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Non profit living

Avondale’s new workforce housing symbolizes hope and success for black residents


CINCINNATI – A workforce housing development is coming to Avondale, and residents have said they are thrilled with the hope and wealth the project is supposed to bring to the community.

The Avondale Development Corporation inaugurated the first phase of the Hale Avenue Townhomes project on Thursday. Seven new townhouses with two and three bedroom units will be built on land on Hale Avenue between Harvey Avenue and Hallwood Place. The units will cost between $ 230,000 and $ 260,000, prices suited to families earning 120% of the region’s median income.

“It gives families the opportunity to own property here in the community instead of just relying on apartment living,” said Terresa Adams, Treasurer of the Avondale Community Council.

Vince Terry, vice president of ADC, said the development is in Cincinnati’s second highest employment area, “so having the property here within walking distance of a lot of jobs is going to be amazing.”

The subdivision means many achievements for its leaders, almost all from disadvantaged backgrounds. The Townhouses are the first development led by black women in Avondale, with Maria Collins of ADC and architect Bridget Harris, president of BTH Construction Delivery, at the helm. The project is also notable for being primarily supported by entities owned and operated by people of color – Kaiker Development & Construction, owned by Kai Lewars, is the general contractor for the project.

“It has been wonderful working with the other companies and organizations who have all contributed professionally to this project,” Lewars said.

Lewars noted how rare it is for black businesses to have the opportunity to collaborate and make developments like townhouses a reality. The fact that this was a black-led development helped allay fears from onlookers who thought townhouses would lead to gentrification.

“From the community itself to the black professionals who have been under contract, whether under contract or volunteering, it took a bit of everyone to bring it to fruition – and I know the community has it. appreciates, ”Lewars said. .

“Being a minority woman leading this charge and being our first project as a non-profit organization, many people have questioned whether we would have the ability or the capacity to make it happen,” said Maria Collins. . , ADC’s director of real estate and community development. “I think that’s what’s really important in this whole process and why we encountered so many obstacles. We did not yet have a proven track record.

Still, Collins said a small group of people believed in the effort and helped move his team forward.

“These people have worked with us to make sure we can innovate on this project and I appreciate their support and partnership to date,” Collins said.

This is ADC’s first stand-alone project. There will ultimately be two dozen townhouses built on Hale and Hallwood avenues in three phases. The houses are particularly marketed to blacks and first time buyers. Organizers say they want to foster opportunities for aspiring black homeowners and provide them with equity in the neighborhood.

CDA officials note that only about 27% of Avondale residents are homeowners, while the remaining vast majority of residents are in rental properties. They hope projects like the Hale Avenue townhouses will continue to introduce more affordable housing to Avondale and surrounding areas.

“There just isn’t enough of that stock in Cincinnati and we’re excited to be able to provide it,” said Harris. “This is something that hasn’t happened in the past, and it makes it even more special that we are really here, that we are innovating and that this project is going to move and build. “

“We want to make a sizable difference in what it means to own a home here in Avondale so that when you think of this community as an owner, you think of it as a place where you want your kids to be, your grand- parents be. You want to be able to contribute to the community and make it a great place, ”said Royce Sutton, CDA Chairman of the Board.

These townhouses are part of a dramatic increase in major neighborhood improvements and investments in what was once a struggling neighborhood. Last month, Fifth Third Bank announced it was investing $ 20 million in Avondale as part of an effort to revitalize predominantly black neighborhoods across the country.

Nearby, the expansion of the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and the development of the Uptown Innovation Corridor on Martin Luther King Boulevard are further signs of Avondale’s transformation in real time. Despite all the changes, leaders say they want all residents, new and old, to feel like they have a place in the community.

“Avondale is one of the most sought after communities in town right now,” said Tony Moore, chair of the Avondale Community Council. “What concerns us is: how do we get the current residents to stay who want to stay and get them to mingle with the new residents? It is our job: to keep what we have and to grow with what we will have.

Like Moore, Russell Hairston, the executive director of the Avondale Development Corporation, acknowledges the concerns of longtime residents who fear eviction due to the new development coming to the neighborhood. It supports affordable housing projects like the Hale Avenue Townhouses as a solution for the most vulnerable people to always find stability and a better quality of life in Avondale. He is also optimistic about the positive message this development sends to the community.

“When you’ve faced intergenerational poverty, when you’ve faced crime, when you’ve faced all the hardships that a distressed community has to go through, it’s uplifting to see the development. It’s uplifting to see homeownership. It’s edifying for kids to see that if they want to be an architect, developer, banker, or association manager, look: you can do it.

Monique John covers gentrification for WCPO 9. She is part of our donor-supported journalism program Report For America. Learn more about RFA here.

If there are any stories about gentrification in the Greater Cincinnati area that you think we should cover, let us know. Send us your tips at [email protected]


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Non profit living

Bezos Day One Fund Provides $ 2.5 Million to Family Life Center in Kahului, Maui


Family life center, Kahului. File photo by Wendy Osher.

Family Life Center, Inc., a non-profit organization serving the homeless on the islands of Maui, Moloka’i and Kaua’i, has been selected to receive a $ 2.5 million grant from Bezos Day One Families Fund, the largest grant in the history of the Family Life Center. .

This is the second year in a row that the organization has received a donation from the Bezos Day One Families Fund. In 2020, the association received $ 1.25 million from the same fund. The Family Life Center is one of 32 organizations in 21 states, and the only one in Hawaii to be included in funding allocations this year.

Launched in 2018 by Amazon Founder and Executive Chairman Jeff Bezos, the Day One Families Fund presents annual leadership awards to organizations and civic groups doing compassionate and needle-moving work to provide shelter and support. against hunger in order to meet the immediate needs of young families.

“The Family Life Center is incredibly grateful to the Day 1 Families Fund, which has so generously supported our organization for the second year in a row,” said Maude Cumming, Executive Director of the Family Life Center. “Our Day One Families Fund 2020 grant allowed us to expand our reach beyond Maui and Kaua’i to reach Moloka’i as well. This year’s donation will allow us to improve and expand the services we offer on the three islands.

This one-time grant will allow the Family Life Center to continue expanding its services on the islands of Kaua’i and Moloka’i, where the homeless population is “very underserved,” according to Cumming. The organization also plans to develop a suitable shelter model for families, replicating a pioneering approach during the COVID-19 pandemic in Maui.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW THE AD

Family Life Center was selected as a Day One Families Fund grant recipient by an independent advisory board of homeless experts with experience in politics, advocacy, racial equity, protection child and housing and service delivery, as well as direct experience of homelessness.

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This year, the Day One Families Fund awarded a total of $ 96.2 million in grants to dozens of organizations across the country.

“Without the support of the Family Life Center, my family and I may still be living in our car,” said a former client of the Family Life Center. “I am so grateful to have a home for our son. We will never be homeless again.

The Bezos Day One Fund has pledged $ 2 billion to focus on creating meaningful and lasting impacts in two areas: funding existing nonprofits that help homeless families and the creation of a network of new non-profit first-level preschools in low-income communities. .

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

The Day One Families Fund presents annual leadership awards to organizations and civic groups that do compassionate and needle-moving work to provide shelter and support from hunger to meet the immediate needs of young families.

Since 2018, the Day One Families Fund has awarded 130 grants totaling more than $ 398 million to organizations across the country that fight homelessness and help families gain housing and stability. The vision statement comes from Mary’s Place in Seattle: No child sleeps outside.

Founded in 1982, the Family Life Center serves the homeless in Maui County. The organization has grown to employ over 40 employees. As a primary resource for homelessness services in Maui County and a growing key resource in Kaua’i and Moloka’i, the organization has assisted over 1,271 families over the past three years.

The Family Life Center offers a holistic approach to meeting the needs of the homeless through a wide range of services, including outreach, shelter, shelter and prevention services.

Bezos recently purchased a 14 acre Maui beachfront estate at Keoneʻōʻio “La Perouse” in the Mākena area of ​​South Maui.

The Family Life donation is the latest in a list of contributions Bezos made to Maui this year. Other donations were made to:


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Non profit living

ExpressionMed Celebrates Diabetes Awareness Month with NFT


MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. 11, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – What do dragons, NFTs, and medical gangs have in common? They all work together to improve the lives of people with diabetes.

ExpressionMed, which has been making designed medical tapes for over six years, is launching its largest awareness campaign to date. they launch Diadragon NFT to raise money for life-saving diabetes supplies, create educational content from YouTube to TikTok, and donate 10% of profits from diabetes-themed tapes to the College Diabetes Network.

Diadragons is an NFT collection project started by ExpressionMed CEO Meghan Sharkus that features art, built in collaboration with Emma from Type One Toucan.

The two commercial competitors have come together to create collectible art, which is available for purchase at www.diadragons.com. This art features one-of-a-kind dragons that represent pieces of the diabetes community. The owners of Diadragon not only support an amazing cause, but also have access to a health-focused community and weekly prizes.

The main objective of the project is to raise funds for “Life Drops”, a donation of funds to pay for one year of insulin and CGM supplies. Anyone who owns a Diadragon is eligible to win, and they can donate the funds to themselves (if they are insulin dependent), a friend or family member, or donate them to Insulin For Life USA. , where it will be used to transport insulin to developing countries and disaster relief areas.

It is one of the first NFT projects to disburse funds directly to individuals.

“We aim to change the way charitable giving works in diabetes,” said Meghan Sharkus, CEO of ExpressionMed. “Right now there is a significant flow of funds for advocacy and research. While these are important, they do not address the current insulin affordability crisis. “

“On average, people with diabetes pay a third of their income for the supplies they need to stay alive. We hope that by donating directly to these families, we can inspire other projects to do the same, creating a better balance between solving the issues at hand and donating to longer term initiatives. ”

This unique approach to NFT is focused on supporting the diabetic community in a new form of giving back that is currently inaccessible to government and other nonprofit support programs.

You can join the Diadragon community on Discord or follow @Diadragons on Twitter to participate and learn more about the project.

ExpressionMed will distribute Diadragon stickers to raise awareness among local businesses and through collaborations with College Diabetes Network, NickiChicki, Senita Athletics, The Petite Nurse NP and more. Each sticker features an insulin dependent dragon and a QR code indicating how people can learn, support and take action on behalf of Diabetes Awareness Month. Digital versions of the sticker are also available for distribution at www.diadragons.com/cause.

In addition, ExpressionMed has added three new diabetes awareness templates to its collection of ribbons and stickers. These can be worn by both diabetics and non-diabetics to spark conversation around the disease, and they make great gifts to show support for loved ones with diabetes.

Finally, 10% of November revenue from ExpressionMed’s diabetes-related bands will be donated to the College Diabetes Network (CDN). CDN helps young adults with type 1 diabetes find the peer relationships and resources they need as they transition to college and beyond. Donations will be distributed to the young adults they serve.

ExpressionMed manufactures pre-cut device tapes from the most durable and comfortable materials, allowing users to achieve peak performance with their portable chronic care devices. They currently sell over 200 models for several types of devices, including diabetic supplies available worldwide. The constant addition of dynamic and diverse design offerings allows the devices to represent the people who wear them, not the disease they are living with. Their products are made and packaged in the USA and are waterproof, fray resistant, and easy to apply and wear. You will find additional products and information at www.expressionmed.com.

###

Media contact:

Brittany Stevens
ExpressionMed Marketing Manager
952-270-9462
[email protected]

Related images

Image 1: Diadragon

Diadragon with Libre CGM

This content was posted through the press release distribution service at Newswire.com.


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Non profit living

Equitable Giving Circle stimulates communities of color, giving without strings attached: Sharing Season 2021


The pandemic has put the life of most countries around the world on hold. But for Equitable Giving Circle, it was the catalyst that started it all.

Since its inception in the spring of 2020, the black women-led organization has collected weekly food boxes for thousands of families, distributed plants, and provided housing assistance and school supplies to families in the Portland area.

Driven by a philosophy of “give without conditions”, the organization’s mission is to economically stimulate communities of color and address inequalities created by institutional biases and discriminatory systems.

“We know the most ignored people are often the hardest to reach,” said AJ McCreary, executive director and one of the founders. “We wanted to take care of black and brunette people, women and women. “

McCreary said the group had evolved from pre-pandemic discussions about ways to support black and brunette women in professional settings. At an event called Black Growers Gathering, McCreary said, she met people who inspired her. The pandemic has prompted the organization to regroup more quickly.

“Farm-to-table produce has always been in fashion here,” she said. “And as business owners, moms, aunts, community caregivers, we were all worried about what was going on. So I said let’s buy CSAs from farmers in BIPOC and give them to black families. “

AJ McCreary is the Managing Director of Equitable Giving Circle.Randy L. Rasmussen / For The Oregonian / OregonLive

She and several others started fundraising and started delivering food in June 2020. The organization now delivers boxes of food to 325 households or families every week.

The nonprofit, beneficiary of the Oregonian / OregonLive’s 2021 Season of Sharing fundraising campaign, has an annual budget of around $ 1.2 million, with four and more employees of 50 volunteers.

> Donate to Fair Giving Circle or the General Fund of the Season of Sharing

The organization aims to provide three main services to BIPOC families: food, accommodation and welfare.

Every week, Equitable Giving Circle hosts a pop-up pantry where black and brunette individuals and families can pick up produce and packaged items. “We see an average of 75 families or households per week,” McCreary said.

The food comes from local farms and businesses. CSA director DeeDee Hopkins said she tries to get unique products every week.

“Bob’s Red Mill, Dave’s Killer Bread, Stumptown Coffee,” Hopkins said, “I got a lot more yeas than nays about what we do in the community.”

A sign reading "Fair Giving Circle"

The majority of Equitable Giving Circle’s funding in its first year was spent on food programs. But the organization is also helping families find stable housing and has provided backpacks and new clothes to more than 500 children.Randy L. Rasmussen / For The Oregonian / OregonLive

Although the organization has a social media presence, Director of Outreach Dyvisha Gordon said much of its work is spread through word of mouth and the connections it is already forming.

“I’m in the community, so we know what our community members need,” Gordon said. “It’s a very small BIPOC community, so we all work together and collaborate. “

Several founding members said that although they did not know each other before, they had heard about each other because they had all been active in helping their communities.

“We may be a new organization, but we’re not new to serving the Portland metro area,” said Housing Manager Lillian Green.

Leigh Bohannon of the Black Parent Initiative, a Portland-based organization that connects black families with community-specific resources and education, said that during the 2020 holiday season, Equitable Giving Circle has provided more than 150 gift baskets and boxes of food, including culturally specific foods, to families with whom his organization works.

“It tends to be a pantry problem that ‘you get what you get and you don’t complain’,” Bohannon said. “But you should feel valued. You shouldn’t feel like you are a burden or less than deserving of nice things because you need a little help. They made our families really feel special. “

The majority of Equitable Giving Circle’s funding in its first year was spent on food programs. But the organization also helps families find stable housing.

Over the past year, it has distributed emergency rents and three-month mortgage grants, which have helped prevent dozens of families from being evicted.

The organization hopes to expand the housing program.

“We really want a radical model of wealth and equity redistribution,” Green said. “We really want to buy an apartment complex and have cohorts of families – especially black and brown single parents – live there for a few years without rent, so they can live, heal, save and, in the end, have a competitive down payment. . “

Equitable Giving Circle has provided backpacks and new clothing to over 500 children. He also hosts a “Plant Jam,” distributing houseplants to community members by working with local stores like Birds and Bees Nursery and EcoVibe Style.

When buying food, the organization looks for companies belonging to BIPOC.

A man stacks crates of produce.

Pablo Muñoz, of Pablo Muñoz Farms in Dayton, delivers product for distribution by the nonprofit Portland Equitable Giving Circle on October 21, 2021 in Portland.Randy L. Rasmussen / For The Oregonian / OregonLive

Japhety Ngabireyimana, whose family owns Happiness Family Farm, said McCreary contacted last year and asked if they were willing to provide boxes of community supported agriculture. The experience prompted the farm to start its own CSA program and to seek partnerships with others as well.

“I think they do a good job supporting us as farmers and highlighting what we do,” he said.

Dr. Allen, co-owner of EcoVibe Style, said she appreciates the group’s commitment to BIPOC-owned businesses. His company has a “matching donation” program: every time a customer purchases a plant to donate to Equitable Giving Circle, EcoVibe Style matches that donation.

As the founders of Equitable Giving Circle seek to increase their impact, they are excited about the work they have done so far.

“I’m really proud of our intentionality in everything we do,” said McCreary. “I’m proud that we’re continually stretching organizations to be better and making those little pivots that really have a profound impact. “

What your donation can do

$ 55: Provides a box of local food to a food insecure family.

$ 250: Provides one month of local food (one box per week for four weeks) to a food insecure family.

$ 500: Provides two weeks of rent / mortgage support.

> Donate to Fair Giving Circle or the General Fund of the Season of Sharing

Read more Season of Sharing stories at oregonlive.com/sharing


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Vivalon ends the challenge of Marin’s paratransit contract


A VIvalon paratransit bus descends Bridgeway in Sausalito on Saturday, September 25, 2021 (Alan Dep / Marin Independent Journal)

A long-standing provider of transport services for disabled and elderly residents of Le Marin has decided not to challenge plans to transfer the service to a French company from next year.

Vivalon, formerly known as Whistlestop, has been providing paratransit service in Marin for over 50 years and has had a contract with the local transit agency, Marin Transit, for 48 years. More than 10,000 passengers used the service each month before the pandemic.

Vivalon’s contract will expire next year. Marin Transit has issued a tender for the three-year, $ 24 million contract. In September, the agency’s board of directors voted to award the contract to Transdev from February.

After two unsuccessful attempts to protest the decision, Anne Gray, Managing Director of Vivalon, announced that she would no longer continue to challenge the decision and would instead work to ensure a “smooth transition” with Transdev.

“After carefully considering our options for ensuring paratransit users the same safe and reliable service that they have enjoyed with Vivalon over the past 50 years, we are confident that Vivalon has done everything possible, other than hiring legal counsel. costly, to continue to provide the Marin Access paratransit services in Marin County, ”said Gray.

Gray previously said the contract could have been appealed to the Federal Transit Administration, but Vivalon spokeswoman Jennifer Golbus said the research needed would be too costly for the association.

“After careful deliberation and consultation with trusted advisors, we have concluded that the right decision for Vivalon and for those we serve is to focus on a smooth transition of paratransit services to Transdev,” said Golbus.

The paratransit contract is Vivalon’s largest, representing approximately $ 5 million of its $ 11 million operating budget. Most of the revenue is used to operate the paratransit service, but about $ 500,000 is used for other programs, which will force the nonprofit to find a new source of funding, Gray said.

Marin Transit staff and board members justified the decision to award the contract to Transdev based on federal restrictions on tendering. The Federal Transit Administration demands “fair and open competition” and prohibits agencies from favoring or excluding non-local bidders, said Nancy Whelan, executive director of Marin Transit.

A selection panel made up of Marin Transit employees and consultants rated Vivalon and Transdev in different categories, Transdev having finally obtained the best rating. Categories included project understanding, experience and qualifications; work plan and approach; innovation; and the granting of bonuses for bilingual staff.

Vivalon obtained a score lower than that of Transdev in terms of understanding, qualification and experience of the project; work plan and approach; and innovation. Gray said the categories were the most subjective.

Transdev said it would offer all Vivalon drivers a job with the company. Golbus said Vivalon hopes many of its drivers will stay with the nonprofit to work in its Vivalon Rides service, which will provide medical rides, specialized transportation, shuttles and other services.

“In addition to transportation, we have enormous opportunities to continue to serve our community with the many programs at Vivalon that impact the health and vitality of seniors and people with disabilities,” Golbus said. “We are particularly excited about the opening of our Healthy Aging Campus at the end of 2023. Vivalon has a very bright future as Marin’s hub for healthy aging. “

Whelan said Vivalon and Transdev have been “very cooperative” in the transition.

“There has been a lot of talk about this change,” Whelan said. “We all want everything to go well. We want to continue working with Vivalon. They are a highly respected partner in our community. We will continue to serve the same people and we want to partner with them in the future. It’s an important part of that relationship here.


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St. Charles family touched by Ida donated caravan after months of sleeping in tents


PARADIS, Louisiana (WVUE) – A family of five in St. Charles Parish is sleeping warmer this weekend, after spending 77 days without a solid roof over their heads.

Hypolite Nazio’s family home in Paradis was destroyed by Hurricane Ida.

After weeks of back and forth with FEMA and the state, Nazio said he was understandably skeptical when he got a call offering him a free trailer.

“I got a call from someone who said, ‘Hey, we’ve got a trailer that we want to give you,’” Nazio said. “And my first reaction was, ‘No, it’s not real.’

“I spoke to my wife and she said, ‘OK, did you ask how long we can keep him? Or when they need it in return? “

Their benefactor Matt Rookard said he noticed a tweet from Fox 8 containing photos of the living conditions of the Nazios last week. He reached out to find out more.

“It started and ended with the tweet for me,” Rookard said. “I knew it was your tweet and I think it was three photos of some sort of tent city they had created.”

Rookard works with the Terrebonne Economic Development Authority, which also has a non-profit parent organization designed to help those who need it most.

Nazio, his wife and three children fit this description.

“Simpler is better, isn’t it?” Rookard said. “Go buy a used trailer, use our links with community organizations to identify needs and drop it off. “

Nazio said on Sunday that he still struggles to deal with the kindness his family has shown. But he said he remained true to his faith in God and in mankind.

“I sort of had doubts about any faith in humanity,” Nazio said. “It restored all of my faith in humanity.

“The Bible says worry about nothing. The Bible says, “God will provide. And in this case, God has definitely provided.

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Music in the Mountains live choral concert on November 7 – YubaNet


Nevada County’s Music in the Mountains (MIM) will present its fall choral concert this Sunday, November 7 at 3 p.m. at the Center for the Arts in Grass Valley, California.

Under the direction of artistic director and conductor Ryan Murray, the MIM 60-Voice Choir and select musicians from the orchestra will be joined by renowned organist Dr. Ryan Enright; and the haunting soprano soloist, Liisa Davila.

Organist Dr. Ryan Enright holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees and an artist’s diploma in organ performance from McGill University. He participated in international competitions; its awards include first prizes in the Canadian Music Competition and the National Organ Performing Competition of the Royal Canadian College of Organists. Dr. Enright is known regionally for his performances in the San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento and for accompanying the Sacramento Choral Society and Orchestra (SCSO) on their tour of Italy.

Soprano Liisa Davila is recognized for her vocal clarity and dazzling coloratura, combined with a richness and depth that enables her to possess a highly desired level of versatility in her work. Its repertoire includes both traditional and contemporary works. She has appeared in Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, Mendelssohn’s Christmas Oratorio, Mozart’s Mass in C minor as well as Handel’s Messiah,

The highlight of the program will be Dan Forrest’s Requiem for the Living, composed in 2013, which garners widespread acclaim as it is discovered around the world. Conductor Murray describes this work as “neo-romantic”, with rich melodies and harmonies. The ethereal movement of Sanctus in this piece was inspired by photos from the Hubble Space Telescope.

“For anyone interested in vocal music this is a must see gig,” said Murray. “” Forrest’s Requiem is one of the choir’s favorite pieces and is packed with beautiful melodies, incredible solos, and some of the greatest choral moments in the repertoire. It will truly be an unforgettable concert!

Under Murray’s direction, the MIM Chorus is an auditioned group of experienced singers from Nevada County and surrounding communities with roots dating back to the 1960s. With weekly rehearsals and individual studies and practices, the MIM Chorus is dedicated to presenting superior performance and to maintain professional standards of excellence. The group presents an ambitious summer music festival, performs with the MIM Orchestra and wows audiences with two performances of their popular holiday concert in December.

Murray will give a 30-minute talk before the concert at 2 p.m. before the concert, for those who want to know more about the compositions on the program and their composers, as well as the pleasure of singing.

In addition to his work with Music in the Mountains, Ryan Murray is also the Associate Conductor of the Modesto Symphony Orchestra. He is also Director of the Symphony Orchestra and Opera at California State University, Sacramento, and Conductor of the First Orchestra of the Sacramento Youth Symphony. Award-winning opera conductor, Murray is currently Music Director of Opera Modesto.

Music in the Mountains is a Nevada County-based non-profit organization that celebrates 40 years of delivering classical music live to the Sierra Foothills, Metro Sacramento and surrounding communities. Tickets for the MIM Holiday choral concerts are available online at musicinthemountains.org, at the box office at 131 S. Auburn Street, Grass Valley, or by calling 530-265-6124.


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Find it early and live Public service and social media campaign during Lung Cancer Awareness Month


WASHINGTON, Nov. 4, 2021 / PRNewswire / – LUNGevity, the nation’s leading lung cancer nonprofit, launches Lung Cancer Awareness Month with the launch of its Inspire for life: find it early and live public service campaign. This powerful campaign features the stories of lung cancer survivors diagnosed with stage I cancer, when it is most treatable, dramatically increasing their chances of survival. In fact, these survivors are leading normal lives.

Check out the interactive multi-channel press release here: https://www.multivu.com/players/English/8883051-lungevity-inhale-for-life-find-it-early-and-live-lung-cancer-psa/

Inspire for life: find it early and live is tLUNGevity’s fifth annual campaign Inspire for life educational videos and series focused on social media. This article aims to educate people with a long history of smoking about whether they are eligible for low dose CT screening, which can detect their lung cancer at its earliest stage, when it is most treatable. and even curable. Patients who may have had surgery to remove their lung cancer when it was caught early due to screening share their stories and current active lifestyles.

The videos also explain why it is crucial to support research into new, non-invasive and universal early detection tests that will help discover all lung cancer in both smokers and non-smokers. Survivors shown who have been diagnosed due to unrelated circumstances help to convey that lung cancer should not be discovered by accident.

“Detecting lung cancer at an early stage, when it’s easiest to treat, can save lives,” says Andrea Ferris, President and CEO of the LUNGevity Foundation. “Today, only 18% of lung cancers are diagnosed at an early stage, and many patients are diagnosed when they have symptoms, when the cancer is most likely at a more advanced stage. Our goal with Inspire for life: find it early and live is to screen eligible patients and lobby to support new ways of early detection so that more lung cancer patients have a chance of a cure. “

The Inspire for life: find it early and live videos feature six lung cancer survivors who have been screened for lung cancer or whose cancer was discovered during screening for unrelated medical conditions. Also featured are two renowned medical experts who talk about the importance of early detection of lung cancer: Robert Winn, MD, director of the VCU Massey Cancer Center and member of the board of directors of LUNGevity, and Avrum Spira, MD, MSCI , Global Head of the Johnson & Johnson Lung Cancer Initiative, Professor of Medicine at Boston University, and Member of the Scientific Advisory Board of LUNGevity.

The Inspire for life: find it early and live The campaign is funded in part by grants from AstraZeneca, Genentech, Bristol Myers Squibb, Regeneron and Sanofi Genzyme.

The campaign can be viewed at lungevity.org/inhale-for-life-early-detection.

About the LUNGevity Foundation

The LUNGevity Foundation is the leading national lung cancer organization focused on improving outcomes for people with lung cancer through research, education, policy initiatives and advocacy. support and engagement of patients, survivors and caregivers. LUNGevity seeks to have an immediate impact on the quality of life and survival of all those affected by the disease, while promoting health equity by addressing disparities across the continuum of care. LUNGevity works tirelessly to advance research into early detection and more effective treatments, provide information and educational tools to empower patients and their caregivers, promote impactful public policy initiatives and amplify patient voices through advocacy. research and engagement. The organization provides an active community for patients and survivors, as well as those who help them live longer and better lives.

Comprehensive resources include a medically-controlled, patient-centric website, a toll-free support hotline, the International Lung Cancer Survival Conference, and an easy-to-use guide. Search for clinical trials, among other tools. All of these programs aim to achieve our vision: a world where no one dies of lung cancer. The LUNGevity Foundation is proud to be a four star Charity Navigator organization.

Please visit lungevity.org to learn more.

About lung cancer in the United States

  • About 1 in 16 Americans will be diagnosed with lung cancer in their lifetime.
  • More than 235,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year.
  • About 60-65% of all new lung cancer diagnoses are in people who have never smoked or who are former smokers.
  • Lung cancer takes more lives than the following three major cancers (colorectal, breast and prostate) combined.
  • Only 22% of all people diagnosed with lung cancer will survive 5 years or more, BUT if it is caught before it spreads, the chances of survival at 5 years improve dramatically.


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Non profit living

Lake Chamber presents awards to community leaders at fall dinner


It was a great evening for the Lake District Chamber of Commerce.

The chamber last week held its annual fall dinner and awards ceremony in Camden on the Lake.

Among the awards during the evening, the Boy Scouts Great Rivers Council was named Nonprofit of the Year.

“The scouts have been going well here at the Lake of the Ozarks. The Cubs, the BSA scouts all survived 2020 and I think we’re doing pretty well ” says BSA executive director Chris Harper on behalf of the Boy Scouts.

Other accolades include: Mike Smith of Precision Auto with the President’s Award, Morgan Crainshaw with Arrowhead Senior Living and Luke Hagedorn with Dog Days (and, of course, KRMS / 93.5 Rocks the Lake) sharing the honor of being a member of the Board of Directors of the Year, Sandy Waggett as Distinguished Citizen of the Year, Sam Beck as Young Professional of the Year, the Barrett Restaurant Group as Big Business of the Year and Ball Parks National as the small business of the year.

There were also 10 business members known to have been with the chamber for 25 years.

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Lake District Chamber of Commerce hosts annual fall dinner and awards ceremony

LAKE OZARK, Mo. – Over 200 members of the Lake business community gathered for the Lake Area Chamber of Commerce Annual Fall Dinner and Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, October 27, 2021 at Camden on the Lake Resort and Conference Center .

Seven prestigious prizes were awarded throughout the evening in the following categories:
Non-Profit Organization of the Year, Small Business of the Year, Large Business of the Year, Young Professional of the Year, Board Member of the Year, Emeritus Citizen of the Year and Awards Of the president.

The winners of the LACC Annual Awards 2021 are:

  • Nonprofit of the Year: Great Rivers Council – Boy Scouts of America
  • Small Business of the Year: BallParks National
  • Great Business of the Year: Barrett Restaurant Group
  • Young Professional of the Year: Sam Beck – Edward Jones – Financial Advisor
  • Distinguished Citizen of the Year: Sandy Waggett – MSW Interactive

Lake Area Chamber staff presented the Board Member of the Year award to Morgan Crainshaw with Arrowhead Senior Living and Luke Hagedorn with Dog Days Bar and Grill for their exceptional service to the Lake Area Chamber and the countless hours spent serving. Mike Smith of Precision Auto & Tire Services received the President’s Award in recognition of his outstanding service to the Lake Area Chamber and the Lake community.

Members of the Lake District Chamber of Commerce celebrating 25 years of membership were also recognized. These members include:

  • Central Bank – Lake of the Ozarks
  • Old kindergarten crochet
  • Instant signs and banners
  • S. Station management
  • Town of Linn Creek
  • Windows and more
  • Holiday Inn Express
  • StoneBridge retirement home
  • Miller companies
  • Lutheran Church of Christ the King

The Lake District Chamber of Commerce is a non-profit membership organization with over 590 members ranging from home businesses to large corporations. The House’s mission is to enhance economic and community prosperity in the Lake of the Ozarks region by providing services and advocating for businesses. To learn more about the Chamber, including membership, please contact Casey Alexander, Director of Membership, at (573) 964-1008 or [email protected]


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Non profit living

VIDEO | The Bend welcomes Kat Perkins from The Voice


West Bend, WI – The theater of curvature, 125 N. Main Street, hosts Kat Perkins, finalist for The Voice, for two performances on its historic stage.

Under coach Adam Levine, Perkins advanced to the final in the 2014 season of The Voice.

Perkins and guitarist Dave Burkart will perform at the non-profit theater’s first Bend Ball on Friday, November 19, with all proceeds going to The Bend’s operating budget as well as Perkins’ own charitable foundation, which supports the initiatives. music education.

On Saturday, November 20, the entire Kat Perkins Band will take the stage with free admission for all students.

Kat Perkins

Tickets for both evenings are on sale now at thebendwi.org

Her bold voice and passion for music have not only led to commercial success, but she is a rock star who enjoys giving back to the community.

Perkins averages two military tours a year to perform for troops overseas, sells venues across America with a variety of shows and themed tours, and visits schools to talk to students about the fulfillment of their dreams, of life without fear and of achieving a positive impact on the world.

kat

The success of these presentations led Perkins to create a nonprofit, The Rising Star Foundation, providing scholarships and opportunities for aspiring musicians while giving back to the local community.

Part of how The Bend gives back is giving students FREE tickets to Kat’s concert on Saturday, November 20. come discover Turn, live music and all that music can do for our community.

The Bend is proud to present original music in a unique setting. Operated by the non-profit Historic West Bend Theater Inc., The Bend, is a 1929 vaudeville theater building fully restored in early 2020. It is listed on both the National and National Records of Historic Places.

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit thebendwi.org or by email [email protected]

Learn more about Kat’s music and founding at katperkinsmusic.com

Kat Perkins
Kat Perkins


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Non profit living

Amid climate talk, an actor’s call to action unfolds on stage


Actor Fehinti Balogun knows that theater can mobilize people towards climate action, because that’s what he has done for him.

In 2017, while preparing for a role in “Myth,” a climate parable, he started reading books about climate change and became alarmed at the unusually hot summer he was experiencing in England. The play itself called on him and the other actors to repeat the same mundane lines over and over, to the point of absurdity, as their surroundings terrifically fractured around them – the ridged walls of oil, the stove on fire, the freezer oozing water.

The whole experience changed her life, Balogun said. Suddenly, nothing seemed more important than tackling the global crisis. Not even land the head of a West End production (a long coveted dream) of “The Importance of Being Serious”. His growing anxiety made him feel like he was experiencing a real version of the “Myth” in which society repeated the same old scenario even as the planet fell into chaos.

“Knowing everything I’ve done made me angry with the world for doing nothing,” Balogun, 26, (“Dune”, “I can destroy you”) said in a telephone interview. “I didn’t understand how we weren’t upset.”

That sense of urgency is what he said he hopes to convey to audiences on “Can I Live?” », A new play he wrote, performed and created with the Complicité theater company. A filmed version of the play, which also features supporting actors and musicians and was originally intended as a live performance, was screened on Monday as part of COP26, the United Nations climate meeting. in Glasgow. The resulting artwork is as innovative as any play to emerge during the Covid-19 era: initially it seems like just an intimate Zoom session with Balogun, but evolves into an explosive mix. spoken word, animation, hip-hop and dialogue.

The hour-long production, which the Barbican Center has made available to stream on its website until November 12, combines scientific facts about how the greenhouse effect works with the story of Balogun’s own journey into the climate movement. He also emphasizes the gap between the predominantly white environmental groups he has joined and the experiences of his predominantly black friends and family.

Throughout the show, Balogun answers phone calls from family members about issues seemingly unrelated to the centerpiece of the room, asking when he is getting married or why he left a bag in the hallway. at home. Although at first it seems like they interrupt Balogun’s main narrative of ‘shows, shows, shows’ as he sings at one point, their interjections hammer home one of his central ideas: if the movement is unwilling to prioritize someone like his Nigerian grandmother, he misses the point. Climate action, in other words, is for ordinary people with everyday concerns.

“The aim is to make popular activism accessible and to represent people of color and people of the working class,” he said. To that end, he interweaves his own story with that of Nigerian writer and activist Ken Saro-Wiwa, who campaigned against destructive oil extraction on behalf of his Ogoni people. “Very often we don’t talk about the Global South,” Balogun said. “We are not talking about the communities that have been fighting this fight for years.

