Miami Workers Center and the Community Justice Project, said the problem is that some landlords will not participate in rent relief programs because of the requirements. they place on the owners.

To participate in the FHFC program, for example, landlords had to waive late fees and agree not to increase the rent until January 2021, while also pledging not to turn down lease renewals for late tenants. rent or report them to the credit bureaus. They also had to agree not to initiate new eviction requests and to suspend ongoing evictions for a period of time.

However, Price said he believed the biggest obstacle to disbursing the funds was that tenants had to pay 30% of their household income in rent to be eligible, a prerequisite which was later removed.

He said a separate program run by the non-profit organization, in which FHFC contracted with 119 local government housing offices to distribute rent assistance, was much more successful. According to figures provided by the association, $ 98.3 million in rent assistance and $ 18.1 million in mortgage relief were spent as part of this strategy.

Price said FHFC returned the unspent money before the deadline set by the CARES Act, which required all funding to be used by December 31, 2020 or returned to the federal government. Former President Trump ultimately extended that until the end of 2021 when he unexpectedly signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act in December.

He waited to sign the $ 900 billion COVID relief plan until December 27, just days before many provisions of the CARES Act expired, including federal unemployment and the paycheck protection program. . The moratorium on deportations from the country was also about to end.

Price said the uncertainty over whether or not Trump would sign an extension put the Florida Housing Finance Corporation in a difficult position.

“There was a real question of whether President Trump was going to sign or veto this bill,” Price said. “At this point, we needed to start moving (the unspent money) to the state of Florida. You don’t just snap your fingers and move $ 99 million. There was a bit of a rush. “

Christina Pushaw, spokesperson for Gov. Ron DeSantis, said the decision was made to “pull out” the unused money because this bill awaiting Trump’s signature contained $ 25 billion in aid to the government. dedicated rental, including $ 1.4 billion for Florida. Pushaw said the money returned by the Florida Housing Finance Corporation had been reallocated “to support the state’s ongoing pandemic response spending,” but couldn’t say exactly what it was being used for.

But it’s unclear why the governor’s office was confident he would receive this money, given Trump’s reluctance to sign the Consolidated Appropriations Act, which passed both the House and the Senate with bipartisan support. Pushaw did not immediately respond when asked for further details.

In a video posted to Twitter, Trump at the time called the bill a “disgrace” and called on lawmakers to “get rid of unnecessary and unnecessary pieces of this legislation and send me an appropriate bill.” , referring to the provisions of the 5,593 -page legislation allocating money to foreign aid, environmental projects and the arts and humanities.

“It’s called the COVID Relief Bill, but it has almost nothing to do with COVID,” Trump said, toppling lawmakers and even some of his own aides, who were in tense negotiations over the package. for months. Trump was also unhappy that the bill only included $ 600 stimulus payments for Americans and said he wanted to issue checks for $ 2,000.

However, Capitol Hill residents were quick to point out that some of the unrelated projects that received funding were programs that Trump included in his 2021 fiscal budget. His critics also ignored that Steven Mnuchin, Trump’s secretary of the Treasury, was the one who negotiated the figure of $ 600.

read more
History organization

50 years ago today: Team Penske’s first victory

The July 4th weekend generates a myriad of memories and emotions for most Americans. Some are reminiscent of summer vacations and family celebrations or a favorite place to watch a fantastic fireworks display. The holiday weekend also honors our service members and military women who protect our nation’s freedoms while honoring their sacrifices.

For the Penske team, this weekend marks a historic date in the team’s history. On Sunday July 3, 1971, Mark Donohue won the checkered flag in the Schaefer 500 at Pocono (Penn.) Raceway for the team’s very first victory in the INDYCAR SERIES (photo provided by Pocono Raceway). Today, 50 years after that historic victory, Team Penske celebrates its special anniversary by looking back on that winning weekend that set the stage for lasting excellence.

Formed in 1966, the Penske team saw rapid success in sports car racing with Donohue rising to the top of the racing discipline. While winning races in Can-Am and Trans Am competitions, Roger Penske and Donohue broadened their horizons at INDYCAR in 1969 with the goal of winning the Indianapolis 500 in three years.

The team nearly achieved this lofty goal as Donohue conquered the “greatest racing spectacle” in the team’s fourth Indianapolis 500 in 1972. Team Penske’s third INDYCAR season was a success, however, with success. starting with Pocono. A crowd of 75,000 people filled the stands to witness the first race in the history of the track known as the “Tricky Triangle”. In fact, as the competitors hit the circuit for the first practice session, the workers were still putting the finishing touches on the 2.5-mile oval in Long Pond, Pa.

With several strong ties to Pennsylvania, Pocono served as a sort of home game for Team Penske. As of 1971, the team was still based in its original store in Newtown Square, Pennsylvania. Donohue lived in Media, Pa., And Penske had attended Lehigh University, located in Bethlehem, Pa.

The weekend got off to a good start with Donohue taking pole position in the # 66 McLaren M16 with an average four-lap qualifying speed of 172.393 mph. Starting from pole, Donohue dominated most of the afternoon, but had to fight late in the race with Joe Leonard due to a new warning procedure adopted at Pocono.

Pocono Raceway was built to closely resemble the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and in many ways. From its 2.5 mile length (albeit triangular in shape) to qualifying races of four rounds with 11 rows of 33 cars on the starting grid, Pocono was designed in the hope of helping INDYCAR (USAC to l era) to welcome a triple crown of 500-mile races that would rival those of thoroughbred races.

One of the differences between Pocono and Indianapolis, however, was that when the warning flag was displayed at Indy, the drivers were ordered to keep the gap between themselves and the other competitors. At Pocono, the cars gathered before the pit lane opened to welcome the competitors, eliminating any advantage of having a big lead. It was in this scenario that Donohue lost the lead of the race to Leonard with just nine laps to go as the Penske team rider later admitted he was being too cautious when restarting the race when ‘he thought there was oil on the surface of the track.

Fortunately, Donohue regained his momentum and rounded Leonard one last time with six laps to go for the win with 1.688 seconds – one of the closest finishes in INDYCAR history so far. Leading 126 of the 200 laps, Team Penske’s first INDYCAR victory is remembered as a dominant performance with a thrilling finish.

“When our team started racing we were just focusing on competitiveness and fighting for victory,” said Roger Penske. “Our racing teams have certainly come a long way since those early days, but our goal remains the same: to win. I don’t think any of us could have imagined that we would still be racing and winning more than 50 years later. “

Team Penske’s second victory, also with Donohue at the wheel, came 15 days later in the Michigan 200 at Michigan International Speedway. It started the team’s unprecedented success in INDYCAR races with a ledger that currently includes 219 wins, 18 Indianapolis 500 wins and 16 series championships. From those early days, the organization grew and became the gold standard of American racing. It’s sort of fitting that the team can celebrate the first victory of a legendary INDYCAR legacy every year during the weekend of July 4th.


