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Lt. Darryl Ng, Civil Air Patrol Commander of the Maui County Composite Squadron, will be the guest speaker at the Lahaina Sunset Rotary Club Virtual Reunion at 5:30 p.m. on September 21.

For more than 50 years, the 57th Maui County Composite Squadron has served the community, responding to Hurricane Iniki and famous Eddie Aikau research, according to a press release. Ng will share history and information about the squadron as well as its main mission and programs in Maui.

Club members and guests are welcome to attend the meeting via Zoom. To receive a meeting link, contact Joanne Laird at [email protected]

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Pizza Charity founder to speak to Rotarians

The Rotary Club of Kihei-Wailea will welcome Jonathan Yudis as a guest speaker at its virtual meeting on Wednesday at noon.

Yudis is the founder of the “Charity Pizza in Maui” community service project, which provides hot meals to homeless people in Maui.

The Zoom room will open at 11:30 am for communion. The Zoom meeting ID is 829 1334 8817; the access code is 081120.

For more information, contact Allan Weiland at [email protected]

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Shelter to host an adoption event

The Maui Humane Society will be hosting an adoption event from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on September 18.

No appointment is necessary and there is no adoption fee. Prospective pet parents can participate in the Maui Humane Society’s 10-day Paws to Adopt trial program.

In addition to the animals that await their homes forever, there will be food trucks and live entertainment at the event. Social distancing and masks are mandatory.

For more information, visit www.mauihumanesociety.org.

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Bezos donates to Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity Maui received a personal donation from Jeff Bezos, Founder and Executive Chairman of Amazon.

“We are incredibly grateful for the support of Mr. Bezos”, said Sherri Dodson, executive director of the association. “We are in the process of expanding our home security repair and modification program for low income kupunas and / or homeowners with disabilities, so this donation could not have come at a better time. Sadly, so many of our low income seniors live in unsanitary conditions and just need a helping hand. This donation will help us build our capacities and allow us to continue our mission. Everyone deserves a safe and decent place to live.

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Children’s advocacy group receives donation

The Friends of the Children’s Justice Center of Maui received a personal donation from Amazon Founder and Executive Chairman Jeff Bezos.

“This donation comes at a crucial time for us due to the overwhelming increase in service requests we have received during the COVID pandemic, as well as the broader needs we have seen in the community,” said Paul Tonnessen, executive director of the Friends of the Maui Children’s Justice Center.

The nonprofit organization provides assistance to abused and neglected children, promotes the prevention of child abuse and neglect, and supports the Maui Children’s Justice Center, which is part of the State Judiciary. Hawaii.

For more information about the Friends of the Maui Children’s Justice Center, contact Tonnessen at 986-8634 or visit mauicjc.org.

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Bezos donates to boys and girls clubs

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Maui is one of many local nonprofits that have received a personal donation from Jeff Bezos, founder and executive chairman of Amazon.

“We want to send a huge mahalo to Mr. Bezos and his team for his support and for recognizing the incredible value that Maui’s nonprofits provide,” said Kelly Maluo-Pearson, CEO of Boys & Girls Clubs of Maui.

The nonprofit said it would use the donation to continue providing its evidence-based programs that help young people learn, develop social skills, express themselves creatively and participate in events. sports.

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Saginaw Neighborhood Celebrates Planned Return of Children’s Community Center

SAGINAW, MI – Eight-year-old Asia Pratt was sitting breathlessly laughing next to her friends during a break as she jumped inside the inflatable house set up for an event reconnecting a neighborhood in Saginaw on the south side with an old community center ready to reopen in the coming month.

“I feel very happy,” she said of the celebration going on outside the facility at 3145 Russell. “It was so much fun. I can’t wait to be able to go here.

Organizers say the building – known as “The Nabe” – will likely not open to the community until 2022, but the excitement surrounding the news warranted some sort of block party on Saturday, August 28. The rally included The Nabe’s future target demographic. : Pratt and children his age.

Pratt plans to be the third generation in his family to run and play inside the facility when it reopens. Her father, Michael Pratt, 50, was part of a group of nine adults who formed a non-profit organization and bought the community center where they once played as children.

The Saturday celebration also catered to its demographic age. A DJ played Rick James; Earth, Wind and Fire; Kool and the Gang and other old hitmakers.