Although Balogun is the only theater artist on the official COP26 program, he is certainly not the first playwright to tackle climate themes. Climate Change Theater Action, an initiative of the nonprofit Arctic Cycle, was created to encourage theatrical creation that could draw more attention to COP21, the United Nations climate meeting in 2015 that culminated in to the historic Paris Agreement. (The theater group has never been officially affiliated with any of the annual COP meetings.)

Since its creation, the group has produced 200 works which have been performed in front of 40,000 people in 30 countries, said its co-founder, Chantal Bilodeau. The organization commissions plays on environmental themes, remunerates the authors and then provides the scripts free of charge to theater companies, schools or any other group that wishes to stage readings or productions.

The first year, Bilodeau said, they ended up with “a lot of depressing parts.” Now they’re trying to steer playwrights away from dystopia and toward visions of a liveable future, and encourage those who direct the works to pair them with programming that helps audiences better understand the issues.

Lanxing Fu, co-director of the nonprofit Superhero Clubhouse in New York City, devotes some of her time to those who will be most affected by a warmer planet: the next generation. Through Superhero Clubhouse’s Big Green Theater after-school program, run in conjunction with the Bushwick Starr and the Astoria Performing Arts Center, students at Brooklyn and Queens public elementary schools are learning about climate issues and writing plays in response to what ‘they learn.

More than a decade after the program began, Fu said that what is most striking about the student’s plays is how young writers instinctively understand a fundamental truth about the climate that escapes many. adults: to find long term solutions, we will need to work together.

“A huge element of climate resilience is in the community we build and the way we come together,” she said. “It is always very present in their stories; it’s often part of how something resolves.

Queens-based TV playwright and screenwriter Dorothy Fortenberry also spends a lot of time reflecting on children’s roles in the movement. His play “The Lotus Paradox,” which premieres in January at the Warehouse Theater in Greenville, SC, asks: What happens when children are constantly being told that it is their job to? save the world ? Like much of Fortenberry’s work on television (she is a writer on “The Handmaid’s Tale”), “The Lotus Paradox ”includes the subject of climate change without making it the singular center of the story.

“If you make a story about anything, anywhere, and you not having climate change in it is a science fiction story, ”she said. “You made the choice to make the story less realistic than it otherwise would have been.”

It is a feeling also shared by Anaïs Mitchell, musician and author of the musical “Hadestown, ” which reopened on Broadway in September. In his account of Greek mythology, Hades is portrayed in the song as a greedy “oil and coal king” who fuels his industrialized underworld hell with the “fossils of the dead”. Above the ground, the main characters, Orpheus and Eurydice, suffer from food shortages and brutal weather that is “either scorching heat or freezing cold”, a framing inspired by the headlines on climate refugees.

It’s worth fighting intentionally with climate narratives in theater, not only because they make plays more believable, Mitchell said, but also because theater might just be one of the best tools for dealing with such themes. . Like Orpheus trying to put things right with a song that shows “how the world could be, despite what it is”, Mitchell sees theater as a powerful tool to help us imagine our path to a better future.

“The theater is able to open our hearts and our eyes to an alternative reality to the one we live in,” she said.

This is why Balogun – although he notices it more than once in “Can I Live? “ that he is “not a scientist” – said he believed he had an equally crucial role to play as any climatologist. “Scientists are begging artists and theater makers to help get this message across,” he said. “And there is a need for it more than ever. “


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Non profit living

Urban transplants threaten to cost Southern California desert dwellers dearly


MORONGO BASIN, Calif .– Along a dusty highway that winds through the Southern California desert, Eric Wilson makes a list of fruits and vegetables available at his nearby farm.

He’s been selling kale, lettuce, tomatoes and other locally grown produce since April at Morongo Valley Fruit Market, a small grocery store he and his wife took over earlier this year.

Despite being located in what Wilson calls a “food desert” – the nearest grocery store is 15 minutes away in the nearby Yucca Valley – Wilson was initially dismissed as another outsider seeking to gentrify the community. calm.

Eric Wilson and his wife Garden Ramirez at their farmer’s market.Michael Rubenstein for NBC News

“People thought I was from LA,” said Wilson, who grew up in Cathedral City, about 30 minutes away. “I was called a yuppie because of the prices of organic products.”

Once a hamlet for cowboys and homesteaders, the Morongo Basin is undergoing rapid change amid an influx of city dwellers seeking to escape city life during the pandemic. They come to the sun-drenched desert hoping to find fresh air, cheap homes, and Instagram-worthy settings.

But what’s considered affordable for residents of Los Angeles, Silicon Valley, or New York is out of reach for many longtime residents, who say transplants are costing locals and disrupting the fragile ecosystem.

“It’s culture shock,” said Sarah Kennington, of the Morongo Basin Conservation Association. “Everybody Loves [Joshua Tree National Park], everyone loves the desert, and if you were gentle, that was fine. But that’s not where it was decades ago.

Located more than 160 km from Los Angeles, the Morongo Basin is nestled in the great Mojave Desert. It borders Joshua Tree National Park and includes the communities of Morongo and Yucca, Joshua Tree, Twentynine Palms, Pioneertown, and others.


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Non profit living

See Danny Pintauro from “Who’s the Boss?” Now – Better life


Danny Pintauro literally grew up on TV. For eight years he starred in Who is the boss as Jonathan Bower, the son of single mother Angela (Judith Lumiere), whose world changes when a new governess (Tony Danza) and her daughter (Alyssa Milano) move in. The multi-camera sitcom was a smash hit and aired on ABC from 1984 to 1992. By the time it ended, 16-year-old Pintauro was a true teenage idol, appearing regularly on the covers of Bop and teen beat alongside people like Kirk cameron and Michael j fox. Then he moved away from Hollywood and a full-time acting career. To find out why Pintauro left the company and what he does today, read on.

RELATED: 13 Child Actors From The 90s Who Left Hollywood And Why.

Ron Galella, Ltd./Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images

Before Who is the boss, Pintauro got his first credit on the soap opera As the world turns, followed by his film debut in the 1983s Cujo. And during the course of the sitcom, he held a few other jobs, including two TV movies.

When Who is the boss passed away, Pintauro took a break from his acting career to finish high school, then study theater at Stanford University. After graduating he tried to get back into the game and performed on stage in a few productions. However, he didn’t find the screen success he once had, and a tabloid story complicated matters further.

Danny Pintauro in 1997
Ron Galella, Ltd./Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images

In 1997, the National investigator called the young actor to tell him they would air an article publicly denouncing him as gay. Pintauro said Weekly metro two years later, it wasn’t as traumatic as some might assume since he was already open about his sexuality in his personal life.

“Most people think it was a terrible, terrible experience,” he told the outlet. “It wasn’t. It might have been if I wasn’t expecting it. If they hadn’t been nice enough to call me and ask me if I wanted to be a part of it. But as a actor, I have to say I totally expected it sooner or later because I wasn’t hiding it. I wasn’t in the closet. I knew it was going to happen.

Pintauro said he called his former co-star and close friend Judith Light for advice. “And his advice was, ‘If they write a story about you whether you like it or not, as much as they quote you correctly,” “the actor explained. “So I cooperated with the Applicant. And the article was really great. It was sincere. It was interesting. It was smart. What people don’t realize about these magazines is that if you cooperate, they’ll make a good story. They will do it well. If you don’t cooperate, they’ll come after you. “

And Pintauro certainly has no regrets today. On this year’s Spirit Day, a celebration of the LGBTQ + community, he posted a TikTok that begins: “You know, it always makes me smile when someone tells me I inspired them to come out of the closet. It’s something I can be proud of for the rest of my life. “

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Danny Pintauro in 2019
Bobby Bank / Getty Images

In a 2015 appearance on Oprah winfrey‘s Oprah: Where are they now, Pintauro has revealed his HIV status. He was diagnosed in 2003.

“I went for a regular check-up,” he said. “You know, as a responsible gay man, you get tested for HIV every six months… And you kind of waited two weeks with pins and needles, or at least I did, because that I was just terrified of contracting HIV. “

He said he believed he contracted it because he had used drugs and therefore was less concerned about safe sex.

“On meth, you have no limits, you feel invincible,” he told Winfrey. “You feel incredibly elated when it comes to your sexuality, and everything looks and feels arousing to you.”

Daniel Pintauro in 2016
Gregg Felsen / Getty Images for the Desert AIDS project

Although he felt compelled to back down right before Winfrey’s interview, Pintauro said that ultimately being upfront about his status made his life better.

“Before, it was difficult to walk in the street without someone recognizing me, and it was initially because I was on Who is the boss?. Then it was, ‘He was on Who is the boss? and he’s gay. Now it was going to be, ‘He was on Who is the boss?, he’s gay, and he’s another one of those HIV-positive guys, “” the 45-year-old said. People in 2021. “It was a little terrifying, but it didn’t really make me guess because I’m much happier as a person with no secrets.”

And Pintauro didn’t just tell the world he’s HIV positive. After the interview aired, he collaborated on the HIV Equal social media campaign for the “Beacon of Light” tour, which aimed to reduce the stigma associated with the disease, as reported. People. The campaign involved in-depth discussions between Pintauro and HIV and AIDS experts about living with the disease.

In 2016, Pintauro received the Arts and Activism Award from the Steve Chase Humanitarian Awards, which raises funds for the Desert Aids Project charity based in Palm Springs, California.

“I am proud to say tonight, in front of this welcoming, passionate and alluring crowd, that this award, in many ways, completes a huge circle of life and reinforces the fact that I made the right decisions,” he said. he declared when he accepted, the Desert sun reported.

Pintauro touched on a few areas after graduating from college, including the entertainment industry in a behind-the-camera capacity. In addition to working as a casting assistant, production coordinator and agent assistant, according to his LinkedIn, he managed a restaurant and worked at Whole Foods.

He is now a veterinary technician and pharmacy technician at the Texas nonprofit shelter, Austin Pets Alive.

“There is something of a wonder around animals,” Katera Berent, the shelter’s communications and events manager, told Austin360 in 2019. “You can feel the love he feels for every cat and dog he takes care of.”

The Who is the boss? The star told the outlet that he believes his job at the clinic is his true calling.

“As a very young child, that’s literally what I wanted to do when I grew up. Even though I was on TV, every summer I worked at this vet practice near my home in Los Angeles and cleaned the kennels or whatever they left is me doing it, ”he said. “I liked it.”

Pintauro did not lose the acting virus, however. He posts videos of himself performing monologues on TikTok and last year collaborated with several other former child stars for a web series called The quarantine group. And he has a sense of humor about his sitcom past; In a live musical parody titled Who is Da Boss?, Pintauro played a version of himself at the age of six.

He has shared his life in Austin with her husband for seven years, Wil tabares.

RELATED: Former Star Children Who Are Actually Geniuses.



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Non profit living

Do you think giving attracts wealth? A lot of millionaires do. Here’s how to make it work for you


You are reading Entrepreneur United States, an international Entrepreneur Media franchise. This story originally appeared on MarketBeat

To some people, the idea that giving money attracts wealth seems like a lot of hokum, but others strongly believe that living a life of abundance can make you a millionaire.

Contributor Depositphotos.com/Depositphotos.com – MarketBeat

When you give back, the argument is that this type of abundant act is flowing back to you. Not only do you feel great, but you also earn money with your freebies. In fact, wealth givers often say that before you can receive wealth in the first place, you must first learn how to sow goodness by giving.

It’s a hot topic ahead of Giving Tuesday on November 30. According to Giving Tuesday, Inc., the nonprofit behind the famous hashtag #GivingTuesday, 34.8 million Americans donated $ 2.47 billion to Giving Tuesday on December 1.

Let’s go over this seemingly incongruous concept: how to give your money away make you more money? We will find out.

Reasons Why Giving Your Money Attracts Wealth

Let’s take a look at the (admittedly unscientific) reasons why giving away money increases your prospects for wealth.

Reason 1: You adopt the principle of abundance against the principle of scarcity.

Scarcity vs. abundance means you stop seeing the world as a kid hoarding their Halloween candy. Instead of stuffing Halloween candy in every nook and cranny of your closet or believing that you’ll only get so much money before your allowance runs out (a la Mr. Scrooge), an abundance mindset takes on an abundance mentality. different approach – that there is a lot for Everyone.

Holding on to your money emphasizes the scarcity mentality, and wealth experts say it will hamper your ability to attract money.

Reason 2: It focuses your attention on what you want.

When you focus on attracting wealth, it can happen to you because you are creating momentum behind those thoughts. A negative mindset (like focusing on not having enough) can become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Instead of focusing on the fact that you weren’t able to purchase the “extra” things you want, figure out how you will donate to charity once you have the money.

How to give and attract wealth

Now what? Easy – you pick a charity, figure out how much you will give, figure out how you plan to give, and increase your percentage each year.

Step 1: Choose a charity.

Do you want to increase the tithe in your church? Give to your alma mater? Allocate funds to eradicate childhood cancer? Whichever recipient you choose, identify them and make a commitment to them – or multiple charities, if you prefer.

You can use Charity Navigator to help you determine the right organizations. The site assigns trust metrics to nonprofits so you know which charities are accountable and transparent. Charity Navigator does not charge the organizations it evaluates so that it can keep its marks objective.

Step 2: Determine how much you will give.

You may want to choose a small amount to start with so you can donate larger amounts later. (Many wealth experts suggest working up to 10% of your income.)

Let’s say you earn $ 100,000 per year. You may want to start giving 1% of your salary, or $ 1,000 per year – just $ 20 per week.

You may find it easier to get into the habit of giving early in your career (or before you earn millions) and keep giving a higher percentage as you earn more.

Of course, the mindset is that the more you give the more you will receive, but that doesn’t mean that you are pushing your limits or giving so much that you have to leave your home.

Step 3: Determine how you plan to donate.

Next, determine how you plan to give – through regular donations or a lump sum throughout the year. Some organizations run campaigns throughout the year and some companies often offer a matching donation option.

You can also save all your effort for Giving Tuesday, donate through a donor advised fund, start a private or family foundation, join a donor circle, or donate items you own, like a car or clothes. Let’s take a look at some of these definitions:

  • Fund advised by donors: Donor-advised funds, also known as charitable giving accounts, offer less expensive and more easily accessible options than using a private foundation. The sponsoring institution manages your money once you have invested it.
  • Private or family foundation: Private or family foundations look like what they are: foundations that allow you to donate money based on your goals and preferences. The IRS imposes rules on private foundations, including how much you must donate each year. It is important to involve an attorney and an accountant in order to achieve the foundation’s goals and meet all IRS requirements.
  • Donation circle: Giving circles can involve community gatherings that come together to offer donations to specific charities or groups. Giving circles don’t just exist in your local community – you can find them state or nationwide.

Step 4: Increase your donation percentage each year.

Last year’s Giving Tuesday donations were 29% higher than in 2019, despite the pandemic, according to Giving Tuesday.

Just like increasing your retirement savings percentage, why not do the same for your philanthropic efforts? Increase your donations to the percentage that suits you best.

Step 5: What now? Watch my bank account grow?

Winston Churchill said (roughly paraphrased): “We earn our living with what we earn, but we earn our living with what we give.” (He also said, “If you’re going through hell, keep going,” also great advice.)

If this seems like the least “safe” way to embrace wealth, you are right. It’s not like putting X amount on the market and expecting a 10% return after 30 years of compounding. However, experiments have shown that people often take higher (read: higher paid) leadership positions after their known charitable acts.

Giving Attracts Wealth – Try it!

If someone else needs your money more, don’t hang on to it, give it away. Give and you will receive: just a month before #Giving Tuesday is a great reminder.
Don’t be surprised if you find yourself richer because of it – in more ways than one.


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Non profit living

Merck to share its Covid pill formula with poor countries


Merck has granted a royalty-free license for its promising Covid-19 pill to a United Nations-backed nonprofit in a deal that would allow the drug to be manufactured and sold cheaply in countries the poorest, where coronavirus vaccines are extremely short. supply.

The deal with the Medicines Patent Pool, an organization that works to make medical treatments and technologies accessible globally, will allow companies in 105 countries, mostly in Africa and Asia, to sublicense the formulation of the antiviral pill, called molnupiravir, and start making it. .

Merck reported this month that the drug had halved the rate of hospitalizations and deaths among patients at high risk of Covid in a large clinical trial. Rich countries, including the United States, have rushed to negotiate deals to buy the drug, locking up much of the supply even before it was approved by regulators and raising concerns that countries poor people are deprived of access to medicine, much as they have been to vaccines.

Treatment access advocates hailed the new deal, which was announced Wednesday morning, calling it an unusual step for a major Western pharmaceutical company.

“The Merck license is very good and meaningful protection for people living in countries where more than half of the world’s population lives,” said James Love, who heads Knowledge Ecology International, a non-profit research organization. “It will make a difference. “

Charles Gore, Director of the Medicines Patent Pool, said: “This is the first transparent public health license for a Covid drug, and very important, it is for something that could be used outside of hospitals, and which is potentially going to be very cheap. “

“This will hopefully make things a lot easier by preventing people from going to hospitals and preventing people from dying in low- and middle-income countries,” he said.

Mr Gore said more than 50 companies, from all parts of the developing world, have already approached the organization for a sublicense.

The deal with Merck, Gore said, is also a critically important precedent. “Hopefully this will trigger a landslide of people coming into the Medicines Patent Pool, wanting to license, because there is no doubt that access has been the problem,” he said. “From a scientific standpoint, the industry has done a really brilliant job – first providing the vaccines, and now providing the treatments. But the access side dropped everything. “

Pfizer also has a Covid antiviral pill in late stage trials, and Mr Gore said the company is in talks with the patent pool as well.

Molnupiravir was developed by Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics of Miami, based on a molecule first studied at Emory University in Atlanta. All three organizations are parties to this agreement, which will not require any fees from any sublicensing company.

Merck has submitted its clinical trial data to the Food and Drug Administration to apply for emergency use authorization; a decision could be made in early December. Regulators in other countries that produce a version of molnupiravir will need to evaluate it. Some drugmakers will likely seek World Health Organization prequalification for their versions, so they can bypass regulatory steps country by country.

Stephen Saad, managing director of Aspen Pharmacare in South Africa, said his company plans to apply for a license to make molnupiravir and distribute it across Africa. He said he believed Aspen could make the drug for around $ 20 per course. The US government has an agreement to purchase 1.7 million courses of the drug, pending FDA clearance, an agreement that fixes the price at $ 712 per course.

Mr Gore said some in the field told him that a generic version of molnupiravir could be produced cost-effectively for as little as $ 8 per course.

As part of the licensing deal, Merck would continue to produce and sell the drug in wealthy countries and many middle-income countries at significantly higher prices.

Merck had already taken the initiative to allow eight major Indian drugmakers to produce generic versions of molnupiravir, pending clearance. But the company feared that production in a single region would not be sufficient to ensure rapid access to the drug in developing countries, said Jenelle Krishnamoorthy, Merck’s vice president for global policy.

The company has therefore also entered into talks with the patent pool, which has extensive experience working with a global network of drug manufacturers capable of meeting high quality standards, including those required for WHO prequalification. , she said.

“We knew we had to work faster, we had to do things that we had never done before, we had to be more efficient,” said Ms Krishnamoorthy.

The licenses Merck has issued to Indian generics manufacturers restrict sales to developing countries and exclude most middle-income countries, including China and Russia – the site of a current raging Covid epidemic – raising the possibility that the citizens of these countries, which often have weak health systems, will not have access to the drug.

The molnupiravir patent pool deal also excludes middle-income countries and most Latin American countries, Love said.

“What are you going to do for countries like Chile or Colombia, Thailand or Mexico? ” He asked. “They are not in the license.”


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Guys with Ties offers life classes in Massillon in CM2


MASSILLON – Jason Hamilton Jr. doesn’t want to take off his crisp white shirt and black clip-on tie.

He looks and feels great.

This is exactly what a Guys with Ties participant is.

Following: Guys with Ties Expands to Gibbs Elementary in Canton

“We’re dressed for success,” Massillon alumnus and Tiger football star Devin Jordan told more than a dozen students from Franklin Elementary School who have joined the volunteer leadership program.

On Monday, Jordan, president of his nonprofit Beyond the Game foundation, welcomed 87 elementary students in Franklin, Whittier and Gorrell to the brotherhood.

The leadership program for third graders aims to develop good leaders, good manners and good citizens.

Dressed in matching ties and shirts, the boys meet regularly to learn about different skills, including social etiquette, community service, job skills and respect.

Guest speakers will travel in person and virtually to discuss their personal experiences.

Following: Girls with Pearls Prepares Fairless Third Grade Students for the Future

Following: TE Harrison Bryant of Cleveland Browns shares frozen treats with area students

Boys are expected to live up to the program’s motto “Be good. Look good. Do good.”

“Wear this shirt and tie with pride,” he told the third graders.

The first lesson was about making a good first impression, which happens within two to three seconds of meeting someone.

They learned the five ways to make a good first impression – the 5 S’s: stand up when you meet someone for the first time, smile, say your name loud and clear, shake firmly, and say something nice to you. about the person.

Jordan challenged the boys to practice the techniques, promising them that those who follow the rules, do their “homework” and emulate the leaders will be awarded prizes and participate in special events.

As a former Tiger, Jordan wanted to bring the Guys with Ties program to Massillon. They were close last year but COVID has hampered efforts.

“There is a lot of enthusiasm around this program,” he said. “Superintendent (Paul) Salvino really insisted on that.”

The Massillon Guys with Ties program reaches Middlebranch and Avondale schools in Plain Local, Fairless Elementary School and Alliance City schools.

New programs are expected to start in Carrollton and Tusky Valley in the coming weeks, he said.

Girls with Pearls comes to Massillon

The girls also have a chic new group.

The Girls with Pearls is similar to Guys with Ties. The program promotes healthy relationships and values ​​to equip young people with the skills to prepare for femininity.

It was introduced to about 80 grade three girls in the city’s school district last week.

Throwing on organza scarves and satin gloves in a rainbow of matching colors, a beaded bracelet and necklace, the girls regularly meet volunteer coaches.

After just one meeting, Jordan said. there were several girls who asked to join after hearing about the effort from their classmates.

“This is what we want,” he said. “We want to build the program to include all the girls.”

Local Fairless schools hosted the program last year and more are expected to launch a program this year, Jordan said.

The Guys with Ties and Girls With Pearls programs both require volunteers to run the program with help from Jordan.

A positive program

Anytime the district can put a positive male figure in front of the kids to teach good manners, respect and being a good citizen is positive, said Franklin principal Mike Medure.

Hamilton’s mother Ashley Smith is hoping her son’s participation will give him the boost he needs.

“My son has a lot of self-confidence issues and what (this program) does is build confidence. I hope this can help him be more of a leader than a follower,” she said. declared.

As she picked up her son from school on Monday, the youngster couldn’t contain his excitement.

“Look at my shirt,” he told those waiting in the car.

“He likes to look good,” Smith said of his son. “I haven’t seen his face light up like this in a while.”

Contact Amy at 330-775-1135 or [email protected]

On Twitter: @aknappINDE


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Here is an overview of the business news from the Mahoning Valley


Also among today’s business updates: Regional chamber says it’s time to be scary and Real Living Ministries is donating to first responders.

YOUNGSTOWN – Mahoning County Commissioners have awarded Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corp. $ 500,000 in ARP funding to provide emergency home repairs to low-income homeowners.

The Emergency Home Repair Program can provide the following repairs at no cost to owners of a home equal to or less than 50% of the region’s median income who occupy their home:

  • Replacement of leaky roofs on the house;
  • Repair or replacement of furnaces that are not functioning properly;
  • Repair of plumbing leaks or other major plumping issues (i.e. replacement of hot water tank).

Those who qualify should contact YNDC at 330-480-0423 to request an application.

Coleman Health receives grant to help underinsured

YOUNGSTOWN – The Thomases Family Endowment of the Youngstown Area Jewish Federation has awarded a $ 2,000 grant to Coleman Health Services to help the nonprofit serve clients at the Belmont Avenue site in Youngstown who are not uninsured or underinsured to receive necessary mental health services.

Coleman serves nearly 7,000 people a year in the Mahoning Valley, treating everyone by helping clients not only with counseling and case management, but also by helping remove barriers to recovery by helping get cards social security, employment and affordable housing so that they can live independent lives.

“Coleman is grateful for the support of the Thomases family as the need for these services has increased dramatically due to the pandemic,” said Tammy Weaver, vice president of clinical services for Coleman in a press release.

Martha Thomases said, “My father would be proud to be part of Coleman Health Services’ mission. He would have appreciated anything Coleman does to improve life in the Mahoning Valley. “

Real Living Ministries donates to first responders

LIMA NORD – Real Living Ministries will honor Beaver Township first responders with a $ 1,000 donation to the Beaver Township Police and Fire Fund. The check will be delivered at 1 p.m. today at the Beaver Township Safety Building.

The $ 1,000 donation was recently raised during Real Living Ministries’ opening weekend (September 24-26). Local businesses and devotees have designed themed donation baskets filled with everything from art and other desirable items to canine care.

The September 25 Family Fun Day attendees purchased tickets to win the baskets.

Perry and Joy Chickonoski, co-founders of Real Living Ministries, said in a press release that they plan to make Family Fun Day an annual event and fundraiser for the community.

Further information is available online at www.RLMWOW.com or at https://www.facebook.com/reallivingministries.

Power After Hours Costume Party Set

FOWLER – Youngstown-Warren Regional Chamber of Commerce says it’s time to be scared!

The organization is sponsoring a casual networking event and Halloween costume party on Tuesday at Hartford Hill Winery. Powers After Hours runs from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. and costs $ 15.

Power After Hours, like Chamber Power Lunches, allow attendees to connect with other Chamber members.

Participants can enjoy appetizers and a cash bar with Hartford wine. The winner for the best costume will receive a spooky Halloween prize.

To register, click.

Youngstown Police take an oath

YOUNGSTOWN – Youngstown Police Chief Carl Davis will be sworn in to a new officer on Tuesday.

Dylan Bell will be sworn in at 10 a.m. Tuesday in the community room of the Covelli Center.

– Do you have an ad about your business or organization that you would like to share? Send an email to [email protected]


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-profit celebrates 10 years of healing with horses | Online features


Silver Lining Riding, a non-profit organization providing adaptive riding and horse-assisted therapy, celebrates 10 years of helping others heal through horses.

The organization, located at 7220 N. 185th Avenue in Waddell, offers therapeutic and educational horseback riding and horseback riding programs for people with physical, mental and cognitive disabilities. It caters to a wide range of special needs, aimed at challenging its students physically, cognitively and socially.

Founded in 2011, Silver Lining Riding is a member of the Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA) and celebrates a decade since achieving non-profit status, according to Silver Lining Riding Board Chairman Gregg Brown.

“We work with special needs, but it’s a pretty big topic and we’re trying to be a little vague,” Brown said. “Our mission is to help people overcome the obstacles in life, whatever those obstacles, whatever.

Silver Lining typically serves 35-40 clients per week, ages 4-90. Classes can be delivered as semi-private or group lessons in six-week blocks. They are also adapted, with the help of parents and guardians, to the needs of each student.

According to Cori Morris-Sweetalla, instructor and manager of the Silver Lining Riding program, horse-assisted experiences help improve balance, strength, range of motion, coordination, motor skills, reflexes, breathing, circulation and sensory integration, to name a few.

“We adapt it to the needs of each student. Our main goal is to make sure that all students end up riding independently, ”she explained. “With that in mind, we know this may not always happen. We do admissions so our students know what their goals are, and from there we build. “

Because horseback riding moves the body rhythmically in much the same way as a human gait, the act can be therapeutic, said Morris-Sweetalla, who has seen students with physical disabilities improve their flexibility, balance and strength. muscular.

“When you are on horseback, after you finish your first lesson, you get off and it hurts – so it’s the same with these kids when they are out and riding them (the horses) for 30 minutes of lessons” , she said.

“We’re looking for that automatic reaction where, when you see them start sliding to one side, their body automatically adjusts, regains their balance and readjusts themselves,” he said.

Physical benefits aside, horses have gained a reputation within the mental health community as quality companions for relieving stress, anxiety, and depression.

Equines can “mirror and respond” to human behavior, says the Anxiety Treatment Center. With similar social and responsive behaviors, it’s easy for clients to bond with the animal in the herd.

The benefits of Silver Lining can also be educational, Brown said.

“We have a riding program where we teach the different parts of the horses, how to saddle them and how to groom them,” he explained.

Riding students work with their equine partners in the field, building a stronger relationship. Brown suggests pairing the adaptive riding lessons with the riding feature to get the maximum benefit.

Silver Lining Riding is scheduled to host its 10th Anniversary Student Showcase in February of next year. Originally scheduled for May 2021, the two-day event has been postponed due to security measures related to COVID-19.

The student recital gives the nonprofit organization’s students a chance to show off their riding skills through a series of locally judged events, Brown explained. They will also have the opportunity to qualify to compete in the Silver Lining Riding Special Olympics Track and Field Games.

“We’re just starting to plan for it, but I don’t think it will differ from previous years,” Brown revealed. “We have different classes and they follow a pattern. We have judges, and it’s very much like a horse competition – just for special needs. We make trophies and have a trophy party – for everyone to receive a trophy. “

Morris-Sweetalla added that the Special Olympics portion of the recital is the highlight of his career each year.

“This is literally why I come to work every day, especially the Olympics,” she said. “When you see the kids, it’s really worth it to see how their faces light up. Some of these kids will never get the chance to do a horse show, and it’s their day. “

To be eligible, students must complete a full six-week session. Riding lessons suitable for groups of four are $ 35 each, or $ 55 with the riding program.

Semi-private two-rider lessons cost $ 45 each and $ 65 to include horseback riding. Private lessons are available for $ 60.

Although most of the funds go towards operating expenses, Morris-Sweetalla said Silver Lining Riding is always open to volunteers.

Brown echoed his partner’s sentiments, adding that he was eager to get Silver Lining Riding up to standard with his students in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I have seen real breakthroughs,” he shared. “But the great thing I take in – and I’ve heard this from a lot of parents – is that they become a normal family, at least one day a week.”

To complete a student registration form, go to silverliningriding.org/student-

registration. For more information visit

silverliningriding.org or contact Morris-Sweetalla at [email protected]


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Berghoff is passionate about supporting seniors |


FORT WAYNE —Sherri Berghoff is clear when she shares her philosophy of life.

“Be better today than yesterday and better tomorrow than today,” said Berghoff.

Berghoff is currently focused on growing his three businesses and a nonprofit organization from scratch: One Purpose Senior Healthcare; Single-use services for the elderly; Single objective marketing; and One Purpose Senior Adventures nonprofit.

“I’ve been working in the healthcare industry for about 18 years now,” Berghoff said.

“I was looking to redefine who I was and what I wanted to be and I started working in the healthcare industry and fell in love with long term care. “

When setting up his three new businesses and his non-profit organization, Berghoff said, “An opportunity presented itself and I just had a few ideas on how I might turn those opportunities into certain businesses. So I took the leap of faith the first part of June and I jumped and started three for-profit businesses and one non-profit organization.

“My goal with these three for-profit companies is to end up getting them to where they operate successfully and make money so that I can really focus on the nonprofits, because that’s where my heart is really in, ”she added.

Berghoff’s nonprofit, One Purpose Senior Adventures, works to make the wishes of seniors in need come true. The seed that led to the creation of the organization was sown about five years ago.

“My mom lives in southern Tennessee. She was 78 at the time … At least once a year, I made a point of spending time with my mother. And normally when I went to visit, we would go shopping, go out to eat, that sort of thing. But on that visit, I asked her, “Mom, what would you like to do while I’m here this time?” And she said, “Well, we don’t have to do it this time, but I saw pictures you posted, taking your kids’ zipline and I would love to try that.”

Berghoff said she told her mother there would be no wait until next time and, thanks to Google, was able to find a place nearby and the mother-daughter duo went to do of the zip line the next day.

It started an annual tradition, and subsequent adventures included whitewater rafting, attending Dollywood’s opening day, and a hot air balloon ride.

Bergoff also took his father zipline after seeing photos posted on social media that showed Berghoff and his mother on their adventures.

“So at 82 I took my dad’s zipline for the very first time,” she said.

Checking things off his mother’s to-do list, Berghoff figured there were other seniors who had things on their to-do list that they had never been able to do due to calendar or finances.

“Through our non-profit agency, our focus will be on fulfilling some of the bucket list wishes for individuals – primarily focused on low-income people living in a long-term care facility. And he doesn’t have to be adventurous. It doesn’t have to be ziplining and whitewater rafting. But whatever it is, it’s on their bucket list, ”Berghoff said.

Berghoff went on to describe his three businesses.

One Purpose Senior Healthcare aims to provide personalized healthcare coordination for the elderly.

“Basically, this is an attempt to improve communication between all providers involved in the care of an individual,” Berghoff explained.

Berghoff said that while working in healthcare, she found there was a lot of disconnection between providers and her business attempts to involve everyone involved in the care of an elderly person in communication. of what was going on with that person.

One Purpose Senior Services provides consulting services to healthcare organizations.

One Purpose Marketing offers services such as sales coaching, sales training, website design, logo design, branding, and social media management.

Berghoff said her passion for serving the elderly likely stemmed from the relationship she had with her grandmother.

“It was such a special relationship… It was such a positive experience in my life… It was like a way of honoring him,” she said.

“I feel like if I’m living my own mission, which, I say, is to be better today than I was yesterday and better tomorrow than I am today, my only hope is that people are not afraid to step out of their comfort zone and really go for the things they want. I think if there is anything I could say to anyone, it’s not to be afraid. And I think that is holding us back. So often in our lives the fear of what other people will think or the fear of failure or, I think, fear in general just holds us back and I’m inspired by the women who have been in my life and I don’t. can only hope that I can be half of what these women have done for me for someone else.


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Zena empowers women living in poverty in Uganda


OXFORD, UK – Zena, a non-profit organization with a deep and lasting impact on women living in poverty in Uganda, works in several parts of Uganda, including Kamuli, one of the most poor people of the country.

Women in Uganda

Due to pervasive gender inequality in Uganda, women are treated like second-class citizens. Women are marginalized in many ways, whether due to lack of access to education, political under-representation or the violation of harmful cultural practices such as female genital mutilation and marriage. of children. Although overall poverty has declined over the years, the poverty rate is still high in Uganda, rising to 21.4% in 2016. Notably, high poverty rates have a disproportionate impact on women.

In an interview with The Borgen Project, Loren Thomas and Caragh Bennet, co-founders of Zena, point out that the women they work with “are not beneficiaries but benefactors”. Entrepreneurship women are enrolled in The Zena Launchpad program, where they gain confidence, education and community, while simultaneously gaining a learning / employment opportunity to create jewelry for the community. Zena brand. This work allows women to save to start their own business and escape poverty.

Origin story

Thomas and Bennet met in Uganda while volunteering on a gap year after high school. After active discussions on best practices in aid, Thomas’ experience in developing a social enterprise program for women, and Bennet’s research thesis in Uganda, they agreed that “women entrepreneurs needed debt-free capital ”. From there was born the idea of ​​Zena.

Zena has two bodies that go together. One is the Zena Launchpad where the focus is on social impact. The other is the product line, The Zena Brand, which focuses on creating unique jewelry. The quality and style of Zena’s products make the brand popular, featured in Vogue Italia, Marie Claire and Harper’s Bazaar.

Hybrid model

What makes Zena unique is that it is not a traditional charity. Zena is partly nonprofit because she works with donors who invest in women, wishing to have an impact rather than getting a capital reward. At the same time, Zena is a social enterprise as women gain access to stable employment and acquire skills and earned capital for their business ideas.