Source link

read more
Canadian army

AFP urges CHR to deepen Absalon murder – Philippine Canadian Inquirer

Kieth Absalon (Photo courtesy of Facebook via PNA)

MANILA – The Armed Forces of the Philippines Center for the Law of Armed Conflict (AFPCLOAC) has asked the Human Rights Commission (CHR) to conduct a side investigation into the Masbate incident that killed college footballer Kieth Absalon and his cousin, Nolven.

Brig. General Jose Alejandro Nacnac, director of AFPCLOAC, sent a letter of request to the president of the CHR, Jose Luis Martin Gascon, to investigate the “heinous, despicable and reprehensible” attack perpetrated by the New People’s Army (NPA) June 6, 2021.

“As a vanguard of human rights and international humanitarian law, we call on your office to pursue justice for the Absalons and all the victims of the latest anti-personnel mine (APM) explosions and the protection of civilians from use of MPAs by the NPA and the CTGs (communist terrorist groups). We also ask for your help and support in the government’s overall effort to end the local communist armed conflict, ”the letter dated June 29 reads.

Nacnac condemned the incident, saying NPA rebels must be held accountable for indiscriminate use of PAM and attacks on innocent civilians.

“The continued use by ANPs of anti-personnel mines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) that kill and maim civilians and soldiers in flagrant disregard and in willful violation of international humanitarian law is worrying and must be stopped,” said Nacnac in a press release on Friday. .

Nacnac noted that “the distinction between civilians and combatants is a cardinal principle” of international humanitarian law, “intended to minimize damage to civilians by making violence a combatant’s business”.

Quoting Article 14 of Republic Law (RA) No. 9851, or the Philippine Law on Crimes Against International Humanitarian Law, Genocide and Other Crimes Against Humanity, promulgated on December 11, 2009, Nacnac said that the communist leader who orchestrated the violent attacks must also face criminal charges.

“In addition to the other grounds of criminal responsibility for the crimes defined and sanctioned by RA 9851, section 10 thereof provides that NPA leaders like Joma Sison will be criminally responsible as the principal for these crimes committed by subordinates under his effective command and control, or effective authority and control, as the case may be, due to his inability to properly exercise control over those subordinates, ”added Nacnac.

“The responsibility of the leaders of these CTGs for the damage and prejudice that their subordinates inflicted on non-combatants must not go unpunished,” he continued.

In May, the CHR pledged to investigate the 1,506 atrocities and IHL violations committed by the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) -NPA and the National Democratic Front from 2010 to 2020.

The CPP-NPA is listed as a terrorist organization by the United States, European Union, United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the Philippines. (With reports from Priam Nepomuceno / PNA)


Source link

read more
International headquarters

G Kishan Reddy visits BSF headquarters in Jammu; commends the officers for eliminating threats at the international border

Minister of State (Interior) G Kishan Reddy visited the Border Security Force (BSF) headquarters in Jammu on Friday and was briefed on the current security situation at the Jammu border. He also interacted with BSF officers and staff and praised their abilities to tackle challenges at the international border.

NS Jamwal, BSF Inspector General, Jammu Frontier, made a detailed presentation to the Union Minister, explaining the threats and challenges at the Jammu border and BSF’s strong border domination plan to counter these challenges.

G Kishan Reddy was also informed of the different systems and innovations adopted by BSF to neutralize cross-border threats from the counterparty side.

G KISHAN REDDY ADDRESS ‘PRAHARI SAMMELAN’

The Union Minister also addressed a “Prahari Sammelan” which was attended by about 250 officers and staff of the BSF.

READ ALSO : General CDS Bipin Rawat: The Indian Air Force remains a supporting weapon like artillery and engineers | Exclusive

He paid tribute to the BSF martyrs who sacrificed their lives for the unity and integrity of the country.

The Union Minister stressed that BSF, being the first line of defense, has done excellent homework at the international border, especially at the Jammu border.

G Kishan Reddy praised the abilities of BSF staff who work in difficult and difficult conditions, whether in snowy areas, hot desert terrain, or a difficult area of ​​Rann of Kutch or areas prone to malaria or areas prone to Naxal.

Congratulating officers for consistently meeting challenges successfully, G Kishan Reddy said BSF has been successful in eliminating threats from its counterparts, be it undercover, tunneling, smuggling or drones.

Additionally, G Kishan Reddy said it was a matter of pride for him to see the Mahila Praharies sitting among the Jawans and rendering their services at the border with the same zeal and enthusiasm.

READ ALSO : Army obtains 12 indigenous bridges for operations along western borders with Pakistan

Appreciating the recent success of Jammu FTR, where BSF troops successfully cleared intruders across the border and confiscated large quantities of narcotics and detected underground tunnels at the Jammu border, the minister said commended the BSF for shooting down a Hexacopter that was coming across the border, carrying weapons and ammunition to the Samba border.

G Kishan Reddy presented a fruit basket to the troops. (Photo: Sunil Ji Bhat)

NS Jamwal presented a souvenir to G Kishan Reddy on behalf of Jammu Frontier. (Photo: Sunil Ji Bhat)

G Kishan Reddy congratulated Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Interior Minister Amit Shah for their efforts through which BSF received modern weapons and advanced technology to effectively protect the country’s international borders against new threats.

In addition, he also underlined that the Prime Minister and the Minister of Interior have been working continuously to provide all possible assistance to the staff of BSF. Various social protection programs like Ayushman Bharat, Skilled Development have been launched under the leadership of PM Modi in this regard.

G Kishan Reddy wished BSF great success in all its future endeavors and trusted in its capabilities.

LOOK: BSF opens fire on “Pakistani drone” spotted near Jammu border


Source link

read more
History organization

How the idea of ​​a local “business climate” was created in the 1950s to give businesses leverage equal to the power of unions.

Most states, cities, and local authorities in the United States are concerned with promoting and maintaining a favorable “business climate” in order to attract foreign investment, jobs, and other economic benefits. Using General Electric’s Better Business Climate program as a case study, Caroline hanley notes that the concept was mobilized by a popular conservative political movement in the 1950s as a way to undermine union power. The concept of the business climate, she writes, has since become a way for companies to define their own interests as shared community interests.

Job insecurity has become a hallmark of the contemporary American economy, and it’s not just workers who fear losing their jobs. Job insecurity is also evident at the community level. Shared concerns about a region’s “business climate” and its relationship to job growth inform virtually all areas of local politics in the United States, often through the work of public economic development agencies operating. in partnership with the private sector. Maintaining a favorable business climate to encourage job growth means limiting regulation, offering tempting tax breaks or publicly funded business infrastructure to potential employers, and promising a skilled and enthusiastic workforce (from non-unionized preference).