Still, the rally seemed to remain focused on the future: more specifically, The Nabe’s potential for the South Side neighborhood that has become largely desolate over the past two decades. Organizers say they hope when the community center reopens it will help revive the area and provide a place to grow up for children living nearby.

Leola Gochett, 80, moved to the South Side neighborhood in December 1970. Her three children spent their youth at The Nabe, known for decades as the Lutheran Charities Neighborhood House Community Center. After several changes of ownership, the building has remained largely unused in recent years, after decades of declining participation.

Gochett said she was delighted to hear that former attendees are planning to resuscitate the community center. She has known the nine members of the association since they played there when they were children.

“I believe in them,” said Gochett, who attended the celebration on Saturday. “This community needs this, to help us get back to the way things were in this neighborhood.”

After purchasing the old building, members of the nonprofit – which bears the same name as the community center – began tidying up the Nabe earlier this summer. It has fallen into disrepair in recent years, so the walls have been repainted, the floors have been repaired and the rooms have been cleaned.

The work remains, organizers say, but the progress of their efforts was visible to anyone who saw the interior of the 24,000-square-foot facility a month ago compared to today.

During the visits organized on Saturday, the participants got a glimpse of this renovated interior. However, much of the event activity at the start of the day took place on the community center lawn and parking lot, which organizers have turned into something that looks like a small fair.

Food vendors were camping on the outskirts of the rally. Children rushed between two inflatable houses and a mobile truck carrying playable video game consoles. Within sight of these children were their parents and other adults socializing to the music of the event.

“I’m so grateful that it brought this community together again,” said Anthony Dent, a 52-year-old man who once attended the community center as a child. “I can’t wait to see how this place will grow when it opens. “

James Carthan, a member of the nonprofit that owns the facility, said the support expressed by the community on Saturday was a sign that more success could be in store for the Nabe.

“It takes a village to raise a child,” said Carthan, 50. “I want this place to be a bright light for the young people of Saginaw.”

Organizers have organized tours of the interior of The Nabe, a Saginaw community center that the owners hope to open within the next year. Here, participants visit a basketball court where a mural was being completed.

RELATED:

Childhood friends reunite to revive Saginaw children’s community center


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Study: Food insecurity and poverty rate increased for Colorado children during pandemic

Referrals to early intervention services, which help young children from birth to 3 years old with developmental skills like speech therapy, also dropped dramatically in the first few weeks of the pandemic, dropping 63% over the course of the pandemic. during the first two weeks of March 2020.

That’s because primary care physicians, who make about a third of all referrals for such support, stopped doing good health checks on children at the start of the pandemic.

Providers aim to provide children with early intervention services in their ‘natural environment’, be it home or childcare – with the aim of making them function at the same level as their peers. said Christy Scott, director of the early intervention program at Colorado’s Office of Early Childhood. “And if we don’t get the early intervention they need, then we might see the ramifications when they get into kindergarten, special education, or even kindergarten.”

Scott said there has been an increase in referrals recently, and advocates for child care are hoping that trend continues.

Household income has fallen and food insecurity has increased

Almost half of households with children have reported loss of employment income since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. At the beginning of March 2021, a third declared having difficulty paying the usual household expenses.

Meanwhile, about 10 percent of Colorado households with children reported not having enough food to eat over the past week.

Black and Latino families have suffered disproportionately, reporting more food and rental insecurity – and more job losses – than white families.

“They entered the pandemic with higher rates of child poverty, higher proportions of children without health insurance, limited access to high quality child care, and kindergarten to grade 12 education.” , Manoatl said. “During the pandemic, they were hit harder than other households (economically)… it’s kind of like an aggravated effect.”


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The Recorder – Regina Curtis is retiring as GCC executive. director of institutional promotion

GREENFIELD – Regina Curtis has amassed a 48-pound stash in thrift stores. From September 1, she will have more time to read them.

Curtis is retiring as Executive Director of Institutional Advancement at Greenfield Community College on August 31, after 16 years on the job. She coordinated the school’s legislative affairs and oversaw its grants office in addition to being the executive director of the GCC Foundation, the nonprofit fundraising arm of the college.

“Community college students stay in their community. They end up living and working within a 25 mile radius, usually. So we are really educating the workforce in this community, ”she said. “This college is exactly where it needs to be.”

Curtis, 62, said she turned legislative affairs over to her colleague Keith Bailey and new recruit Alexis Page took on other responsibilities. She said their abilities reduced her natural anxiety about quitting the job she had been heavily involved in for so long.