Thomas explains: “The hybrid model Zena Launchpad allows women to access start-up capital without loans and without handouts. This is extremely important in fostering a sense of agency, as it “allows them to start businesses from a real place of strength and trust, knowing that they have fully earned this opportunity themselves”.

The model in practice

The selection process is simple: the participants / potential members of the program are women living in poverty in Uganda with viable business ideas. Women are an eclectic mix of backgrounds, all “from a variety of religions, tribes and even different countries,” says Thomas. Some were once refugees, others were abused, but all women come into Zena and find not only a new livelihood, but a new community of support. Women end up becoming clients of each other and looking after each other’s children.

Once selected for the jewelry apprenticeship program, women receive education and training in business and literacy. Each member is assigned a unique contract based on their business idea and the amount they need to save to start the business. Zena supports achievable goals so that women graduate and the next cohort can then be enrolled.

But, Zena doesn’t stop there. Bennet and Thomas intentionally decided to use only recycled and locally sourced waste to make their products, believing in the power of the fashion industry to do good not only for workers but also for the environment.

Education

Education in Zena is extremely important. The program takes a holistic approach through three areas of learning: classroom instruction, work experience, and personal development through mentoring. Zena sees literacy as crucial in changing the lives of women living in poverty in Uganda alongside formal business education and leadership training. Women gain “project management experience and communication skills” while working and discussing important topics, such as violence, family planning and mental health in a supportive environment.

Bennet and Thomas are continually looking for a way to improve their program. They are now planning a course on social media and smartphones after noticing during the COVID-19 pandemic that a lack of computer literacy can be a barrier to success.

Combat gender inequalities

In Uganda, there is a significant gender disparity in human capital wealth, with women accounting for only 39%, while men accounting for 61%. What is more, girls and women of lower socioeconomic status are the most affected by gender inequality. Therefore, the Zena Launchpad program, active since 2016, deliberately focuses on creating future women entrepreneurs by empowering women living in poverty.

The Zena team believes that these women will then also become leaders in their communities, defending and supporting other women. Some of Zena’s graduates now only hire women at their startups, and a graduate called Susan is going one step further, focusing on hiring single mothers. Thomas says that another graduate, Eva, “is currently working to run for local government to better advocate for women in her community.”

The empowerment and social awareness gained through the model has a clear impact on the community, not just the women in the official program. This belief in solidarity is something Bennet and Thomas stand for, with weekly team bonding sessions mandatory for all Zena members, regardless of the role of the participant, from security personnel to board members. .

An exemplary model

In her first five years, Zena supported the development of 31 women entrepreneurs, with 19 graduating from her program. This impact means that 200 people are lifted out of poverty, 90 children receive an education and 17 women are literate.

Zena’s founders are now looking to expand their program to help more women living in poverty in Uganda, believing the success of their model is proof of its potential for replication around the world. Zena, a community power-driven nonprofit, is one to watch for the future and be inspired by today.

– Hope Browne
Photo: Courtesy of Zena


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Non profit living

Initially, surgeons attached a pig kidney to a human – and it worked


Surgeons in New York have successfully attached a kidney grown on a genetically engineered pig to a human patient and found the organ to be functioning normally, a scientific breakthrough that could one day produce a vast new supply of organs for them. critically ill patients.

Although many questions remain unanswered about the long-term consequences of the transplant, which involved a brain-dead patient followed for only 54 hours, experts in the field have said the procedure represents a milestone.

“We need to know more about organ longevity,” said Dr Dorry Segev, professor of transplant surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine who was not involved in the research. Nonetheless, he said: “It’s a huge breakthrough. This is a big, big problem.

Researchers have long sought to grow organs in pigs suitable for transplantation into humans. A constant flow of organs – which could eventually include hearts, lungs and livers – would offer a lifeline to the more than 100,000 Americans currently on transplant waiting lists, including the 90,240 who need of a kidney. Twelve people on waiting lists die every day.

An even greater number of Americans with kidney failure – more than half a million – depend on grueling dialysis treatments to survive. Largely because of the scarcity of human organs, the vast majority of dialysis patients are not eligible for transplants, which are reserved for people most likely to thrive after the procedure.

The operation, performed at NYU Langone Health, was first reported by USA Today on Tuesday. The research has not yet been peer reviewed or published in a medical journal.

The transplanted kidney was obtained from a pig genetically engineered to grow an organ unlikely to be rejected by the human body. In a close approximation of an actual transplant procedure, the kidney was attached to a person who had suffered brain death and was kept on a ventilator.

The kidney, attached to the blood vessels in the upper leg outside the abdomen, began to function normally, producing urine and creatinine waste “almost immediately,” according to Dr. Robert Montgomery, director of the NYU Langone Transplant Institute, which performed the procedure in September.

Although the organ has not been implanted in the body, problems with so-called xenotransplants – from animals like primates and pigs – usually occur at the interface of the human blood supply and organ, where human blood circulates through porcine vessels, the experts said.

The fact that the organ is working outside the body is a strong indication that it will work in the body, said Dr Montgomery.

“It was better than we expected, I think,” he said. “It looked like any transplant I have ever done from a living donor. Many kidneys of people who have died do not work right away and take days or weeks to start. It worked immediately.

Last year, 39,717 residents of the United States received organ transplants, the majority of them – 23,401 – receiving kidneys, according to the United Network for Organ Sharing, a nonprofit that coordinates the country’s organ procurement efforts.

Genetically modified pigs “could potentially be a sustainable and renewable source of organs – the sun and the wind of organ availability,” said Dr Montgomery.

Reactions to the news among transplant experts ranged from cautious optimism to wild outpouring, though all agreed that the procedure represented a sea change. The prospect of raising pigs to harvest their organs for humans is sure to raise questions about animal welfare and exploitation, although around 100 million pigs are already killed in the United States each. year to feed.

While some surgeons have speculated that it may be a few months before kidneys from genetically modified pigs are transplanted into living humans, others have said there is still a lot of work to be done. .

“This is truly a leading edge translational surgery and transplant that is on the verge of being able to be done in living humans,” said Dr Amy Friedman, former transplant surgeon and chief medical officer of LiveOnNY, the organ procurement organization for the greater New York City area.

The group was involved in the selection and identification of the brain dead patient receiving the experimental procedure. The patient was a registered organ donor, and because the organs were not suitable for transplantation, the patient’s family agreed to allow research to test the experimental transplant procedure.

Dr Friedman said she is also considering using hearts, livers and other organs grown in pigs. “It’s really mind-boggling to think of how many transplants we could offer,” she said, adding: “You have to raise the pigs, of course.”

Other experts were more reserved, saying they wanted to see if the results were reproducible and review the data collected by NYU Langone.

“There is no doubt that this is a feat, in that it is difficult to do and you have to overcome a lot of obstacles,” said Dr. Jay A. Fishman, Associate Director from the Massachusetts General Hospital Transplant Center.

“Whether this particular study advances the field will depend on what data they’ve collected and shared, or whether it’s a step just to show they can do it,” said Dr. Fishman. He urged humility “about what we know”.

There are still many hurdles to overcome before organs from genetically modified pigs can be used on living humans, said Dr David Klassen, chief medical officer of the United Network for Organ Sharing.

While he called the surgery a “watershed moment,” he warned that long-term organ rejection occurs even when the donor’s kidney is well adapted and “even when you are not trying to cross the barriers of the organs. species “.

The kidney has functions in addition to removing toxins from the blood. And there are concerns about pig viruses infecting recipients, said Dr Klassen: “It’s a complicated area, and to imagine that we know all the things that are going to happen and all the problems that are going to arise is naive.

Xenotransplantation, the process of grafting or transplanting organs or tissues between different species, has a long history. Efforts to use animal blood and skin in humans date back hundreds of years.

In the 1960s, kidneys from chimpanzees were transplanted into a small number of human patients. Most died soon after; the longest lifespan of a patient was nine months. In 1983, a baboon heart was transplanted into a baby girl known as Baby Faye. She died 20 days later.

Pigs offered advantages over primates for organ harvesting: they are easier to rear, mature faster, and reach adult human size in six months. Pig heart valves are commonly transplanted into humans and some diabetic patients have received pig pancreas cells. Pig skin has also been used as a temporary graft for burn patients.

The combination of two new technologies – gene editing and cloning – has produced genetically modified pork organs. Pig hearts and kidneys have been successfully transplanted into monkeys and baboons, but safety concerns have prevented their use in humans.

“So far, the field has been stuck at the preclinical primate stage, as moving from a primate to a living human is seen as a big leap,” Dr. Montgomery said.

The kidney used in the new procedure was obtained by removing a pig gene that encodes a sugar molecule that elicits an aggressive human rejection response. Pork has been genetically modified by Revivicor and approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use as a source of human therapy.

Dr Montgomery and his team also transplanted the pig’s thymus, a gland involved in the immune system, in an attempt to prevent immune reactions to the kidney.

After attaching the kidney to the blood vessels in the upper leg, surgeons covered it with a protective shield so that they could observe it and take tissue samples during the 54-hour study period. . Urine and creatinine levels were normal, Dr Montgomery and colleagues found, and no sign of rejection was detected for more than two days of observation.

“There did not appear to be any incompatibility between the pig kidney and the human that would render it inoperative,” said Dr Montgomery. “There was no immediate rejection of the kidney.”

Long-term prospects are still unknown, he admitted. But “it allowed us to answer a very important question: is there something going to happen when we go from a primate to a human that is going to be disastrous? “


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Nonprofit Organization Denies Jamie Lynn Spears’ Donation From Book Proceeds | Culture & Leisure


This Is My Brave declined Jamie Lynn Spears’ offer for a donation from the proceeds of his upcoming book.

The nonprofit – which aims to raise awareness about mental health issues – reacted to the backlash against the 30-year-old star’s memoir and confirmed it would not accept “proceeds from the book sale. “.

Speaking to Instagram, This Is My Brave said, “We hear you.

“This Is My Brave was recently recommended as a benefit organization for Jamie Lynn Spears’ upcoming book.

“We have made the decision to decline the offer to receive the proceeds from the book sale.”

This was shared with another statement, which read, “We have heard you. We are taking action. We are deeply sorry for all whom we have offended.

“We are refusing the donation of Jamie Lynn Spears’ next book.”

The ‘Zoey 101’ actress sparked a backlash in July when it was announced that she was planning to release an autobiography titled ‘I Must Confess’ – which is a word from her older sister, Britney Spears’ single. … Baby One More Time ‘- but she later revealed it’s titled’ Things I Should Have Said ‘.

The book’s original subtitle, “Family, Fame and Figuring It Out,” also appeared to have been deleted.

And she recently revealed her intention to donate to This Is My Brave by praising the organization’s “amazing work”.

She said: “I know I still have a LOT to learn, but I feel like finishing this book has brought this chapter of my ’30 year’ life to a close and hopefully. , to help anyone who has forgotten their worth, lost their voice or is trying to break an unhealthy cycle in their life.

“That’s why, I’m so happy to announce that a portion of the proceeds from my book will go to @thisismybrave, because I know how scary it can be to share personal struggles, especially if you don’t feel like you have the support or a safe space to do it, and they do an amazing job of supporting and encouraging people as they courageously share their experiences. (sic) “


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Non profit living

I am a fashion editor and am blown away by these eco-friendly heels


This fancy shoe brand is committed to saving the planet and our feet from the throbbing pain

Rachel richardson

As for the heels, we have a lot options, but it’s actually very rare to find a fancy shoe brand that boldly makes lots of promises up front – and actually delivers. Well, that’s precisely what Ma’am Shoes did, and I’m so here for it. The new Los Angeles-based brand made its debut by declaring that women no longer have to choose between style and comfort, and went one step further by using sustainable materials to source locally and produce their very cute and colorful line of quality sandals, heels and ankle boots (coming soon).

Jennifer chan

Jennifer chan

Courtesy

madam shoes

madam shoes

Courtesy

Buy now: $ 300; maamshoes.com

My interest immediately piqued when I browsed the site for more details and I was pleasantly surprised to find that Ma’am was more than just cute suede shoes. The eco-conscious line makes it known that they are created by women for women, and their mission is to make the world a better place. Understandably, there are strong feelings of empowerment and equality for women on their minimalist packaging, and upon closer inspection, I found that Ma’am even partnered with nonprofits. like United States of Women and I Am a Voter to give back and make an impact where it matters. If there was a shoe election in the fashion world, I would definitely vote for Ma’am Shoes.

So when the brand offered to send me a pair of their cute Ruth heels, I took them out for a walk to see how they performed. I wore them for brunch followed by a walk around town afterwards, and I felt cool, confident, and totally at ease. The (very) manageable heel height made for an enjoyable day without any complaints, and it turned out that the Ma’am team tested different heel heights, widths, insoles, outsoles and fabrications for finding the perfect equation to keep consumers comfortable on their feet to “walk the walk”. I like this.

Jennifer chan

Jennifer chan

Courtesy

“At Ma’am, we reject the idea that the bigger the better and that women need throbbing feet to be powerful,” the website proclaims. Music to my ears. The older I get, the more I realize that more reasonable heel heights are better for my joints (did I really just say that?) On your precious feet.

Jennifer chan

Jennifer chan

Courtesy

This particular style comes in four fun colors, and the soft petal pink hue I chose was a good start from the typical beige and neutral hues I usually gravitate towards in the fall. At $ 300, these shoes don’t come cheap, but the quality and brand history are well worth it, if you ask me.

madam shoes

madam shoes

Courtesy

Buy now: $ 300; maamshoes.com

And later this month, Ma’am is expanding its line to offer ankle boots in a rich ink indigo hue with a cool cylindrical heel. As if they weren’t tempting enough, for every pair of Shirley Boots sold, $ 10 will be donated to Baby2Baby, a non-profit organization that provides diapers, clothing and more to children living in poverty.

madam shoes

madam shoes

Courtesy

Buy now: $ 350; maamshoes.com

In short, Ma’am Shoes makes the difference in more than one way.


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Spokane teenager helps found refugee outreach program Youth Brining Immigrants Together


When immigrants and refugees arrive in Spokane, they often struggle to make connections in their new community. This can be especially true for young people, who find themselves in a school system that they do not understand, speaking a language that is foreign to them.

Neharika Sharma, junior at Gonzaga Prep, and a group of teens around the world hope to ease this struggle by connecting recent immigrants with local residents through a new nonprofit they have founded called Youth Bringing Immigrants Together (YBIT).

Students from the United States and Ukraine have been invited to participate in a training camp organized by Global Youth Entrepreneurs. There, Sharma teamed up with Larry Huang, a Taiwanese immigrant living in Vancouver, Washington, Daria Malevka from France and Barbara Potochevska from Ukraine.

Soon they realized that they all had something in common: a family experience with immigration. This inspired them to create a non-profit organization dedicated to connecting local residents with immigrants and refugees to ease their transition.

YBIT has been selected as the winner of the non-profit Global Youth Entrepreneur competition. This competition attracts hundreds of applicants from all over the world.

Students in the United States and Ukraine were matched in groups of four to compete for a $ 1,000 grant and the opportunity to receive financial advice from Nike CFO Mehran Nikko and former Microsoft vice president Dan’l Lewin.

This is how Sharma, Huang, Malevka and Potochevska connected. Using their shared family experience with immigration, they introduced a non-profit organization that matches locals with immigrants and refugees to ease their transition.

“We had to create business presentations, financial and business plans within a week, and it was overwhelming with the jet lag,” because two of the founders lived in Ukraine, Sharma said.

“Some of us didn’t have enough time to sleep because the competition was going on,” Potochevska added.

Sharma said the group didn’t know the financial side of doing business, so when they got $ 1,000 they didn’t know how to use it. As a result, Nike’s CFO and Microsoft’s vice president told YBIT how to set up a non-profit organization, register it with the government, and distribute the funds properly.

Shortly after YBIT won the grant, COVID-19 took the world by storm. However, this roadblock benefited the building of their non-profit organization. This saved the group a lot of money as they have built a positive reputation through social media.

Sharma’s parents immigrated from India to Spokane. She is a junior at Gonzaga Prep and enjoys participating in musical theater and Indian classical dance. She said the process took her family about 13 years to immigrate to the United States. Understanding how difficult and trying this process is for so many people, Sharma sought to make this transition easier, especially for families.

When she first started working with YBIT, Sharma was surprised to find that unlike her, most immigrants quickly abandon their culture to assimilate into American life.

“If I had left my culture behind,” she said, “half of my life would have been gone.

She said she tries to prevent this assimilation by posting topics on Instagram that mentees can discuss with their mentors. One week, she asked mentees to share a recipe from their culture with their mentors. With this program, Sharma hopes to encourage teens to embrace their uniqueness.

Huang immigrated to Vancouver from Taiwan at the age of 3. Huang said that because his family spoke Mandarin Chinese, he struggled to overcome the language barrier. His school enrolled him in ESL, which made it difficult for him to adapt to an unfamiliar environment.

“Coping with the language barrier was difficult for me. So I signed up for this innovation boot camp (Global Youth Enterprises) and met the YBIT team and from there I discovered this common story in this field, ”said Huang.

The team decided that the nonprofit would target teens desperate to find a home in the community.

“With the stress and responsibilities that adults have to take on, it’s easy for teens to feel lost in the equation,” Huang said.

Afghan families who fled their homes continue to arrive in Spokane as the Taliban gain traction following the US withdrawal. Sharma said YBIT is “absolutely” looking for opportunities to help Afghan refugees.

When an immigrant family files their documents, they learn about resources designed to facilitate their transition. YBIT presents documents from immigration agencies as a resource for young people. This advertisement is the reason YBIT hosts operations in over 55 countries.

“The language barrier is the most difficult barrier facing immigrants and refugees,” said Jackson Lino, director of youth programs at World Relief.

The four co-founders echoed Lino’s statement, saying easing the language barrier is YBIT’s top priority. Meeting a mentor each week allows mentees to learn the language of their new home and provides teens with a unique opportunity to experience phrases, slang and nuances of the language they are learning.

Ahmed Hassan participated in the YBIT Refugee Mentor / Mentor Program. Hassan recently moved from Saudi Arabia to Ukraine to study at university and is no stranger to moving countries. He was born in Germany and has also lived in Canada and the United Arab Emirates.

He said the YBIT team had it set up with a friend and they instantly hooked up.

“We shared a lot of cultural knowledge and acquired a good amount of new things,” Hassan said. “We both knew different languages ​​as well, so we also practiced this together. “

In this mentorship, Hassan said he found a place to share his experience and realized that the YBIT participants “were one family with the same goals.”

After completing his mentorship, Hassan was invited to remain a volunteer.

“We do our best to give young people all the support they need and to help them get involved in any new environment they find themselves in,” he said.

In order to facilitate communication, mentors must be at least bilingual. Huang is the leader of the Chinese language, Sharma the Hindi leader, Malevka the French and Potochevska the Ukrainian.

In addition to language proficiency, YBIT is looking for likeable, kind and enthusiastic teens about learning about another culture.

Potochevska lives in central Ukraine and plans to study at Taras Shevchenko National University in Kyiv in the fall. She understands the challenges of immigration because she saw her brother immigrate to Australia. She said the process was “really stressful” for everyone involved.

“For migrants, it’s a big cultural difference,” she said. “For me alone, communicating with Americans is sometimes difficult for me, and sometimes I just don’t understand (their) mentality.

YBIT is delighted to welcome a new group of mentees and mentors for the 2021-22 school year. Their mentee application form is open to refugee and immigrant youth. Applications to become a mentor are closed, but teens are encouraged to contact YBIT to find out how they can be of assistance. Visit YBIT online at ybitinternational.wixsite.com/ybit.


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La Palma volcano, live updates today: eruption, tsunami warning and breaking news | the Canary Islands


A group of celebrity chefs feed the hungry people of La Palma

Working near the glowing lava flowing from a volcano on the Spanish island of La Palma, rescuers eagerly await their lunch break – and while any food will do, it tastes better when it comes from a famous chef’s kitchen.

Chef Jose Andres ‘nonprofit World Central Kitchen (WCK) has delivered hot meals, sandwiches and water to thousands of evacuees as well as rescue workers overseeing residents’ safety .

“Although there are so many of us, it seems there is a lack of staff… including those who come down to give us a sandwich! It sounds silly but after eight hours on the ground it’s fundamental, ”said Guardia Civil police captain Diego Ortiz.

Arriving in one of the emptied neighborhoods in a van, WCK volunteer Pablo Pais told Reuters: “The lava is very close. Until the day before yesterday, there were still people in these houses.”

The association started preparing 200 meals a day at the start of the eruption – which began on September 19 – and now has 1,400, with a daily increase, said Olivier de Belleroche, a 45-year-old chef from Madrid who works for WCK.

After the manager of a local hotel suggested using all of the hotel’s food stocks as creeping lava threatening to cut power lines, WCK and its partners organized a large convoy of food for the military, rescue workers and evacuees, he said.

“It’s very moving, this feeling of being constantly on the alert, so many people lose their homes,” said Belleroche to himself after taking out of the oven a tray filled with dozens of hot dishes sealed in a lively kitchen. sold by a supermarket chain.

You get more and more involved with people – I’ve been doing this for four weeks now,“he added, explaining that initially he had only come for a few days.

WCK chef Andres is known for his innovative cuisine and credited with popularizing tapas in America in the 1990s.

He recently partnered with the Archewell charity of British Prince Harry and his wife Meghan Markle to set up a series of community relief centers in disaster areas around the world.


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KFOR INQUIRY: Oklahoma DHS abruptly ends relationship with nonprofit providing free service to place children


OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – At this time, 7,200 Oklahoma children are in state care.

These children cannot live with their biological parents.

Some may possibly be reunited with a biological parent. Hundreds are available for worship.

Some will grow old because of a system that has failed to find them a forever home.

An Oklahoma-based nonprofit founded to find homes for these children has been told their help is unwanted.

The Oklahoma Heart Gallery is a network of child advocates who maintain a database of photos and videos of children available for adoption.

Several times a year for the past 19 years, photographers have donated their time and resources to take beautiful images of children held by DHS.

According to Oklahoma Heart Gallery (OHG) board chair, Mary Beth Ede, this is a $ 20,000 to $ 30,000 a year business.

Their mission is to connect potential adoptive families with an available child.

“For me, it’s really humanizing for these kids who are in the care of DHS,” Ede said.

Deangelo Coberly, 18, was first presented by the Oklahoma Heart Gallery at the age of 13.

“A lot of these kids. they can’t wait to be on this website for some hope, ”Deangelo recalls.

He had been detained by DHS most of his life.

In 2018, Deangelo was living at the Tulsa Boys Group Home; its 27th foster home.

That same year, the Coberly family found Deangelo on the Oklahoma Heart Gallery website.

“She found his picture and said, ‘Look at him. Look at this kid! ‘ She kept talking about her dimples. Deangelo’s adoptive father, John Coberly, said. “Honestly, without the Heart Gallery, we wouldn’t have found Deangelo. We have gone through so many DHS profiles.

The Heart Gallery has provided this service to DHS for 19 years.

Almost two decades of photos, videos, website maintenance, and daily phone calls from potential adoptive parents.

The founder, Gay Larsen, adopted two teenagers from DHS years ago.

The children of Oklahoma need a home.

Larsen and members of the Oklahoma Heart Gallery board of directors received a letter from DHS earlier this year, informing them that DHS would not “renew” the relationship.

“After all this time and money and all this work that we have done, it was mind blowing,” said Larsen.

The notification from DHS Child Protection Services provided little explanation.

According to the letter, Director Deborah Shropshire wrote: “Over the past few years our understanding and approach to fostering foster care has evolved… Our work with the Oklahoma Heart Gallery just doesn’t align as well as it does. the past. , and for this reason, I want to inform you that we will not be renewing the Memorandum of Understanding between the Oklahoma Human Services and the Oklahoma Heart Gallery. Additionally, the effort to develop a system for photographing children in need of foster care will not be a strategy that we are going to advance further.

“The tone was a bit rude and contemptuous,” Ede said. “Just for someone to say, ‘Oh. Thank you. We don’t need you. It really is. It was a punch in the guts.

Keep in mind that this was a free service for finding homes for children.

Every expense was paid for by the Oklahoma Heart Gallery, including a brand new custom website portal created by the Oklahoma Heart Gallery at the request of DHS.

Today, the Heart Gallery and DHS are embroiled in a legal battle over who owns the rights to the images and videos produced by OHG volunteers.

The database is made up of thousands of images produced over 19 years of effort to help.

“We would have appreciated at least a minimum of respect for the time, effort, energy and money we have put into it over the years. It’s no small effort, ”Ede said.

KFOR has requested an interview with DHS. We asked for a legitimate reason why the state would refuse free assistance in finding homes for the children.

The agency offered this vague statement:

“We are eternally grateful to the organizations and volunteers who use their time and talent to reach out to people who improve the lives of children and families. OK-DHS aims to reduce or eliminate the amount of trauma suffered by children and youth, to heal and strengthen families and communities and to create alternative supports for the safety and well-being of children. . We continue to refine and evolve our strategies, approach and partnerships to achieve this goal based on evidence-based best practices. “

News 4 also requested twelve months of internal communications between DHS administrators and adoption services in Oklahoma. We were hoping to find out more about what was wrong with DHS and the Oklahoma Heart Gallery.

Ali Meyer of KFOR made the request in July, and we have been waiting three months for DHS to comply with the Open Records Act and release these public documents.

Regarding the request, a DHS spokesperson emailed this update in September:

“We are processing your request under the Open Records Act. Due to the volume of your request, we anticipate that the response will likely take months, as to date it has returned over 50,000 pages for review. We expect there will be even more records at the end of our search. As many of our records are confidential under state law, we will need to review all of these records for possible drafting before sharing them with your station. We intend to respond in a reasonable manner and appreciate your patience.


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Green Sudan: the crossroads of well-being


It’s a Friday morning in September and Sudan Green is driving one of his three younger brothers to school.

“See you, man,” he says as his brother gets out of the car. “Be careful.”

Be careful? I ask. Is this your farewell note to everyone? Just him? For some special reason?

He stops ; on the phone, I hear him turn on his flashing light. “When people close to you have been taken away,” he said, the signal fading, “you have some caution about those you hold nearby. “

Seeing Green, like most of the people he has known his entire life growing up in Philly, is no stranger to loss. One of his earliest memories as a toddler? See someone shot in West Philly, near 47th and Kingsessing, where his family lived at the time.

“Having mentors around me and people who change my life is probably the reason I didn’t go looking for a gun or drugs,” says Green.

It would be years later, at the end of 2018, when he would experience one of the most painful tragedies of his life: the murder of his best friend, Nantambu, in Germantown, where Green had grown up.

But Green is no stranger to the role of Big Brother, either. It is a badge of honor that he has worn for as long as he can remember. Older son of poet / musician / goddess Ursula Rucker – he also has an older half-brother – Green grew up leading his pack of siblings. Tayyib Smith, who produced two of Rucker’s albums, remembers Green as a little boy hanging out at Larry Gold’s music studio while mom worked.

“Sudan has always been placed in a leadership position, like it or not,” says Smith. “I remember he and his brother had the code for a particular door in the studio, and it was like an adult honor for them, because they could move around the studio without the help of an adult. And I remember seeing that they were taking Pride in there.

A loss, then a different path

Moving through the artistic and creative circles forged by his mother, Green was exposed early on to the power of community, the glitz of entertainment, the sheer force of music, language and words. He attended the private progressive school in Philadelphia for a while, which he says was life changing, breaking out of the toxic masculinity that often permeated his neighborhood.

He didn’t realize it yet, but these worlds showed him the full gamut of masculinity, of humanity.

“The fact that I had mentors around me and people who changed my life was probably the reason why I didn’t go looking for a gun or drugs and didn’t have unhealthy relationships with these people. things, ”he said. “Because I’ve seen a lot of these things in front of me, like most people of all races, but it’s about what you do with it.” “

Of course, he was also a kid who wanted the same things that so many Philly kids did: work at Ubiq on Walnut Street, with his cool sneakers and streetwear. To hang out with his friends, even when it meant getting involved in the shadows, violence, or “jumping people,” immature activities that Green says he grew up on.

I just believe in being strong in your morals and going back to your standards on a daily basis, ”Green said. “You wonder who are you presenting yourself for and why? “

He grew up and started making his own music; he lived in New York for a few years, tapping into the yoga community through the now defunct, paid studio Yoga For The People; he further broadened his view of the world. He attended Smith’s Institute of Hip Hop Entrepreneurship.

Then, in 2018, Nantambu was assassinated.

“I fell into a depression. I lost 15 pounds in two weeks. It was crazy, ”he said, his voice starting to break. To cope, he turned to music, writing a song called “Spirits Up!”

The earth continued to revolve around the sun and, lo and behold, it was 2020, with all its turmoil, the tensions that had always been part of Green’s Philadelphia rising to the surface of the nation. The Whites – not enough, but more – have started to pay attention.

Green leaned into the protests, of course, but he also listened intently to what they were revealing about the pain, a pain he recognized in his bones; he decided to do something about it.

This something? It encompasses the influences that have shaped Green his entire life: music, community, love. He organized Spirits Up !, a nonprofit movement that invites blacks and brunettes to come together through free community yoga, mindfulness and wellness events.

RELATED: Free Yoga Series for Black Philadelphians After George Floyd Protests

During the past 18 months, Spirits Up! organized nearly 50 events that touched the lives of over a thousand people. At one point on June 17, 2020, over 400 people, mostly people of color, were doing yoga at Malcolm X Park.

“Having the foresight, wisdom and maturity to bring people together in a space that is centered, welcoming and safe for black people, it’s revolutionary, ”says Smith. “I think Sudan is a brilliant man with enormous potential. And I think the Spirits Up! addresses are a priority for everyone who talks about the health and well-being of the city.

Because let’s be honest: seeing a group of white women or suburban children doing yoga, talking about wellness or sharing the names of their therapists? It’s important, but it’s not revolutionary. But among black and brown men, the stigma surrounding mental health issues and barriers to seeking care persists: just 26.4% of black and Hispanic men aged 18 to 44 who experienced daily feelings of loss. anxiety or depression were likely to have used mental health services, compared with 45.4 percent of non-Hispanic white men having the same feelings. What when black men ask for help and would prefer a provider of the same race? Well, they only make up about 4% (albeit rising) of the psychology workforce at the doctoral level.

“You go to white wellness areas, and they’re super nice. They have a lot of support, and that’s my goal. I don’t wanna do it if it’s not gonna be really nice. We have to take people out of the ordinary. You can’t just do the recreation center all the time, ”says Green.

And so bring well-being to light and bring people of color to to kiss this? It’s revolutionary. This is what makes Green the natural fit for Generation Change Philly, The Citizen’s new series in partnership with Keepers of the Commons to shine a light on and support the next generation of Philly change agents.

Since the launch of Spirits Up !, Green has also achieved her certification as a yoga teacher and the group has received fiscal sponsorship from BlackStar, the non-profit organization that produces the BlackStar Film Festival and serves as a platform for them. artists and designers of color. He was approached by sneaker brand Allbirds and LuLuLemon as a brand ambassador, worked with Ars Nova and artist Hank Willis Thomas on events.

Look ahead

Despite everything he has accomplished in the past 18 months, Green’s work has only just begun: he is committed to opening up a physical space, a cool recreation area for yoga, mindfulness, meditation. and workshops, ideally in Germantown and West Philly. But he doesn’t want to rush; he wants it to be nice. Truly attractive.

“You go to white wellness areas, and they’re super nice. They have a lot of support, and that’s my goal. I don’t wanna do it if it’s not gonna be really nice. We have to take people out of the ordinary. You can’t just do the recreation center all the time. It is also moving forward with its plan to offer a virtual platform. “I want to be able to reach everyone. “

Smith admires the path Green has taken and recognizes the pitfalls that abound.

“A lot of times the people most connected to the community are supposed to do everything from a sweat equity space and then jump through a blank stare to qualify for a nonprofit system that isn’t really about invest in you, but the tax benefits make it see like they’ve invested in you, ”he says. “I think this is the fight that Sudan and its advisers must wage. And that’s a challenge. I mean, as far as I read on Build Back Better money… I don’t see a lot of capital, energy or empathy flowing to organizations like the one in Sudan, or a host of people who bring innovation and passion to space. “

Sudan Green | By Sabina Louise Pierce

Green knows this, is not naive. And he’s mature enough to understand the difference between being exploited and being supported on his journey: Oh he Fortunately working with Penn, with IBX, with Comcast, doing the work to bring his work to more people.

He wants to do the job in an inclusive way, for black men (and all people), including those who want to embrace wellness while being part of pop culture, if they so choose; in other words, you can practice yoga and healing while still loving beautiful things. You don’t have to be, say, a bearded ascetic: it doesn’t have to be a choice, because wellness runs deeper than the clothes or sneakers you wear.

Morale! home page, there is a text that describes the mission of the group as “To work collectively to heal the black community through yoga and meditation.” By any means necessary. “

just reread The autobiography of Malcolm X, I ask Green about this last sentence, famous adaptation of Fanon and Sartre. Green says that as much as this quote inspires him, he is even more motivated by another quote widely attributed to the revolutionary leader.

“A man who represents nothing will fall in love with everything. “

“I just believe in being strong in your morale and going back to your standards on a daily basis,” Green said. “You wonder who are you presenting yourself for and why? “

To show up. Perhaps this is what Green does most significantly: he presents himself on behalf of the community that raised him; the brothers who admire him; the best friend he lost; and the city that needs him more than ever.

This is the logo of Generation Change Philly, a joint project between The Philadelphia Citizen and Keepers of the Commons that shines a light on the change makers in Philadelphia.

The Philadelphia Citizen partners with the nonprofit Guardians of the commons on the “Generation Change Philly” series to provide educational and networking opportunities for the city’s most dynamic change makers.

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African penguins at Denver Zoo live their best lives as they get a major habitat upgrade


Seventeen African penguins trembled and twisted, as if they were part of a single organism, out of the 65-degree water of their new enclosure at the Denver Zoo and on the hot deck above the week last.

Impressively, they never lost their tight training, squeezed shoulder to shoulder as they were like an elevator full of commuters with stiff arms and tuxedo clad (albeit incredibly cute).

“They will start to expand and make more use of the main area as they acclimatize,” said John Azua, curator of birds at the Denver Zoo, watching the zoo’s tiny human visitors crush their cheeks against a clear acrylic divider to catch the eye. -eye with the compact creatures. “For now, they are still grouped.”

You can’t blame them: At the time of this visit, the African penguins had barely been in the public eye for 24 hours, after zoo workers removed the wall separating their exhibit from the rest of the 84-acre campus , just north of City Park, home to around 3,000 other animals.

Located in the former Benson Predator Ridge, the $ 1.75 million African Penguin Habitat, which opened on September 30, draws visitors right inside the main entrance. The zoo painted and repaired the fake brown (now gray) rocks of the Ridge instead of tearing them down, while closing their perimeter to create this state-of-the-art 2,400-square-foot home for its endangered penguins, which are native to the area. ‘South Africa.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Children visit the new African penguin habitat at the Denver Zoo on Thursday, September 30, 2021.

“Their new pool is about four to five times the size of their swimming area at Bird World,” said Jake Kubié, communications director for the Denver Zoological Foundation, which operates the nonprofit Denver Zoo.

“The long, linear nature of it also allows them to display natural behaviors, such as porpoising (i.e. what dolphins do), which they weren’t able to do before. Azua added of the 40 foot long pool. “Their old exhibit was what we call in the industry a ‘dump and fill’, so no filtration, no circulation and a lot of wasted water.”