Large companies that have the opportunity to relocate or expand their business elsewhere wield great power over their workers and the communities in which they operate. Recent successful “right to work” campaigns – measures prohibiting people from being forced to join a union or pay dues to do a certain job – campaigns in Indiana (2012), Michigan ( 2012), Wisconsin (2015), 2016) and Kentucky (2017) discuss how communities aspire to be competitive in order to tackle economic insecurity. The imperative to remain competitive by avoiding measures that harm the local business climate organizes local and state economic governance and limits actions to combat economic inequalities.

Ideas and history of local competition for investment

While nothing I have said so far will surprise most readers, the origins of this story are not well known. Capital mobility and the regulatory “race to the bottom” dynamic it encourages are often seen as unfortunate but inevitable products of globalization. But local competition for investments has deep historical roots, and as an economic geographer, David Harvey wrote in 2001, “the production, reproduction and reconfiguration of space have always been central to understanding the political economy of capitalism”.

What varies over time are the institutions and ideas that support capital mobility. And ideas can be powerful. Like Margaret R. Somers and Fred Block observed in 2005, examining “the ideas, public narratives and explanatory systems by which states, societies and political cultures construct, transform, explain and normalize market processes” is essential for understanding economic organization and social change (p. 264).

As a cultural framework that signals the objectivity and naturalness of the advantages of political economic location, the business climate concept advances the interests of capital by undermining organized labor by obscuring the class bias in this organizational logic of the market. In addition, the institutionalization of the concept in state and local policies, which has resulted in the growth of public economic development offices working in partnership with private groups such as the American Chamber of Commerce– entrench managerial interests as shared community interests.

GE’s “best business climate”

Contemporary politics of the local business climate did not happen by accident. The concept was mobilized by a conservative grassroots political movement in the 1950s as an end around the New Deal job protections. The General Electric Company (GE) led the way by developing a national public relations campaign that presented union support as a threat to economic security and emphasized local responsibility to maintain a favorable business climate .

GE’s Better Business Climate (BBC) program aimed to mobilize local political action in support of the company’s regulatory goals through the use of newsletters with headlines such as “The Community’s Problem in Getting and Keeping Good Employers ”(ER News, 3/6/55); encourage GE leaders to address local civic and political groups with a message favorable to the business climate (anti-union); and the distribution of business climate assessment guides to communities across the country, including potential GM plant sites. These “economic education” materials teach that unions (and pro-union elected officials) are detrimental to local economic health and prosperity and that it is the responsibility of the community itself to maintain a favorable business climate to attract investment. and create jobs.

The BBC’s program material sought to mask the alignment between commercial interests and the search for a favorable business climate. Copies of GE’s newsletters were distributed widely outside the company in response to written requests from community members and through Chamber of Commerce networks. A widely circulated issue, titled “Corporate Political Powerlessness Hurt Everyone,” argued that businessmen need to be more involved in politics, but this imperative is defined as distinct from partisan or partisan politics:

Non-partisan political work – which is not “political” in the old or usual sense of the term – is really economic work and other educational work of a truly informative or “better business climate” type. (ER News 28/5/56; emphasis in original)

A key feature of the BBC program is the way business climate surveys and manager awareness were supposed to work together. Correspondence between GE executives dated November 1956 states:

I think any of us doing public speeches should be sure that it’s clear that others are questioning the climate in a given state… I think we should use the technique I used in California to deduce [sic] that it is the local residents who are examining or criticizing the local business climate, and that we are here just to talk about what people elsewhere are doing trying to correct the shortcomings they have found in their business climate.

The campaign has produced tangible effects on the power of work at General Electric. Even at the height of the post-war deal between capital and labor, the power of GE’s electrical workers was relatively weak due to the inter-union conflict and a “take it or leave it” approach to negotiation. was declared illegal in 1969 after nearly a decade of deliberation and appeals by the National Labor Relations Board. GE management has skillfully used the threat and reality of corporate offshoring as a tool to discipline work throughout its company’s history. But the use of the business climate concept as a discursive strategy to frame the mobility of capital has been used effectively to advance employment restructuring by mobilizing the community against work in the union stronghold of Schenectady.

General Electric, Schenectady, New York State“(CC BY 2.0) through Boston Public Library

Amid GE’s massive post-war expansion, managers deployed the business climate concept to define job losses at Schenectady as requiring greater union cooperation. New local economic development organizations dedicated to promoting the local business climate lobbied Local 301 of the International Union of Electrical Workers (UIE) in Schenectady to break with its national union at two points criticism of a campaign to increase job security. GE’s business climate program reshaped job security policy at Schenectady and helped institutionalize insecurity. In the words of a former employee of Local 301 who resisted calls by the National UIE to strike against breaches of GE’s contract in 1964 and instead voted to accept the company’s restructuring plan. , “We were told to vote either to accept or to co. we would leave town and we would lose our jobs. What else could we have done?

How companies define their own interests as shared community interests

The use of business relocation as a tool for restructuring labor relations became a cornerstone of business strategy following the economic crisis of the 1970s. Today, local business climate policy continues. to undermine union organization and the power of workers to resist job restructuring. This landmark case study of GE’s BBC program draws attention to how the concept of the business climate, as a cultural framework for understanding capital mobility, advances the symbolic power of companies to define their interests as shared community interests. The concept obscures class politics, organizes powerful public-private partnerships in favor of commercial interests, and signals the natural or inevitable nature of what are in reality political economic outcomes.

In this time of heightened inequality and widespread economic vulnerability, it may be time to reconsider how the idea of ​​the concept of local business climate – as a concept taken for granted, habitual and legitimate source of inequality, continues to function as an instrument of job insecurity.

Please read our feedback policy before commenting.

Note: This article gives the author’s point of view, not the position of the USAPP – American Politics and Policy, or the London School of Economics.

Shortened URL for this article: https://bit.ly/3yjDp5V


About the Author

Caroline Hanley – Guillaume and Marie
Caroline Hanley is Associate Professor of Sociology at William & Mary. Professor Hanley’s research examines how income is shaped by local contexts – regional, political, economic, organizational and professional – using statistical and archival methods. She is particularly interested in the causes of the increase in income inequality in the United States since the 1970s, the influence of race and gender on incomes, and how popular conceptions of equity in the economic activity shapes the distribution of economic rewards.


Source link

read more
Canadian army

The Rebel to Rabble Review: A Canceled Canada Day

“Pathetic.”

It’s like that Ricochet Columnist Katsi’tsakwas Ellen Gabriel, whose biography says she “has been an indigenous human rights and environmental activist since 1990,” sums up the “shock and horror” with which “mainstream” Canadian society reacted to news of the discovery “hundreds of Aboriginal children on the grounds of two former Indian residential schools” – a number that is expected to increase with site surveys.

“The hearts and souls of indigenous peoples have been breaking for generations,” she says.

“Our pain and anger have been boiling for ages. While most compassionate people mourn with us, the majority of Canadians still do not know the truth about their country. How can anyone claim to have never heard of the residential school system? Or not knowing that there are thousands of Indigenous children buried in anonymous graves across Canada? The Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) traveled across Canada for seven years. There was media coverage. Millions of dollars have been spent. That alone must have attracted attention!

