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Canadian army

November 27: Chapman has the right to reward vaccinated workers, Dundas in smoke and other letters

Chalk crime

Regarding the article entitled “Men guilty of hate crimes in synagogue avoid prison” (November 15): it went without comment that this case is probably the first time in Canada that the crime of mischief has been committed by drawing in the chalk.

I would have no doubts about the fairness of the prosecution of these young men if the hate messages had been painted in the synagogue parking lot. The paint would have been difficult and expensive to remove. The chalk can be removed with a few sweeps of the broom or, if left unchecked, it would be washed away in the next rain. A chalk drawing on a parking lot, whether it is a written message, a symbol or a hopscotch, does not interfere with the normal use of the property.

Whether the marked, written or drawn thing is offensive is not part of the definition of the offense. I have searched in vain for any binding legal authority in which the decision ratio was that marking property with chalk may constitute the crime of mischief within the meaning of s. 430 of the Criminal Code. If a lawyer or a police officer directly involved in this lawsuit can provide me with the report of such a case, I will gladly offer him lunch.

Andrew Bell, Stoney Creek

Non-essential hospitals?

While it might seem silly at first glance, making hospitals a non-essential service would mean that to enter you will need to have your COVID passport just like you have to show it to eat out or see a movie. Just think of the number of beds that would open up to sick people through no fault of their own. An added benefit may be that it would encourage fence keepers to “get the jab!” “

Paul John Phillips, Dundas

Vaccine rewards

Apparently the unvaccinated do not like the vaccinated to be rewarded! Rather than letting unvaccinated workers go, Chapman Ice Cream decided to give its vaccinated employees a raise of $ 1 per hour, which equates to the $ 40 it has to pay each week for rapid tests. for the unvaccinated. Have they let go of the unvaccinated? No! Did they force them to get vaccinated? No! So why can’t they reward those who have done their community duty to help end this pandemic? I guess it’s because they don’t focus all of their effort and attention on the unvaccinated. Want to be part of the increase? Get vaccinated or don’t complain!

Leorita Staresina, Hamilton

Say no to jets

If we were to buy the 88 fighter jets on offer, Canada would very likely be led by NATO to use them in conflicts that destabilize the poorest countries. Have you noticed that when two powerful countries disagree (for example, the United States, Russia or China), they end up going to war in a poor country to settle the dispute by proxy? And as Mark Hagar pointed out in The Spectator on November 22, it would be the largest military purchase ever made by Canada. The massive purchase far exceeds the tax dollars spent on climate issues, health care, Indigenous rights, affordable housing and other social issues. There should be a full investigation into the merits of these arms purchases.

Canada can certainly use its tax dollars for peaceful ideas such as high-profile talks and strong incentives for aid, as well as climate crisis mitigation and Canada’s own social needs. And if you are worried about the climate crisis, remember that the military’s huge greenhouse gas emissions are contributing to climate change but are not even allowed to be counted (due to US demands to exempt them during the Kyoto summit). As our national anthem sings, “Keep the Guard for You”. Tell your MP Filomena Tassi, the new Federal Minister of Procurement, that you do not support these purchases. We must not allow the powerful military-industrial complex and NATO to ruin our country and the planet.

Up in smoke

If affordable housing were pottery stores, the problem would be solved. In Dundas we have a grocery store but two cannabis retailers. Our priorities go up in smoke.

Robin Magder Pierce, Dundas

Military honors

Canadians are now realizing the ultimate goal that a national army should serve. Its primary focus should not be to blow up towns, kill people, and defeat our enemies, but to help with natural disasters, as British Columbia is finding out. The Canadian Armed Forces should take a well-deserved bow for stepping up so willingly to help the citizens of British Columbia. They have also helped other Canadians recently when the COVID-19 crisis was at its height. Pinning prestigious medals on these soldiers for their efforts would recognize their contribution to Canada.


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Rodney N.

The author Rodney N.