Pinnacle African Penguin Point, as it is officially called, solves these problems through technology. The new 10,000 square foot water tank is temperature controlled and filtered every 15 minutes, allowing caretakers to reuse the water instead of emptying it once or twice a week to prevent algae blooms summer events that hit the Bird World exhibit.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

A group of African penguins gather in their new habitat at the Denver Zoo on Thursday, September 30, 2021.

There are also heaters under parts of the deck that will allow the penguins to easily access the water, even in freezing weather, although once it hits 20 degrees or below they are still gathered at inside. The multiple burrows and nesting boxes, as well as various natural and landscaped substrates, effectively mimic their origins in the Cape of Good Hope, Kubié said.

It is specifically inspired by Boulder Beach in South Africa, where experts at the Denver Zoo have brought their Colorado knowledge to help rehabilitate and save African penguins for much of the past two decades. Animal care experts are also returning from these overseas trips with new practices that improve the care of captive animals at the Denver Zoo, Azua said.

Vertix Builders, the company behind the exhibit, has a lot of adaptation experience, having recently completed a major update for the ever-popular Space Odyssey at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science.

“Unlike a traditional commercial building, the exhibits are uniquely unique and the designers, contractors and zoo staff had to work closely together to develop a vision and then execute it to bring it to life,” said Ted Laszlo, vice-president of Vertix, in a press statement.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Left to right, Holly Samson, 2, and her sister Juniper, 3, of Denver have their photos taken in the new African penguin habitat at the Denver Zoo on opening day, Thursday, September 30, 2021.

Vertix had to balance the water and sand areas (the latter, where the keepers’ discussions and daily meals will soon begin), with spaces in which the penguins could both exercise and cool off, including including 600 feet of interior space. They also installed a rope and pulley system that zoo visitors can use to create “their own playful waves that the penguins can splash in”.

Of course, that would require these still-acclimatized penguins to loosen ranks, and luckily – for visitors and penguins alike – they’re on the right track.

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San Francisco housing complex gives victims of domestic violence a fresh start


Tucked away on her Chesterfield sofa, her power wheelchair close at hand, Rosemary Dyer examined the glittering peacock figures she had purchased on her first solo trip to San Francisco’s Chinatown after her release from prison, and admired the bright tablecloth with silk flowers in her new living room.

Dyer, an effervescent woman with a mischievous sense of humor, brought these and other prized possessions to Home Free, a new transitional apartment complex in San Francisco. It was designed for women who have been jailed for killing their abusive partner or being at a crime scene coerced by an abusive spouse or boyfriend. Dyer was convicted of murder and sentenced to life without parole in 1988 for the shooting death in 1985 of her eight-year-old husband, who abused and tortured her, at a time when expert testimony related to domestic violence and its effects were not permitted. in court in most states.

The insidious villainy that defined her life included being repeatedly beaten and sodomized with a loaded handgun. Her husband had dug a grave in the backyard, saying he intended to bury her alive.

Home Free – where Governor Gavin Newsom’s 2020 Dyer’s Switch is proudly hung on the wall – was created by Five Keys Schools and Programs, a statewide nonprofit that provides education, training professional, therapeutic programs and housing for inmates and new releases. The five-bedroom, two-bedroom apartment complex is the result of years of advocacy by survivors of intimate partner violence and the organizations that work with them. Their efforts have enabled women like Dyer to secure their release by pardon or by retroactively presenting evidence of their abuse to the state parole board or the courts.

“The fact that women who have suffered unspeakable violence against them have not been allowed to provide evidence of the abuse is the epitome of injustice,” said Sunny Schwartz, founder of Five Keys. “We are committed to creating a vibrant, dignified and safe home, a place that says ‘you are worth it.’ “

Previous transitional housing options for women were largely limited to those dealing with substance abuse. Home Free, on Treasure Island, a former naval base in the San Francisco Bay area, was forged during the pandemic last year with a tight start-up budget of $ 750,000, including staff. The once grimy apartments have been renovated with the help of nearly 100 volunteers – architects and landscapers, flooring and cabinet installers, plumbers, transporters, electricians and urban construction apprentices. They all gathered on this somewhat bizarre island originally built for the 1939 Golden Gate International Exhibition.

Interior design students at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco dedicated a semester to the project, joining mini-charettes on Zoom with Irving A. Gonzales of G7 Architects. They also reflected with the women, whose desires included full-length mirrors (they had been denied in prison to monitor their form for years).

“We wanted color! said Dyer, who visited the construction site while still in temporary accommodation. She and others had a particular aversion to gray, a shade associated with bunks and metal prison lockers.

A 69-year-old cancer survivor with congestive heart failure, Dyer has been using a wheelchair since she injured her hip in prison. A huge pirate flag – a nod to the Treasure Island theme – greets visitors as they arrive. Her accessible apartment adjoins a patio where she grows pots of tomatoes and radishes.

The landscape itself was designed by Hyunch Sung of the Mithun firm, who chose 10 different tree species. (Because the soil on Treasure Island is contaminated with industrial chemicals, the trees are planted in brightly colored containers.) Sung said she approached her work there as if designing for high-end clients. . “The idea of ​​beauty is underestimated for disadvantaged communities,” she said.

Nilda Palacios, 38, who lives upstairs, said it was “emotionally moving” to join the resort. She grew up with a history of abuse: she was assaulted as a child by an uncle and a stepfather, then raped at the age of 15 by a high school teacher. The teacher’s stressful ordeal made her dependent on drugs and alcohol (“I was trying to sleep my life,” she says). Palacios became distraught and suicidal. When a beggar cornered her one day, she said, she thought he was planning to attack her and “went on a rampage”, strangling her. She was convicted of second degree murder. Incarcerated for 17 years, she benefited from therapists in prison who helped her understand “how the depth of my crime relates to my story,” she said. “I confused someone who was not a threat for someone who was.”

Palacios was paroled. She benefited from a broader vision for Home Free, which now welcomes women like her, whose crimes were directly linked to their abuse.

Upon moving in, she was “shocked” at the prospect of a private room after years of sharing an 8 x 10 foot cell and cramming all her things into a six cubic foot box, with, as one inmate put it, current. , “your panties against noodles and peanut butter.”

“No way, is this my room?” Palacios recalled. “It felt like a real house to me.”

The idea for Home Free arose during a conversation between Schwartz, its founder, and the state treasurer of California, Fiona Ma, then the deputy of the state. Ma’s legislation, signed by Gov. Jerry Brown in 2012, allowed women who had experienced domestic violence and been convicted of violent crimes related to their abuse the opportunity to have their cases heard again using Women’s Syndrome. beaten (as it was called then) as a defense. The law also gave them the right to present evidence of abuse by intimate partners during the parole process. It applied to persons convicted before August 1996.

The number of Rosemary Dyers still behind bars is unknown. About 12,000 women are currently incarcerated for homicide nationwide, said Debbie Mukamal, executive director of the Stanford Criminal Justice Center at Stanford Law School and director of the Regilla Project, a three-year effort to study the frequency with which women in the United States are jailed for killing their attackers. Small studies, including one in Canada, suggest that 65% of women serving a life sentence for the murder of their intimate partner had been assaulted by them before the offense. The link between abuse and violent crime was highlighted by grim statistics in a 1999 US Department of Justice report showing that a quarter to a third of incarcerated women had been abused as minors and only a quarter to almost a half in adulthood.

Despite increased public awareness, “there are still a large number of criminal lawyers who do not understand how intimate partner violence creates the context for a crime,” said Leigh Goodmark, director of the gender-based violence clinic at the University of Maryland School of Law.

In New York State, the Domestic Violence Survivors Justice Act, enacted in 2019, was put to the test in the high-profile case of Nicole Addimando, a young mother of two in Poughkeepsie who shot and killed her baby friend and his father. children in 2017 after years of heartbreaking abuse (the case is dramatically captured in the documentary film “And So I Stayed.”)

Sentenced to 19 years in life for second degree murder, Addimando was entitled to a subsequent hearing under the law, where her allegations of abuse could be factored into a reduced sentence. The county court judge dismissed the allegations, saying she “had been given the opportunity to leave her attacker safely.” In July, the appeals division of the state Supreme Court overturned the decision, reducing the length of Ms. Addimando’s detention to 7.5 years.

For Kate Mogulescu, associate professor at Brooklyn Law School and director of its Survivors Justice Project, the case illustrates “the impossible burdens we place on survivors to prove their victimization.” Women are scrutinized by the courts in a very different way than men, she added. “With women, they are a bad mother, or promiscuous. The tropes are trotted on women and the punishments reflect this. However, so far 16 women have been punished in New York.

By far the most common reason that women who have been abused by intimate partners end up in prison are accomplice laws, in which a victim is forced to be at the scene of an abuser’s violence, like driving the getaway car, said Colby Lenz, co-founder of Survived and Punished, a national rights organization.

This was the case with Tammy Cooper Garvin, a victim of sex trafficking at the age of 14 and jailed for 28 years for being in the car while her pimp murdered a client. Her sentence was commuted and she was hired by Home Free as a residential coordinator.

Another advocate – and a guiding force behind the founding of Home Free – is another survivor named Brenda Clubine, who started a weekly support group at the California Institution for Women. Some 72 women quickly joined. Dyer was one of the original members, but until Clubine encouraged her, she was so terrified of life that she could barely speak.

Clubine herself had suffered years of abuse, including broken bones and stab wounds, by her husband, a former police detective. She hit her head with a bottle of wine and he died of blunt trauma. She served 26 years of a 16 life sentence. Her fierce retelling of the stories of the women in the prison group – which she sent to state lawmakers and governors – led to public hearings and the 2009 documentary “Sin by Silence,” which in turn inspired California laws.

Clubine’s close friendship with Dyer continued and is essential to Dyer’s rebounding confidence. At Home Free, Dyer now delights in making homemade noodles with chicken from his grandmother’s recipe. Clubine, his BFF, found that a safe and strengthening place for his “sisters” was long overdue. “I can’t say how full my heart feels that he’s available to them now,” she said.


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Non profit living

“It’s like having another job” – poverty relief programs hard to navigate during pandemic


Rain Chamberlain, who identifies with the pronoun they / them, lives in a small stucco house in Fresno with their child and a roommate. Chamberlain’s workspace is tucked away in a corner of the living room.

“This is my office here,” they say as they sit down at the desk and begin a regular routine, logging into one of the many government websites they use to access assistance programs. .

“So if I were to go to ‘My Benefits, Calwin’,” they say, waiting for the page to load.

“Oh hey, guess what. The internet decided it wasn’t there, ”Chamberlain laughs.

It takes at least a minute to reconnect the laptop to Wi-Fi.

“That’s a lot,” Chamberlain said, concentrating on the screen.

It takes another 30 seconds for the website to load.

“And a lot of times, I’ll be multitasking. I’ll be working in other tabs while I wait for these items to load, ”Chamberlain says.

Chamberlain writes grants for nonprofit organizations, including one they just started on their own.

“You know, it’s not there yet, but it’s getting closer. I get to the point where I work pretty much full time, ”they say.

Chamberlain, who is a single parent, has also recently started taking online classes. But Chamberlain says one of the most time-consuming and stressful parts of their routine is keeping up with government assistance programs that are helping them get by.

“The housing authority, social assistance, the rehabilitation department, the telephone and the Internet are benefiting,” says Chamberlain, finally referring to the California LifeLine program.

Right now, they have four assistance programs and have applied for a fifth – utility assistance from the Fresno Emergency Rental Assistance Program.

Chamberlain is disabled and sometimes uses a wheelchair. And once COVID hit, their household lost jobs and income.

“Living in poverty usually means going through eight different crises simultaneously,” explains Chamberlain.

It’s like having another job to maintain program benefits.

“So there’s this expectation that from 7:00 am to at least 6:00 pm, you have to be available for any random phone calls, any random text, any random email,” Chamberlain explains.

They say they spend 10 to 60 hours a month keeping up to date with all the programs. They say a lot of the skills needed are financial.

“Bank statements and paypal records and everything to show all my itemized income,” Chamberlain says.

Chamberlain goes through a stack of papers in a trash can. There are 12 bins for each month of the past year. Chamberlain says it helped them sort through the paperwork to re-apply for the housing authority voucher, which is key to lowering the cost of their monthly rent.

“I have to be the one to sit there and professionally make sure it all adds up,” Chamberlain said, flipping through the papers.

Chamberlain says it took about 60 hours over a three month period to complete this app. Before COVID, recipients could schedule appointments to help fill out forms. But everything changed very suddenly.

“Even the desks that they are still there, even though the workers themselves will still go to work every day, that doesn’t mean beneficiaries can enter,” Chamberlain says.

They say browsing can be overwhelming for some of the most vulnerable populations, especially when reliable internet access and often a printer or scanner are needed.

“People who have been disenfranchised, who have multiple marginalizations, all these different things absolutely need to be part of these programs. And the punishment, the pretty literal punishment if you don’t, is homelessness and often death, ”Chamberlain says.

That’s why Chamberlain created a non-profit organization. It’s called Navigating Structures and now has 501c3 status.

“This is by and for people who fit into both the crossroads of disability and chronic homelessness or at chronic risk of homelessness,” Chamberlain said.

It was designed from Chamberlain’s own experiences in and out of homelessness. The goal is to build a stronger community by paying homeless people to work on their own passions, whether it’s fixing bikes or cooking. At present, Chamberlain is still seeking grants to fund the organization.

“We can have the time and the energy to really invest in our community, without having to worry about where that next paycheck comes from,” Chamberlain said.

Although Chamberlain is not yet making any money in this phase of the nonprofit organization, they are hopeful that this effort will pay off in the future.


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Non profit living

LiveXLive, a subsidiary of LiveOne, will exclusively broadcast its 62nd event; United lighting of over 225 landmarks in all 50 states and musical performances for metastatic breast cancer on October 13


To agree October 13e To 8:30 p.m. EDT for #LightUpMBC Live broadcast on LiveXLive.com, Youtube and Facebook @METAvivor, and metavivor.org for a virtual benefit with special guests Rob Thomas, Kristin chenoweth and Tom morello

LOS ANGELES, October 8, 2021 / PRNewswire / – LiveOne (NASDAQ: LVO), a global platform for live streaming and live and on-demand audio, video and podcast / vodcast content in the fields of music, comedy and entertainment pop culture, and owner of LiveXLive, PodcastOne, Lazy radio, React present and Custom Customization Solutions, today announced a collaboration with METAvivor research and support to broadcast live the third annual global benchmark campaign, #LightUpMBC, to highlight the importance of raising awareness and funding metastatic breast cancer research. Each year, more than 685,000 of people worldwide die from metastatic breast cancer (CMB), also known as stage IV or advanced breast cancer, for which there is no cure. It happens when the cancer spreads beyond the breast to other parts of the body.

At October 13, 2021, National Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day, LiveOne will live stream lighting from over 225 Landmarks in all 50 US states as well as Porto Rico, Canada, Sweden and Ireland, in the MBC outreach colors of green, teal and pink, as part of the #LightUpMBC campaign. In the age of inclusiveness, people might not realize that pink doesn’t resonate with the MBC community. Designed and deposited by METAvivor volunteers, the teal, green and pink tricolor ribbon symbolizes hope, immortality, healing and spirituality. Iconic participating locations include: One World Trade Center, Niagara Falls, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, BMW Zentrum and Kilkenny Castle in Ireland. This year, many iconic sporting destinations are participating, including FTX Arena, Caesars Superdome, US Bank Stadium, Citizens Bank Park, Lincoln Financial Field, Wells Fargo Center and BC Place.

#LightUpMBC Live, a virtual benefit co-hosted by a TV personality Katie McGee and MBC Advocate Tami Eagle Bowling, will start to 8:30 p.m. EDT to October 13. Viewers can watch the live stream on LiveXLive, Youtube and Facebook @METAvivor and METAvivor.org. The event will feature inspiring MBC stories from illuminated landmarks around the world and musical guests such as Kristin chenoweth, Tom morello, Rob thomas and JD Eicher.

“#LightUpMBC Live aims to garner critical attention around the lack of funding for stage IV breast cancer research. Fundraising is imperative to support scientists looking for new treatments,” said Tami Eagle Bowling, MBC patient advocate and creator of #LightUpMBC Live. “Research is the only thing that will give me and so many others living with MBC more time with our families.”

“LiveOne is proud to partner with #LightUpMBC to bring the livestream to our global audience and our subscribers. This virtual benefit connecting music, artists and a visual performance will increase awareness and much-needed funding for metastatic breast cancer “, said Jackie Pierre, Marketing Director of LiveOne. “On a personal note, I have known Tami Eagle Bowling For over 20 years, I have continued to be impressed by his drive, dedication and spirit to this important cause. “

“It saddens me to see how many people I have met have not exceeded the life expectancy of 2-3 years for metastatic breast cancer,” said the president of METAvivor. Jamil Rivers. “100% of every donation to METAvivor funds stage IV MBC research. It is simply the only way to prolong the life of people with this terminal illness. “

National sponsors for the event include Seagen, Pfizer, Hulu, BMW and The Eagle Method.

For more information, at make a donation and see the list of participating landmarks, please go to www.metavivor.org/LightUpMBC and follow Facebook on @METAvivor and Instagram @metavivor.

153 participating cities include: Albuquerque, Allen Park, Mooring, Anderson, Annapolis, Antioch, Arlington Heights, Asbury Park, Atlanta, Atlantic City, Baltimore, Barrington, beaver lodge, Billing, Biloxi, Binghamton, Birmingham, Bloomington, Wooded, Boston, Bothell, Bradley Beach, Branson, Ox, Burlington, Calgary, Camden, Charlotte, Charlottesville, Chicago, Crystal Lake, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Colombia, Columbus, Davenport, DC, Denver, Detroit, Detroit, Dover, Duluth, Eagan, Edine, Edmonton, Elisabeth, Evansville, Fan wood, Fort Wayne, Garwood, Gilbert, Large fork, Grand Rapids, Great Prairie, Big falls, Greenville, Greer, Halifax, Harrisburg, Hartford, Hartland, Hermosa Beach, Hershey, Hinsdale, Property (Pittsburgh), Honolulu, Houston, Hummelstown, Huntsville, Jacksonville, Jamestown, Kansas City, Kilkenny, Kittery, Forest Lake, Laramie, Las Vegas, Lethbridge, Lexington, Libertyville, Small stone, Los Angeles, Louisville, Manhattan, Marseilles, McLean, Miami, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Mobile, Mokena, Montgomery, Morristown, Myrtle Beach, Nashville, New Orleans, New York City, Niagara Falls, Northbrook, Oklahoma City, Okoboji, Omaha, Orlando, Panama City, Paris, Pascagoula, Pawtucket, Peoria, Philadelphia cream, Phoenix, Pigeon Forge, Pittsburgh, Pointe Pleasant Beach, Portland, Portsmouth, Poughkeepsie, Fast city, Red bank, Rehoboth Beach, Rochester, Roselle, Rosemont, Saint Louis, Salem, Salt lake city, San Antonio, San Diego, San Juan, Saint Clare, Schaumburg, Scottish plains, Seattle, south bend, south gate, Saint-Charles, Stockholm, Sussex County, Syracuse, Toledo, Tonawanda, Toronto, Trenton, Canton of Union, Vancouver, Virginia Beach, Waterbury, Wausau, Western Orange, Westfield, Wheaton, To roll, Wilmington and Yonkers.

About LiveOne, Inc.
Based at Los Angeles, California, LiveOne, Inc. (NASDAQ: LVO) (the “Company”) is a global interactive music, sports and entertainment subscription platform, offering premium content and live broadcasts from the world’s best artists. The Company has broadcast more than 1,800 artists since January 2020, a library of nearly 30 million songs, 500 expert curated radio stations, 235 podcasts / vodcasts, hundreds of pay-per-views, personalized products, an NFT business and has created a valuable link between brands , fans and bands. The other major wholly owned subsidiaries of the company are LiveXLive, Slacker Radio, React Presents, Custom Customized Solutions and PodcastOne, which generates over 2.27 billion downloads per year and over 300 episodes distributed per week over a stable of hundreds. of leading podcasts. The combination of acquisitions and the expansion of products and franchises have made LiveOne a premier music, entertainment and media services company. LiveXLive is available on iOS, Android, Roku, Apple TV, and Amazon Fire, and through OTT, STIRR, Sling, and XUMO, in addition to its app, online website, and social channels. For more information visit www.livexlive.com and follow us on Facebook, Instagram, TIC Tac, and Twitter to @livexlive.

About METAvivor and the Origin of Breast Cancer Ribbon (MBC):
METAvivor Research and Support is dedicated to the specific fight of men and women living with stage IV metastatic breast cancer. It is a volunteer-run 501c3 nonprofit organization that exclusively funds stage IV MBC research to move the disease from terminal to chronic with a good quality of life for MBC patients. METAvivor dedicates 100% of every donation to research into metastatic stage IV breast cancer.

The pink ribbon is well known to represent the fight against breast cancer, but many patients with stage 4 breast cancer feel that the pink does not sum up their experience. Metastatic breast cancer can start in the breast, but its spread to vital organs makes the disease fatal. To emphasize the uniqueness of the disease and show its similarity to other stage 4 cancers, METAvivor designed a green and teal base ribbon to represent metastases. Green represents the triumph of spring over winter, life over death and symbolizes renewal, hope and immortality while teal symbolizes healing and spirituality. The thin pink ribbon overlay signifies metastatic cancer originating in the breast.

For more information on METAvivor and for make a donation, visit www.metavivor.org/lightupmbc and follow us on Facebook @METAvivor and Instagram @metavivor.

About #LIghtUpMBC:
#LightUpMBC is a campaign produced by Moore Fight Moore Strong (MFMS) in memory of Jessica moore to increase awareness and funding of metastatic breast cancer. by pairing with landmarks to illuminate MBC’s symbolic colors of teal, green and pink. All proceeds collected through #LightUpMBC benefit METAvivor’s research and support.

For more information on the #LightUpMBC campaign, follow on Facebook @LightUpMBC and Instagram @lightupmbc.

Press contact:
Lindsey von Busch, director of public relations
The social status company.
[email protected]
732.284.9089

For LiveOne
917.842.9653
[email protected]

LiveOne IR Contact:
[email protected]
310.601.2505

SOURCE LiveOne, Inc.

Related links

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Non profit living

Satellite Healthcare – Industry Leader in Home Dialysis – Appoints Chief Physician to Lead Home Therapies


SAN JOSE, Calif .– (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Satellite Healthcare, a leading non-profit provider of renal dialysis and related patient services, today announced that it has appointed Dr. Graham Abra to the newly created position of Chief Medical Officer, Home Therapies. Dr Abra will assume the role effective November 1, 2021, having served as the organization’s vice president of medical affairs and home therapy.

Dr Abra brings to the position extensive experience as a practicing nephrologist and success in innovating and operationalizing clinical programs within Satellite Healthcare. This includes playing a critical role in developing and implementing initiatives to identify and prevent diabetic foot disease, prevent hospitalizations by managing fluid overload, and reduce rates of diabetic foot disease. infection in dialysis centers and home dialysis centers.

As Chief Medical Officer, Home Therapies, Dr Abra will aim to bring the benefits of peritoneal and home hemodialysis to more people, introduce new technologies and cultivate partnerships to continuously improve the clinical outcomes and the overall experience of the Company’s patients who choose to have dialysis at home.

“People at all levels of our organization, as well as academic health centers, nephrology practices, and innovators in kidney-focused technology, each make a significant contribution to improving the lives of people on home dialysis.” , said Dr Abra. “This new role gives me the opportunity to combine our thinking and our collective skills for the benefit of the patients we serve in home dialysis. ”

Satellite Healthcare has achieved the country’s highest rate of home dialysis use among end stage renal disease patients, with around 20 percent of its patients receiving home dialysis, compared to a national average of industry about 12 percent. Home dialysis is associated with patient longevity, high quality of life, short recovery times after dialysis, and convenience for people whose health and home environment can accommodate it.

The company pioneered the concept of providing dedicated home dialysis centers, under the WellBound brand. His long history of treating hundreds of thousands of patients in need of dialysis treatment, his home-first philosophy and his increased focus on home therapies reflect his commitment to this modality, as well as to health and wellness. of the people who use it.

“From the day Satellite Healthcare opened its doors nearly 50 years ago, its founder, Dr. Norman Coplon, has insisted that collaboration, ingenuity and access were essential to the success of the company that serves patients, ”said Jeff Goffman, CEO of Satellite Healthcare. “Graham has built his career on these principles. His vision of the continued growth and impact of our home dialysis program will allow us to bring individualized therapy and its clinical and lifestyle benefits to more patients who may benefit from it.

“Satellite Healthcare always strives to determine the best possible care for people with kidney disease, and making it easier for patients to access the benefits of home therapies is at the heart of this commitment,” said Dr. Brigitte Schiller, Chief Medical Officer of Satellite Healthcare. Officer. “Graham’s expertise and in-depth thinking have contributed significantly to the growth and clinical excellence of our home dialysis program, and his new role will allow him to build on that success.

Dr Abra joined Satellite Healthcare in 2012, after obtaining a Fellowship in Nephrology at Stanford University with a focus on population health in people with chronic kidney disease. He currently holds the position of Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Nephology at Stanford University, a position he will retain. He will report to the CEO of Satellite Healthcare, working closely and in tandem with its Medical Director, Brigitte Schiller, MD, and President and COO, Bernadette Vincent.

About Satellite Healthcare

Satellite Healthcare, Inc., has been a leading non-profit provider of kidney dialysis and related services in the country since 1974. Through its affiliated services, Satellite WellBound, Satellite Dialysis and Satellite Research, Satellite Healthcare provides early education unmatched patient well-being, personalized clinical services and a full range of dialysis therapy choices. Additionally, Satellite Healthcare has a well-known mission to “improve the lives of people with kidney disease,” a lasting commitment to philanthropy and community service, ranging from funding millions of dollars in research grants to sponsorship of nationwide renal programs. Satellite Healthcare is committed to advancing the standards of care for chronic kidney disease through innovation and research so that patients can enjoy better health and lead better lives. For more information, visit satellitehealthcare.com.


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Non profit living

Two men strengthen friendship at Boston Marathon – and homeless families benefit – CBS Boston


BOSTON (CBS) – The Boston Marathon is more than just a race. It brings people together to test their endurance on the course and a community’s commitment to helping others in need.

Trainer Rob Vasquez runs the marathon for FamilyAid Boston, a non-profit organization that provides solutions to homeless families in Greater Boston.

READ MORE: I-Team: Traffic Stop delays organ delivery to patient at children’s hospital

“You are running for a cause; you’re running into a goal, ”said Rob. “You are running for someone. You are running for a community.

Rob was introduced to the association through his trainer client, Jim Partridge of Newton. The pair got close as Rob continued to push Jim to go harder, faster, and harder in his workouts. And Jim did just that.

Jim Partridge and Rob Vasquez have developed a friendship that includes Rob who ran the Boston Marathon this year in place of Jim. (WBZ-TV)

“He was one of the most energetic and motivating in the gym. As well as in life, ”Jim told WBZ.

Rob says their relationship means a lot to him. “It has become a great friendship. It turned out that I would do anything for him.

Jim had already run the Boston Marathon for FamilyAid Boston in 2013 and wanted to do it again. However, a cancer diagnosis put that goal on the back burner. Instead, Rob will run for Jim.

“It really is,” Jim paused and bit back tears. “Sorry. It’s very emotional. It’s special to see someone who is so dear to me experiencing the joy that I may have felt.

And Jim says he’ll be at mile 17 to give his friend a big hug and give him the motivation to keep going.

READ MORE: Court rules striking nurses at St. Vincent Hospital no longer eligible for unemployment

“I’m not a big crier, but that will be the point,” Rob said.

Khanisha Felder and her daughter Serenity slept in a car most nights before FamilyAid Boston’s help. (WBZ-TV)

And their efforts in the marathon benefit families who really need the help, like Khanisha Felder and her daughter Serenity of Dorchester. Khanisha says she and Serenity slept in a car most nights before FamilyAid Boston’s help.

“I remember having to go to Dunkin Donuts to wash myself. Wash her and change her clothes in a Dunkin Donuts.

This despite Khanisha’s work. She still had difficulty finding accommodation.

“When we were sleeping in the car it was very scary. And just be alone. It was very scary.

But, things have improved dramatically over the past year for this mom and daughter, thanks to FamilyAid Boston.

“I am able to cook my own meals. I can take a shower. I’m just able to feel comfortable, happy, and secure.

And November will be a happy month for Khanisha and Serenity as they mark the first anniversary of their lives in their own apartment.

NO MORE NEWS: Crews paint Boston Marathon start line in preparation for race day

You can donate to FamilyAid Boston through the Boston Marathon donation site, https://www.givengain.com/cc/familyaidboston/.


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Non profit living

New HUD rule to prevent evictions from social housing


WASHINGTON – The Biden administration is trying to prevent evictions from public housing for non-payment of rent, seeking to strengthen protections after the end of the national moratorium on evictions.

Under a new rule from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, tenants in HUD-subsidized public housing cannot be evicted for non-payment without providing them with 30 days notice and information about federal aid emergency rent available. The rule is expected to be published Thursday in the Federal Register.

Technically, the rule would go into effect 30 days after its publication, but a senior HUD official told The Associated Press that public housing authorities across the country must comply immediately. The official, who was not authorized to comment publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity, said the rule change was due to significant concern over a looming wave of evictions as affairs began to unravel. way to court.

A d

In an official statement due for release on Wednesday, HUD Secretary Marcia Fudge called the change “an important step in making tenants aware of the availability of funds that can help them pay overdue rents and give them more. time to access relief that could prevent deportation. entirely.”

The elements of the new rule are not new. The 30-day notice requirement is part of the original COVID-19 relief program. But the change will come with specific advice for housing authorities on how to direct tenants to the billions of dollars in emergency rent assistance available. It is also designed to give these funds extra time to work their way through the system.

A d

In addition to residents of public housing, the rule change will apply to those living in project-based rental assistance properties – a program by which private for-profit or non-profit landlords contract with the HUD to provide affordable housing. In total, HUD estimates that the change will affect 4.1 million people.

Officials in the Biden administration have complained in the past that rent assistance funds were hampered by bureaucracy at the state and local levels. The senior HUD official said the dispersal of funds went a bit slower than officials had hoped.

The federal moratorium, a response to the coronavirus pandemic, expired in late August and Congress did not extend it. As the federal government now focuses on injecting money into rental assistance programs, the national moratorium has turned into a patchwork of localized bans, in places like Washington State, Boston and New York State – all expiring at different times.

A d

The senior HUD official said one of the main goals of the change was to bring all jurisdictions under one banner.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


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Highland Hills apartment resident digs through rubble; First lawsuit filed – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth


The first lawsuit was filed in connection with the destructive natural gas explosion last week at the Highland Hills apartment complex in south Dallas.

The explosion injured eight people, including three firefighters who remain hospitalized and displaced around 250 people.

An injured employee at the apartment complex filed a personal injury claim against Atmos Energy Corporation.

Eriq Davis accuses the natural gas supplier of complex negligence, although investigators have yet to determine the exact cause of the explosion.

Residents displaced by the blast are continuing their recovery efforts.

Abdul Karriem lived in the building that exploded.

Although his unit was spared serious damage, crews demolished the entire 10-unit building after the explosion.

Karriem returned several times to the pile of rubble left behind, wondering if any of his possessions were salvageable.

“When you lose everything you have, being able to come back and get some of it back, it’s a healing process and it’s a victory,” he said.

This is exactly what the trade construction contractor did on Tuesday morning, using his personal mini-loader and a crew.

“We went there this morning with my bobcat and I moved some debris and dug a tunnel,” he said. “I saw living room furniture and said, oh ok, so my bedroom is there. And of course I was able to find my dresser.

Surprisingly, the dresser survived the explosion and subsequent demolition with several personal effects inside.

“My passport was what I went there for,” Karriem said. “I got my passport. I can’t live without it!

Dallas fire crews and investigators are no longer permanently present at the site. The site was entrusted to Atmos Energy investigators as well as to claims adjusters.

Investigators for natural gas suppliers were seen digging holes around the property.

Fire investigators have previously paid close attention to a stove pulled from the debris.

Davis’s attorneys also provided NBC 5 with new details on the moments before the explosion.

“Mr. Davis and other employees were heading to the area unit in question,” said attorney Eric Allen of Zehl & Associates.

Allen says employees and maintenance workers have been dispatched to inspect a building for possible damage from a shooting that happened the night before.

“As soon as they smelled the gas, they called 911,” Allen said.

As Dallas firefighters joined with workers to investigate the possible gas leak, the building exploded.

“Mr. Davis was in the immediate vicinity of this explosion along with the other colleagues. He suffered burns, abdominal injuries and a leg injury,” he said.

The bodily injury lawsuit accuses Atmos of failing to “control and prevent the gas leaks”, “of failing to carry out operations in a safe, reasonable and prudent manner” and of claiming “the injuries and damages that the plaintiff [Davis] suffered in the incident in question were caused by the gross negligence of the defendant [Atmos Energy]. ‘

The lawsuit calls for a jury trial and a million dollars, unless a jury determines a different amount.

“The lawsuit is about obtaining compensation and medical treatment for Mr. Davis,” Allen said.

The lawyer was unable to speak openly about the decision to file a lawsuit against the company and not against the owners of the apartment complex, but pointed to “a story of [Atmos] failing to properly inspect the lines.

“We are in the early stages. We have a rudimentary understanding of what happened and we are conducting an ongoing investigation, ”he said.

NBC 5 has contacted public relations officials with Atmos regarding the lawsuit but has yet to receive a response.

The company has previously said its equipment appears to have performed as expected.

The law firm and residents are still anxiously awaiting what investigators say caused the explosion.

“It’s very likely that we’ll have our own experts and see if we agree with the state’s investigation,” Allen said.

After managing to collect some personal items from his old home, Karriem stopped to say one last prayer.

“I had to shut it down. I wanted to let God know that I am grateful for my life even though I lost all my possessions, ”he said. “I advance.”

However, he is worried about his neighbors, many low-income families who are struggling to recover from the explosion.

On Tuesday, the city of Dallas announced that it is partnering with several organizations to provide the 250 displaced tenants with some kind of one-stop-shop for resources. Residents will be offered assistance in exploring lease termination options and replacing lost documents.

In a statement, the city said:

The City of Dallas Emergency Management Office (OEM), Dallas Public Library, and the Mayor’s and City Council’s Office have coordinated with nonprofits and volunteer organizations active in disaster situations ( VOAD) to provide a Resource Guide and Multi-Agency Resource Center (MARC) at the J. Erik Jonsson Central Library during regular DPL office hours on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Only tenants of Highland Hills Apartments can receive assistance on Tuesday, October 5 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Wednesday, October 6 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Those interested in providing support to the residents of the Highland Hills Apartments are encouraged to donate to the City of Dallas Emergency Relief Fund at the Dallas Foundation, bit.ly/3oqXGVu.
If any non-profit groups are interested in helping displaced residents, they can email [email protected] with their contact details and the resources they provide to include in the resource guide.
While the owners of the Highland Hills Apartments are responsible for housing their displaced tenants, the City of Dallas Emergency Management Office (OEM) helped coordinate the stay at the hotel.


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Non profit living

Waukegan nonprofit helps families in need of diapers


Waukegan Mayor Ann Taylor welcomed volunteers and toured the Waukegan warehouse where baby, toddler and adult diapers, vintage supplies, infant formula, children’s books, baby seats, cars, winter coats and more are waiting to be distributed to the hundreds of families served by Keeping Families Covered.

“I am very impressed,” said Taylor, who on September 20, along with Waukegan City Council, proclaimed September 27 to October 3 as Diaper Awareness Week in the city.