She is also attacking the “insidious Indian Act,” which she says “remains a tool to control the native population, or, as Duncan Campbell Scott, a key architect of the residential school system, said,” to get rid of the Indian problem. ‘ “

His response: “We are not a problem; we are human beings. The sooner this is achieved, the sooner we can implement an education program that will protect against (current) and future generations from making the same apathetic mistake of not recognizing when a crime against humanity is committed. “

Meanwhile, Ricochet writer Brandi Morin, “An award-winning French / Cree / Iroquois journalist from Treaty 6 territory in Alberta,” shares the latest news on the standoff between indigenous rights activists and ancient logging operations in Fairy Island, Alta.

“Noah Ross, a Vancouver Island-based lawyer who assists the Rainforest Flying Squad – as the loose group of volunteers behind the roadblocks is called – says the RCMP are systematically working to reduce the number of witnesses (of) their actions using exclusion zones. », Reports Morin.

According to Ross, the RCMP “are like a ‘colonial army’ occupying Indigenous lands … and they do not treat Indigenous peoples the same as white settlers in these situations.” In fact, he told Ricochet, “there are certainly times when they (the RCMP) behave in a very peaceful manner, largely when it (the protest or the blockade) is dominated by militants of the settlers. “

Also unabashedly in favor of canceling the usual Canada Day celebrations was Canadian Dimension columnist and longtime Indigenous activist Pam Palmater.

“A national day of mourning and collective reflection in honor of these children is far more appropriate than the usual fireworks and parades, which celebrate a country founded on genocide – a genocide that continues unabated”, she argued.

“It will be a summer of truth for Canadians as more and more graves of Native children are discovered,” Palmater wrote. “At the same time, it will be a summer of great suffering for Indigenous peoples, especially residential school survivors and the families of those children who never made it out alive. Calls for the cancellation of Canada Day celebrations this year (had) nothing to do with the so-called “cancellation culture” – the term dog whistle used by angry white men taking advantage of the status quo. On the contrary, #CancelCanadaDay is what true reconciliation looks like. “

More than Rabble, political writer Karl Nerenberg explains why Carolyn Bennett should step down as Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations – which she believes goes way beyond the now infamous snipe of a note she texted to her former cabinet colleague , Jody Wilson-Raybould.

“Voters would do well to not only remember this incident, but also to carefully consider Carolyn Bennett’s record since taking on this new post, leading a new ministry,” he wrote.

“Bennett has been successful in negotiating a few small-scale deals with individual First Nations bands. But the government has done nothing systemic to reform the current colonial relationship between the Crown and Indigenous peoples. “

In fact, he argues, “whenever large resource projects are on the table, transnational corporations can count on willing partners from the provincial and federal governments, (who) normally collude to put pressure on small underfunded First Nations bands to accept vague promises. jobs and benefits, no co-ownership, no meaningful partnership and not a dime in royalties, ”something Bennett“ has done very little to change, ”in his opinion.

“In fairness to the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, she received little support from federal government centers of power, such as the departments of Finance, Treasury Board, Natural Resources and Industry,” as well as the Privy Council and the Prime Minister’s Office. . That, more than a verbal insult, might be a good reason for Bennett to quit.

Elsewhere on the site, Rabble blogger and self-proclaimed “street nurse,” Cathy Crowe, looks at “the militarized operation to evict two dozen people from Toronto’s Trinity Bellwoods Park,” which she notes was not just “a gruesome story of city hall against the poor “, But a repeat of what happened two decades earlier in Tent City, a” 140-person waterfront encampment “that also found itself” brutally evicted early one morning, “with the courtesy of then-mayor Mel Lastman.

“A fence was erected around the site, a convoy of trucks and heavy machinery arrived, a substantial amount of security and police arrived to remove the traumatized residents and, within hours, their homes – a combination of auto shacks. -built and prefabricated houses. – were flattened, ”she recalls.

“Solidarity demonstrations took place within the hour and included members of the union squadron. “

The move also sparked “tears from housing activists, including residents of Tent City,” who “fought and secured housing through a pilot rent supplement program.” Yet 20 years later, under current Toronto Mayor John Tory, “homelessness has exploded” and the city “is more than unraveled; it is broken by surgical assistance from other levels of government.

Also keeping a close eye on events at Trinity Bellwood is Passage essayist Matthew Alexandris, who criticizes Toronto City Council for failing to keep its promise to fight “devastating changes” to the Residential Tenancies Act under Ontario Premier Doug Ford.

“Almost a year later, the city has yet to launch this legal challenge,” he says.

“And beyond doing nothing to prevent people from becoming homeless, the city hasn’t done much to help those who are, making matters worse. Campsites have emerged in increasing numbers throughout the pandemic, serving as places for those who have been evicted and who cannot afford rent. “

In fact, Alexandris notes, “The violent methods used by police and security guards to clear encampments reflect the violence of being forced out of your residence, not knowing where you will be staying next, and having your belongings thrown away. … By evicting people and pushing them from place to place, it is more difficult for them to have stability in a community and to have access to support networks.

To finish, Progress of the press recounts the latest twist in the ongoing Alberta investigation into “foreign funding of anti-Alberta energy campaigns,” sending official notices to environmental groups and other organizations formally requesting their support. response to “research materials, evidence and conclusions report.”

The twist: “The letters were missing specific allegations of all kinds,” which, according to Greenpeace Canada – one of several groups to confirm receipt of the mass letter – “puts the legal right to the investigation of make an allegation public on a legal basis. “

Or, as the group’s senior energy advisor, Keith Stuart, put it in an interview with PP, “It’s a bit of a puzzle.

PP adds, “The letter of inquiry further states that its evidence was ‘mostly’ drawn from publicly available information online, including websites and government documents that the organizations have already published themselves. “

“Paradoxically, it is also clear that the recipients, a number of whom received identical letters, according to Stuart, were not found guilty of acting unlawfully during the two-year investigation.”

Trends on the right side of the Canadian activist media universe:

  • Adam Soos, correspondent for Rebel News in Alberta has an “exclusive” interview with Pastor Artur Pawlowski, who he reports was found “guilty of all contempt of court charges” for refusing to comply with the province’s social distancing restrictions, which Soos describes as a “much worse – case scenario.
  • Meanwhile, after responding to a tweet from Alberta’s chief medical officer, Deena Hinshaw, accusing her of “sentencing hundreds of Albertans to death for depression, suicide and drug overdoses,” and l called “a wicked woman going to hell,” Ezra Levant, Commander of Rebel News is faced with a retort from former Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s son Ben for his “ridiculous and unbalanced claims”.
  • Levant also offers his thoughts on Catherine McKenna’s announcement that she will not stand for re-election. McKenna “quits politics in a typically futile way” and “will be remembered as a bully,” he says.
  • To finish, True North News compiled a timeline of “every community that has decided to give in to Canada Day cancellation requests.”