She previously worked for State Representative Stephen Kulik and plans to follow her former employer’s advice on retirement – don’t make any additional commitments for at least a year. She intends to continue serving on the board of directors of Rural Development Inc., a nonprofit organization created by the Franklin County Regional Housing and Redevelopment Authority, but wishes to spend more time walking, hiking, kayaking and visiting her son in North Carolina and her daughter-in-law. in Idaho. She would also like to relearn Spanish and knitting.

Curtis grew up in the Detroit area, but has lived in Franklin County his entire adult life. Warwick has been his home for decades.

She worked at the college for 16 years, serving on the Board of Trustees of the GCC Foundation for six years previously, including two as President. Prior to that, she was a campaign volunteer for the school. But that was not his introduction to college. She received her associate’s degree in commerce in 1986 at the age of 28, after taking evening classes for five years while working full time. The average age of a CCG student is around 27, she said.

Curtis then transferred to North Adams State College (now Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts) for another five years to earn a bachelor’s degree, graduating while pregnant with her son. She waited four years before pursuing her Masters of Business Administration in five years.

“I know women who… worked full time and went to school in the evenings with me and had a baby, but I couldn’t… think about that. So I waited until he was 4, then I started at Fitchburg State College (now the University) because, ”she said,“ I only attend public higher education institutions. from Massachusetts that are next to Highway 2. It’s like my jam.

“I never worked full time during all of this,” she added. “It’s just that the career trajectory was made possible thanks to the degrees I acquired along the way, which was possible thanks to GCC. … It is definitely the mission to make higher education accessible to all who want to learn. This is not the case for many colleges.

Curtis also said that many CCG students are, like her, first generation students. She said 48% of them transferred to four-year colleges and 25% were from Hampshire County.

“I’ve always wondered if there is a magical way to survey every employer in Franklin County and find out how many GCC employees (there are),” she said, adding that a third of Greenfield Savings Bank employees are GCC graduates. “It’s quite remarkable.”

Curtis also said that GCC will celebrate its 60th anniversary next year.

“GCC and I are about the same age. Funny – I never thought of it that way, ”she said. “We kind of grew up together. ”

Contact Domenic Poli at: [email protected] or 413-772-0261, ext. 262.


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Oswego County Arc to Host Flame Concert in Oswego August 27 – Oswego County Today

In this file photo, those supported by the Arc of Oswego County enjoy the music performed by Flame. Photo provided by the Oswego County Arc.

OSWEGO – The Arc of Oswego County, a Fulton, New York-based nonprofit that supports people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, will host Flame the band for a free concert in Oswego, New York.

The concert will take place on August 27 at Breitbeck Park at 5:30 p.m. The event is free and open to all members of the community.

The recipient of the organization’s Dr. John Readling Award will be announced at 5 pm. The award honors an individual affiliated with the Arc of Oswego County or its sister agency, Oswego Industries, who has made a significant contribution to improving people’s lives. with intellectual and / or developmental disabilities in the local community.

“Flame provides great entertainment while having a huge impact on the people we support,” said Laurie Davis, Executive Director. “When they see people with disabilities on stage and living their dreams, they are also inspired to pursue their dreams. “

Events like this are made possible by the support of the community through membership in the ARC. Membership helps provide more people and their families with access to programs and services through fund development and advocacy efforts. You can make a difference by becoming a member today! Join us here: https://bit.ly/arc-membership.

Event organizers are asking anyone with fever, shortness of breath, or any other respiratory symptoms to stay home to reduce the spread of COVID-19 and for the safety of all attendees.

The County of Arc of Oswego is a private, non-profit organization that has provided programs and services to children and the elderly with disabilities since 1953. Services include recreational and respite activities, day adaptation programs for seniors, a family and child support program, guardianship and planning assistance and more. Its mission is to be a leader in the field of developmental disabilities, determined to meet the needs of individual growth, productivity and independence through education, advocacy, and increased acceptance and participation of the community. Its sister agency, Oswego Industries, Inc., provides services to adults with disabilities: together they create a comprehensive support system for residents with disabilities in Oswego County. Find more information online at www.arcofoswegocounty.org.