“I knew you offered the diapers, but I didn’t know you had clothes and those other offerings too.”

The non-profit organization that Ann Marie Mathis created 11 years ago in her basement to provide mothers in need with lightly used equipment and clothing has indeed come a long way. Today, diapers, pull-ups and more are stacked over about two floors at his North Oak Grove Avenue facility. The organization serves 1,200 families and 1,800 children per month and is set to distribute 1.5 million diapers this year.

The National Diaper Bank Network, of which Keeping Families Covered has been a member since 2014, estimates that one in three families needs diapers. That is, they cannot afford enough diapers to keep their babies’ buttocks clean, dry and healthy.

The domino effect can include making it more difficult for parents to find and keep work, as daycare centers will not take babies without a sufficient supply of diapers for the day.

“The more I learned about diaper needs, the more determined I was to do everything possible to meet them,” said Mathis, herself a mother of seven children aged 3 to 12.

With the help of a small group of volunteers, Keeping Families Covered operates monthly mobile pantries in Gurnee, Grayslake, Waukegan, Round Lake Park and Kenosha, Wisconsin, and weekly distributions in Highwood.

The agency recently partnered with six other like-minded Illinois nonprofits to form an advocacy coalition to raise awareness of unmet diaper needs.

“A lot of people don’t realize that programs like WIC (the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children) and other government safety nets don’t cover diapers,” Mathis said. . “And efforts to lower the Illinois diaper tax rate have yet to be successful.

“The unmet need for diapers is a major source of stress for parents, especially those who are struggling to make ends meet,” she said. “On average, diapers cost $ 70 to $ 80 per month per child. For families living in poverty, this represents about 14% of their monthly income. These families need help, and we are here for them.

As she walked through the offices and warehouse of Keeping Families Covered, Taylor said she was amazed at the size, scope and efficiency of the operation. The need, she said, is certainly critical.

“All of these items are so expensive,” Taylor said. “They say you can change a child’s diapers for $ 70 to $ 80 a month, but I think that’s a conservative estimate.”

And even that amount breaks the bank of thousands of families, Mathis added.

“Many parents have to choose between groceries and diapers,” she said. “It’s a vicious circle.”

In the diaper packing room during the tour, five volunteers filled packages of 25 diapers each, carefully labeling them by size and preparing them for distribution.

“One thing I would say about this place is it’s so easy to volunteer,” said Gurnee resident Bryan Pearson, who was there with his wife, Sandy. “It’s so well organized.”

Mathis said there are many ways for those interested in volunteering. Thursday Night Wrappy Hours, Neighborhood Diaper Drives, and Saturday Duty Days are just a few examples, with more opportunities listed under the “Help Out!” Heading. ”Tab on keepfamiliescovered.org.

A new changing table sponsorship program has also been launched, with cash donation options ranging from $ 500 to $ 5,000 and benefits ranging from social media ads to the company name and logo on the organization’s 16-foot trailer and box truck.

Mathis said his agency’s partnership with the National Diaper Bank Network allows Keeping Families Covered to buy diapers in bulk at a great price, so every dollar donated is stretched considerably.

Additional sponsorship details are available at keepfamiliescovered.org.

Taylor said she wished Mathis and her team continued success in achieving their goals, including advocating for reductions in sales taxes on items such as diapers and period supplies.

“What you do is really, really important,” the mayor said. “I am so impressed.”

• To submit your news, visit dailyherald.com/share.


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California experiments with social democracy


In summary

A flurry of laws signed by California Governor Gavin Newsom is an experiment in European social democracy. Will it work?

California, as everyone should know by now, has the highest poverty rate in the country, as determined by the Census Bureau when the cost of living is included in the calculation.

While family incomes in California aren’t particularly low compared to other states, our extremely high living costs, especially on housing, mean that those incomes don’t stretch as far as they would. elsewhere.

The Public Policy Institute of California takes it a step further by calculating how many Californians live in near poverty, using a methodology similar to that of the Census Bureau.

In total, more than a third of the state’s roughly 40 million people are in severe economic distress. They are, for the most part, workers in low-paying jobs and their families, and their plight has been exacerbated by the nearly two-year COVID-19 pandemic, which has hit them the hardest both in terms of medical than economic.

Backed by unions, Gov. Gavin Newsom and his fellow Democrats pledged to reduce the state’s high levels of poverty and income disparity and this year generated a basket of bushels of laws that they say will reduce deviations.

California is indeed testing the long-held beliefs of the political left that America should move closer to the European model of “social democracy” by expanding supportive public services and empowering workers in their dealings with it. employers.

The former include increasing eligibility for Medi-Cal, the state health care system for the poor that already covers more than a third of California’s residents, expanding early childhood education childhood to both improve learning outcomes and free up more parents to work, and increase housing expenses for low- and middle-income families.

The latter is a variety of bills that impose new labor and pay standards on industries that employ large numbers of low-paid workers, including clothing production, agriculture, and the ever-growing distribution centers operated by Amazon and other big companies.

“We can’t allow companies to put profit before people,” Newsom said as he signed a law to relax production quotas at Amazon’s huge “distribution centers”.

“The hard-working warehouse workers who have helped support us during this unprecedented time should not have to risk injury or be punished because of operating quotas that violate basic health and safety.” , Newsom added.

“California holds corporations accountable and recognizes the dignity and humanity of our workers, who have helped build the world’s fifth-largest economy,” Newsom said later as he signed a bill banning piece-work in the garment industry centered in Los Angeles.

Newsom also signed bills to extend protections for domestic workers, increase the minimum wage for workers with disabilities, increase criminal penalties for “wage theft” by employers, and provide agricultural workers with smoke protection equipment. forest fires.

This is not, however, a 100% sweep for union-backed legislation. Newsom has vetoed a bill allowing postal voting in elections for the agricultural workers’ union organization and one that would extend paid family leave.

Expanding government services will of course cost the state billions of dollars, which it can afford now as income taxes pour into its treasury, but its sustainability is questionable. California is overly dependent on high-income taxpayers, which means its income plummets during an economic downturn.

New benefits for workers, meanwhile, will drive up costs for employers, potentially prompting some to move their operations and jobs to less expensive locations. The clothing industry is particularly competitive, which is why a large part has already gone abroad.

Higher public and private costs are the flip side of the California experiment in social democracy. Ultimately, Newsom and the legislature cannot repeal the laws of economics.


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Living in the North in brief: 10/03/2021 | Lifestyles


Yoga class scheduled for October 5

INTERLOCHEN – A Vinyasa yoga practice begins at 4 p.m. on October 5 at the Interlochen Public Library. Bring a yoga mat, water, and a towel. Donations are appreciated.

Book folding course at the Bellaire library

BELLAIRE – Sue Geshel is leading a 6 p.m. book folding event on October 5 at the Bellaire Public Library. Fold the pages of a book so that it shows the word “joy”. All supplies provided. Space is limited. Register online or call the library at 231-533-8814.

Glen Arbor Drawing Workshop Set

GLEN ARBOR – David Westerfield is leading the “Drawing Demystified” class from 10 am to 3 pm on October 9 at the Glen Arbor Arts Center. Those 13 and older can learn the basics of drawing, including building shapes, lines, shading, and other techniques. The cost is $ 75 for GAAC members, $ 85 for others. Registration is due October 6 at glenarborart.org.

Basketry sessions on Wednesdays

ALDEN – Dorothy Walter leads the basketry activities from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesdays at the Helena Township Community Center. Experience is not required. A fee of $ 5 covers the material. More information: 231-331-6583.

Money management workshops

INTERLOCHEN – The Northwest Michigan Community Action Agency is presenting workshops on money management from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. October 6 to November 3 at the Interlochen Public Library. These Wednesday events cover consumer protection, debt reduction, banking basics and more. Registration: 231-276-6767 or nmcaa.net/workshops.

Book club meets in Interlochen

INTERLOCHEN – Discuss “Educated” by Tara Westover at 6:30 pm on October 6 at the Interlochen Public Library. Discover the book from the library. Contact: 231-276-6767.

Sons of Norway meets on October 7

SUTTONS BAY —The local sons of Christian Radich Lodge from Norway meet at 6:30 pm on October 7 at the Immanuel Lutheran Church. This monthly event includes a business section and a program. More information: 248-890-9221.

NWS Presents Virtual Book Conference

TRAVERSE CITY – The National Writers’ Series features science author Mary Roach at 7 p.m. on October 7 via a live broadcast. Roach talks about his latest book “Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law”. Find tickets for $ 10.50 each on the NWS website.

Recruitment of mentors

TRAVERSE CITY – Big Brothers Big Sisters is launching the “30 adults in 30 days” campaign to recruit 30 new mentors in October. Mentors (Bigs) meet with mentees (Littles) four to six hours per month. In-person training is offered. Bigsupnorth.com/volunteer

Scheduled peer support events

TRAVERSE CITY – Disability Network Northern Michigan is offering virtual support activities in October.

A group of men meets on Mondays at 10 a.m. via the Zoom app.

Peer advocacy group sessions begin at 2 p.m. on October 7 and the quarantine kitchen continues at 2 p.m. on October 12 and 26.

Spirit Club organizes events on Fridays from 11 a.m. and Wednesdays at 3 p.m. The free program includes exercises led by an instructor.

Race fundraising results published

TRAVERSE CITY – The TVC5K Run the Runway supported the nonprofit Wings of Mercy with over $ 20,000. Over 200 runners participated in the September race at Cherry Capital Airport.

Library sale brings in more than $ 19,000

ELK RAPIDS – Friends of the Elk Rapids District Library raised over $ 19,000 at the Glamor, Glitter and Glitz event in September. The funds will support library events and activities.

The hospital receives a regional grant

FRANKFURT – The Anchor and Heart Endowment of the Grand Traverse Regional Community Foundation recently awarded the Paul Oliver Memorial Hospital. Its new specialty clinic receives a grant of $ 94,320 to provide local patients with services such as cardiology, orthopedic surgery and urology.


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A Year of Service for All: The Key to Rebuilding the Fabric of Our Nation


As our nation moves away from the 20th anniversary of 9/11 and Congress moves closer to requiring women to register for selective serviceI can’t help but think of the 13 soldiers who died on August 26 in Kabul. How they were linked in service to the nation. How they answered the call at such a young age – five of them were only 20 when they died. How they represent a cross-section of America – cities, men and women, different ethnicities, serving side by side on behalf of our great nation.

I can’t help but think about how divided our country has become. We live in individual Americas bubbles – physically and culturally, in person and online. The contrasts between our Americas were highlighted for me recently, during our first family vacation since the pandemic. We were in the Great Basin, on the border of Nevada and Utah, a decidedly rural area, different in every conceivable way from the dense New York suburbs that I call my home. Our motorhome broke down on a washed out gravel road in the middle of a dusty field, and a few good souls came to help us. Through my military service and that of my husband, we instantly forged a connection, a shared humanity, because they helped us out of the gap.

Having been fortunate enough to visit a few national parks on our trip, I remembered the excellent work of the Civilian Conservation Corps. 1930s engineering and the blood, sweat and tears of a representative sample of Americans created the Angel’s Landing Trail in Zion, among many others. What is my generation’s lasting gift to Americans a century from now, I wondered? What will our Angel’s Landings be?

Taking all of these thoughts – our fallen servicemen, our divided country, our aging infrastructure – together, it seems to me that maybe, for so many reasons, it’s time to broaden the conversation of the women signing up for the project – to all 18-25 year olds serving our nation to some extent.

I feel very lucky to be born into a family that values ​​service before oneself. My maternal grandparents both served in World War II and my parents both moved thousands of miles from home to work in the Navajo Nation. These values ​​are, in large part, what drove me to go to West Point and serve in the military.

The irony is that now, over a decade after my military service, living squarely in an unrepresentative slice of America, I realize that my time in uniform has given me far more than I have ever had. never given – and I also realized that national service can be the key to mending the tattered fabric of our national narrative. As our country has become more and more divided, what I appreciate most is that through my service I was able to experience all from America. Like those 13 brave servicemen, I too was side by side with a cross-section of America. I have lived in places very different from where I grew up, be it rural Missouri, the metropolis of Oahu, a German village, or a large base in Iraq. These experiences help me understand, appreciate, respect and love the diverse perspectives of the countless parts of America that exist in our fractured country – and allow me not only to coexist, but to connect and thrive in places. away from where I now call home.

I feel that encouraging more national service or, better yet, making it compulsory, is the most important solution we have to one of the most fundamental challenges we face: fixing the divisions in our country and fundamentally strengthen the fabric that binds all of us together. This fall, as Congress discusses including all women in selective service, let’s take it a step further and start discussing how to include all 18-25 year olds in a national service program.

Service can take many forms, such as joining the military or AmeriCorps, working at a nonprofit, joining a parks system, or teaching at an underserved school. What matters most is not only that the service helps strengthen our country and its citizens, but that it is designed for young Americans to work closely with teammates with significantly different lived experiences, serve in places different from where they come from, do more important work and accomplish difficult feats.

As we work on policy changes to make service mandatory, there are steps we can take now to make service feel mandatory and celebrated. What if recruiters asked about service experience during interviews? What if it was included in college applications? What if there was a way to give diplomas and certifications at the end, who would then help people find future employment? Measures like these can start now to give more credibility to such an important activity.

Imagine a country in which all 18-25 year olds spend a lot of time alongside other Americans who come from very different parts of the country and serve in parts of the country very different from where they grew up. Imagine not only the positive impact this can have on our country’s infrastructure – our 21st Century Angel Landing – but also the impact it will have on every individual. “Other Americas” will no longer feel like foreigners, and we will appreciate the values ​​that unite us all as Americans, which are greater than any political party, demographic, or city big or small in our great country. These experiences will leave an indelible mark on every person who serves, and as a group, it will strengthen our country in ways we sorely need.

Elizabeth Young McNally is Executive Vice President of Schmidt Futures, a philanthropic initiative of Eric and Wendy Schmidt, former partner and global leader of McKinsey Academy, and veteran of service in Iraq in the US military. Liz was also named president of the visiting council of the US Military Academy. A Rhodes and Truman scholar, she began her career as a military police officer in the United States Army. She and her husband John are raising their three school-aged children outside of New York City and taking every opportunity to introduce them to and serve the diversity that makes up our nation.


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Police chief no longer has to live in Broomfield – Greeley Tribune


Broomfield Police Chief is no longer required to live within city and county limits, the city council voted on Tuesday evening.

The ordinance was passed 8-1 with Councilor Elizabeth Law-Evans voting no and Councilor Sharon Tessier absent.

Police Chief Gary Creager announced in June that he was retiring on January 11, 2022 after 40 years in law enforcement. His retirement and the subsequent recruitment process allowed city and county staff to reconsider the residency requirement, the council’s memo said.

“Given the recent and future difficulties in recruiting and retaining law enforcement positions, the reassessment of the residency requirement is timely,” the note said. “The change in the residency requirement will allow staff to expand the pool of potential candidates when recruiting a new police chief to ensure that the city and county are able to attract and retain the chief.” most qualified police officer, regardless of residence. “

Of the 18 municipal staff police departments surveyed in the Denver / Boulder area, only two have a residency requirement, according to data presented during the first reading of the order on August 24.

City Councilor Deven Shaff said he heard concerns from residents about how a police chief who potentially does not live in Broomfield will be connected to the community of Broomfield.

“Our policing department is deeply integrated into every aspect of everything we do,” said Jennifer Hoffman, city and county manager. “And to think that we would pick a police chief who doesn’t embody that just isn’t going to happen.”

Shaff asked if a police chief would be less devoted to the citizens of Broomfield simply because he does not live in Broomfield.

“Resolutely, unequivocally, I can say absolutely not,” Hoffman said.

Law-Evans said his lack of support for the ordinance was not directed against any person or circumstance.

“I know the BPD is tightly integrated into the community. I think it’s important to consider what the situation would look like several years from now, maybe decades later, ”she said. “The comments I have received from my constituents are that it is very important for the chief of police himself to live in our community, to integrate so closely with our community.

Law-Evans said she was ready to draft an amendment to the ordinance that would give preference to applicants who already live or are willing to move to Broomfield, although the Council is not in favor.

Mayor Guyleen Castriotta noted that this was Hoffman’s hire and not Council.

“We should all facilitate this hire by giving it the most leeway to choose from the largest pool of candidates,” Castriotta said.

Before the ordinance was passed, the chief of police and the city and county manager were the only two employees required to live in Broomfield.

The job posting was posted on Wednesday and applications are being accepted until October 27 at 5 p.m.

“The position will report to the City and County Director and will work closely with all city and county departments, community members, faith-based organizations, non-profit organizations and our regional partners,” indicates the list. “As a visible community leader, the police chief will demonstrate and uphold the fundamentals of community policing, that is, position the department as one that ‘politics with and within the community’, as opposed to ‘community policing’.

The annual salary range is $ 175,000 and $ 200,000. For more information, visit Broomfield.org/ChiefOfPolice.


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Parents of shooting victims hope New Haven collaboration will reduce violence – NBC Connecticut


New Haven partners with CT Against Gun Violence (CAGV) to fight violence in the city.

The non-profit organization will engage community members and guide the city’s new violence prevention office.

The CAGV says it will be holding community listening sessions soon to discuss ways to prevent gun violence, in particular preventing it, intervening and also focusing on the after-effects.

The announcement was made at the Healing Botanical Garden in Elm City on Friday.

There, bricks commemorate the lives lost in New Haven to gun violence.

“It’s sad. My heart goes out to all of these moms,” said Pamela Jaynez, who doesn’t want to keep adding names to a path she helped create.

“Ten more bricks are being laid tomorrow and it’s not even for September and October. We go back to the months of June and July for which these are asked. “

Jaynez took NBC Connecticut to see his son’s brick.

Walter Jaynes Sr. would have turned 44 in June. He was killed in 1997.

“He’s been gone longer than he’s lived… It was six days before his 20th birthday when he was murdered.

The grieving mother is hoping New Haven’s collaboration with CAGV will have an impact, a step she believes is in the right direction to stop this growing path of deadly gun violence.

“I had no idea going to this funeral, that one day I would be one of those front row relatives,” said Thomas Daniels, who has the same background as Jaynez.

Her son Thomas was killed in 2009.

“These young murderers don’t know the effect they have on families, and the long-term effects, because for the last two or three years, I’ve just started to live. I just started living, ”said Daniels, who started the Fathers Cry Too group to help others experience what he has.

As New Haven searches for creative ways to fight violence, Daniels hopes all Connecticut communities come together to make a difference.

“It is no longer a black against black crime. Gun violence is everywhere. Death knows no boundaries.

A push for change – a Jaynez says she will never stop doing while her son watches over her.

“Every time I come here and start talking about my son, the chime (starts ringing) and I know he says to me, ‘Yeah, mom, yeah. “”


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10 in-demand jobs of the decade that don’t require a bachelor’s degree


A college degree can put you on the fast track to success in today’s job market by increasing your earning potential and your access to different work opportunities – but higher education is a costly investment that continues to grow. be inaccessible to many.

Over the past 10 years, college costs have increased by about 25%, according to a CNBC Make It analysis of College Board data. Along with these rising costs, student debt has skyrocketed; Americans currently owe over $ 1.73 trillion in student loans.

According to a recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there is a range of jobs that do not require a bachelor’s degree in several industries that are expected to be in high demand over the next 10 years.

Many of these jobs require a high school diploma, an associate’s degree, or a non-degree post-secondary scholarship. A non-degree post-secondary scholarship is a course typically taken in less than two years that teaches you the specific skills or knowledge needed for a job. Community colleges often offer these programs, which can include EMT certificates or library technician training, as two examples, Bureau of Labor statistics division chief Michael Wolf told CNBC Make It.

“It’s a bit of a mishmash,” Wolf says of the job classification. “It’s hard to find a common explanation as to why they are all popular… there are specific reasons why each is in demand, and will continue to be in demand over the next ten years.”

However, three trends are driving the growth of almost every job: increased demand for sustainable energy, an aging population and a renewed interest in personal care during the coronavirus pandemic.

Wind turbine maintenance technicians and solar PV panel installers are expected to be among the fastest growing jobs of the decade due to the climate change emergency and the resulting demand for sustainable energy.

Occupational therapy assistants, physiotherapy assistants, orderlies and physiotherapist assistants will become essential roles as more baby boomers retire and depend on these services. In a recent analysis, the University of Southern California notes that health care costs for this group are expected to be high, as this generation “lives longer, but experiences higher rates of obesity, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension ”.

Wolf specifies that physiotherapist assistants and physiotherapist assistants have separate and distinct roles: assistants are actively involved in providing patient care, while assistants are not involved in providing care, but rather focus on providing care. administrative tasks such as setting up equipment and completing office documents.

After dealing with the exhaustion and isolation induced by the pandemic over the past 18 months, people are investing more in personal services like massages and self-enrichment classes, resulting in increased demand massage therapists and teachers. “People are realizing that focusing and maintaining their personal care is important not only for their mental state, but also for their overall well-being,” said Vicki Salemi, career expert at Monster.

If you are interested in pursuing one of these careers, Salemi recommends that you read job descriptions to identify the skills recruiters are looking for, and read professional publications or blogs for up-to-date industry information. It also helps to have related work experience, she adds, whether through an online certification course, a work-study program at your local community college, or volunteering. in a non-profit organization. “Even if you don’t have any work experience, you can train yourself or follow someone in the field,” says Salemi. “Not only will you gain valuable skills, but you will also be able to meet contacts and references for that next job.”

To verify:

These are the 6 fastest growing jobs of the decade grossing over $ 100,000

How Networking Helped a 23-Year-Old Student Make an “Early Career” Discovery

The 3 fastest-disappearing jobs in the United States over the next decade

Register now: Be smarter about your money and career with our weekly newsletter


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Argus Wesleyan | WesCeleb: Philippe Bungabong ’22 on Freeman Scholarship, Nonprofit Work and American Idol


c / o Yongxi Tan ’22

During his college application, Philippe Bungabong ’22 was looking for an opportunity to further broaden his intellectual horizons. Throughout his time at the university, Bungabong has made himself an indispensable member of several campus communities, including the sailing team, the economics department and the Career Center. Outside of class, Bungabong can be found co-managing his non-profit organization, cooking delicious meals or singing. The Argus caught up with Bungabong on a foggy Tuesday evening over a glass of wine.

Argus: Why do you think you are nominated to be a WesCeleb?

Philippe Bungabong: [Laughs.] I think I was nominated for, well, part of it has to be nepotism.

A: Yeah, WesCeleb is talking about nepotism. [Laughs.]

PB: I have a number of great friends on The Argus, but I also think the other part of that should be the time I spent working at different levels on campus. I have been a residential counselor, I have worked as a teaching assistant for several classes and I am also part of the sailing team. I also sing and write songs and am friends with several people on the artistic side of campus. It’s just a gift, to know different people from different walks of life, and I am honored to be a WesCeleb.

A: Could you tell us more about the Freeman scholarship?

PB: The Freeman scholarship program, as it operated during my year, was that Wesleyan selected one student each from 11 countries in the East and South East Asia regions. I believe the countries are Philippines, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Indonesia, Malaysia, Japan, China, South Korea, Thailand and Vietnam. Of course, this has been a great opportunity to learn Wesleyan at no cost, but I also think the Freeman Scholars community is such a powerful community just to have students who really love to learn and study so many different things. I like the way I study economics and applied data science, but a number of other Freeman fellows are more in computer science or more in environmental studies or government. And they’re always the first, or among the first, groups of people I would tap into for insight into these areas.

A: Speaking of fields of study, did you know you wanted to study economics when you arrived? How did it happen?

PB: I came in thinking I wanted to study something more quantitative. I was either thinking about physics, math, or economics, and I took the three years of first and second year, but I think what I was most excited about was economics, and the ECON300 class, of which I am currently CA. It is a course on quantitative methods in economics. It was in this course that I really realized how economics is an area that will help me see and quantify the systems and interactions in the world.

A: It makes sense! I want to go back to your experiences at Wesyou mentioned that you have met so many different people on campus, people from all walks of life through your engagements. Which were the most valuable in shaping your Wesleyan experience?

PB: My closest friends are on the sailing team. I live with two of my co-captains. I had never sailed before entering college and it was just something I had chosen in first year and kept. I love sport. I also like the people in it. But aside from the sailing team, I would say my time as a tour guide, and now as a senior interviewer, continues to inform my time at Wesleyan. As a tour guide, I continue to introduce Wesleyan to future students, and this has given me a new set of eyes again through which I look at Wesleyan…. I always try to keep finding things that I love about Wes and also things that I want to improve about Wes, or things that I would like them to be different about Wesleyan, all with the goal of communicating why I think Wes might be a good fit for someone. I would say Wesleyan is not a perfect school, but for some people it is the ideal school, and I want to make sure that I am able to communicate that to all the potential students who come here.

A: Speaking of college admissions and helping people find perfect universities, you also run an educational non-profit organization.!

PB: I co-founded CAUSE Philippines when I was a freshman here. I co-founded it with two other low income Filipino students and we really built it with the idea that talent is everywhere, but opportunity not. We wanted to equip other low income Filipino students with the best college education they can receive so that one day they can go home and develop their community for the better, as we believe low income students know the more intimately the problems of their community. focused towards.

A: Could you explain what CAUSE does in particular?

PB: We organize a variety of programming events. We have a mentoring program, where we match mentees (low income high school students) with mentors, who are currently students in the US, UK, Singapore and around the world. We guide them step by step through the university application process, preparing for the SATs, writing their common application activities, their essays, requesting recommendations from teachers, all because it There is no defined infrastructure with which these students can really work, especially in terms of applying abroad.

Apart from that, we also run webinars that are more open to the public, and we do that on topics like how [to] get scholarships abroad, which scholarships are even available. We run these events throughout the year where we really try to bring together talent, not only from the capital of Metro Manila, but also from remote provinces in the Philippines.

A: Beyond non-profit and academic work, you are also an artist! What does music mean to you? You always joke about how you want Ryan Seacrest to work, so tell me about “American Idol” and the role he’s played in your life.

PB: [Laughs] Music has always been an outlet for me. I grew up watching American Idol, Kelly Clarkson, Carrie Underwood from the living room, even though I lived in Manila, Philippines, a 17 hour flight from New York. Growing up, I was always drawn to singing competitions. I think it’s so much fun watching people sing, but also from a competitive point of view, strategizing and trying to win a singing competition. My interest in music really arose from the fact that I grew up watching shows like American Idol, but also growing up in the Philippines, where everyone sings karaoke. So I sang a lot of karaoke growing up, and now music is still my biggest outlet. I rely on a number of songs for whatever mood I’m in. If I can’t find the appropriate song for this moment, and if I have enough creativity in me, I would write the song and my approach to songwriting This is typically what I want to learn from my own experiences , but also wanting to generalize, so that a number of other people can also feel what I felt.

A: It’s really beautiful, isn’t it? The interaction between an audience and the artist and how it reinforces meaning.

PB: Yeah yeah.

A: Well Philippe, we’re kinda friends because of the pandemic.

PB: [Laughs] Yes.

A: [Laughs] Well we were stuck here [on campus] for a long time.

PB: [Laughs] During a very long time.

A: How do you think COVID-19 impacted you and your time at Wesleyan?

PB: The pandemic really made me appreciate the importance of community, of staying in touch with those who matter to you, whatever the circumstances. Of course, respecting the safety and hygiene measures. During the pandemic, I realized that my friends in the Wesleyan community are so important to me and so important to my college experience and that they really add a lot of color to a genre of college learning that was otherwise mostly black and White. When we were all sent home in second year, I realized that, my God, I’m still so lucky to have other Wesleyan students around me.

And when people were sent home, Nalu Tripician, my best friend on this campus, was so far away from me, but we still called every now and then, and that was one of the times I really realized that I wanted to stay in touch with many members of the Wesleyan community and friends that I have met over the years. And now that we’re all in person again, I really try to cherish every moment that I have with my friends in Wesleyan.

A: What advice would you give your freshman?

PB: I would say “breathe”. Breathe and recognize that everything will be fine. Just keep doing your best, but also live in the moment and don’t always think about what to expect.

A: Certainly not! [Laughs]

PB: I think as a senior now I realize that college is really short. And it’s the last four years (unless you’re in graduate school), the last four years of your life that are super structured, after that you’ll be released into the workforce and you’ll have 17 days of paid leave. So for my first year, breathe, have fun, and keep doing your best, but rest assured knowing that if you do your best, you’ll be fine too.

A: In that vein, how did Wesleyan shape you?

PB: I think Wesleyan made me more open-minded, in every sense of the word. I came here from a rather conservative Asian family, studied at a science high school and grew up with the idea that you would only be successful if you studied something in science or something quantitative, but coming to Wesleyan, meeting so many open-minded people like that, also made me realize that there are so many different perspectives that I could learn from, recognize and grow with. It is something that I will strive to keep in my heart even as I leave Wesleyan. Being open to as many experiences as possible, to as many right perspectives as possible, and not always having a clear idea of ​​what is right and wrong on my mind, and being open to changing your mind.

The interview has been edited for length and clarity.

You can reach Magda Kisielinska at [email protected].


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Non profit living

Calendar | News, Sports, Jobs


Editor’s Note: The Sentinel offers nonprofits and other community organizations the opportunity to promote upcoming events in this community calendar for free for three days prior to the event. Events requiring reservations can also be promoted up to two weeks before the reservation date.

Submit articles at least one working week before publication by e-mail, [email protected]; voicemail, (717) 248-6741; online, virtual press room at www.lewistownsentinel.com; or by mail or deposit, The Sentinel, PO Box 588 Lewistown, PA 17044. The publisher reserves the right to modify all submissions.

With all submissions, you must include a phone number for verification purposes. The phone number is not for publication unless otherwise noted.

If your organization would like to add a recurring event (for example, every Monday, third Thursday) that has been canceled due to the pandemic, contact Lifestyles editor Jeff Fishbein, email [email protected], or call ( 717) 248-6741, ext. 108.

Reserve now

Central PA Pink Connection Costume Party – 7-10 p.m. October 9 at Brookmere Winery in Belleville. Tickets cost $ 25 and can be purchased by calling or texting (571) 422-8969 or online at https://bit.ly/3o2xqAT. More information: pinkconnection.org or [email protected]

¯RAP Mifflin County Section Lunch – October lunch at noon on Friday October 15 at Birch Hill Event Center, 1100 N. Pine St., Burnham. The menu will be caprese salad, ham, sweet potatoes, almond green beans, roll / butter, gingerbread. The cost of the meal is $ 14. The program will be “Unusual suspects”. If you plan to attend, please respond to this email, [email protected], by noon on Tuesday, October 12, or by calling (717) 437-6024. Please indicate the number of people present. All retirees from the school are welcome.

Thursday September 30

¯Ace the Interview – 10 a.m. to noon; PA CareerLink Mifflin County, MCIDC Plaza, Bldg 58. Learn the best way to present yourself on paper and in person.

¯Intro to Microsoft Excel – 1 pm to 2:30 pm, PA CareerLink Mifflin County, MCIDC Plaza, Bldg 58. Learn how to use basic Microsoft Excel spreadsheet functionality to create, track, and edit data. Find out how to insert and format formulas, use shortcuts, manage rows and columns, and insert headers.

Bingo – 1 p.m., Yeagertown Senior Center

¯Standard Steel Melt Shop Retirees Lunch – 8:30 a.m. at Yetter’s, McVeytown

Friday October 1

¯Free Community Lunch – 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., New Life Church, 101 N. Beech St., Burnham.

¯ American Red Cross Blood Drive – 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Christ Church, Beaver Springs. Appointment required. For appointments and “Fast pass” visit: www.croixrouge.org.

¯45th annual JCS auction – 4 p.m. and up, McAlisterville Park. Local food trucks, crafts, baked goods, fresh produce, housewares, outdoor items, gift certificates, specialty coffees and themed baskets available. The profits will be donated to the Juniata Christian School.

Kettle Fest – 8 a.m. until dark at Tuscarora Heritage Days in East Waterford. Flea market with free installation. More information: (717) 543-8457.

Saturday October 2

¯Church Hill UMC Art Festival – 9 am-2pm, 199 Woodland Circle. Rain or shine event. Information: (717) 667-3778.

¯Keystone State Muscle Cars Cruise – 5-8 p.m., Londonderry Restaurant and Pub, Reedsville, across from Rutter’s. All cars, trucks, motorcycles are welcome. Meets every Saturday until October 30.

¯45th Annual JCS Auction – All Day, McAlisterville Park. Local food trucks, crafts, baked goods, fresh produce, housewares, outdoor items, gift certificates, specialty coffees and themed baskets available. The profits will be donated to the Juniata Christian School.

Kettle Fest – 8 a.m. until dark at Tuscarora Heritage Days in East Waterford. Flea market with free installation. Auto Show, 10 am-4pm Horseshoe Tournament; Reenactors of the Civil War. More information: (717) 543-8457.

¯ Rescue Our Furry Friends Adoption and Giving Event – 9 am to noon at Blaise Alexander Subaru, Lewistown.

Sunday October 3

¯ Flea Market – 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Lewistown Moose, 80 Brady Lane.

Kettle Fest – 7 a.m. to noon at Tuscarora Heritage Days, East Waterford. Flea market with free installation. More information: (717) 543-8457.

Meetings

Upcoming meetings are posted in the calendar. Missing classmate requests are posted once and repeated only if they are updated. Brief minutes of meetings and photos of class reunions with identified individuals in the order in which they appear are accepted for publication in the Living section. The deadline for submitting reviews is one week before publication. Submit meeting notices to Jeff Fishbein at The Sentinel; email [email protected] or call (717) 248-6741.

1956 Rothrock High School class reunion – noon October 13 at Hoss’ home. More information: Shirley Davidheiser, (717) 248-2746.

The latest news today and more in your inbox


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Non profit living

Woofstock, Wags & Whiskers events return this weekend


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Woofstock returns this weekend to Sedgwick County Park.

The Wichita Eagle

If you’re a dog or cat lover, free up your schedule this weekend for two fun outdoor events that organizers say are key to solving pet overcrowding and homelessness in the area. Wichita area. You can celebrate with other pet owners at Woofstock’s 25th anniversary on Saturday at Sedgwick County Park, then attend the Wags & Whiskers Dinner and Live Auction on Sunday night at Chicken N Pickle.

Two of Wichita’s biggest fundraisers for local animal rescue organizations are back in person this weekend after COVID-altered events last year. Both take place outdoors and both will continue their online components to expand their reach during what is described as a banner year for animal inputs at the local and national levels.

Christy Fischer, executive director of the Wichita Animal Action League, says a number of factors have led to an overcrowding problem that she and others are calling the worst they have seen in the wellness industry animal. Among the contributors: elective procedures, which included sterilizations and sterilizations for dogs and cats, were postponed to 2020 as hospitals worried about drug shortages for patients struggling with COVID; some owners have had to abandon animals for financial and housing reasons following pandemic closures; and an adoption rush in 2020 as people worked from home and didn’t travel.

“All of the rescues did a lot of adoptions over a fairly short period of time in 2020 instead of that number of adoptions spanning 12 to 16 months as we would normally see,” Fischer said. “So now adoptions are down across the board because people already have their pets and they’re not necessarily looking for another one. “

Wichita Animal Action League, or WAAL, is one of many state-approved rescue groups working alongside the Kansas Humane Society to help save pets from euthanasia at local shelters simply for want of space or funds for medical needs. KHS is Wichita’s largest privately funded nonprofit animal shelter organization. It cares for 16,000 pets each year through approximately 8,000 pet adoptions and provides spaying / neutering services for low-income people, end-of-life services and community outreach. WAAL is a foster home rescue and does not operate a full time facility. The group rescued approximately 1,100 animals in 2020 from overcrowded shelters and also conducts several community outreach initiatives, ranging from sourcing community pet food banks to approaching owners for neglect or neglect issues. cruelty.