More iPolitics


Source link

read more
International headquarters

Saudi transport and logistics plan intensifies competition with Gulf states – Analysis – Eurasia Review

Recent announcements by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman regarding his intention to transform the kingdom into a transport and logistics hub connecting the continents take Saudi efforts to replace the United Arab Emirates and Qatar as the United Arab Emirates to a new level. must-see addresses in the Middle East.

Prince Mohammed’s plans, which include the creation of a new national airline alongside Saudia, currently the kingdom’s aviation flagship, and the construction of a new airport for the capital, Riyadh, aim to position the Saudi Arabia as the hub of the Middle East at the crossroads of Asia and Africa. and European.

The UAE, supported by Emirates and DP World, currently serves as the region’s transportation and logistics hub. DP World handles ten percent of the world’s container traffic and operates some 80 ports as well as marine and inland terminals in more than 40 countries.

Emirates is the world’s fifth largest airline in terms of number of countries served and fourth in terms of brand value and passenger and scheduled freight tonne-kilometers.

Qatar Airways has made the Gulf State a serious competitor as an aviation hub. The airline is giving Emirates a run for its money when it comes to the number of countries served and scheduled freight tonne-kilometers.

Challenging the first mover advantage of the UAE and Qatar is likely to prove to be a big order, but not impossible. This is also true for Turkish Airlines, the other major airline in the Middle East with ambitions similar to those of Emirates and Qatar Airways.

Prince Mohammed said his transportation and logistics plan aims to make Saudi Arabia the country with the fifth highest number of transit passengers served by Saudi airlines that would serve more than 250 international destinations.

Saudia currently serves destinations in 39 countries. According to Prince Mohammed’s plan, it would welcome pilgrims to Mecca and Medina while the new airline would focus on tourists and business travelers.

By comparison, Qatar Airways flies to at least 160 passenger and cargo destinations, Emirates 139 destinations and https://www.flightconnections.com/route-map-turkish-airlines-tk Turkish Airlines, topping the list with 200 international destinations .

Prince Mohammed further aims to double the capacity of the Saudi air cargo sector to 4.5 million tonnes of cargo per year, through the development of port infrastructure and improved integration with shipping lines and networks. railways and roads in the country.

The rail lines would be extended from 5,330 to 8,080 kilometers and would ensure that Saudi Arabian Sea ports are connected to those in the Red Sea.

Prince Mohammed said his plan was to get Saudi Arabia to the top ten on the Logistics Performance Index. The kingdom is currently connecting to number 55.

Prince Mohammed said he expects transport and logistics to eventually account for 10% of Saudi GDP, up four points from the current 6%.

Prince Mohammed’s efforts to shift geopolitical, infrastructural, economic and trade gravity from the Middle East to the kingdom are part of his Vision 2030 strategy which aims to create jobs, diversify the Saudi economy and reposition the country regionally and global.

“Transport and logistics are a major focus of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 programs and a vital factor for economic sectors towards sustainable development,” said Prince Mohammed at the launch of the transport and logistics plan.

Vision 2030 appears to be working on a metric amid question marks over the approach of the Crown Prince’s expensive projects such as Neom, a futuristic $ 500 billion city on the Red Sea.

Unemployment among Saudi nationals fell to 11.7% in the first quarter of this year from 12.6% in the fourth quarter of last year, its lowest level in nearly five years.

The problem is that the unemployment rate only tells part of the story. The decline in unemployment was not entirely attributable to job creation in a country that must create at least 150,000 new jobs per year to keep unemployment stable. This was in part the result of the Saudis withdrawing from the labor market.

The kingdom’s General Statistics Authority reported that Saudi labor force participation fell from 51.2% in the fourth quarter of last year to 49.5% in the first three months of this year. , the largest drop since the economic slowdown in 2017.

Prince Mohammed’s expanding competition with the UAE, Qatar and Turkey for transport and logistics follows earlier moves that include challenging the UAE’s position as a regional headquarters international trade, an announcement of plans to operate regional ports and container terminals, and a focus on sport as a tool of soft power, among other things by potentially bidding for the hosting rights of the 2030 World Cup .

Prince Mohammed’s ambitions are beyond doubt. The intensification of competition for regional positioning raises the stakes to ensure that the ambitions of the crown prince ultimately translate into tangible achievements.


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Summerville teenager helps community members escape homelessness | New

SUMMERVILLE – One of the most obvious priorities in helping someone get out of homelessness is finding a place for them to live.

But what happens when they move into a space with nothing but a crate full of clothes and rent money?

“The difference between having a bed or not really changes all day long,” said John Michael Stagliano, 18, a lifelong Summerville resident.

Stagliano is also the founder of Home Again, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing furniture and household items to families leaving behind their old conditions and moving into new homes.

It all started with Stagliano volunteering at a Summerville homeless shelter, where he learned that residents’ needs don’t end with just leaving the shelter.

Over the past five years, Home Again has supplied the homes of nearly 500 people and helped raise thousands of dollars for local shelters.

Stagliano managed to accomplish all of this before graduating from high school.

“You can always do something to help someone else,” he said.

While acquiring something as simple as furniture may seem small to some people, it has been life changing for those who have benefited from Home Again. Connie Ross, one of these recent furniture recipients, said the organization’s help took a lot of stress away.

“Because I had nothing,” she said. “Not even a chair to sit on.”

Do something right

Ross now has two jobs – one at a local fast food restaurant and another for a cleaning service. She recently moved into a new apartment after being homeless for over a year. Between November and this summer, she was living at Hope’s House, the homeless women’s shelter at Dorchester County Community Outreach.

Before getting a place in the shelter, she had also spent a year living in her car while recovering from drug addiction. She said she still remembers the rainy nights sitting alone in her car, including during the pandemic, which compounded the isolation.

“I’ve had a few nights of crying, but not a lot,” Ross said. “You just have to find your inner strength.”

She became homeless after leaving a space where she lived with others. Ross learned that someone loaded furniture and other items in his name and damaged his credit.

This caused him to spend most of the pandemic in his car.

Summerville sees need for affordable housing options but struggles to find a place

“I had to pay off a lot of debt,” she said.

She was able to keep both of her jobs and save money, enough to eventually afford her own place.

The shelter did not allow women to buy anything because everything was given. “It was a breath of fresh air,” she said.

When Ross was finally able to find a place to stay, she hooked up with Home Again. Stagliano and his team gave him a bed, lamps, crockery, toiletries, a TV and more.

She said that as a black woman it felt good to see someone willing to help her. When looking for apartments after fixing her credit, she said there were times she could see that property managers were disappointed when they found out about her race.

With Stagliano being so young and doing so much volunteer work in the community, it was inspiring, she said.

“He’s doing something right,” she said. “And I think people should support him in any way they can.”

Who gets help

Home Again recipients ranged from people like Ross to entire families and local veterans. Stagliano said what he expects the most in his job is to see the change in personalities in people when they get help.