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Can humor, laughter and AI reduce stress for women living with cancer? | New

NEW YORK and WASHINGTON and PALO ALTO, California, August 11, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Sounds like the opening of a classic joke: “Cancer survivor, scientist and doctor walk into bar,” but it’s more of a groundbreaking 8-week study on the mindset and metastatic cancer research using artificial intelligence to study personalized stress reduction strategies for women living with advanced cancer. This study is the result of Saranne Rothberg, a stage IV cancer survivor and founder of the ComedyCures Foundation.

Want to have fun ? Sign up for this groundbreaking study on mindset and metastatic cancer research.

“Humor, laughter, play, meditation, yoga, breathing and visualization techniques were essential in reducing my stress, giving me more energy and hope as I battled three surgeries against the cancer, 44 radiotherapy treatments and more than two years of chemotherapy starting in 1999, “says Rothberg, who no longer has cancer.

As part of this study, she invites other people living with a metastatic diagnosis to create an individualized stress management and relaxation plan, informed by artificial intelligence, to improve their quality of life. Rothberg enlisted the help of Dr. Catherine Grill, neuroscientist and co-founder of Neolth, an award-winning digital health platform from Silicon Valley. Dr. Grill explains, “Mental health is often overlooked when clinicians create treatment plans for cancer patients. I wanted to make mental health support more accessible to patients. We are excited to add Saranne’s expertise and fun strategies, along with original ComedyCures content, to our Neolth platform as part of this important study. ”

Neolth’s chief medical officer, Dr. Claire Wheeler, integrator and psychologist specializing in stress management and author of “Pocket Therapy for Stress” will also supervise the collaborative study as co-principal investigator. Dr Wheeler says, “Women with cancer who participate in stress management and emotional support programs have significant improvements in quality of life, immune markers and even improve their survival rates.”

Rothberg happily describes: “Each participant will be invited to use the Neolth platform via a mobile device, tablet and / or desktop computer to create their own personalized self-care plan with the help of proprietary technology. from Neolth and many experts. A free subscription to Neolth will be provided to every woman through an innovative cancer and behavior research grant awarded to our ComedyCures Foundation by the Willow Foundation. In previous years, the foundation grant was awarded to Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center.

Co-founder of the Willow Foundation and survivor of stage IV cancer Lea Evert confirms: “Because the pandemic has put even more isolation, health risks and stress on people living with cancer, the Willow Foundation felt that this year’s grant should go to the ComedyCures Foundation in because of his track record of positively impacting the lives of others. in the event of a mental, emotional and / or physical crisis. “

Evert adds, “As a cancer and COVID-19 survivor, Saranne’s authentic vision to seek an immediately scalable and affordable health solution integrating artificial intelligence, technology, as well as the award-winning ComedyCures and Neolth programs, has made the funding of this mindset research very compelling. “

In addition to the many relaxation practices offered by the study, participants will have the opportunity to attend three live online sessions with Rothberg and several of his ComedyCures comedians. Please see the Study FAQs for more information and to register immediately.

ABOUT THE COMEDYCURES FOUNDATION

The ComedyCures Foundation is a 501 (C) 3 non-profit, here 24/7 to tickle fun bones. Through award-winning digital programming and live events, ComedyCures entertains, educates and helps patients, caregivers and frontline workers develop their superpowers of laughter, hope, joy, play and perspective. comical. https://www.ComedyCures.org @ComedyCures

ABOUT NEOLTH

Neolth provides stress and mental health support by providing personalized care on demand through its self-guided platform. This includes relaxation practices, self-care and mental health monitoring, as well as mental health videos. Neolth presents a variety of original content from the ComedyCures Foundation to support people living with cancer. All participants in the ComedyCures study will have free access to Neolth for an extended period. https://www.Neolth.com @Neolth

ABOUT THE WILLOW FOUNDATION

The Willow Foundation (United States) supports research efforts that help link behaviors to better outcomes for patients with advanced and advanced cancer.

https://www.willow.foundation/goals

ABOUT SARANNE ROTHBERG

From the patient with stage IV cancer to the CEO of ComedyCures, Saranne Rothberg is a thought leader, speaker, patient advocate, and health and happiness expert. She started the ComedyCures foundation from her chemo chair in 1999 and is cancer free today, helping over 1 million people at over 1,800 live and digital events around the world to rediscover their funny bones. , their mojo and their lens. https://www.saranne.com @sarannelive

View original content to download multimedia: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/can-humor-laughter–ai-reduce-the-stress-of-women-living-with-cancer-301353265. html

SOURCE The ComedyCures Foundation


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Even if live concerts return, stream here to stay in Michigan

Just days before the pandemic interrupted life in the Detroit metro area and around the world in March last year, Stephen Wogaman, president of the Chamber Music Society of Detroit, was talking on the phone with his brother, a consultant. in computer science.