KHS and WAAL said their fundraisers in 2020 brought in less dollars than in 2019 and they hope returning to the in-person events will help fund the community’s unprecedented needs. Here’s how to participate in either of these events:

Kansas Humane Society Woofstock

Woofstock, the Kansas Humane Society’s main annual fundraising event, has drawn up to 10,000 attendees in recent years and temporarily changed its format in 2020 to a drive-thru version of Woofstock and virtual activities. As they return in person for the 25th anniversary of the event, organizers expect the continued spread of COVID to keep attendance lower.

“We understand that not everyone is comfortable attending events right now,” said Ericka Goering, KHS Director of Marketing and Communications. “We’re an outdoor event and we have a big space, so people should be able to spread out. We recommend that those who want to go out, wear a mask and practice social distancing as much as possible. “

Woofstock is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 2 at Sedgwick County Park, 6501 W. 21st St. Anyone 12 years of age and over pays $ 10 to access the festival grounds, which will have 80 vendor booths with freebies . as goods and services for sale, a beer garden, a dozen food trucks on site and live music: the acoustic duo Dangie Music in the morning and the rock band Tequila Ridge in the afternoon.

Dog activities include races, agility lessons and a costume contest. Planned human activities include a play clinic where kids can practice being a vet, raffles for gift baskets, stage contests featuring musical chairs and pet / owner costumes, photo booth and live demonstrations from the Wichita Police Department’s K-9 unit.

Also included in admission: A limited number of free microchips and dog vaccines are available on a first come, first served basis.

Five custom niches created by Commerce Construction Services Inc. will be on display at Woofstock; they are part of the Woofstock online auction which launched on September 20 and ends at 8 p.m. on October 4. or sign up for a VIP package. Tickets are also available at the door on October 2, but you’ll have a better choice of shirt size if you pre-register.

There are two VIP packages: $ 25 includes a t-shirt, event bag, dog bandana and entry to the event while a $ 40 package includes the Woofstock package plus participation in a walk launch at 9 a.m., breakfast, a Woof Walk t-shirt and early entry to the festival grounds.

Those who aren’t comfortable attending can still donate and receive freebies for the event, and KHS is promoting a series of activities online this week ahead of the event. Visit the group’s Facebook page (facebook.com/kshumane) to keep up with daily activity, from bad drawings of animals for a small donation to free photo contests with prizes.

WAAL Wags & Whiskers

This is the seventh year for Wags & Whiskers, the main annual fundraiser for WAAL, which began saving animals in crisis in November 2013. This year’s event was originally booked at a covered venue and the organizers decided to move it to the Chicken N Pickle outdoor area, 1240 N. Greenwich Road.

Doors open at 5 p.m. on Sunday, October 3 and the event runs from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets cost $ 75 per person and there were over 100 left at the start of this week. You will need to purchase a ticket before the end of the day Friday at WAALrescue.org/ww.

Admission includes vegan and non-vegan dinner options, beer and wine, a DJ playing music, and fun activities throughout the night. There will be a dog and cat toy raffle, wine raffle and live auction of 20 items with unique journeys and experiences.

Participants and those at home can bid on the silent auction, which is already live and has end times shifted to Sunday evening. You can register to bid using the same link above. If you can’t attend, Fischer said, consider fostering, volunteering, or donating in some other way described on the WAAL website.

More Upcoming Animal Rescue Fundraising Events:

ICT Dachshund Races, 2 p.m., Saturday, October 9, outside Historic Union Station, 701 E. Douglas: Held in conjunction with ICT Bloktoberfest, the annual Dachshund Races are great fun to watch and all proceeds go directly to Lifeline Animal Placement & Protection. LAPP is a non-profit animal rescue and adoption kennel based in Wichita; learn more about the group at lifelineanimalplacement.org.

In addition to the $ 5 entry fee per dog, funds are raised through a silent auction and raffles open to the public during the event, as well as merchandise. Registration and training from noon to 1:30 p.m. followed by a fancy dress contest for dogs at 1:45 p.m. and race from 2 p.m.

Who Let the Dogs Out 5K / 1 Mile Fun Run, Sunday, November 7, at the Sunflower Building at Sedgwick County Park: You can run with your canine running companion or just run alone; in any case, you will help reduce the overpopulation of pets in our region. This event raises funds for Spay-Neuter Kansas, a non-profit veterinary clinic located at 319 S. Hydraulic that provides low cost sterilization / sterilization to pets in low income households. Learn more about the clinic at spayneuterkansas.com. To register, search for the event name on Facebook and click Book Now, or search for the event on runsignup.com.

Online registration is $ 25 for the 1 mile tailwaggers event and $ 36 for the 5K timed chip event. This includes a t-shirt, a finishing medal and a raffle ticket for gift baskets. Dogs that participate will also receive racing gifts. Register by October 20 to guarantee your shirt size.

Fur Ball, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday, November 13, at The Vail, 210 N. Mosley: Fur Ball is the largest annual fundraiser for Beauties and Beasts Inc., a volunteer-run non-profit animal rescue organization that focuses on saving death row animals at shelters across the Wichita region and their placement in foster homes until adoption. Tickets start at $ 75 per person (beautiesfurball.givesmart.com) and include dinner from Culinary Catering plus two drink tickets. There will be silent and live auctions, photo booth, wine tasting and other activities. Learn more about the organization at beautiesandbeasts.org.


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Non profit living

#AM_Equality: September 28, 2021 – CRH


REPORT FINDS 2.3 MILLION LGBTQ + LATINX ADULTS IN AMERICA: A new report from the Williams Institute has found that of the 11.3 million LGBTQ + adults living in America, at least 2.3 million are Latinx. In addition, the report examined statistics relating to mental health, access to health care and economic characteristics. Williams Institute.

POLICE SERVICES ACROSS THE UNITED STATES CALL FOR LGBTQ + TRAINING: “Not only can training help the LGBTQ community, but it can also help police departments do their jobs better, especially those who are really invested in community policing,” said Christy Mallory, legal director for the Williams Institute of UCLA Law School. “These trainings can really help get to a place where LGBTQ communities feel comfortable working with law enforcement and really empower the police to do their jobs better and safer.” More NBC News.

🩺 GOP BILL WOULD FUND RESEARCH IN HEALTH CARE FOR YOUNG TRANSGENDERS: Last week, Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) introduced a bill that would end public funding for health care research for transgender youth. Specifically, the legislation “would prohibit the use of federal funds for gender transition among minors”. More American Independent.

FROM HOLLYWOOD TO CAPITOL HILL, HERE ARE 12 LGBTQ + LATINX TRAILBLAZERS: In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, Cynthia Silva (@ItsCynthiaSilva) compiled a list of 12 LGBTQ + Latinx pioneers. More NBC News.

?? IN STATES

“BLACK TRANS WOMEN LIKE ME DIE IN TEXAS DUE TO POLITICAL GAMES”: In a comment by Diamond Stylz (@DiamondStylz), she writes: “I urge all allies and LGB people to join me in holding lawmakers to account and denouncing dangerous rhetoric as a violent threat. We must implore them to reject harmful anti-transgender laws and focus on promoting strong non-discrimination policies like the equality law and investing in the programs our communities need to thrive. More Lawyer.

✈️ CALIFORNIA BANS STATE-FUNDED TRAVEL TO OHIO DUE TO ANTI-LGBTQ + ACT: The California Attorney General on Friday announced that California would restrict state-funded travel to Ohio due to Ohio passing the “Medical Practitioner Conscience” clause in June, which has been dubbed ” allowed to discriminate ”. More Cleveland scene.

🌈 THE NEW MINNEAPOLIS NONPROFIT LAUNCHES AN LGBTQ + MENTORING PROGRAM, ONE OF NOTHING IN THE UNITED STATES: A new Minneapolis-based nonprofit called Queerspace Collective (@QueerspaceC) fills a critical void in LGBTQ + mentoring programs. The program hopes to expand nationwide in the coming years. More StarTribune.

ALABAMA ASBL OBTAINED A GRANT TO HELP DOCUMENT LGBTQ + HISTORY IN THE SOUTH: The Invisible Histories Project, a nonprofit that documents the history of LGBTQ + people in the South, received a $ 600,000 grant to document the history of LGBTQ + in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi and the Panhandle of Florida. More AL.

CHARLESTON PRIDE’S REAL RAINBOW ROW TOUR EXPLORES THE LGBTQ + HISTORY OF THE CITY SUNDAY: As part of Charleston Pride Week, the tour will take attendees through the city’s historic neighborhoods as they tell the often-overlooked stories of Charleston’s LGBTQ + community. More Charleston City Paper.

?? CULTURE

NON-BINARY CHARACTERS LIKE ‘GONZO-RELLA’ ENLIGHTEN CHILDREN’S TELEVISION AND ENCOURAGE SELF-ACCEPTANCE: For children whose gender expression may not correspond to preconceived notions of boy or girl, it may be important to see themselves reflected on the screen. More CNN.

TIKTOK’S ELDERQUEER DESIGNERS BRING LGBTQ + HISTORY TO LIFE: A community of older LGBTQ + TikTokers are sharing their life experiences with a younger generation looking for mentorship. More them.

?? GLOBAL EQUALITY

🗳️ TWO TRANSGENDER WOMEN WIN SEATS IN THE NEXT GERMAN PARLIAMENT: Tessa Ganserer and Nyke Slawik made history yesterday by winning seats in the German Parliament in the Bundestag. More The New York Times and Reuters.

?? SCOTLAND IS NOW THE FIRST COUNTRY TO DEMAND LGBTQ + HISTORY IN SCHOOLS: More them.

You have news ? Send us your news and tips on [email protected].Click here to subscribe to #AM_Equality and follow@CRH for all the latest news. Thanks for reading!



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Non profit living

New Life Village near Tampa offers new homes for foster children, new purpose for seniors


As the only intergenerational residential model in the state of Florida to do what they do, New Life Village in Palm River, just east of Tampa, is working to reduce the number of children in foster care. ‘welcome for over a year.

Founded in 2012, New Life Village is helping solve two of the issues plaguing the Tampa Bay area: affordable housing and a foster care crisis.

With their mission being to provide a “supportive environment, within an intergenerational community for children in need of a safe, stable and permanent family experience”, the association’s leadership works on their 12-acre campus which is currently about 1/3 developed.

Earlier in September, the construction of two new buildings that will house 16 families in about a year, increasing the village from around 100 to 170. The new buildings will add to the 32 already existing townhouses, plus a community garden. , paddling pool, swimming pool, playground and football field. Plans further are preliminary, but now include a multi-purpose program building and one-bedroom living spaces for the elderly.

“The community and its program are focused on healing children,” says Mariah Hayden, Executive Director of New Life Village. “We help them overcome their trauma and gain coping mechanisms.”

Seniors living in the Village are all 55 and over and are here for an intentional retirement. They serve as surrogate grandparents, guardians and mentors.

“It’s basically the village elders in the saying ‘it takes a village to raise a child,’” says Hayden.

Being in New Life Village, she explains, prevents these abandoned, abused and neglected children, who usually do not live with their birth parents, from entering the foster care system. This creates a safe place where they can call “home” with their foster family without being stigmatized for being adopted.

The program also works to address the negative outcomes associated with foster care systems, such as low education / graduation rates, homelessness, teenage pregnancy, incarceration, mental health problems and unemployment.

In a survey collected from residents in June 2020, 88% of children had improved their grades since moving in, 100% of children thought they were an important part of the village family, 99% of seniors thought they were leading a determined and meaningful life-in-the-Village project, and 91% of caregivers were convinced that the Village’s family environment was safe. Breaking the cycle of many of the main issues in the foster care system, New Life Village has a positive impact on a variety of issues associated with traditional foster care: a lack of support from loved ones. caregivers, a shortage of foster parents, the impact of trauma and the lack of affordable housing.

“The longer children are placed in foster care, the more they have a physical likelihood of very negative and traumatic outcomes,” says Hayden.

The average household change per child is around three placements per year. Whenever this happens, this child not only loses a sense of family and stability, but is again traumatized by thinking that no one wants them and that he has nowhere to go.

“Children have a need and seniors have a need. Children and the elderly provide for everyone’s needs, so it’s a beautiful yin and yang relationship that provides psychological and health outcomes for both groups.

Of course, there are going to be problems that arise from mixing the generations. “If we go to our grandparents, no matter who we are, no matter how old we are, there’s a good chance they won’t understand some aspect of our life,” says Hayden. “You have the standard and expectations of each generation, and each generation looks at the other generation through that lens. “

From phone etiquette to good manners and work ethics, kids today hold very different values ​​than their elders, she says.

“Our elders come from a generation where you stayed married all your life, you chose a career and it was your career your entire life. The older generation is really attached to the idea that you start a job and move up the ranks. You stay a long time, you respect your elders no matter what, and that’s what the job looks like to them. The younger generation is completely on the other side of that spectrum, ”says Hayden.

The challenges caused by technological innovations and changes in the workplace will never go away.

“Our grandparents had the same problems with their grandparents and so on. … It’s just that things change and that will always be represented in the generations.

What is unique is how a versatile pace of life is based on societal manners.

“Our generation, and I in particular, are still going a million kilometers an hour. I’m still multitasking and do 25 things at a time. It is a blessing and a curse. They are [seniors] not like that, so when they come to the clubhouse and we see them in the community, they stop, take a break and have intentional, very present conversations with you, ”says Hayden. “It’s such a great way to remember to be there, to listen to people and to talk. … It shows us that we have to slow down and be present with each other because life is short.

Living in this type of community is also good for older people, giving them purpose and keeping them healthy and active while participating in the various activities offered by New Life Village. It is not a new concept; the United States is just late. For years, Europe has designed similar communities by incorporating assisted living facilities with college students, bringing in the elderly to daycare centers, etc.

To better understand the need, consider these statistics listed on the New Life Village website:

  • Florida is 3rd in the United States, behind California and Texas with 22,781 foster children;
  • Hillsborough County is # 1 and Pinellas County # 2 in Florida for the number of children in foster care;
  • Since January 2020:
    – 2,366 children were in foster care in Hillsborough County
    – 2,484 children were in foster care in Pinellas and Pasco counties

By going to the Take Action tab on the New Life Village website, you can help them take it one step closer to the end of their construction campaign or make a donation. For example, $ 25 per month allows a senior to participate in their on-site wellness program year-round, allowing them to choose from weekly yoga classes, tai chi classes, trips to the theater, etc.

Being a part of this community has given Hayden the chance to watch these children grow, grow stronger, heal, and gain confidence in who they are.

“From a holistic perspective, it’s just great because it provides a holistic healing context for the elderly and families of children,” says Hayden.

It’s a beautiful blend of culture and perspectives that come with time and age, together in one safe place. In a house.

For more information, see their website, Facebook page, and watch their story on CBN.


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Non profit living

Oregon nonprofit looking to hire staff for home support for people with disabilities


PORTLAND, Ore. (KTVZ) – Advocates for Life Skills & Opportunity (ALSO), a non-profit organization committed to supporting people living with intellectual and developmental disabilities, is looking for several direct support professionals who will support people disabilities and will help them achieve independence and person-centered lifestyle choices.

These positions at ALSO, which is consistently rated by current employees as a preferred place to work, do not require any prior healthcare experience, and the organization will provide all the necessary training.

“Our mission is to stand up for people with disabilities and promote their full inclusion in the life of their community,” said Brett Turner, CEO of ALSO. “As COVID-19 restrictions and economic issues hamper the ability of some employers to hire, ALSO is confidently launching our “The work of the heart is my work” campaign to recruit candidates deeply committed to a profession centered on love and care.

The Direct Support Pro position assists people with a multitude of home care needs, provides accompaniment on social outings and appointments, helps with medication and performs other critical support tasks. The position is eligible for signing and retention bonuses and potentially eligible for the Public Student Loan forgiveness program. ALSO provides a robust benefits package, including medical, dental, vision, LTD checks, life insurance, sick leave, PTO and 401 (k) plan with match up to ‘at 4% (for full-time employees).

Interested candidates can apply directly on the ALSO website: heartworkoregon.com

“I don’t think there’s a more rewarding job with a more people-focused organization statewide than a direct support pro at ALSO,” says Ben McClure, chief engineering officer. systems at OCHIN and chairman of the board of ALSO. “It’s a demanding job, but one that comes with tremendous personal and professional rewards. In short, it is really for people who want to work from the heart.

About ALSO

ALSO is a non-profit organization committed to providing the best residential, employment and assisted living services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. ALSO promotes full community inclusion, creativity, independence and employment opportunities. Our main goal is to ensure that our customers live the life of their choice. ALSO serves people all over Oregon from its Metro Portland, Bend and Klamath Falls locations. For more information, visit alsoweb.org.


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Non profit living

Nonprofit grants propel prosecutor against racial injustice


PHILADELPHIA (AP) – When Deborah Gonzalez took office in January as prosecutor for the Western Judicial District of Georgia, she noticed that too few defendants, especially black defendants, were eligible for a program that promised treatment for drug addiction or mental health, not jail.

Like many court diversion programs elsewhere, potential participants in the Athens-Clarke and Oconee counties programs were disqualified for certain prior charges or contact with police. People living in poverty also struggled to qualify due to the weekly program fees.

“My philosophy is that there is racial injustice and disparities in the way people are treated in this system. And we have to be intentional in the way we approach it, ”Gonzalez said.

With a grant from a national nonprofit criminal justice advocacy group, Vera Institute of Justice, and a local organization, People Living in Recovery, Gonzalez is redesigning the program to make it more accessible.

Many of the changes adopted by states after the death of George Floyd have focused on police tactics and not on racial disparities in the criminal justice system. Nationally, bipartisan congressional talks on overhaul of policing practices ended without a dealnegotiators on both sides said last week, despite promises of change from the Biden administration.

And now groups like Vera are targeting suburban communities to push through criminal justice changes without new laws.

Vera awarded 10 prosecutors approximately $ 550,000 to help reduce racial disparities in prosecutions. Prosecutors in Georgia, Virginia, Michigan, Hawaii, Pennsylvania, Missouri, New York and Indiana – most of whom were elected in the past two years on progressive platforms – are reviewing agendas or policies in their offices that disproportionately affect accused of color.

Some prosecutors handle prosecutions for specific crimes or make diversion programs more inclusive. Others are looking for ways to keep minors out of the criminal justice system all together.

“There was a desire to do more right now, to tackle the system that continues to allow this to happen. So we started to wonder if there was anything more we could do with this unique moment to reimagine what a fair system looks like, ”said Jamila Hodge, former director of the Reshaping Prosecution program with Vera.

In Gonzalez district, for example, about 22% of the district’s total population is black. Of the more than 6,800 people indicted in 2019 and 2020, the majority were blacks. Fewer than 150 people were referred to the trial preparation program, and most came from a county that is only 5% black.

She hopes to double participation in her program by 2022 and will put in place controls to monitor as diversity increases.

Vera will provide assistance for 12 months. The hope is to reduce by 20% the disproportionate number of black and brown people prosecuted and imprisoned in the pilot areas. The grants require prosecutors to partner with local community organizations.

In Washtenaw County, Michigan, where Ann Arbor is located and just west of Detroit, prosecutor Eli Savit is working with a group called My Brothers Keeper to divert colored youth accused of non-violent crimes to a program. intensive mentoring. Savit, who took office in January, said he wanted to focus on interventions that occur with children who act or commit minor crimes.

“What we’re trying to do is come in early without the intervention of the criminal justice system, without creating a case that can hold them back. It can have this cascading effect on their lives. Job applications ask if you’ve ever been charged, not if you’ve been convicted, ”Savit said.

In Chatham County, Georgia, where Savannah is in the northeastern state, Deputy Chief Prosecutor Michael Edwards said an analysis of black men and boys in the criminal justice system revealed that they constituted a disproportionate number of people accused of possession of firearms.

The office, in partnership with Savannah Feed the Hungry, has developed a program called Show Us Your Guns that focuses on people between the ages of 16 and 25 who are in possession of a gun while interacting with police. . Until these young men have used these weapons to commit a crime, they are eligible for the program instead of being arrested or jailed. This requires that they return the weapon in exchange for their participation.

“We do this, knowing that guns are a third rail in conversations in the community. But we know it’s an important way to impact public safety and the lives of these minors and young men, ”said Edwards.

Edwards said the program will be tailored to individuals, seeking needs such as job training, education, mental health and addiction treatment and even partnering with the local YMCA so young men can take care of it. of themselves physically.

“Too often lawsuits are case-based, but we want it to be cause-based – looking at the underlying causes,” Edwards said.

For Shane Sims, the thought of prosecutors in all of these places making plans to consider everyone in front of them, and not just the crime they committed, gives him immense joy. Sims is the executive director of People Living in Recovery, which is working with Gonzalez in Athens, Georgia, to redesign its mental health and addiction diversion program.

He was sentenced to life over 15 years for his role as an accomplice in a theft which resulted in the death of a store clerk. He was 18 and it seemed like no one thought who he was or how he got there – that his parents were addicted to crack and that he was taking care of his younger brother on his own from a young age.

When he got out, after three guards demanded his release, he started working in the community.

“What we’re doing together is realizing that drug addiction is at the heart of so many people who enter the criminal justice system. Historically, minorities have the least consideration in deciding how to handle this, ”Sims said.


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Non profit living

Seiler promotes the benefits of living in the great outdoors | State and region


Melanie Seiler’s life is very much about wellness.

Having a little fun doesn’t hurt either.

In uncertain times like the Covid-19 pandemic, many have pointed out that being outdoors is one of the best remedies for fighting the spread of the disease.

“The Covid-19 pandemic was very difficult to navigate, but an extremely important time to continue health education campaigns and creative ways to keep people active,” said Seiler, Executive Director of Active Southern West Virginia. “We relaunched the organization in 2021 to bring the programs back in person.”

Although her mother Susie Hofstetter’s family is from Ohiopyle, Pa., And her father Bob Seiler’s family is from the Cumberland, Md. Area, Seiler grew up in Fayetteville. It allowed him to appreciate – and understand – how much outdoor fun can be discovered in southern West Virginia.

Prior to his affiliation with Active SWV, Seiler worked for Adventures on the Gorge following the merger of the family rafting business, Songer Whitewater with AOTG in 2011. At Songer, Seiler was responsible for the river for several years and responsible for the river. vacation cabin, and she also spent a lot of time dealing with accounts receivable and human resources.

She has also been a certified ski instructor for 20 years and a member of the National Ski Patrol for 10 years.

“Growing up in the outdoor industry made me feel like everyone had the opportunity to raft and paddle white water or meet friends on bike trails and rock climbing routes. She said. “What motivates me is to later realize the lack of access and interest in outdoor recreation on the part of my peers and my generation.

“I want to express and share opportunities to experience the benefits of being active in the outdoors. “

Her days at Active SWV currently include “a lot of paperwork to keep track of funding requests and reports,” she says. “I really try to provide my people with all the tools and resources they need to do a great job.

“I spend a lot of hours on my computer, but I love going out and talking to groups about our work and free events,” she said.

Active SWV has made huge strides in recent years, Seiler believes.

“Active SWV was formed in late 2014 with a non-profit status, then I was hired as a sole employee in February 2015,” she said. “We quickly acquired a member of the AmeriCorps VISTA service and took to the streets recruiting volunteers to run programs.

“The first two years were tough structuring each program area and building a brand, but it paid off and in 2016 we entered into a cooperative agreement with the New River Gorge National River (today the New River Gorge National Park and Preserve), many county parks and had a handful of children’s clubs in elementary schools in the area. In 2019, we had the highest number of volunteers with over 200 people across our four program areas: Community Captains, Kids’ Running Clubs, Workplace Wellness, and SWV Bike / Walk.

“I am very proud of the trusted partnerships, of the people who have improved their lives through the activity and of the staff who remain cohesive and dynamic,” she added.

As the battle continues to urge children – and adults for that matter – to stay active and not focus too much on computer or phone screens and adopt a more sedentary lifestyle, Seiler says that ‘Active SWV has made progress.

“Active SWV is seeing progress in youth through our Kids Run Club grant program. Surveys before and after show that children achieve the recommended amount of daily physical activity, have less screen time, and 75 percent report being able to get someone home more active with them.

“The progress we are seeing in the region is more collective resources from agencies, organizations and the faith community to reach underserved families and individuals. One collaboration being Adventure Fayette County providing substance abuse prevention and the Icelandic youth model combining survey data with programming solutions. It means finding populations at risk, understanding their challenges in accessing healthier choices, and creating programs with a strong group of volunteers and mentors.

“Throughout the pandemic, Active SWV continued to work with companies as members of the Active SWV Workplace Wellness program. We spend many hours of the day at work or on our computers working remotely. Implementing changes to policies, systems, and the environment to make healthy choice an easy choice has shown results in employee morale, productivity, and increased buy-in to other investments in well-being at work.

Each year, Active SWV – in partnership with WV Health Promotion and Chronic Disease – awards a series of workplace wellness capacity building grants to businesses across the state. This year, they searched for 20 workplaces, each of which will receive $ 1,000. The mission of these grants is to increase access to healthy foods, physical activity and other supports to improve employee well-being. The application period is closed and the winners will be announced on October 1.

The agency created the Kids Run Club program in 2015 with a pilot club, and the program has since grown to reach more than 30 schools and community groups across West Virginia, Seiler said.

“With our comprehensive Kids Run Club manual providing structure to all clubs, trained volunteers lead groups of children through the activities described in the manual,” she explained. “Through these activities, children acquire lifelong skills and strengthen their confidence in their physical activity abilities.

“The goal of the Kids Run Club program is for children to have fun with physical activity and have a positive team experience. It is important to Active SWV that the program is offered free of charge so that all children have the opportunity to participate.

To apply, go to https://activeswv.org/2021/07/fall-kids-run-club-mini-grant-is-now-open/.

Active SWV also sponsors an adult / family / multigenerational program known as the Community Captain program. This is a volunteer-led activity that usually meets once a week. Weekly programs in locations such as Summersville, Fayetteville, Oak Hill, Beckley and Williamson focus on running / walking, Pilates, youth disc golf, Refit, yoga, stand-up paddleboarding and paddling. cycling / walking.

For example, a Wednesday run group from Fayetteville that Seiler and his friends participate in will meet as a three-year free run group in December.

“We started the winter of 2018 thinking that we would come together every Wednesday in December to get through the dark days of winter,” she said. “So we started to meet at 6:15 pm when everyone got out of work and ran down the sidewalks of Fayetteville with the street lights and headlamps.

“Well, the group decided to continue meeting in January, then February, and so on. Every three months or so, we move to a different location and usually end up in a restaurant to eat together. Many people have joined the group over the years and we continue to welcome new people.

“Group responsibility helps keep people and myself,” Seiler said. “You know that your running friends are waiting for you and making the activity more fun in good company.

“Even when it rains and snows, we dress appropriately and go out anyway. Physical activity is good for the body and the mind, and the social connection is good for the mind.

To learn more about the Community Captains program, visit https://activeswv.org/community-captains/.

SWV’s active staff and volunteers have “made a difference in the lives of individuals and improved the health culture in Southern West Virginia,” said Seiler. “This was accomplished by normalizing beginner activities like walking and hiking, and having easy ways to volunteer increased the ways to be active.

“These efforts have been well received and volunteers find that their friends, family, neighbors and coworkers are helping each other remove barriers to an active lifestyle such as transportation, skills, equipment, child care. children and fear of injury. This work is even more important during the pandemic to help people stay healthy and active. “

Seiler, of Fayetteville, is married to Travis Hames and has daughters-in-law Kalila and Delaney.

His favorite outdoor hobbies are telemark, a skiing technique that combines elements of alpine and Nordic skiing; paddleboarding and surfing.

Her hobbies and interests also include raising chickens and adventures with her bird dog.

E-mail: [email protected] or follow us on Twitter @gb_scribe


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Non profit living

Anonymous reader pays Saint-Dominique cancer patient’s debt


Linda Burks owed more than $ 4,000 for her breast cancer treatment at St. Dominic, a not-for-profit church hospital in Jackson who hired a debt collector to sue her. Burks works as a full-time receptionist with Medicare who has started taking extra janitorial shifts to pay his bills.

After a series of investigations which the Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting product, and the Mississippi Free Press republished in its entirety, a woman who read the series took action. Earlier this month, she hooked up with Burks and paid off her medical debt.

“We’re supposed to help each other, aren’t we? Wrote the reader, who wished to remain anonymous. “People helped me when I needed it.”

After receiving treatment for her breast cancer at St. Dominic’s Hospital, Linda Burks had thousands of medical debts, which the hospital sent to collections. Photo by Sarah Warnock

However, St. Dominic Hospital did not change its policies in response to the report.

Burks’ story was part of an investigation into the aggressive debt collection policies of St. Dominic and its debt collectors. Reports revealed that the hospital was billing thousands of Mississippians when these patients should have qualified for free or reduced medical care; inflated patient bills by a third or more with attorney fees, court costs and interest rates by 8%; the wages of the seized patients; money seized from patients’ bank accounts; and sued thousands of patients, many of whom work in low-wage industries like fast food and retail.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the the federal government has given the hospital millions of dollars in pandemic relief funds, but St. Dominic continued to sue patients and even their employees, as the hospital sued over a hundred staff for medical debts.

Burks: “What am I doing? “

Linda Burks was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2016 and received treatment at St. Dominic. She faithfully paid her bill for over a year when she said she noticed Saint-Dominique was no longer automatically withdrawing from her account.

Burks said she proactively contacted St. Dominic, but was told it was too late – her invoice was sent to the collections. Smith, Rouchon & Associates, a Jackson-based collection agency, started calling him, demanding more money from Burks. The debt collector sued her, adding more than $ 1,500 to her bill for legal fees.

Relief sculpture of Saint Francis of Assisi kneeling before an angel
Saint Francis of Assisi (photo) inspired the religious order which now sponsors Saint Dominic Hospital. Photo by Fr. Daniel Ciucci on Unsplash

St. Dominic has annual operating expenses of around half a billion dollars and pays virtually no tax due to its nonprofit status. Experts say suing patients for medical debts is only a tiny fraction of a hospital’s income, but the effects can be devastating for patients. For Burks, this meant she was reluctant to return to St. Dominic for treatment because she feared she would be sued again.

“I’m a cashless receptionist, living from paycheck to paycheck,” Burks wrote to a judge in 2018. “… I want to live, and these tests play a big role for me in whether I stay cancer-free. … What should I do. to do?”

Follow the example of the founder?

In 2019, the Dominican Sisters for St. Dominic’s Health Services sponsorship transferred from St. Dominic Hospital to the Health system of the Franciscan Missionaries of Notre-Dame, whose inspiration, St. Francis of Assisi, was a man born into a wealthy family who gave up his wealth and begged with the poor.

“Let us therefore have charity and humility and give alms because they wash souls from the stain of sins”, François wrote in the 13th century. “For men lose all that they leave in this world; however, they carry with them the reward of charity and alms which they have given, for which they will receive a reward and remuneration worthy of the Lord.

When contacted this week, a spokesperson for the Franciscan Missionaries of Notre Dame, the Louisiana-based health system that owns St. Dominic, reiterated that the hospital no longer directly pursues patients – a policy that took place in July.

“We always want to be compassionate and improve the experience for our patients,” spokesperson Ryan Cross said in an email.

But St. Dominic rarely sued patients directly, relying instead on two local collection agencies to handle the vast majority of medical debt collection lawsuits. The hospital still allows its debt collectors to sue patients, garnish their wages, damage their credit and bankrupt them.

The Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting produced the series. Email reporter Giacomo Bologna To [email protected]. Read Giacomo Bologna’s full series on medical billing in Mississippi:

Part 1: Investigation: St. Dominic’s nonprofit hospital routinely sued patients who could not afford care

Part 2: “It broke my heart”: the tactics of the Saint-Dominique debt collectors cause lasting damage

Part 3: Medical debt lawsuits hurt low-income Mississippians; Here are expert solutions


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Non profit living

Many obstacles for families with dietary challenges | News, Sports, Jobs


WASHINGTON – Many Americans who have struggled to feed their families in the past pandemic year say they have struggled to find how to get help and have struggled to find healthy foods they can afford.

An Impact Genome and Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll finds 23% of Americans say they haven’t been able to get enough to eat or the types of foods they eat. they want. Most people with food issues signed up for a government or nonprofit food aid program in the past year, but 58% still had difficulty accessing at least one service.

And 21% of adults who have difficulty meeting their food needs have not been able to access any assistance. The most common challenge for those in need was a fundamental lack of knowledge about eligibility for government and nonprofit services.

Survey results paint a big picture of a country where hundreds of thousands of households suddenly found themselves food insecure due to the economic disruption of the COVID-19 pandemic

They often found themselves navigating the intimidating bureaucracy of government assistance programs and with limited knowledge of local food banks or other charitable options available.

Black and Hispanic Americans, Americans living below the federal poverty line and young adults are especially likely to face eating problems, according to the survey.

Americans who struggle to afford food also feel less confident than others about their ability to afford healthy foods. Only 27% say they are “very” Where “extremely” confident, compared to 87% of those who do not face dietary challenges.

For housewife Acacia Barraza in Los Lunas, a rural town outside of Albuquerque, New Mexico, the challenge has been finding a steady supply of fresh fruits and vegetables for her 2-year-old son while respecting the family budget.

Barraza, 34, quit her job as a waitress before the pandemic when her son was born. She considered returning to work, but intermittent childcare shortages as the pandemic set in made that impossible, she said. The family lives off her husband’s salary as a mechanic while receiving help from SNAP, the government program commonly known as food stamps.

Despite government help, Barraza said she still scrambles to find affordable sources of fresh vegetables, actively browsing local markets for bargains such as a bag of fresh spinach for $ 2.99. .

“If we don’t always have vegetables, he won’t want to eat them in the future. And then I am worried that he will not get enough vitamins from vegetables in the future or now for his growing body. So it’s really hard. It’s just really hard. she said.

Even those who haven’t lost income during the pandemic find themselves stretching their food dollars at the end of the month. Trelecia Mornes of Fort Worth, Texas works as a customer service representative over the phone, so she was able to work from home without interruption.

She earns too much money to qualify for SNAP, but not enough to easily feed the family.

She decided to take distance education with her three children at home over fears about COVID-19 outbreaks in schools, which took school lunches out of the equation. Her job responsibilities prevent her from picking up free lunches offered by the school district. She takes care of her disabled brother, who lives with them and receives SNAP benefits. But Mornes said that $ 284 a month “Lasts about a week and a half. “

They try to eat healthy, but budgetary considerations sometimes lead them to prioritize cost and longevity with “canned soups, maybe noodles – things that last and aren’t that expensive”, she said.

Radha Muthiah, president of the Capital Area Food Bank in Washington, said the difficulties reflected in the survey are evidence of a new phenomenon brought by the pandemic: families with no experience of food insecurity are suddenly in need, without knowledge of charitable options or experience in navigating government assistance programs.

“It’s all new to them” she said. “Many people and families, especially those experiencing food insecurity for the first time, don’t know all of their options. “

Many are reluctant to engage directly in government programs such as SNAP and WIC – the government’s parallel food aid program that helps mothers and children. Muthiah said reluctance often stems either from frustration with paperwork or, among immigrant communities, from fear of endangering their immigration status or green card applications.

The survey shows that overall, about 1 in 8 Americans regularly get their supplies from convenience stores, which typically offer less nutritious foods at higher prices. This experience is more common among Americans with dietary issues, with about 1 in 5 frequenting convenience stores.