He remembers helping a veteran who slept on his apartment floor for at least a week.

When they visited him after delivering the furniture, he noticed that he was more social with his neighbors and happier overall. He said he had the same level of excitement when he saw two children jump on the beds his team brought them.






Back home

John Michael Stagliano (left) prepares to prepare a bed for veteran Timothy Hall on June 19, 2021. Stagliano founded Home Again, which helps provide furniture and household items to families emerging from homelessness and moving to new accommodation. Brad Nettles / Staff




It was a sense of accomplishment that Stagliano knew well from having spent much of his childhood volunteering.

Volunteering and giving back to the community is something the Stagliano family know well.

In addition to Home Again, John Michael’s sister Katie founded and runs Katie’s Krops. This is another Summerville nonprofit that creates community gardens to support food drives to end hunger.

This organization was formed after Katie grew a 40-pound cabbage when she was in third grade. John Michael was 4 at the time.

Cabbage then fed nearly 300 people and propelled Katie towards the launch of Katie’s Krops. The nonprofit now spans 31 states across the United States with dozens of community gardens.

Summerville's Katie's Krops reflects on more than a decade of national community garden work

“I think it was just meant to be,” Katie said. “The entire Summerville community as a whole, they have been amazing.”

Years later, while preparing meals at a Summerville homeless men’s shelter called Home of Hope, John Michael began helping residents of the shelter obtain furniture. He and his family would solicit the community for donations. After joining the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center and supporting homeless veterans, Home Again was born.

“It really changes lives and helps bring families together,” Katie said. “I couldn’t be prouder to be his sister.”

Without this giant cabbage, the family is not sure the two nonprofits would have taken off. But, they said the enthusiasm for supporting the community would have always been there.

“It’s kind of who we are as a family,” said Stacy Stagliano, mother of John Michael and Katie.

She said she never imagined that any of her children would oversee the organizations. With Home Again, she said she was surprised because John Michael has always been her shy child.

“They just see the possibilities,” Stacy said.

Without the support of the community, she said nonprofits would never have had the impact they are having now.

John Michael agrees.

“I couldn’t do it on my own,” he said.

During the height of the pandemic, Home Again was not receiving many calls. John Michael’s best guess was that, unfortunately, few families were getting out of homelessness.






Back home

John Michael Stagliano (center) and his father, John Stagliano, unload furniture with the help of veteran Timothy Hall on June 19, 2021. John Michael founded Home Again, which helps provide furniture and household items to families who emerging from homelessness and transitioning to new housing. Hall needed a bed and furniture. Brad Nettles / Staff




But recently with vaccines there has been a noticeable increase in awareness. Community support is therefore always welcome and necessary, he said.

Along with Ross, she said she was not only grateful to Home Again, but also to the community of Summerville in general for supporting her so much.

She can’t wait for her turn to do the same for someone else.

To support the association, go to Home Again Facebook page or send an email to [email protected]

Summerville's non-profit community garden Katie's Krops opens its first outdoor classroom

read more
International headquarters

Florian Hess, Jens Pflüger and Christian Ulrich start on July 1st

Florian Hess, Jens Pflüger and Christian Ulrich already know their missions. In addition to working as a team to direct the fortunes of the cooperative, its subsidiaries and its interests, they also have clearly defined individual responsibilities. As a member of the Fair Management Board, Florian Hess supervises the organization and marketing of exhibitions. He is also responsible for the representative network, the World of Toys international show program and legal matters. Florian Hess joined Spielwarenmesse eG in 2016 as Director of Trade Show Management, where he was in charge of exhibitor activities in all trade show projects and their development. After graduating in Business Administration, he gained extensive experience in overseeing various strategy and change management projects abroad. He has also organized a leading international exhibition for capital goods and was managing director of Hess Consulting GmbH – a service provider for trade fairs such as the Spielwarenmesse.

The responsibilities of finance, human resources and IT fall to the member of the management board Jens Pflüger. He also takes care of the members of the cooperative, digitization and contract management. The graduate in IT and Business Administration started his career as IT and Organization Manager at Göhler Tank- und Industrieanlangen. In 2000 he joined the Spielwarenmesse, making him the longest-serving member of the team at the headquarters of Nuremberg. In his role as IT & Finance Director, he was already in charge of the management and development of the areas of finance, accounting, management control and IT. Jens Pflüger is also CEO of SeG Beteiligungs GmbH.

Christian Ulrich is a member of the Marketing and Public Relations Board of Directors as well as a Board spokesperson. He is responsible for marketing, corporate communication as well as press and public relations. He also oversees the development of new business opportunities. A graduate in business administration, he launched his career as a consultant for the Serviceplan group of agencies. This was followed by a period at Fischer Group, first as Head of Advertising and finally as Head of International Marketing. He joined Spielwarenmesse eG in 2007 as Marketing Director and was in charge of brand leadership, global marketing for all shows and events and creation of special shows. More, Christian Ulrich is managing director of the agency “Die roten Reiter”, a subsidiary of Spielwarenmesse eG.

Even though the pandemic has raised a whole host of new challenges, the three board members see the company’s potential as an important trading hub connecting global industrial networks. “We have made excellent progress in developing innovative concepts that encompass the accelerated introduction of digitization while focusing on the unique and much-needed experience of a physical salon. We will continue to build on more than 70 years of Spielwarenmesse eG success and to live up to the future demands and expectations of all trade fair attendees ”, states Christian Ulrich.

Spielwarenmesse eG

Spielwarenmesse eG is the trade fair organizer and marketing service provider for the toy industry and other consumer goods markets. the Nuremberg company organizes the world leader Spielwarenmesse® in Nuremberg, Kids India in Bombay and Insights-X in Nuremberg. The range of services provided by the cooperative also includes industry campaigns and the international fair program, World of toys by Spielwarenmesse eG, which allows manufacturers to exhibit in pavilions presented in trade fairs Asia, Russia and the United States. Spielwarenmesse eG operates a global network of representatives in over 90 countries. It also has several subsidiaries, including Spielwarenmesse Shanghai Co., Ltd., responsible for the People’s Republic of China and Spielwarenmesse India Pvt. Ltd., covering the Indian market. The cooperative owns a majority stake in the Russian exhibition company Grand Expo, which organizes Kids Russia in Moscow. Die roten Reiter GmbH subsidiary with its registered office at Nuremberg works as a communication agency for the consumer and capital goods industry. The full company profile of Spielwarenmesse eG can be viewed on the Internet at www.spielwarenmesse-eg.com.

SOURCE Spielwarenmesse eG ([email protected])


Source link

read more
Non profit living

Stimulus Check Live Fourth Update: Can It Be Approved In July? Tax Refund, $ 3,600 Child Tax Credit Portal …

How has personal and disposable income changed throughout the pandemic?

With new personal income data released in May by the Commerce Department on June 25, a clearer picture of the economic recovery is starting to emerge.

