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DVIDS – News – NATO Multinational CBRN Defense Battalion Live Agent Exercise in Canada wraps up

CANADIAN FORCES BASE SUFFIELD, Alberta, Canada – A multinational NATO live chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear agent exercise concluded at Canadian Forces Base Suffield in Alberta, Canada, July 29.

Exercise Precise Response brought together highly trained units from the United States, Canada, Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, from Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovakia and the United Kingdom to conduct training missions for the NATO Response Force. CBRN Defense Battalion.

Since Precise Response began in 2004, over 4,000 soldiers have trained with live agents at Canadian Forces Base Suffield, except for 2020 and 2021 due to COVID-19 restrictions.

US soldiers from the 20th Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Command deployed for the exercise, including troops from the 22nd Chemical Battalion based at Fort Bliss, Texas; Joint Base Lewis-McChord, 11th CBRN Company (technical escort) based in Washington; 21st CBRN Company based at Fort Bragg, North Carolina; and the 1st Area Medical Laboratory in Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

U.S. Army soldiers and civilians from the 20th CBRNE Command regularly deploy from 19 bases in 16 states to confront the world’s most dangerous hazards.

Corporal of the Canadian Armed Forces. Shannelle Adam said working with other countries has given her the chance to learn new ways to accomplish CBRN missions.

“The highlight for me was being able to gain knowledge from other countries and now being able to go back to my unit and create ideas to try and implement positive changes like this,” said Adam, a six-year-old military medical technician who is from George Town, Cayman Islands. “Working with live agents made the training much more real.

“We always like to practice fighting here,” Adam said. “In the event that there is a CBRN threat in the future, we are now more confident that we have worked with live agents in training.”

Adam said his team learned new ways to run a thorough decontamination line on both the ambulatory and non-ambulatory side.

“We have learned how other nations operate so that if ever there is a CBRN threat that we are called upon to respond to, we now have the confidence to be able to assist other nations,” Adam said. .

Maj. Joshua M. Carmen, chief of the 1st Sector Medical Laboratory’s Biological Threat Assessment Section, said the Precise Response exercise allowed his soldiers to validate their abilities in an austere field environment.

A unique formation of the U.S. Army, the 1st Area Medical Laboratory deploys to perform surveillance, laboratory testing, and health risk assessments of environmental, occupational, endemic disease, and CBRNE threats to support the protection of forces and missions of weapons of mass destruction.

Carmen said her 1st AML team worked with NATO Sampling and Identification of Biological, Chemical and Radiological Agents (SIBCRA) teams from most of the countries involved in the exercise.

The 1st AML team received all biological samples during the exercise, including 112 separate samples, and saw a variety of sampling and conditioning techniques. The 1st AML team also performed its first successful genetic sequencing of a sample in a field training environment.

Carmen said her team had gained experience receiving and processing samples and engaging SIBCRA team leaders to prioritize processing based on their description and assessment of the site.

“The more information we have, the better analysis we can perform to provide a complete picture of the threat,” Carmen said. “We learned as much as we could about the new techniques we saw and provided real-time feedback on our assessment of their effectiveness, along with tips and advice for improvement.”

Carmen said the NATO SIBCRA teams were willing to make adjustments and were grateful for feedback.

“We were overwhelmed by the camaraderie with the teams and many of them came to the lab before, during and after the missions to seek advice, discuss our findings and thank us for helping them improve their knowledge of the threats. organic,” Carmen said.

Originally from Phoenix, Carmen served in the US Army for 19 years and deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. He said the international live agent training exercise provides a higher level of realism for his team.

“Training live agents for CBRN is the equivalent of a live fire maneuver exercise for the combat arms branches,” Carmen said. “It is the epitome of training and tests your confidence in the equipment you train with and the procedures you have developed in your organization.

“The NATO component adds an extra layer to this by developing the same confidence among multiple countries in each other’s equipment and techniques,” Carmen said. “Whether your place on the battlefield is to investigate and sample potential CBRN agents, catalog, record and transport them, or test and assess them, the safety of the forces you support depends on you every step of the way. stage. Live agent training allows us the luxury of practicing our skills in a controlled environment so we can be successful in a life-threatening situation.







Date taken: 08.03.2022
Date posted: 08.03.2022 15:54
Story ID: 426455
Location: AB, CA






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Rodney N.

The author Rodney N.