Reliance on convenience stores is a particularly troubling dynamic, Muthiah said, as the options there are both more expensive and generally less nutritious. Part of the problem is just habit, but a much bigger problem is the lack of proper groceries in “Food deserts” that exist in the poorest neighborhoods of many cities.

“Sometimes they’re the only quick and efficient option for many people to get food,” she said. “But they don’t get the full range of what they need in a convenience store and that has a lot of negative health effects.”

The survey shows that half of Americans with dietary challenges say extra money to pay for food or bills is needed to meet their dietary needs.

Fewer consider reliable transportation or enough free food for a few days, such as in emergency food parcels, or free prepared meals at a soup kitchen or school as necessary resources to meet their food needs, although the majority states that this would be helpful.

Gerald Ortiz of Espaeola, New Mexico, bought a 2019 Chevrolet pickup truck before the pandemic, then lost the office job he had for 20 years. Now he’s scrambling to make the monthly payment of $ 600 and gets by with charity and just eating less. His unemployment benefits ended this month.

“I make sure that the payment for my truck is made” Ortiz said, as he sat in a line of around 30 cars waiting to collect food from a charity, Barrios Unidos, near Chimay. “After that, I, I just eat once a day” he said, pointing to her stomach. “That’s why you see me, I’m so thin now.”

He applies for several jobs and survives on charity and all the produce he can grow in his garden – peppers, onions, cucumbers and watermelons.

“It was depressing. It’s been, like, stressful and I have anxiety. he said. “Like, I can’t wait to find a job. I don’t care what it is right now.

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Non profit living

Powell meets a changing economy: fewer workers, higher prices


WASHINGTON – Restaurant owners and hoteliers are struggling to fill jobs. Delays in the supply chain drive up prices for small businesses. Unemployed Americans unable to find work even with record high job vacancies.

These and other disruptions to the U.S. economy – the aftermath of the viral pandemic that erupted 18 months ago – appear likely to last, a group of nonprofit business owners and executives said on Friday. to Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell.

The business challenges, outlined during a “Fed Listens” virtual panel discussion, highlight the ways the COVID-19 epidemic and its delta variant continue to transform the U.S. economy. Some event attendees said their business plans are still evolving. Others have complained of sluggish sales and fluctuating fortunes after the pandemic eased this summer, then escalated over the past two months.

A d

“We are living in truly unique times,” said Powell at the end of the discussion. “I’ve never seen these kinds of supply chain issues, I’ve never seen an economy that combines drastic labor shortages with a lot of unemployed … So it’s an economy that evolving very quickly, it will be very different from the one (before).

The Fed chairman asked Cheetie Kumar, a restaurant owner in Raleigh, North Carolina, why she is having such a hard time finding workers. Powell’s question goes to the heart of the Fed’s mandate to maximize employment, as many people who worked before the pandemic have lost their jobs and are no longer looking for them. When – or if – these people resume their job search will help determine when the Fed can conclude that the economy has reached the peak of jobs.

Kumar told Powell that many of his former employees have decided to quit the restaurant industry for good.

A d

“I think a lot of people wanted to change their lives, and we lost a lot of people in different industries,” she said. “I think half of our people have decided to go back to school.”

Kumar said her restaurant now pays a minimum of $ 18 an hour, and she added that higher wages are likely a long-term change for the restaurant industry.

“We can’t get by and pay people $ 13 an hour and expect them to stay with us for years and years,” Kumar said. “It just won’t happen.”

Loren Nalewanski, vice president of Marriott Select Brands, said his business was losing out to similar challenges as many former employees, especially housekeepers, left for other jobs that recently raised wages. Even the recent cut to a federal unemployment supplement of $ 300 per week, he said, has not led to an increase in the number of job seekers.

A d

“People have left the industry and unfortunately they are finding other things to do,” Nalewanski said. “Other industries that may not have paid that much … are (now) paying a lot more.”

Jill Rizika, president of Towards Employment, a non-profit workforce development organization in Cleveland, said she sees the stark disconnect every day between companies posting millions of job vacancies. and those struggling to find work and escape poverty. About 60% of the people her organization helps find jobs have criminal records, she said, and 65% have only high school diplomas. Many parents, especially mothers, are still unable to return to full-time work.

“They tried to work but because of the epidemics, the children are being sent home from daycare or school, which makes their schedules unmanageable,” said Rizika. “Where the digital divide comes in: a young mother tried remote working but didn’t have enough broadband to make it work.

A d

Small businesses are also grappling with rising costs, with little relief in sight, some participants said. The Fed has accelerated its plans to start withdrawing its low interest rate policies, in part because of concerns about rising inflation.

Larry Andrews, chairman of Massachusetts Growth Capital, a state agency that supports small businesses, said that during a recent tour of the state, a cafe owner told him that the price of a case of eggs had skyrocketed since the pandemic. Another restaurant owner said a jug of cooking oil went from $ 17 to $ 50 – “if you can get it.”

“The speed and intensity of this slowdown – and the speed of the recovery in many areas – is unprecedented in modern times,” said Powell in prepared remarks at the start of the event. “The business plans have been reworked, the outlook has been revised and the future continues to be tainted with uncertainties.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


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Non profit living

Expanded Child Tax Credit Means My Son Will Have More Options Than Me – Press and Guide


I remember finding out that I was about to become a mother. I felt fear take hold of me. My brain stopped. I remember crying, but I had no tears. I remember trying to run, but couldn’t move.

No one had prepared me for motherhood – my own mother abandoned me when I was not even 2 years old. The father of my child was violently abusive. My life was unstable and I was afraid that another human being would depend on me.

Things are so much better now. My son, Caleb, is entering kindergarten and he is the light of my life. We’ve been through so much together, but we’re doing it.

One thing that helps more than words can express is the expanded new child tax credit. Adopted as part of the Biden administration’s COVID-19 relief program, it puts money in our bank account – and the bank accounts of almost every parent in this country.

This credit is on track to lift half of all children living in poverty, including mine. This will help them lead safer and happier lives into adulthood.

My own early childhood was filled with trauma.

After our mother left us, my father had to take care of all of us children. He did his best, but he didn’t know how to access social services for us. When he got sick, we lost everything. We ended up living in a tent “village” under a bridge, where I had to cook for 50 people for the next seven years.

I was just a child.

I was afraid of people in the streets, of students at school, even of being with others where I lived. When I took action and skipped school, I was put in juvenile detention for truancy. The years that followed saw cycle after cycle of abuse, instability and trauma.

But eventually I found help. When I was 18 and on the run, I found a job at a homeless shelter called Covenant House and moved in. They helped me get ID and taught me about social services and how to get them.

I didn’t know there was help available for someone like me. I became a team leader there and my life began to change. Now I’m an advocate for a nonprofit called RESULTS, which trains and helps people fight for policies that help families like mine survive and thrive.

Along the way, I learned something really important: Many of us who grew up in abusive situations just don’t have access to mental health services, so we end up in abusive relationships. adulthood. And many others who experience the trauma of poverty simply don’t know how to get help.

Before the COVID-19 relief program, I would never have been able to access the child tax credit – I was just too poor. And complex paperwork and bureaucratic requirements also put other help out of reach.

But now families like mine, and all other families with children, are receiving life-changing assistance right in their bank accounts. I can’t tell you how much of a difference it makes.

Thanks to the Child Tax Credit, Caleb will not suffer the tremendous trauma I suffered as a child. His life will be better. He will have the love and economic support he needs to thrive.

We are the richest nation in the world, but too often we have abandoned our poorest children, like my mother abandoned me. But if we have the political will, we can make smarter economic choices like these to give all children a safe and secure childhood.

Not only will Caleb prosper, but we in society as a whole will.

La’Shon Marshall lives in the Detroit metro area and is a poverty advocate with the RESULTS Educational Fund. This editorial was distributed by OtherWords.org.


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Non profit living

Haitian group in Houston seeks to help refugees coming from the border – Houston Public Media


Migrants, many from Haiti, wait to board a bus to Houston at a humanitarian center after being released from the United States Border Patrol after crossing the Rio Grande and turned into asylum seekers, on Wednesday, September 22, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas.

As the United States orders the deportation of thousands of Haitian migrants crossing Mexico to Texas, a local nonprofit is dealing with those who have already made it to Houston.

Organizers of the nonprofit Houston Haitians United this week called for volunteers to cook and translate Haitian dishes, helping to bridge the linguistic and cultural divide. The organization has looked after relief efforts and recently worked with Mayor Sylvester Turner’s office to organize supplies drives in the wake of the devastating earthquake that rocked Haiti this summer.

HHU is also using its platform to denounce immigration policies aimed at deporting recently arrived Haitians.

“Some people walked two months to come to the United States just to be deported to Haiti and start from scratch,” said James Pierre, president of HHU. “It’s heartbreaking because a lot of money, blood, sweat and tears have been invested in trying to find a better life.”

According to the Houston Chronicle, up to 3,000 additional Haitian refugees are expected to pass through Houston on their way to other destinations in the country. Most or all of those who do will have come from Del Rio, where tens of thousands of migrants were waiting under the international bridge between Del Rio and Mexico.

Florida and northeastern states like New York and New Jersey have historically been stopping places for the Haitian diaspora. There are over 500,000 Haitians living in the United States, nearly half of whom live in Florida.

Pierre is a transplant from Florida who says there are thousands of Haitians in the Houston area alone, and his organization is a way to build a community here.

“When I moved to Houston 18 years ago, it wasn’t around, you know? ” he said. “Haitians have been here since the 1970s. But the reason we created HHU was that they were here, people move here every day.

Buses arrive at a shelter in northwest Houston run by the Mormon Church since Monday evening, with two to three buses of about 65 people each, greeted by HHU volunteers, organizers said.

Rolanda Charles, the group’s secretary, helped coordinate volunteers via social media, posting a call for people who speak Haitian Creole and who can help make large casseroles of comfort food like chicken stew and Diri Kole, Haitian-style rice and beans. plate. Charles also posted the bus arrival times.

“We were there from 6:30 p.m. to almost three in the morning, distributing food, translating, putting people in touch… with their friends and families who are currently in the United States and helping them buy those bus tickets or tickets. ‘plane. to bring them home,’ Charles said.

As of Thursday, the number of Haitian migrants at the Del Rio Bridge had fallen to around 4,000, according to information from the Associated Press. About 1,400 had been returned to Haiti on 13 flights under the pandemic public health authority known as Title 42, while 3,200 others are in U.S. custody and under treatment, several thousand more returning to Mexico, according to the AP.

For those who are allowed to stay in the United States at least for the time being, Charles was hopeful that more organizations would help them along their journey, especially after seeing heartbreaking footage at the border.

“Every person, however they get to the border – whether they stay there or have to go back – must be respected,” Charles said. “They must be treated with respect, dignity and humanity. We are people at the end of the day. We are not animals. We are human beings.

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Non profit living

Where to give Halloween candy


There’s no better time to give back and spread the joy than a holiday – Halloween included! If you are looking to make a positive impact in someone’s life this Halloween, you may want to consider donating candy to those who could use a treat to lift their spirits. Whether you’re planning to give back on your own or looking to instill charitable values ​​in your kids after a treat, read on to learn more about where you can give Halloween candy this spooky season.

United Way

United Way is a non-profit organization whose mission is “to improve lives by mobilizing the benevolent power of communities around the world to advance the common good”. The organization is known for hosting Halloween events for kids and making the holidays a little more special for underserved communities. Visit their website to find your local chapter and learn about Halloween candy donation.

Ronald McDonald House Charities

Ronald McDonald Houses is a non-profit organization that seeks to support families struggling with serious childhood illness. Because these children are unable to go out and make treats, many Ronald McDonald House chapters will accept unopened Halloween candy to share with children with illness and their families. Find your local and ask whether or not they could use candy donations to help spread the Halloween joy.

Operation Gratitude

Operation Gratitude proudly distributes candy to deployed troops, local military units, veterans and first responders. Complete the registration form and pair up with a local military unit, first responder service, or veterans organization. If no match can be found, you can always send your candy to the organization’s Candy Processing Center in Los Angeles.

Operation Shoebox

Operation Shoebox sends thoughtful care packages to troops and is known to include candy, especially during the holidays. Other sugary treats they’ll accept as donations for their treatment packages include individually wrapped granola bars and cookies. Visit their website to learn more about the donation.

Local organizations

Sometimes you don’t have to look far to tell the difference. Call your local pantries, nursing homes, and shelters to see if they would be interested in accepting new unopened Halloween candy. There is something special about giving back to your own community and doing something positive for other members.


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Non profit living

American Dream Center in Tulsa helps families integrate into the United States


The American Dream Center in Tulsa helps families from other countries settle in Oklahoma.

Founder Casey Jones told News On 6 they have helped nearly 100 families this year. Jones grew up in Oklahoma, then began to travel and live abroad.

“I have lived abroad, I have lived in Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Ivory Coast,” Jones said.

Friends helped him adjust to life in other countries. When Jones returned home, he realized that there were people moving to Oklahoma from outside the United States who needed the same help and guidance as overseas. , so he created the American Dream Center.

“We are helping immigrants and refugees adjust to America,” Jones said.

The non-profit organization provides immigration legal services, it helps people find jobs, it even provides a translator who does errands, like going to the DMV a bit easier.

“We walk alongside them and help them navigate the ins and outs of our system,” Jones said.

American Dream Center has already helped 90 families this year and hundreds since the doors opened in 2017, including people like Ariana Wilson, who immigrated to the United States with her triplets from Venezuela.

“This country has opened the door to new life,” Wilson said. “Sometimes God sends angels into your life.”

Wilson thinks these angels are at the Dream Center. She said that before moving to the United States, she was robbed several times at gunpoint, would not have electricity for weeks, and could not regularly access the medications her son took. need. Jones and his team helped Wilson and his family gain Temporary Protected Status.

“We can help inexpensively since we’re a non-profit organization,” Jones said. “These people have left their friends and family, their culture, their language to try something new. We have to accept them, welcome them and help them succeed because if they succeed, we succeed.”

The American Dream Center has said it is ready and willing to help Afghan refugees in the coming months, but has not yet been contacted.

For more information, visit the American Dream Center website here.


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Non profit living

Family stranded in Afghanistan returns home to SoCal – NBC Los Angeles


When the Kashefi family first arrived in Southern California in March 2017, it was because Bashir Kashefi had finally been granted a safe exit, after working for the US government for over a decade.

But a summer trip to visit family went very badly for the Kashefi, who arrived in Afghanistan in June with a return trip scheduled just days before the country fell to the Taliban.

In a video sent to NBC4, Bashir Kashefi said he fears for the lives of his family.

“We have tried to leave Afghanistan more than nine times,” he said. “We went to the airport to catch a plane, but unfortunately because there were too many people, it was difficult to get in.

He says repeated attempts by members of the US government have also proved unsuccessful.

And when the American troops withdrew, he says he almost gave up all hope.

“Coping with life right now in Kabul, Afghanistan… it’s so difficult right now and more difficult than ever,” Kashefi said.

Kashefi served as the basis for an April 2017 NBC4 story about a local nonprofit called Miry’s List. Miry Whitehill started the charity to help refugee families resettle in the United States. The Kashefi family were one of the first families Miry’s List helped find an apartment, furnish it, and put them on track to thrive in the United States.

Bashir Kashefi has become the Miry’s List ambassador – an achievement – of what the association is capable of doing, even appearing in a special Belmont Shores TedX Talk, sharing his story of starting over.

Miry’s List announced its Emergency Action Fund in August 2021, following the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan, which led to donations from Lady Gaga to help resettle refugee families.

So it’s no surprise that Miry’s List stepped in again to help the Kashefi family return home.

A group of volunteers – they call themselves the Hive – ensured that the Kashefi family did not feel the trauma of returning to the United States as they did when they arrived.

“They’re in a life and death situation one way or another,” says Laurel Felt, a Hive volunteer. “World events conspired against them. They didn’t do anything wrong. They brought nothing on themselves.

The Hive raised funds to cover the costs of living the family overseas and to cover bills at home to keep them up to date when they return.

“We really wanted to make sure the rent was paid, the utilities were paid, certainly the cell phone because that was our lifeline for him,” said Shareef Mustafa, Hive volunteer. “We wanted to make sure that their repatriation to the United States was not filled with the same anxiety as when they arrived in 2017.”

And good news arrived on Monday morning – with the Kashefi family sharing photos from Doha, Qatar. They were out of Afghanistan safe and sound.

“Bashir confirmed that they all slept well last night for the first time in a long time,” Felt said.

The family’s return to Southern California and their home in Anaheim, however, is still unclear. It will likely cost additional money and effort from the volunteers, who hope to see Kashefi in the United States soon.


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Non profit living

Diapers and push-ups desperately needed for children living in Village of Hope – Orange County Register


Orange County Rescue Mission is in desperate need of diapers for toddlers and young children living in Village of Hope, a transitional living center for homeless families.

The association is looking for diapers in sizes 5 and 6, as well as diapers and wet wipes for boys and girls 3T-4T.

“We have received generous community donations of newborn and small infant diapers, but the continued need for larger diapers and retractable diapers is often underestimated,” said Jim Palmer, president of the Orange County Rescue Mission.

The increase in homelessness in the wake of the pandemic has contributed to this continued need, the mission said.

Those wishing to donate or organize a diaper drive can drop off their donations at the Village of Hope at 1 Hope Drive, Tustin, 92782. Donations can also be made online and delivered to this address.

For more information, visit rescuemission.org/urgent-baby-needs.

The facility’s donation warehouse is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Sunday.

Upcoming fundraisers

The Orange County Community Foundation is hosting a fundraiser on Wednesday, September 22 for 17 local nonprofits, seeking to raise $ 200,000.

The 24-hour Ignition Potential event will support programs that help Orange County youth.

Participants include Assistance League of Irvine, Child Creativity Lab, Court Appointed Special Advocates, Early Childhood OC, Giving Children Hope, Helping Others Prepare for Eternity, Irvine Public Schools Foundation, Kid Healthy, Kidworks Community Development Corporation, MOMS Orange County, Parentis Foundation , Pretend City – Orange County Children’s Museum, Scholar’s Hope Foundation, Literacy Project, Prentice School, Orange County Youth Center and YMCA.

To donate, go to igniting-potential-giving-day.ocnonprofitcentral.org or bit.ly/2VOfvSz

The Santa Ana Chick-fil-A at 3601 South Bristol St. will contribute 20% of sales from 4 pm to 7 pm Tuesday, September 22 to the non-profit MOMS Orange County if you mention “Spirit Night”.

Donations for MOMS

Eat chicken, help a mom.

The Santa Ana Chick-fil-A at 3601 South Bristol St. will contribute 20% of sales from 4 pm to 7 pm Tuesday, September 22 to the non-profit MOMS Orange County if you mention “Spirit Night”.

MOMS Orange County helps moms caring for newborns and pregnancy health, helping improve birth outcomes, infant health and development.

Body Spa Salons, a concept that leases space to beauty professionals, has opened an 8,000 square foot location at 3333 West Coast Highway in Newport Beach. The company rents spaces to specialists in hair, nails, skin, massage and medical / wellness care such as weight loss services, medical spas, vitamin infusions and acupuncture. (Courtesy of Body Spa Salons)

New spa debuts in NB

Body Spa Salons, a concept that leases space to beauty professionals, has opened an 8,000 square foot space in Newport Beach.

Spa salon at 3333 West Coast Highway rents spaces to professionals specializing in hair, nails, skin, massage, and medical / wellness treatments such as weight loss services, medical spas, herbal teas of vitamins and acupuncture.

The company has 11 sites in California, Nevada and Arizona. For more information, visit bodyspasalons.com.

  • Justine Cromer is the new director of Goodwill at the Tierney Center for Veteran Services in Orange County. She is a retired US Air Force Lieutenant Colonel with 28 years of military service in the Air Force, Air Force Reserves and Air National Guard. (Courtesy of Brocoff Photography)

  • Gynecologist-oncologist Antonio Castaneda has joined Hoag Gynecologic Oncology. He comes to Hoag from the Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University. (Courtesy of Hoag)

  • Paul Fleck, partner at the law firm Atkinson, Andelson Loya, Ruud and Romo, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based non-profit organization. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

  • GK Kannan, vice president of research and development at Grifols, a Los Angeles-based biopharmaceutical company, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

  • Jay Lee, family physician and co-founder of Family Medicine Revolution, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

  • Robert Handy, former police chief and assistant faculty member at Arizona and California universities, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

Moving

Justine Cromer is the new director of Goodwill at the Tierney Center for Veteran Services in Orange County. She is a retired US Air Force Lieutenant Colonel with 28 years of military service in the Air Force, Air Force Reserves and Air National Guard. As Director of the Tierney Center for Veteran Services, Cromer will lead strategic planning, project implementation, collaboration and innovation for the Goodwill program. She started her new role on September 1st.

Gynecologist-oncologist Antonio Castaneda has joined Hoag Gynecologic Oncology. He comes to Hoag from the Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University. Her research and expertise covers a wide range of gynecologic oncology issues, from the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for women with early-stage cervical cancer to the incidence of ovarian metastasis. in small cell neuroendocrine tumors of the cervix.

On board

Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit, has added four new members to its board of directors, including Paul Fleck, Robert Handy, GK Kannan and Dr. Jay Lee.

Fleck is a partner at Atkinson, Andelson Loya, Ruud and Romo, a firm of professional lawyers, with a focus on federal, state and local employment and labor laws.

Handy is a former police chief and was an adjunct faculty member at the universities of Arizona and California.

Kannan is vice president of research and development at Grifols, a global biopharmaceutical company based in Los Angeles.

Lee works in family medicine and co-founded the Family Medicine Revolution, a popular social media brand.

Venture capital financing

Vibrato Medical, a medical device startup in Irvine, closed a $ 4 million Series A funding round led by Newport Beach-based Horowitz Group.

Vibrato also received a $ 1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

The money will support a clinical trial of the company’s non-invasive wearable device designed to treat patients with critical limb ischemia, peripheral artery disease, directly from their homes.

Vibrato’s technology is based on ultrasound research which has shown increased tissue perfusion and vessel growth. The company believes that the approval and commercialization of its device could reduce the costs of the current average annual treatment.

The 10th edition of the Getzlaf Golf Shootout, held on September 11 at the Monarch Beach Golf Links, raised $ 800,000 for CureDuchenne, a non-profit organization focused on finding a cure for muscular dystrophy by Duchenne. Seen here are Ryan Getzlaf, Jeff Frieden of F&F Capital and title sponsor, Zandy Davidson, Ryder Getzlaf and David Bradley.

Good work

The 10th edition of the Getzlaf Golf Shootout, held on September 11 at the Monarch Beach Golf Links, raised $ 800,000 for CureDuchenne, a non-profit organization focused on finding a cure for muscular dystrophy by Duchenne.

The event, hosted by Anaheim Ducks captain Paige and Ryan Getzlaf, included a golf tournament, awards reception and dinner.

Status Update is compiled from press releases from Editor Karen Levin and edited by Editor-in-Chief Samantha Gowen. Send high resolution articles and photos to [email protected] Allow at least a week for publication. Elements are edited for length and clarity.


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Colleges expand mental health services for students


The COVID-19 pandemic has created an increased need for mental health services in colleges as students grapple with the social and economic consequences of closed campuses, online learning, and in some cases, loss of life. illness or death of their loved ones. Now, as most institutions return to more normal in-person operations, they are relying on telehealth mental health services to provide assistance to students, whether on campus or off campus.

“We have seen that many schools are focusing more on their services and making sure that they offer a health and wellness offering such as telehealth and teletherapy,” said Seli Fakorzi, director of health operations. mental health at TimelyMD, a telehealth provider. “Campuses are now wondering if they are offering enough services that offer virtual and in-person support. “

In June 2020, TimelyMD found that 85% of students reported experiencing increased stress and anxiety due to the pandemic and uncertainty about continuing with their education. Another survey from the Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement found that 53% of freshmen reported a substantial increase in mental and emotional exhaustion. Due to the increased need for services, institutions are strengthening their mental health resources for the fall semester. And given the wide range of student needs and living and learning situations – on-campus, off-campus, in-person, remote, hybrid – many institutions are using technology in innovative ways to deliver advisory services. and support to all who seek them.

T. Anne Hawkins, director of the Carruth Center for Counseling and Psychological Services at the University of West Virginia, said she and her team recognize they need to do something “outside the box” for the next semester. fall. So they established a one-year partnership with Talkspace, an online platform and app that connects students with licensed therapists. Students can send text, audio, photo and video messages to their therapist anytime, as well as schedule live video sessions. Hawkins said the partnership is especially helpful for out-of-state students because of telehealth licensing laws. As of the semester started on Aug. 18, 178 students have signed up for the app, Hawkins said.

“We know some of our students haven’t returned and are out of state or elsewhere in the state navigating virtual learning,” Hawkins said. “Our goal is really to increase mental health services to support students and help them manage the events of the pandemic and get back to in-person learning.”

She added that the university has a “large menu” of mental health resources, both in person and virtually. In addition to seeing counselors on campus during office hours, WVU students have 24/7 access to the Crisis Text Line, a mental health service where they can text a trained counselor. live that responds to messages privately. Students can text the counselor, who asks questions, empathizes, and actively listens. ProtoCall is another mental health service that students can call for crisis intervention and stabilization, as well as for referrals for network providers and other resources.

Such programs hold great promise in helping students. Studies have shown that teletherapy can be just as effective as face-to-face therapy in treating post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety, as one researcher said. The New York Times. Even before the pandemic, researchers from the Milbank Memorial Fund, a nonprofit health foundation, drew similar conclusions, also pointing out that behavioral telehealth can cost less than in-person visits and affect more people as well.

“What we’ve seen is that telehealth is essentially as effective as face-to-face psychotherapy – and retention rates are higher,” said David Mohr, director of the Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies at Feinberg. School of Medicine at Northwestern University. the American Psychological Association.

At Belmont University in Tennessee, Katherine Cornelius, director of counseling services, said students were torn between the need for in-person or virtual mental health services. In the first two weeks of classes, the institution saw a 60% increase in the number of counseling appointments compared to 2019, Cornelius said. His office has worked to increase access to mental health for non-traditional students, including graduate students or those in full-time employment.

“Over the past few years, we’ve really focused on improving access to care and reducing barriers,” Cornelius said. “Telehealth has been a huge benefit for this. Students don’t have to go to campus, and we’ve seen that a lot of students are really concerned about their health, so they really feel more comfortable doing virtual tours.

Before the onset of the pandemic, Belmont purchased Therapy Assistance Online, a virtual self-help platform that offers self-guided tools, educational and interactive modules, reviews, and progress tracking tools, to which all students , teachers and Belmont staff have free access. This fall, the school also purchased TimelyCare from Timely MD, which provides free virtual physical and mental health support and is available 24/7 to all students at Belmont, Cornelius said.

“Student life doesn’t end at 4:30 pm when our office is closed. A lot of them are just getting started, ”Cornelius said. “So TimelyCare kind of fills the gap after working hours. “

At the University of Virginia, Nicole Ruzek, director of counseling and psychology services, said students were grappling with issues beyond the pandemic. Many have felt the impact of racial injustice following the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, among others, at the hands of police, as well as the anxiety over the climate crisis and the 2020 presidential election. which divides. She said students seemed to like in-person and virtual counseling, so her department offers hybrid options. In 2018, the university contracted with SilverCloud, a virtual mental health platform that focuses on digital therapy, to give students access to informational videos, mental health quizzes and interactive tools.

In addition, the university signed a contract with TimelyMD “to continue to meet this demand for service,” said Ruzek. The contract allows students to have 24/7 virtual access to individual counseling, psychiatric services and on-demand support with a healthcare professional.

“Some students really appreciate having telehealth as an option. It can be much more convenient if they don’t want to travel, ”said Ruzek. “Having that option to be able to engage with a mental health provider, through a remote service, I think it’s really helpful. Then there are other students who really want to be seen in person.

Cooper Union, a private college in New York where the majority of students commute, has had to develop mental health resources that meet with students while they are on campus and when they are at home, said Chris Chamberlin , dean of students.

“We are small and we are trying to capitalize on our geography and all the resources that are available to us here in New York and in our neighborhood to provide students with significant access to care,” Chamberlin said.

In partnership with TimelyMD, Cooper Union created Cooper Care, an online app and platform that gives students 24/7 access to virtual healthcare providers. Chamberlin said that using Cooper Care with the institution’s own counseling program created “maximum flexibility” for students to meet their needs. He added that students are encouraged during Welcome Week to download and configure the Cooper Care app so that in the event of a crisis, they can immediately access help.

And it’s not difficult to engage students in telehealth resources if campuses standardize their use, said Fakorzi of TimelyMD. 24-hour services like TimelyCare can connect students with help during late hours and early when in-person care is not available in a crisis.

“If the problems boil over at 4 am I think it’s definitely a benefit for campuses to have a backup program to say, ‘Hey, this is also a place you can get help. “” said Fakorzi. “But it also gives the campus the security of knowing the help is there.”

There is always a stigma around helping with mental health, said Cornelius, of Belmont. Some students are concerned about confidentiality, while others come from backgrounds where mental health treatment is not the norm. And there is greater stigma against students struggling with mental health issues other than depression and anxiety, she said, including bipolar disorder and trauma.

Ruzek of the University of Virginia said the shift to more virtual mental health resources has opened up access for students from families or cultural backgrounds who do not typically seek mental health help.

“They don’t even have to come through our doors anymore,” Ruzek said. “They can connect with us electronically and we can put them in touch with the right resource without their parents knowing, if they don’t want their families to know, or even without their peers knowing if they are. are in a private location. “

Chamberlin agreed, saying the switch to telehealth “created access in a way that did not exist before”, when many mental health resources were confined to a certain time and place on campus. .

“More and more students are engaging in our virtual programming, whether it’s seeing a therapist remotely or attending a workshop they normally couldn’t do,” Chamberlin said. “I also think we’ve continued to do a number of things virtually that we could have done in person, because we also know that people learn differently and engage differently.”


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Non profit living

Get addicted to Colorado Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop


Drifters co-owner Beckie Clarke finishes brewing coffee in the downtown New Castle boutique.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

There’s a new buzz to pick up in Old Town New Castle.

Combining the West’s love for trout fishing and potent elixirs, Colorado Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop truly reflects highland culture at its best.

As the great Colorado River rushes a few hundred yards from its back porch, New Castle’s freshest cup of coffee in town offers both a full coffee bar and, yes, an entire fishing section. fly.



“Who doesn’t love coffee and fly fishing, seriously?” Wonders co-owner Kyla Hemelt, 36, standing behind the rustic cafe’s caramel-colored wooden bar adorned with a school of fish to the side. “Or, who doesn’t like coffee in the river?” “

Housed in a high-ceilinged historic monument in the heart of New Castle’s West Main Street, guests can sip locally brewed coffee while sinking into the welcoming furnishings greeting the front door. Palates can enjoy the Bonfire artisan roaster based in Carbondale. Hemelt said Drifters will soon sell two in-house mixes using this primary supplier.



For every bag sold, 3% of the proceeds will go to Fish For Change, a Denver-based nonprofit that promotes international fly fishing programs. Specifically, the funds will help sponsor a member of the Coal Ridge High School Fly Fishing Club.

Drifters co-owner Kyla Hemelt chats with business partner Beckie Clarke in the downtown New Castle boutique.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

Beyond its roasted benefits, Drifters offers so much, like sweet treats, breakfast burritos, and homemade tea, called “Here, Fish, Fish.” Source: Moving Mountains Tea Company in Steamboat Springs.

But uniquely adapting to that ragweed of organic coffee harvested from small farms in the Roaring Fork Valley and high mountain tea is a recreational expertise. Meet 40-year-old co-owner Beckie Clarke, there’s a good chance she’ll serve you a hot cup of Jo before she talks about trout pretty quickly.

Clarke is from Fernie, British Columbia, Canada. There she ran a fly fishing guide outfit for 17 years.

“My heart runs through the waters of these mountains and I know them very intimately,” she said. “Unlike these waters, everything is new and great. It’s just a completely different fishery. It’s pretty epic.

Not surprisingly, Colorado Drifters offers recreational opportunities in harmony with the landscape. Stand-up paddleboard rentals, fly fishing lessons, and qualified fly fishing guides are available for trips along the Colorado River Valley, a world-famous artery that sometimes jumps with 16-inch trout. inches.

Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop in downtown New Castle.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

To catch these behemoths, the next customer is a sip of fresh coffee to check out the vast collection of Colorado Drifters flies backwards.

“We probably have the most flies in the valley,” Clarke said. “We have minimal space there, but we focused on the flies. You should choose two things that you are really good at when starting a business.

Products available at Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop in downtown New Castle.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

While fly fishing can be an expensive habit, Colorado Drifters’ selection is all about modesty. All fly rods are priced from $ 80 to $ 150.

“Everything that we have chosen to go to this store has been specially chosen for our community,” said Clarke. “We definitely want tourists, but we want to support local people and families and make things affordable, because rivers are our passion.”

“We are not fancy,” she added. “We are a family.”

Clarke and Hemelt first met during the height of COVID-19. Hemelt, a mother of two, grew up “living the river life” as a native of Gunnison. She started hanging out with Clarke, a mother of three who was passionate about the subject of trout.

One day, the two new friends noticed that something was missing in the restaurants of Old Town New Castle: a coffee shop.

“There was no cafe and there was no fly shop,” Clarke said.

Drifters in downtown New Castle is a combination of cafe and fly shop.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

After spending many late nights texting each other and ultimately making a business plan, Clarke and Hemelt acquired the storefront and began work on the building in May. By the time they opened the doors, “New Castle arrived,” said the owners.

Now, locals have a place to sip an early morning coffee in the mountains and bask in the Colorado Drifters mantra.

“The river brings everything to life, but it’s also what brought us together,” said Hemelt. “It brings people together.”

A wide variety of flies available at the Drifters Coffee and Fly store in downtown New Castle.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

Journalist Ray K. Erku can be contacted at 612-423-5273 or [email protected]


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Non profit living

San Antonio nonprofit train provides guide dogs for visually impaired Texans


San Antonio – Since 1989, Guide Dogs of Texas, a non-profit guide dog provider, has worked to train and supply guide dogs for the visually impaired in Texas.

This group professionally breeds, trains, and pairs guide dogs with owners statewide. It is a service that brings friendship, freedom and mobility to those who need the help of guide dogs.

Judy St. Clair has been legally blind since 1993, and she has said that only her ability to travel independently with a guide dog has positively impacted her life.

“We trust each other and that’s a factor of trust. With a wand you basically have to know where you’re going, but that’s great because you can still hurt yourself. The dog will see something in advance and protect you, ”said Sainte-Claire.

According to the Guide Dogs of Texas, puppies are placed with volunteer puppy breeders until they are 14 to 16 months old. The San Antonio group said it had been successful in dealing with the future number of guide dogs, even in a pandemic, and needed a “puppy breeder” to support the program.

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Patty McCauley is a puppy breeder who has lived with her dog “nugget” since she was eight weeks old. She said she had played with the idea of ​​volunteering for a while, then decided how much her service would help those in need.

“I just raised a puppy, gave it love, took it out and introduced it to people, the environment and what the average person encounters every day, and I know you give back to someone. ‘a. I think it’s pretty awesome to know that you can help someone on your own, ”said McColly.

According to the group, “No previous experience is required and all training is provided. “

“Puppies are responsible for teaching puppies etiquette and providing them with a social experience for the first year of their life,” a nonprofit said.

Puppies also attend monthly meetings to share ideas and information, work on training techniques, and participate in social gatherings.

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Guide dog instructor Amy Samora said dogs do more than just increase mobility and independence.