His brother asked what Wogaman was planning to do about COVID-19.

“I said, ‘Well, I heard about it,'” Wogaman recalls. “He said, ‘You have to be careful.’

Soon he was. COVID completely turned the Chamber Music Society season upside down, as it did all over cultural institutions, forcing them to quickly turn to streaming and webcast performances, which they never had. done before.

But that change – which involved quickly figuring out what equipment was best for streaming, perfecting the audio, and figuring out how to create the best quality webcast – was a step forward for the Chamber Music Society.

Even as he prepares for his 2021-22 season, which begins in September, they aren’t straying from the webcasts they’ve perfected during COVID. They will offer live performances but will stream them at the same time for those who wish to watch from home or from a distance.

“As we come out of this time – with caution – we see it as a way to expand our audience, to facilitate connections from audience members who may not be entirely comfortable coming back,” Wogaman said.

Concerts and live performances may be making a comeback in venues across the region, but streaming is here to stay in some venues, especially when it comes to classical, chamber and folk music. Some say they can reach an even larger audience far beyond Michigan through streaming or those with accessibility issues.

“It’s an important tool and access point,” said Marianne James, executive director of The Ark, a well-known folk music venue in downtown Ann Arbor that aired its popular folk festival in January. . “It doesn’t replace live performances, but it’s something that can really go with that and give artists and performances more reach.”

But could streaming concerts deter people from buying tickets to see shows in person, as some worry? Time will tell us.

Dinner with the DSO

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra, a leader in webcast presentation, has offered digital concerts for years, but expanded its offering during COVID-19 to include its pop concerts. Anne Parsons, CEO of DSO, said several subscribers told her how much they enjoyed the concerts that were broadcast during the pandemic, sitting down to “dine with the DSO.”

“When we have these gigs, they’re one of a kind,” Parsons said, referring to the pop gigs. “They tend not to be captured and they should be – and shared with the world.”

For this year’s Concert of Colors, the Midwest’s largest free music festival that runs through Monday, the format was a mix of live, broadcast and broadcast performances. Last year’s Concert of Colors, which was fully streamed, recorded 162,000 plays and views.

“We don’t want to give this up entirely,” said Ismael Ahmed, longtime founder and director of Concert of Colors.

But like James at the Ark, Wogaman agrees that streaming is not an alternative to live music. He said there is “no doubt” that hearing music in person is the “superior” way to experience it, but the pandemic has caused bands like his to rethink their approach. in some ways.

“A webcast captures this incredible sense of collaboration,” especially when it comes to chamber music, Wogaman said. “And that brings you to the front row when you’re in your living room.”

Learning curve

Even before Wogaman got out of the car after that phone call with his brother – who works with Gartner, a well-known company that does IT consulting work – he was already thinking about the bedroom’s next steps. He called the manager of his next act in March and asked if they would rather broadcast their performance than perform live, offering to pay 40% of their fees.

“The following week, two days after the World Health Organization declared the pandemic, we had an audience of 3,000 people watching our first webcast,” said Wogaman, who noted that it was is five times the audience they would have had in person.

Three weeks later, they aired another show. In total, since COVID, the Chamber Music Society of Detroit has broadcast over 30 concerts to date with over 60 other music presenters across the country on its CameraMusic platform, reaching audiences of nearly 200,000 across six continents. .

The Ark also launched a series of live concerts during COVID called the Ark Family Room series. They broadcast over 100 live shows.

“People really appreciated having access to this,” James said. “It was a great way to keep performers and audience members together.”

But it has been a learning process for the sites. The Chamber Music Society of Detroit has invested more than $ 10,000 in streaming material – they now use a live video streaming platform called Resi – and Wogaman has even started broadcasting streaming services at his Episcopal Church in Birmingham to train more.

“Personally, I learned to do it all – all the technical webcast stuff,” Wogaman said. “It’s not that we hired someone. We bought the equipment, we learned how to use it, we bought the licenses for the streaming equipment.”