The Department of Commerce defines personal income as “income received by, or on behalf of, all persons from all sources.” This includes wages, social security, unemployment benefits, etc.

From January to March 2020, before the pandemic really took hold of the United States, personal income in the United States was $ 18.95 billion. For the same period in 2021, this figure was $ 22.1 billion. The largest increase in recent history, largely due to the fact that 70% of unemployed people earned more than when they were workingg.

In April and May, those numbers started to decline, which many economists believe two factors.

The first being that of January and March 2021, revenues hit record highs after sending the second and third stimulus checks.

The second reason is related to the continuous movement of people re-enter the labor market. If the unemployed start working where they earn less than they were when they were receiving benefits, this number will decrease.

Total income from unemployment benefits has fallen in recent months from a high level of $ 556.4 billion, after the federal $ 300 per week topper was first sent, to $ 458 billion in May as the The unemployment rate has plummeted and claims for benefits have reached an all-time high since the start of the pandemic.

read more
History organization

Eugene YMCA’s new facility to receive $ 15 million from Oregon Legislature

The Eugene Family YMCA will receive $ 15 million in state funding for a new facility, after the economic impacts of COVID-19 blocked the sale of bonds for projects in 2020.

Brian Steffen, CEO of Eugene Family YMCA, said it was the highest amount ever awarded in the organization’s 134-year history and that it would be a crucial step towards the completion of funding for a new YMCA building.

“This was pivotal funding for the new Y, and once again we are touched and grateful for the trust and support of lawmakers,” said Steffen. “From there, we’re focusing on the last major giveaways for the new Y, and we think we can clear them up by the end of the summer.”

Steffen declined to say how close the YMCA has come to its goal of $ 42 million for the project, and added that he believes he will be able to share the amount by the end of August or in early September when the organization will know if it will receive a significant amount. federal funding from new market tax credits.

The YMCA announced several important donations made by the community, including:

  • $ 4 million, April: YMCA donors helped raise $ 4 million by raising $ 1 million for the John E. and Robin Jaqua Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation.
  • $ 650,000, March: Includes donations from four different donors: $ 350,000 last winter from the MJ Murdock Charitable Trust; $ 100,000 from Herb Merker and Marcy Hammock; $ 50,000 from Joe Karcher and his wife, Cathleen; and an anonymous donation of $ 150,000.
  • $ 1.5 million, June: Gift of the Chambers Family Foundation.
  • $ 4 million, January 2020: Gift from Bill and Michelle Service.
  • $ 1 million, December 2019: YMCA donors raised $ 50,000 through a matching grant from local philanthropist Betty Soreng, who donated $ 50,000.

In 2019, state lawmakers authorized $ 15 million in funding for the Eugene Family YMCA as part of lottery bonds for 37 projects in the state.

However, because COVID-19 and the associated economic decline blocked the sale of the bonds in 2020, the 2021 legislative session re-examined each of the projects.

Related:Eugene Family YMCA makes summer programs for kids free

The $ 15 million funding, designated in Senate Bill 5534, was passed by the Legislature on Saturday, as part of a package of $ 445.2 million for 55 projects. It is expected to be signed by Governor Kate Brown in early August.

“The economic downturn due to the pandemic has had a widespread impact, including delays in the development of the much-needed new facility for the Eugene Family YMCA,” Representative Nancy Nathanson, D-Eugene, said in a statement from hurry. “My colleagues and I took the first opportunity we could to re-authorize public funding for the Y. We recognize how vital this organization is to the well-being of our community, and our community needs the Y all the more. after COVID.

The new YMCA building is expected to have an area of ​​74,000 square feet at the corner of 24th Avenue and Hilyard Street.

“The current Y building at 2055 Patterson St. was designed to serve a 1950s population of 70,000,” the statement said. “He has served the community well for 66 years, but is now in a state of costly structural decline. “

Louis Krauss covers the latest news for The Register-Guard. Contact him at [email protected] or 541-521-2498, and follow him on Twitter @LouisKraussNews.



Source link

read more
Canadian army

Coronavirus: What’s Happening in Canada and Around the World on Wednesday

The last:

Ontario moved to the next step in its plan to reopen on Wednesday, just hours before health officials reported the lowest single-day case count the province has seen since September 10.

The province reported 14 additional deaths and 184 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday.

The update came a day after the province’s top doctor said he would prefer to wait 21 full days before further lifting the restrictions.

“The two to three week cycle is very important to maintain so that we open Ontario in stages, always moving forward and not having to back down,” said Dr. Kieran Moore on Tuesday.

Moore made the comments during his first pandemic briefing since officially taking over as Ontario’s chief medical officer of health.

Ontario has exceeded COVID-19 vaccination targets to enter the second phase of its plan to reopen, which will allow more outdoor activities and more indoor services like haircuts. resume Wednesday.

More than 77% of people had received at least one dose of the vaccine by Tuesday morning and 37% were fully immunized.

The province has set 21 days between each stage of its economic reopening to observe public health trends and allow vaccines to take full effect. He brought forward the second stage of the plan a few days based on vaccination rates and other positive trends from COVID-19.

Ontario also exceeded the target to enter the third stage of the reopening plan, which would further increase the capacity of indoor gatherings.

But Moore, like his predecessor Dr David Williams, argued on Tuesday that vaccination is not the only measure. He advised to proceed with caution with the spread of the more infectious delta variant.

Region of Waterloo not moving to step 2

People who have received a dose of the vaccine are less protected against this variant and this has contributed to local spikes in infection in the Gray Bruce and Waterloo region. Waterloo will not reopen with the rest of the province on Wednesday as it manages the increase in infections.

Moore said he is monitoring the impact of the variant locally and internationally and that reopening must be done with caution to avoid losing the progress made in fighting the virus so far.

“He’s a tough opponent. He’s aggressive. He wants to spread quickly,” he said of the variant.

“We have to be careful and we need 21 days to be able to understand the impact of openness on our communities.”

-Based on the latest update from The Canadian Press and CBC News at 10:20 a.m. ET


What’s happening across Canada

WATCH | Masks still matter as Canada faces a more transmissible delta variant, according to an expert:

Masks are our “last line of defense” against the highly transmissible delta variant of COVID-19 as Canada opens up, says pulmonologist Dr Samir Gupta. (Ben Nelms / CBC) 1:39

As early as Wednesday morning, Canada had reported 1,414,746 confirmed cases of COVID-19, of which 7,400 were considered active. A CBC News death tally stood at 26,274. More than 36.7 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered across the country so far, according to the CBC vaccine tracker.

A total of five cases of COVID-19 were reported in Atlantic Canada on Tuesday, including:

No new cases of COVID-19 have been reported in Newfoundland and Labrador Tuesday.

In Quebec, health authorities have reported four additional deaths and 71 new cases of COVID-19.