One thing they noticed with the Wogaman Church webcasts is that people who didn’t normally attend church, or who could be considered recluses, “were suddenly much more connected than they were. never have been. Because they were able to attend the service. “

This approach could also help aging clients who cannot attend live shows for all kinds of reasons.

“For me, the most exciting thing about this ability that we have spent hundreds of hours learning and tens of thousands of dollars obtaining is now that we are able to do things that we cannot do. ‘Never even imagined possible,’ Wogaman said. “We flipped a switch and there it is.”

Every program that the Chamber presents this year, they will also be broadcast. They will also sell digital subscriptions for concerts and something called Digital Plus which will allow customers to attend two concerts in person as well.

In fact, the Chamber Society of Detroit now has so much streaming equipment – which Wogaman has driven all over the Midwest and East to broadcast concerts – that they are creating a set that they plan to set aside for them. non-profit groups.

Blessing and curse

The DSO launched its on-demand digital archive of performances called DSO Replay in 2015, making it the first streaming archive of any American orchestra. The orchestra was already a leader in webcasting its performances.

But not all cultural institutions have turned to streaming.

Streaming performances are not yet something the Michigan Opera Theater has looked at, said Christine Goerke, MOT’s new associate artistic director, “but I think it’s here to stay on course.”

“There are things that were made especially for streaming. It’s a different animal,” Goerke said. “Creating a piece designed to be filmed as if you were watching a movie? There’s another art form. It’s different from what we do. Maybe we’re creating something brand new.”

The Metropolitan Opera’s Live in HD series shows its operas in more than 2,000 theaters across the country and in 70 countries around the world. But there is a downside to these HD shows, Goerke said.

“When these HD shows came on, it was a wonderful thing for people who lived far away, but it also reduced the number of subscribers,” she said. “They could just go to their movies instead of driving three hours to see a live show. It’s a blessing and a curse.”

James de l’Arche said the fear of deterring live audiences is something they also encounter with the artists they book. She said there was “general reluctance” on the part of some artists to stream their performances.

“Artists are really focused on wanting to be in a room with people” right now, she said.

Nevertheless, L’Arche is studying the performances it could still broadcast and the equipment it will need. He will likely begin with his free Artist Spotlight series when he returns this fall.

“We have learned so much and the public has come so far and accessed this technology,” said James. “A lot of people were reluctant like in ‘I won’t do this.’ Others have found that they really like this access. “

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DaBaby invited to visit Dallas area leading HIV prevention and treatment center for black LGBTQ + people

DALLAS – August 3, 2021 – Kirk Myers, longtime HIV prevention advocate and head of Dallas Southern Pride (DSP), on Tuesday invited acclaimed hip-hop artist DaBaby to visit the prevention and treatment center he runs in the heart of South Dallas for black LGBTQ + people. people and the community at large. Myers’ invitation follows homophobic and callous comments DaBaby recently made on stage about people living with HIV and members of the LGBTQ + community.

DaBaby performs at the 63rd Grammy Awards on March 14, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. (Credit: Kevin Winter / Getty Images for the Recording Academy)

Abounding Prosperity, Inc. (APInc) has worked tirelessly for nearly two decades to address health and other disparities among black LGBTQ + men and women and the community at large. DaBaby’s offensive comments further underscore the enormous task that lies ahead for those of us on the front lines of this fight to the life and death. As such, APInc is launching this public invitation for DaBaby to be an ally with us as we work to eradicate HIV and other systemic issues that plague our communities.

“As others seek to cancel DaBaby, we believe this is the perfect opportunity to build a bridge,” said APInc founder and CEO Kirk Myers, who himself lives with HIV. “We want to take this moment to educate him about the negative impact of HIV misinformation and the harmful stereotypes he has promoted of black LGBTQ + people, many of whom are his fans. We must also stress that HIV is no longer a death sentence through testing, prevention and treatment. “

HIV in numbers, according to the most recent statistics from the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2019:

  • In the United States, 1.2 million people are currently living with HIV.
  • One in seven people living with HIV do not know they have the virus.
  • Heterosexuals account for 23 percent of all HIV cases in the country.
  • In the home state of DaBaby, North Carolina, 35,457 people are living with HIV.
  • Blacks represent a higher proportion of new HIV diagnoses compared to other races / ethnicities.
  • Blacks make up 13 percent of the U.S. population, but accounted for 42 percent of new HIV diagnoses in the United States

Besides being dangerous, the stigmatizing words used by DaBaby perpetuate false narratives that have made it difficult in the past to book hip hop artists for DSP events. That started to change this year when rap superstar Rick Ross performed in front of thousands of black LGBTQ + fans at DSP’s Juneteenth Black gay pride celebration. Appearances over the years by Ross, Cardi B, Tank, Lil ‘Kim, Beat King, Erykah Badu and others as part of our Ticket test The program has enabled us to test thousands of people for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections and to refer large numbers for treatment and counseling. This is how we stop the spread.

We do not intend to allow ignorance and homophobic rhetoric to dismantle all the hard work we have done to point us on a better path. We hope DaBaby accepts our offer and makes amends with its actions and not just press releases. Lives depend on it.

Abundant Prosperity, Inc. was founded in November 2005 to provide services that address health, social and economic disparities among black Americans, with a special focus on gay and bisexual men, cisgender women, transgender women and their families. As one of the only indigenous black community nonprofits in Texas, we provide services that address the health, social, and economic disparities between our affinity populations. Our services enable clients to achieve self-sufficiency through skills development, increased knowledge and access to community resources.


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The logic of Cori Bush’s fight for the moratorium on evictions

Cori Bush knows the violence that can stem from homelessness – and how it so often begins with deportation. Local surveys have found that from 12% to almost half of people living on the streets blame the eviction for their homelessness. Bush, who is now the Democratic Representative of the United States from Missouri, lived in a Ford Explorer with her then husband and two young children for three months after the family was deported in 2001.

It considers the right to housing to be a central principle of environmental justice. Homelessness and housing insecurity, she argued, hamper families’ ability to access the resources – clean water, fresh food, heating and air conditioning – needed to survive. The past year has been particularly deadly for homeless people, as relentless heat waves, poor COVID-19 precautions and unhealthy air quality levels exacerbated by wildfires and pollution have made life on the streets even more dangerous. At the same time, cities across the country have decided to criminalize housing settlements and limit the rights of the homeless.

“I don’t want anyone else to have to go through what I’ve been through, ever,” Bush told The Associated Press. So when the White House said last week it couldn’t extend the federal moratorium on evictions – which has banned evictions since March 2020 to curb the spread of COVID-19 – by possibly letting it expire, it took the fight in hand. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities estimated that 11.4 million adult renters were on the verge of eviction.

For four nights, Bush slept outside the United States Capitol, demanding that President Joe Biden extend the moratorium. In the end, she and her congressional allies won. On Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, issued a new moratorium on evictions that will last until October 3. which would cover areas where 90 percent of the US population lives. The CDC’s new moratorium comes after the Biden administration claimed it did not have the power to extend the eviction ban – and after some localities have already started resuming evictions. (Despite the moratorium, declining state protections and inadequate legal services have led to at least 450,000 evictions during the pandemic, according to the Princeton University Eviction Lab.)

Representative Cori Bush speaks with supporters outside the United States Capitol to call for an extension of the federal moratorium on evictions on July 31, 2021. Photo by Joshua Roberts / Getty Images

In a column for Time last week, Bush denounced the “consequences of our government’s failure to provide the basic necessities that people need to survive.” On the same day, she introduced a “Homeless Bill of Rights,” which calls on Congress to end homelessness in the United States for good by 2025 by investing in affordable housing, universal housing vouchers and social services for people most likely to live on the streets.

While many environmental activists, including the Sunrise movement, have called the new moratorium a victory for climate justice, Bush and other housing advocates argue that protection is one of many that must be instituted to ensure housing and environmental justice for America’s most vulnerable .

Julian Gonzalez, a water policy lobbyist with nonprofit group Earthjustice, says issues such as unaffordable public services are another front in the fight to ensure housing security. (Disclosure: Earthjustice is a Grist advertiser.)

“The affordability of utilities, especially the affordability of water, is a big part of the housing crisis and environmental justice,” Gonzalez told Grist. “Eventually the moratorium on evictions is going to be lifted and people are going to be grappling with bills, and they are going to have their water and electricity cut off – with that comes displacement and eviction.”

This is especially important, according to Gonzalez, because while there are state and national programs to provide assistance for energy bills, there are none for water. Households across the country face billions of dollars in utility debt, and hundreds of thousands of homes face utility cuts. Earthjustice and other organizations across the country are calling for the inclusion of water and utility assistance programs in the next congressional infrastructure bill, which in its current version only includes a pilot low-income rural water assistance program in 40 towns without authorized funding.