In the Prairie provinces, Manitoba Tuesday reported no new deaths and 61 new cases of COVID-19. Saskatchewan, meanwhile, reported two more deaths and 52 more cases of COVID-19.

WATCH | Laina Tuckanow lost her mother and grandmother to COVID-19 and says for her, life will never be normal again:

While many Canadians celebrate a return to normalcy, for many the pain is still too great. Laina Tuckanow lost her mother and grandmother to COVID-19 and says for herself that life will never be normal again. 2:44

In Alberta, health officials on Tuesday reported four deaths and 61 new cases of COVID-19.

“Overall, our numbers are heading in the right direction,” Dr Deena Hinshaw said on Tuesday, before a wider reopening later this week.

“Cases, hospitalizations, ICU admissions and our positivity rate are the lowest since last summer, early fall.”

In the North, no new cases were reported in Nunavut or the Northwest Territories Tuesday, as 10 new cases and one additional death were reported in yukonese.

“We are in a new phase of this pandemic, one that we hoped not to see,” Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr Brendan Hanley said in a statement on Tuesday. “But we are here and we will continue to work together to contain this tide.”

British Columbia will move to step 3 of its pandemic reopening plan on Thursday, lifting the provincial mandate of the mask and the government’s declaration of a state of emergency. The news came as British Columbia reported 29 new cases and no new deaths on Tuesday.

-From CBC News and The Canadian Press, last updated 10:20 am ET


What is happening in the world

A street is seen in Brisbane’s central business district on Wednesday as the city goes silent after a lockdown. Australia is battling outbreaks of the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus. (Patrick Hamilton / AFP / Getty Images)

As of Wednesday morning, more than 181.8 million cases of COVID-19 had been reported worldwide, according to data released by Johns Hopkins University in the United States. The death toll worldwide was over 3.9 million.

In the Asia Pacific region, Australian authorities on Wednesday extended lockdown and physical distancing measures to more of the country, with four major cities already under strict lockdown in a race to contain an outbreak of the highly contagious variant of the delta coronavirus.

Bangladesh is deploying army troops from Thursday to enforce a strict lockdown amid a record spike in coronavirus cases caused by the delta variant first detected in India, the government said on Wednesday.

“No one will be allowed out except in an emergency during this time,” the government said in a statement, warning that army troops alongside law enforcement would be deployed to enforce the lockdown.

In the AmericasDr Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said the CDC is leaving it up to local authorities to establish guidelines for wearing the mask as the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus increases in areas with low vaccination rate.

Walensky said Wednesday on NBC Today show that “we’ve always said that local decision-makers should make policies for their local environment,” but added that CDC guidelines broadly say that those who are vaccinated do not need to wear masks.

Los Angeles County health officials recommend that people wear masks indoors in public places, regardless of their immunization status. Separately, the World Health Organization reiterated its long-standing recommendation that everyone wear masks to reduce the spread of the coronavirus.

In Africa, the Tunisian government extended the hours of nighttime curfew on Tuesday in a bid to stop the rapid spread of COVID-19, as the North African country hit a daily record of cases since the start of the pandemic Last year.

Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa on Tuesday imposed a dusk-dawn curfew, banned intercity travel and reduced hours of operation with immediate effect in response to the increase in coronavirus infections.

Roofing Rolling Mills workers fill oxygen tanks which will be distributed free of charge to various hospitals in Uganda at their factory in Namanve, Wakiso, Uganda on Tuesday. The factory is filling 350 to 400 oxygen tanks daily, following an increase in COVID-19 cases in the country and lack of oxygen in various hospitals. (Badru Katamba / AFP / Getty Images)

In Europe, Greece will allow people fully vaccinated against the coronavirus inside restaurants without masks, the government said, as part of measures to increase vaccination rates.

Russia will not be able to immunize 60% of its population by fall as planned due to weak demand for vaccines, the Kremlin said, after the country recorded its highest number of daily deaths from the virus.

In the Middle East, Oman has said it is expanding its vaccination campaign to anyone over 18 as it speeds up what has been the slowest rollout in the Gulf.

-From Reuters, last update 8:10 am ET


Source link

read more
International headquarters

Guess & Co. Corporation Appoints Retired Senior FBI Agent

OSAGE BEACH, Mississippi, June 30, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Guess & Co. Corporation is pleased to announce that Kevin J. Kline has been appointed Special Advisor for Compliance and Risk Management. Kevin J. Kline is a shareholder and special advisor to Guess & Co. Corporation. Mr. Kline retired from the Federal Bureau of Investigation as a deputy special agent in charge of the New Haven, Connecticut division. He managed more than 175 employees in this field office and oversaw the division’s national security, intelligence and administration programs. Prior to overseeing the FBI office in New Haven, Mr. Kline was an inspector at FBI Headquarters in Washington, DC, where he was responsible for conducting compliance audits of FBI field offices and working closely with the Director of the FBI. FBI. While at FBI Headquarters, he created and implemented a new method for evaluating the performance of FBI executives. Prior to working at Headquarters, Mr. Kline was the on-scene commander in Afghanistan for the Counter-Terrorism Division of the FBI. Prior to his international assignment, Mr. Kline was Deputy Special Agent in charge of the Boston, Massachusetts Division. While overseeing the Boston division, Mr. Kline managed over 225 employees and established joint task forces for terrorism investigations. He also led the team to locate, apprehend and secure the conviction of an organized crime fugitive in Boston. As a special supervisory agent for the Newark Division in New Jersey, Mr. Kline led the investigation into the 9/11 attacks in New Jersey and United Airlines Flight 93. Mr. Kline graduated from Magna with a Bachelor of Arts in History and Education. Cum Laude from Canisius College. He holds a Juris Doctor from the Albany Law School of Union University. Mr. Kline works closely with members of the management team and our Board of Directors to ensure effective compliance and risk management for Guess & Co. Corporation. In addition to Guess & Co. Corporation, Mr. Kline is COO of The Aggeris Group, LLC, an investigation and security company. “We are delighted to have Mr. Kline as a trusted advisor to the management and board of directors of our company. His many years of experience as a Senior Federal Law Enforcement Officer are essential to our compliance and risk management programs, ”said Jerry D. Guess, President and CEO of Guess & Co. Corporation.

About Guess & Co. Corporation

Guess & Co. Corporation is a diversified energy, healthcare, technology and real estate company focused on revitalizing and serving rural America. Our company is positioned to become the undisputed market leader in rural energy, rural health care, rural technology and rural real estate. As a company based in the Midwest, we are at the heart of rural America. Guess & Co. Corporation is also a registered contractor with the US government to provide solutions to federal government agencies and members of our company have active top-secret / SCI authorizations. We are based in Osage Beach, Missouri. Our company operates in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and North Carolina. Guess & Co. Corporation was founded in August 2017. The management team of Guess & Co. Corporation has over 50 years of combined experience.

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/328b1625-43d1-4881-bf20-e35f77bacb2f


        


Source link

read more
1 9 10 11 12
Page 11 of 12