Courtney McKinney, director of communications at the nonprofit Western Center on Law and Poverty, said the United States should create a system that permanently limits the prevalence of evictions. The center is working to create state-based legal aid funds, dubbed the “homelessness prevention fund”. Across the country, only 10 percent of tenants who go through eviction proceedings have legal representation, compared to 90 percent of landlords.

The eviction creates an endless cycle of substandard housing, McKinney argues. According to Princeton’s Eviction Lab, 70% of evicted tenants experience serious quality-of-life issues in the next home they move into.

“Across the country, the climate is making the situation even more dire,” McKinney told Grist. “In the West, in particular, climate change, substandard housing and homelessness are a deadly reality in the future.”




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Jam to Low-Down Blues with Hurricane Jerry Loos at the Westerwood Blueberries and The Blues Concert

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COLUMBUS, Ohio, Aug 4, 2021 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) – The Westerwood Senior Living Community is hosting a Blueberries & The Blues Summer Concert from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Friday August 13, 2021, featuring the local blues artist Hurricane Jerry Loos. Relax in the shade as you listen to soft blues and celebrate Columbus blueberry season with chilled blueberry limoncello cocktails and savory treats created by Chef Marshall of Westerwood.

“We are delighted to welcome Hurricane Jerry and showcase Chef Marshall’s culinary skills,” said Lisa Burkhart, Executive Director. “These events are a great way for us to showcase our great community. Participants will be able to meet residents and team members, and schedule community tours.

RSVP today for The Blueberries and The Blues concert by calling 614-368-1209 or visiting https://www.liveatwesterwood.org/events/. And be sure to enter to win one of four Fresh Thyme Market gift certificates and a basket full of all things blueberries.

Hurricane Jerry Loos began playing guitar in the late 1960s and worked for decades at local recording studios in Columbus Ohio. A versatile guitarist, Jerry has worked with a wide range of independent artists playing styles such as Gospel, Rock, Blues, Jazz, Country and more. Jerry enjoys many styles of music but plays blues / rock in his band “Hurricane Jerry and Stormfront”

Listen to Hurricane Jerry on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaHC4215onQ.

Westerwood is also hosting a Resident Lifestyle Brunch at 10 a.m. on August 18, 2021. In addition to enjoying a delicious free brunch, residents and the dedicated team will share what makes Westerwood a great place to enjoy. the life. They will also share updates on the exciting new outdoor amenities that are being added to the 23-acre campus! RSVP today by calling 614-368-1209 or visiting https://www.liveatwesterwood.org/events/.

Westerwood, formerly Friendship Village Columbus, is a quaint 23-acre nonprofit retirement community rooted in northeast Columbus. It is minutes from downtown Westerville and the University of Otterbein. The active resident community enjoys lifelong learning, artistic pursuits, exercise, giving back and connecting with nature. Westerwood offers a full continuum of best-in-class care, including a Life Care contract.

This wooded oasis offers restaurant quality cuisine cooked from scratch, wellness classes with a personal trainer, an art studio, carpentry and gardens in a friendly atmosphere where ageless spirits can satiate their curiosity. . Westerwood is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit charitable community. It is classified as a community of choice by the Holleran group in recognition of an exemplary culture of resident engagement. Westerwood is SAGECare Platinum Certified, has received the Columbus CEO Top Workplaces Award six years in a row, and has received the Best of Business: Retirement Community award. Learn more at https://liveatwesterwood.org/.

#SummerConcert #HurricaneJerryLoos #OurCampusYourCanvas #SeniorLiving #ColumbusBlueberrySeason

NEWS SOURCE: Westerwood Life Care Community

This press release was issued on behalf of the information source (Westerwood Life Care community) who is solely responsible for its accuracy, by Send2Press® Newswire. Information is believed to be accurate but is not guaranteed. Story ID: 73980 APDF-R8.2

© 2021 Send2Press®, a press release and electronic marketing service of NEOTROPE®, California, United States.

To view the original version visit: https://www.send2press.com/wire/jam-to-low-down-blues-with-hurricane-jerry-loos-at-the-westerwood-blueberries-and-the- blues-concert /

Disclaimer: The contents of this press release were not created by The Associated Press (AP).


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