“The dog brings a lot of happy faces, and it really encourages people to go to our customers to get involved with them, and it also brings all of this great social relationship.” Said Samora.

Guide dogs are obedient and friendly, but the instructor said it was important not to pet the guide dog. Guide dog owner St. Clair says he will not allow the dog when wearing the harness.

“If I let someone touch her with the harness, she would want to go too far and play. It would be fun, and the general idea of ​​working with a guide dog would be a distraction. But they will continue to focus, ”said St. Clair.

Guide dogs in Texas charge only $ 1 per specially trained dog, but the cost of breeding and training guide dogs can run as high as $ 50,000.

For more information or to register for the program, please visit www.guidedogsoftexas.org, call 210-366-4081 or email @ guidedogsoftexas.org.

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KSAT Details:

San Antonio dog owners share tearful reunion with lab that disappeared 10 years ago

Copyright 2021-KSAT All rights reserved.

San Antonio nonprofit train provides guide dogs for visually impaired Texans

Source Link San Antonio Nonprofit Train Provides Guide Dogs to Visually Impaired Texans


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Non profit living

Fourth Live Update from Stimulus Control: Child Tax Credit Extension to 2025, New Payment in California, Unemployment Benefits …


Securities

AOC announces efforts to expand federal unemployment benefits until February 2022. (Full story)

– New projections on Social Security Cost of living adjustment for 2022 emerge. (Whole story)

President Biden fails to convince Sen Manchin to support the $ 3.5 billion spending bill

Seventeen states have seen increase in unemployment claims Last week. (Whole story)

A new bill to extend federal unemployment benefits until February 2022 emerges on Capitol Hill. (Whole story)

– How do I register a newborn baby for monthly child tax credit payments? (Whole story)

Last week, initial unemployment claims have increased for the first time in recent months. (All the details)

800,000 New Yorkers lost unemployment benefits when federal programs ended. (Whole story)

September Child Tax Credit Payments Sent, when will the money arrive in the banks (More information)

– Fourth federal stimulus check not in the $ 3.5 billion reconciliation invoice (full story)

Some US states send their own stimulus payments (More information)

Overview of the three dunning checks adopted by Congress. (Details)

Useful information / links

California Golden State Stimulus Checks:

California Tax Franchise Board to Send 2 million additional Golden State Stimulus checks Friday September 17th.

– How to Track Your Golden State Stimulus Check

– Who can receive a second Golden State Stimulus check? (Details)

– When can I expect my $ 600 Will Golden State Stimulus in California Happen? (Details)

– What state programs exist for Americans who lost their unemployment benefits? (All the details)

IRS distributes third payment of the child tax credit (Find out how you can unsubscribe from the monthly CTC)

Some of our related press articles:


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Non profit living

Lewisville nonprofit ‘Haitian Pilgrims’ strive to improve living conditions in Haiti – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth


Observing the immigration situation of more than 10,000 Haitian migrants at the Texas border is difficult for a local missionary group.

“They are doing their best with what they have,” said Haitian Pilgrims President Sue Ogle. “They are a wonderful, loving and hardworking people and I really love the people of Haiti.”

Ogle is president of the Lewisville Haitian Pilgrims Missionary Group. It was founded by some members of St. Philip the Apostle Parish in Lewisville in 1999.

Ogle has been traveling for work in Haiti for 20 years.


Haitian pilgrims

“In fact, I lived in Haiti and taught in a school that we built there in 2014, period 2015,” Ogle said.

Ogle saw the struggles in Haiti with his own eyes.

“The situation is extremely desperate,” Ogle said. “Over the years, the economy has declined at a rate of about 2% per year.”

Ogle added: “People are on their feet and the children get up very early in the morning to go to the wells to get water to take away so the family can have water to cook for a day and clean themselves for a while. a day.”



Haitian pilgrims

Ogle said even some organizations trying to help can cause problems.

“Unfortunately, some very large nonprofits send a significant amount of food up for sale, which undermines farmers who cannot sell at the price the larger organization can sell,” Ogle said.

Ogle and Haitian pilgrims strive to improve life in Haiti, especially in rural areas. They have built schools and teach agricultural programs among their other initiatives including health, clean water and leadership.



Haitian pilgrims

Ogle said the situation on the Texas border is just a glimpse of the desperate situation in Haiti and what is fueling their migration.

“Desperation gives them strength,” Ogle said. “They don’t have opportunities in Haiti and of course we are the land of opportunities.”

Haitian pilgrims will continue to share this opportunity to try to make things better in Haiti.

To learn more about the mission of Haitian pilgrims and ways to donate, click here.


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Non profit living

How parents can find their strength and resilience


Parents facing issues such as violence, drug addiction, and food or financial insecurity often feel blamed, humiliated and judged by society. Even well-intentioned initiatives designed to help them focus only on the issues and challenges they face, as if that was their entire story.

But a new group of community parenting programs recognize the multitude of strengths and wisdom inherent in these parents. These programs help parents recognize what they are doing well, trust their own expertise, honor their resilience, and bear witness to the importance of their love for their children.

Three organizations supported by GGSC’s Raising Caring, Courageous Kids initiative have worked to help parents recognize their individual parenting strengths, promote positive bonds with their children, and improve their ability to raise caring and resilient children. Participation in these programs often causes parents, as well as children, to begin to strengthen their sense of purpose in the world and to articulate their goals and dreams for the future.

Resilient parenting at the Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota

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Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota (LSS) works with families to create stability and success in the home. LSS helps parents involved, or at risk of involvement, in the child protection system.

After listening to the concerns and needs of parents, they created the online program “Resilient Parenting” —a blended learning experience with a combination of online units, face-to-face meetings and activities. interactive learning. The program promotes character strengths such as purpose, gratitude, forgiveness, and love. For example, mindfulness activities can involve breathing, yoga, or visualization breaks that parents can try.

Woven into the program were stories voiced by real parents going through similar experiences. Hearing from other parents offered hope and helped participants trust their own parenting decisions. It also helped create what Carol Dweck, professor of psychology at Stanford University, calls a “growth mindset,” in which parents in the program came to believe their basic abilities might be. further developed through hard work and dedication.

Heather Kamia, director of metro youth and family services at LSS, says they created a parenting program that has met parents in their community “where they are.” “We had to start from the assumption that all parents were the experts on their child. That they had ideas and experiences to share, ”she said. “To develop a productive partnership with parents, we also had to recognize [that] systems they may have experienced before have left many without confidence in this ability. “

According to Andrea Hussong, professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, this kind of strength-based partnership was essential. “It is important to work in partnership with parents around the knowledge that already exists and to help them remove the obstacles that prevent them from acting on this knowledge,” she explained.

Making the program virtual allowed parents to learn at their own pace and in a safe space. “Parents talked about feeling respected. They felt that the content could be really valuable to any parent, not just families involved in the system, ”Kamia said. LSS’s culturally relevant programming, which recognizes how systemic racism and lack of access to needs such as child care, wages and essential technology can affect a parent’s confidence in their child’s education , helped parents trust their own wisdom and positioned them to be able to guide their children to do the same.

Inspiring Grace and Resilience at UCAN

Chicago’s nonprofit UCAN strives to build strong youth and families through education and empowerment. They developed the “Inspiring Grace” program for young parents between the ages of 18 and 20 living in Chicago neighborhoods with high levels of violence, family and community trauma, and a lack of resources, including education and training. employment.

Once a week for six weeks, parents participated in dinner, discussions and activities focused on building resilience and improving parenting skills. Activities included planting seeds to represent forgiveness, marking the stones with aspects of their life they wanted to keep or let go, mindfulness through guided pictures, practicing benevolence by speaking into a mirror, and (most popular activity) creating vision boards. Parents wrote down their thoughts on their life purpose and who they wanted to become and wrote those thoughts on decorative vision boards that they presented to the group.

One vision was “to buy one of the abandoned buildings in the neighborhood for my son so that he always had a place to live”, another “to teach my children what love is”.

The creation of the vision boards made it possible for parents to see themselves in a better light and envision their possible inheritances, and even led to increased happiness. “These exercises led to aha times, in which parents could say, ‘Yes, I do. Yes, I have a sense of purpose. Yes, I help people. Yes, I show love! Said Karrie Mills, co-host of the program.

Velma McBride Murry, Professor of Human and Organizational Development at Vanderbilt University and Scientific Advisor at UCAN, says for these parents, “The consequences of negative childhood experiences are long-standing and the effects can be passed on from generation to generation, with which parents interact and raise their own children. She explained that the program was designed to disrupt the ripple effects of trauma on families through love, forgiveness and purpose.

Mills says it was essential to ensure that any trauma experienced by these parents did not obscure their ability to recognize their parental potential. They were encouraged to recognize the things they did regularly that helped others and showed their ability to love.

Murry says living in a home where parents are supportive and loving creates a sense of self-worth, self-acceptance and self-esteem in children. Having this internal trust can serve as a protective factor for children, reducing their dependence on their peers as a source of validation. She adds that these protection processes are essential when young people live in communities with an increased likelihood of exposure to violence.

Citywise: mentoring and more

Citywise specializes in individual, school and community mentoring programs for 8-12 year olds living in low income urban areas of the UK. Their goal is to develop character strengths in young people, including resilience, self-control, good judgment and fairness.

To be more successful with children, program officials also recognized the importance of involving parents. To help determine what services to offer parents, “they started out by listening, hearing what people are looking for, what they are trying to accomplish with their own parenthood,” according to Hussong.

The program has evolved over time to include parents who attend and participate in mentoring sessions, receive regular communications about the child’s mentoring experiences, and get tips and suggestions for activities that families could do. together.

Hana Bútorová, Director of Citywise Glasgow, says: “Most of the time the parents of the children we worked with were only contacted if something was wrong or something was going on that was difficult. So, we just started contacting them frequently with the right stuff, with quotes from mentors telling us how awesome the kid is today… inviting parents to celebrate their kid’s progress.

Perhaps more importantly, they created informal ways for families to interact, such as “Family Fun Days” and family game and craft clubs. These interactions allowed parents and guardians to reflect on key areas of the program such as self-control and identifying emotions, things they may not have learned when they were younger. “I think that was the biggest advantage of the program: just creating a space for them to start talking more explicitly [those] things, ”Bútorová adds.

Participation in family activities has allowed the character growth of children (and sometimes adults!) To occur naturally. For example, board games allowed parents and children to discuss concepts such as taking turns, the need for patience and honesty. Citywise research found that children who participated in family activities achieved the highest level of character building.

It was especially meaningful for some parents to hear from counselors that their children wanted to participate because they had loving and engaged parents (not just because of games or snacks). When a parent had “realized his value as a parent to his child … it made him feel like his love was doing something important here,” Bútorová said. For parents living difficult lives, this recognition offered a renewed sense of purpose.

Courses for parents

For all parents, these community programs offer many lessons. An important concept they encourage is to reject the idea of ​​having to be “the perfect parent” before trying to raise children in any meaningful way. What parent has not felt this pressure? But the perfect parent does not exist! Children learn resilience when they have the opportunity to watch their parents make mistakes and bounce back.

Realizing that there are no perfect parents means that we are all “work in progress”. As these organizations demonstrate, being an active “work in progress” benefits children. Modeling self-reflection, discovering and leveraging inner parenting strengths, and working alongside children to develop character strengths together can be a rewarding and fulfilling family experience.

Another important lesson is not to be afraid to ask for and accept help from those around you. It is an act of courage, not weakness. When parents have a supportive community and opportunities to discover their strengths, they can better develop a nurturing environment for their children.

Hussong says experts are learning there is no big secret to parenthood; parents may need a variety of tools and habits to establish an environment that is most supportive of their children’s unique needs. “It’s not just the modeling or the communication you use or just the types of activities and things you do with your child, or how you respond to them when they are having difficulty or when they are successful. to demonstrate a positive character and virtues, ”she said. “It’s all of those things.”


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Afghans are likely to find Georgia a more welcoming place than former refugees


Heval Mohamed Kelli, 11, believed his family were going on vacation after crossing the Syrian border into Turkey in 1996, when his father paid smugglers to take them to safety in Germany.

He was unaware at the time of the political persecutions his father, a lawyer, was facing in Syria or how life was going to change drastically as they mostly lived in resettlement camps for the next few years in a unknown country.

Kelli eventually settled in Clarkston in 2001, where he and his family still lived in poverty, but the opportunities for better education and professional mobility sparked optimism they did not have in the camps. German refugees. Two decades later, Kelli watches with keen interest as hundreds of thousands of Afghans flee their country after the Taliban declared control when the United States ended its role in the longstanding conflict.

Kelli was 17 when he arrived in America and did not speak English. He now works at Northside Hospital as a cardiologist. It’s a piece of the American dream that started small as a teenage refugee working as a diver to support his family. Now he is inspired to help refugees and others living in underserved communities in the United States.

Heval Kelli, center, a Syrian refugee whose family moved to Clarkston in 2001 watches with keen interest Afghan refugees waiting to find new places to live after US troops withdraw from their home countries. Kelli is a cardiologist at Northside Hospital, Photo credit Emory University

“These Afghan refugees come from a very unfortunate situation, it is so sad to see what is happening,” he said. “They are just happy to be in a safe place for them. But I tell them, I think this is the only country in the world where you could come here. I have lived in the Middle East and I don’t think I would have become who I am if I hadn’t been here.

Approximately 123,000 people have flown from Afghanistan and 50,000 are currently undergoing security screening at military bases in preparation for reintegration into American communities.

Tens of thousands of Afghans who worked directly with the US government started leaving the country a few months ago and many arrived after a August evacuation. The majority of these refugees have special visa status which will allow them to clear basic security hurdles more quickly.

The Associated Press reported this week that officials in the Biden administration have started briefing governors and mayors in 46 states of the number of people from the first wave of 37,000 evacuees to be expected in the coming weeks, including more 1,000 refugees expected to arrive in Georgia.

A coalition of Atlanta nonprofits, including New American Pathways, will likely begin helping individuals and their families find housing, employment and other supports soon, as many relocate. in apartments and rental homes in Georgia, primarily in the Metro Atlanta area.

Larger numbers of refugees will go through an even more complicated process as they have yet to apply for permanent status as they seek to pass a more rigorous background check.

Finding enough affordable housing for those allowed to relocate to the United States will be a major challenge that will also benefit from the kindness of strangers. While resettlement groups typically pay a few months of rent, Airbnb provides temporary housing across the country to 20,000 Afghan refugees.

The Biden administration has asked Congress for $ 6.4 billion for the resettlement of Afghan refugees, with targets of 65,000 by the end of September and another 95,000 by September 2022, according to the AP.

Over 90% of people served by American Pathways and other local groups pay their own expenses within six months. There is a strong system of support from the religious community and beyond in the greater metropolitan area and among ethnic groups that depend on each other, said Emily Laney, director of development for New American Pathways.

“Even before the 1980 Refugee Act, groups were resettling refugees in Georgia,” Laney said. “It’s really so intense. There have been a lot of really traumatic events in the last few weeks, and we have the resources to support them.

“The people who have gone through some of the worst things humanity has to offer, these refugees are strong, resilient and courageous,” Laney said.

The amount of resources spent on refugee resettlement has been slashed under the administration of former President Donald Trump through federal policy changes reducing refugees admitted each year to less than 23,000 in 2018 compared to plans last year. year of former President Barack Obama to admit 110,000.

During Trump’s tenure, Muslim-majority countries in the Middle East were among the countries targeted by tighter restrictions hampering the path to a green card.

According to the New American Economy, a nonprofit refugee research organization, Afghans made up less than 2% of the total number of refugees who immigrated to the United States between 2002 and 2018.

The Biden administration has raised its goal of admitting refugees to 125,000 people this year. It’s an unrealistic benchmark due to dwindling resources, but it’s a much better direction than the previous four years, according to Jeremy Robbins, executive director of America’s New Economy.

“It’s our biggest competitive advantage that people want to come here and work hard, but it masks the fact that it’s really hard to do if you don’t speak the language, if you don’t have the network, or if you can find a job by yourself. ” he said.

“Having a big influx of people from Afghanistan right now is something you can expect to have a backlash,” Robbins said. “But one thing that’s different now is that I think the circumstances in which this happened, seeing people who risked their lives to help us win this war all of a sudden hanging on the air libre has really brought about a big change that seems to be very bipartisan. “

Georgia Republican Governor Brian Kemp signaled his willingness to take in controlled Afghan refugees shortly after the Taliban took control of their country last month. This contrasts with the stance taken in 2015 by his compatriot Republican and former governor Nathan Deal against the resettlement of Syrian refugees fleeing a bloody conflict in their country of origin.

Witnessing current events was an overwhelming experience for Muska Haseeb, an Afghan refugee turned American citizen, as the Taliban regained control after two decades of sacrificing American troops and treasures and the dashed hopes of Afghans who sought more help. opportunities in their country.

Haseeb’s family moved to Phoenix in 2012 after spending six years in Pakistan as a refugee to escape the physical abuse her mother suffered in Afghanistan for working as an administrative assistant.


(left to right) Muska Haseeb, sister-in-law Madina Haider, brother Syed Haider, niece Marwaha, nephew Sultan and mother Haseeba Aria. Photo by Kulsoom Rizvi & Andrew Oberstadt / International Rescue Committee

Today Haseb’s mother is a social worker and her 27-year-old daughter runs her own fashion business and will soon be starting school at the University of Texas in a pre-medical program.

“I really wish they could do something about this in the future because nobody wants to stay under Taliban rule,” Haseeb said. “I’m definitely going to want to be a motivation for any new refugee, whether from Afghanistan or any other country. I want them to see that (the United States) is the land of opportunity and that we can certainly pursue our dreams and goals and that we can become something here.

Clarkston from Georgia to welcome remaining Afghan refugees

Clarkston, a town in DeKalb County where more than half of its 13,000 residents were born overseas, is likely to receive an influx of Afghan refugees via New American Pathways and other resettlement agencies in the coming months.

Clarkston became a home town for many refugees, earning it the nickname of Southern Ellis Island. It offers affordable rental housing and is small enough that newcomers can walk to schools or its small downtown area, while still providing enough public transportation to get around Atlanta’s two largest counties. .

Immigrants frequently take on low-paying minimum-wage jobs and other lower-paying positions as they adjust to life in a new country.

For some refugees who settle in Clarkston, this means daily trips to Gainesville to work in the chicken processing plants.

Yet Clarkston’s leadership was not so welcoming to foreign nationals and refugees settling in the city as recently as the past decade.

In 2013, the former mayor of Clarkston helped ban the resettlement of new refugees. A few years later, when Ted Terry was elected mayor, the moratorium was lifted. He has set in motion an attitude of acceptance within government that continues to push the community toward inclusion as more refugees become citizens, vote and run for office.

“I think we finally hit a kind of critical mass of voters who were like, in fact, we think refugees are a positive thing. And we don’t want to go back in the history of Clarkston. We want to look to the future and move forward, ”said Terry, who is now DeKalb County Commissioner.

Refugees are known to contribute to the economy of their new country almost upon arrival. Their crime rate in their community is generally low. And they own businesses or attend college at a higher rate than the average American.

Although Kelli lived in a poorer area of ​​Clarkston while he was finishing his studies, the town offered an enclave that could have been much worse for a Muslim family who had recently arrived in America shortly after 9/11.

“We always say we got scared more than anything,” Kelli said. “I think Clarkston was such a loving community that really offered protection from the harassment we might have faced.

With the withdrawal of American forces from Afghanistan now complete, Catholic Charities Atlanta will continue to help evacuated families find new homes, as it has done for the past 20 years.

“Rebuilding your life is not easy,” said Vanessa Russell, CEO of Catholic Charities Atlanta. “These brave families escaped with just what they could take. They are courageous, resilient and optimistic about their future. We will welcome these families with a grateful heart and help them integrate and thrive in their new home here in Atlanta. “


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Friendly Neighborhood ‘Dealer of Hope’ Fuels Federal Way


Louis Guiden is known as Federal Way’s “hope dealer”.

Since 2008, the Good Shepherd Youth Outreach of Federal Way has provided mentoring and character development skills to youth in the area. When the pandemic struck, the association pivoted its mission to tackle food insecurity among black and brown families in Federal Way.

“With their children at home, families are running out of food… it was the emergency for us,” said Guiden, 47, executive director of the association. “We have to respond to the need which right now is hunger. ”

Good Shepherd Youth Outreach of Federal Way is one of six finalists from the Western Region in the 2022 Chick-fil-A True Inspiration Awards competition.

The True Inspiration Awards began in 2015, in honor of Chick-fil-A founder S. Truett Cathy. The grant awards celebrate and support nonprofits dealing with education, hunger or homelessness that are run by black people or serve communities of color, according to the organization.

Voting began on September 4 and continues through September 25 through the Chick-fil-A app.

Good Shepherd Youth Outreach of Federal Way was founded by Guiden in 2008. The aim of the organization is to provide mentorship to youth of color through academic support, character development, life skills education and training. support for prevention and intervention.

Feeding Our Community was launched in April 2020. Since then, approximately 2.5 million pounds of food and over 28,000 meals have been served to local families from the Guiden drive-style weekly distribution program started at The Boys and Girls Club of Federal Way.

A team of about 15 people organize the drive-thru distributions each week, including young people from local middle and high schools who receive a stipend for their work, and additional volunteers from the community.

“It went from 15 to 20 cars a week to 120 cars a week,” Guiden said. The pandemic has allowed Guiden to refocus the mission of his program, moving to meet the most immediate needs of the community.

Black, Indigenous and Colored (BIPOC) families make up about 80% of those served by the association, Guiden said. Food is provided through partnerships with the Peacekeeper Society, Food Lifeline and Northwest Harvest.

Few food banks or distribution centers are run by Blacks or BIPOC, Guiden said, leaving a void in the provision of culturally relevant and culturally appropriate foods.

Guiden and his team understand the needs of the people to whom they provide food, and in return, there is a sense of understanding.

“As a black African American man living in Federal Way for 22 years, it really gave me a deep connection to my community, serving food,” he said. “It connects me to the community at large… The fight against food insecurity has given me so much hope, so much enthusiasm, so much love. ”

While Guiden and his team feed the community, people often drop off homemade meals, treats and other tokens of appreciation at distributors.

The True Inspiration Award nomination allowed Guiden to step back and realize the power of his work. If his nonprofit wins, the funds would be used to further develop the Community Empowerment Center, Feeding Our Community and Brothers Bout Business programs.

“It gave me the fuel I needed… I’m like, ‘What else can we fix in Federal Way? What can we do as an organization now to solve the problems of this community? ”

Moved from Louisiana to the Pacific Northwest in 1993, Guiden said he arrived with five dollars in his pocket. A work-related incident shortly after his move left him with a traumatic brain injury, an ankle fracture requiring 12 reconstructive surgeries and constant pain.

He found strength in his story through his faith and his wife. Guiden sees himself as a Sankofa bird, a symbol of his West African heritage that reminds people that “we must keep moving forward by remembering our past,” Guiden said.

By embarking on his own journey, he made sure to plant a seed to strengthen the capacities of future generations.

In its 22 years of mentoring and dedication to the youth of the community, Good Shepherd Youth Outreach has served over 180 youth and families.

“I’m the hope dealer,” he said. “I help people deal effectively with overwhelming pressures. ”

For more information or to get involved, visit www.gsyowa.org.

Local Federal Way youth are primarily responsible for the drive-thru food distribution each week.



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Northern Alabama Food Bank Tackles Child Hunger


HUNTSVILLE, Alabama – Food insecurity continues to be an issue the Northern Alabama Food Bank is working to alleviate.

While some sit down to dinner each night, others wonder if they will go to bed hungry. Some of these people are children. Instead of focusing on learning at school or playing with friends, they worry about when the next meal is.

“You know, if we are to have a vibrant and prosperous community, children need to be able to learn and grow without having to worry about hunger,” said Bobby Bozeman, director of development for the Food Bank of North Alabama. They strive to beautify the future and the present by providing food to those in need.

One thing many people may not realize is how widespread food insecurity is in northern Alabama. According to the Food Bank, 1/4 of northern Alabama’s kids don’t know when they’ll have their next meal.

“When kids have to deal with this, it’s virtually impossible to focus on other things, be it clubs, activities, their studies or athletics,” said Bozeman. “When you’re focused on hunger, that’s all you can think of.”

Fortunately, there are nonprofits like the Food Bank that help ease this burden. Bozeman said they distribute food to partners who run backpack programs and help with mobile pantries set up at elementary schools in Huntsville.

For those fortunate enough not to have to think about where their next meal is coming from, there are opportunities to help through the food bank.

If you are interested in helping local families, one of the best things you can do is donate. To help them in their efforts to end hunger, click on ‘Donate’ at https://www.foodbanknorthal.org/. Every dollar donated provides nearly seven meals.

You can also volunteer to help. While many businesses and nonprofits grapple with the job, Bozeman says the food bank is in luck.

“Huntsville is a very passionate community that gives back and obviously we face sales like everyone else, but luckily a lot of people have come to work for us,” he said. “Nonprofits don’t always offer the best, but we try to be competitive and give our people a living wage. ”

You can find a link to become a volunteer on the organization’s home page, as well as information on how to get food aid and program information on the Food Bank’s website.


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Hello Kitty arrives at the new Sanrio store in Irvine; Madison Reed opens 2 stores – Orange County Register


Hello Kitty, Chococat, My Melody, and Keroppi head over to UC Irvine.

There’s no word on what classes they might take, but the popular characters will soon be on sale at a new Sanrio store that will debut at the University Center in early October.

The Japanese company is known for making kitschy characters and collectibles. Wendy Hsu is the franchise owner of Sanrio Irvine.

The store will sell the latest versions of Sanrio and limited edition collectibles such as back-to-school items, stationery, clothing, accessories and housewares.

Hello Kitty, Chococat, My Melody and Keroppi arrive at Orange County in a dedicated Sanrio store. The store filled with plush toys, stationery, clothing, accessories and housewares opens Oct. 2 at the University Center near UC Irvine. Address: 4255 Campus Drive (Courtesy of Sanrio)

Sanrio Irvine, which opens on Sunday, October 2, will have sections dedicated to plush, clothing, beauty and stationery walls, as well as space for Hello Kitty and friends.

Address: 4255 Campus Drive Ste-B-142; Hours: 11 am to 7 pm, Monday to Thursday; From 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. from Friday to Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday.

  • Madison Reed, a San Francisco-based do-it-yourself hair dye startup, opens its first Orange County locations, one at Tustin Market Place on El Camino Real (September 15) and the other at Fashion Island at Newport Plage (Sep 23). The startup specializes in matching colors and can apply the dye in their Madison Reed Hair Color Bar. (Courtesy of Madison Reed)

  • Madison Reed, a San Francisco-based do-it-yourself hair dye startup, opens its first Orange County locations, one at Tustin Market Place on El Camino Real (September 15) and the other at Fashion Island at Newport Plage (Sep 23). The startup specializes in matching colors and can apply the dye in their Madison Reed Hair Color Bar. (Courtesy of Madison Reed)

  • Madison Reed, a San Francisco-based do-it-yourself hair dye startup, opens its first Orange County locations, one at Tustin Market Place on El Camino Real (September 15) and the other at Fashion Island at Newport Plage (Sep 23). The startup specializes in matching colors and can apply the dye in their Madison Reed Hair Color Bar. (Courtesy of Madison Reed)

Madison Reed opens its first OC locations

Pandemic lockdowns have left millions of dyed, highlighted and swept women in quarantine at home with no living room and few good ways to hide those pesky roots.

Some women just let it grow, while others turned to startups offering DIY hair dye kits.

One of them was Madison Reed, a do-it-yourself hair dye startup in San Francisco that exploded early in the pandemic months. The company is opening its first locations in Orange County, one at Tustin Market Place on El Camino Real (September 18) and the other at Fashion Island in Newport Beach (September 23).

CEO Amy Erret told Yahoo Finance last summer that Madison Reed saw her sales increase 12-fold as the pandemic changed lives as we knew it.

“I’m not happy that it took a pandemic for this to happen,” she said in July 2020. “I’d rather it didn’t happen. But I think it proves that the coloring of the hair is really important to people emotionally.

The startup uses unique color matching technology in their kits, which can be mailed to clients, or a professional can match and apply the color in a Madison Reed coloring bar. The company says it employs licensed colorists and uses products that are ammonia-free, paraben-free, and cruelty-free.

Addresses: 3003 El Camino Real, Tustin (next to the White House / Black Market); 313 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach.

Fullerton’s Women’s Transitional Living Center, under the leadership of CEO Mark Lee, is raising the minimum wage for its full-time employees to $ 22.44 from $ 18.27. The nonprofit’s salary increases benefit 26 of its 49 part-time and full-time employees. (Courtesy of Bill Nichols and the Women’s Transitional Living Center)

Nonprofit salary increase

The Women’s Transitional Living Center in Fullerton is increasing its minimum hourly wage for full-time employees from $ 18.27 to $ 22.44.

The nonprofit’s salary increases benefit 26 of its 49 part-time and full-time employees.

The new wage standard was based on the Living Wage Calculator created by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology so that a single adult without children could afford adequate housing, food and other expenses.

The WTLC said it previously relied on the Southern California nonprofit compensation report to determine a market rate for staff positions. The nonprofit, said chief executive Mark Lee, now recognizes that such reports are based on a system with “built-in inequalities that undermine people in lower paid positions.”

“Our new compensation standard is no longer influenced by external unfairness factors,” Lee said in a statement. “This positive change has been made possible by the dedication and commitment to the WTLC that our staff demonstrate every day.”

The non-profit organization helps individuals and families escape domestic violence and exploitation by providing resources aimed at independent living. WTLC has 24 hour bilingual telephone support at 877-531-5522 or can be contacted by email / text at [email protected] For more information, visit www.wtlc.org.

Moving

Yunkyung Kim has been appointed COO of CalOptima in Orange. Kim returns to CalOptima after leaving Blue Shield of California Promise Health Plan, where she was Vice President of Medi-Cal Growth and Vice President of Medi-Cal Performance. She has 20 years of experience in the healthcare industry. CalOptima provides state-funded health care coverage for low-income children, adults, seniors, and people with disabilities in Orange County.

Good work

The Orange County Community Foundation raised $ 144,502 from 450 donors to Protect & Preserve, a day of giving to support the county’s open spaces and marine protected areas. The money will go to seven local nonprofits that help protect marine areas along the 12 miles of Orange County coast. Participating organizations included Laguna Canyon Foundation, Laguna Ocean Foundation, Newport Bay Conservancy, OC Habitats, Ocean Defenders Alliance, Pacific Marine Mammal Center and The Ecology Center.

Ralphs and Food 4 Less raised $ 100,000 in donations for their Hunger Action Month campaign. Proceeds will support Cal State Fullerton’s permanent pantry for students, Homeboy Industries’ Feed HOPE program and “Fill the Fridge,” an ongoing campaign that benefits Project Angel Food, the Los Angeles LGBT Center and the Los Angeles Unified School District.

The City National Bank recently presented a check to the Small Business Development Corporation of Orange County as a Community Reinvestment Act grant to help small businesses. From left to right, Eduardo Brugman, news director of SBDC-OC; Theresa Don Lucas, City National Bank CRA Officer; Richard Lee, Senior Vice President of Commercial Lending at SBDC-OC; City National Bank SVP Sal Mendoza. (Courtesy of City National Bank)

Subsidies

The Orange County Small Business Development Corporation received $ 20,000 in Community Reinvestment Act bank grants that will help the organization guide entrepreneurs and small business owners through tough times or expansions. The association received a grant of $ 10,000 each from City National Bank and CIT Bank this summer. the money will go to its entrepreneur loan fund which lends directly to businesses.

Milestones

Stretto, an Irvine-based technology and services company, was recognized at the 15th Annual M&A Advisor Turnaround Awards as Turnaround Product / Service of the Year. This recognition marks the second consecutive year that Stretto has received this award for its services. Stretto was also honored in the Chapter 11 Reorganization of the Year category.

Laguna Cafe and Grill was honored as Local Restaurant of the Month for August by MP Cottie Petrie-Norris (District 74). Laguna Woods Restaurant is known for its all American-style cuisine and breakfast. The Laguna Cafe was founded by Richard Martinez and is co-owned by Tammy Martinez and Monja Chavez.

Editor’s Note: This post has been updated to correct Madison Reed’s opening date to Tustin.

Status Update is compiled from press releases from Editor Karen Levin and edited by Editor-in-Chief Samantha Gowen. Send high resolution articles and photos to [email protected] Allow at least a week for publication. Elements are edited for length and clarity.


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Local files | News, Sports, Jobs


Lt. Darryl Ng, Civil Air Patrol Commander of the Maui County Composite Squadron, will be the guest speaker at the Lahaina Sunset Rotary Club Virtual Reunion at 5:30 p.m. on September 21.

For more than 50 years, the 57th Maui County Composite Squadron has served the community, responding to Hurricane Iniki and famous Eddie Aikau research, according to a press release. Ng will share history and information about the squadron as well as its main mission and programs in Maui.

Club members and guests are welcome to attend the meeting via Zoom. To receive a meeting link, contact Joanne Laird at [email protected]

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Pizza Charity founder to speak to Rotarians

The Rotary Club of Kihei-Wailea will welcome Jonathan Yudis as a guest speaker at its virtual meeting on Wednesday at noon.

Yudis is the founder of the “Charity Pizza in Maui” community service project, which provides hot meals to homeless people in Maui.

The Zoom room will open at 11:30 am for communion. The Zoom meeting ID is 829 1334 8817; the access code is 081120.

For more information, contact Allan Weiland at [email protected]

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Shelter to host an adoption event

The Maui Humane Society will be hosting an adoption event from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on September 18.

No appointment is necessary and there is no adoption fee. Prospective pet parents can participate in the Maui Humane Society’s 10-day Paws to Adopt trial program.

In addition to the animals that await their homes forever, there will be food trucks and live entertainment at the event. Social distancing and masks are mandatory.

For more information, visit www.mauihumanesociety.org.

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Bezos donates to Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity Maui received a personal donation from Jeff Bezos, Founder and Executive Chairman of Amazon.

“We are incredibly grateful for the support of Mr. Bezos”, said Sherri Dodson, executive director of the association. “We are in the process of expanding our home security repair and modification program for low income kupunas and / or homeowners with disabilities, so this donation could not have come at a better time. Sadly, so many of our low income seniors live in unsanitary conditions and just need a helping hand. This donation will help us build our capacities and allow us to continue our mission. Everyone deserves a safe and decent place to live.

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Children’s advocacy group receives donation

The Friends of the Children’s Justice Center of Maui received a personal donation from Amazon Founder and Executive Chairman Jeff Bezos.

“This donation comes at a crucial time for us due to the overwhelming increase in service requests we have received during the COVID pandemic, as well as the broader needs we have seen in the community,” said Paul Tonnessen, executive director of the Friends of the Maui Children’s Justice Center.

The nonprofit organization provides assistance to abused and neglected children, promotes the prevention of child abuse and neglect, and supports the Maui Children’s Justice Center, which is part of the State Judiciary. Hawaii.

For more information about the Friends of the Maui Children’s Justice Center, contact Tonnessen at 986-8634 or visit mauicjc.org.

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Bezos donates to boys and girls clubs

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Maui is one of many local nonprofits that have received a personal donation from Jeff Bezos, founder and executive chairman of Amazon.

“We want to send a huge mahalo to Mr. Bezos and his team for his support and for recognizing the incredible value that Maui’s nonprofits provide,” said Kelly Maluo-Pearson, CEO of Boys & Girls Clubs of Maui.

The nonprofit said it would use the donation to continue providing its evidence-based programs that help young people learn, develop social skills, express themselves creatively and participate in events. sports.

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Saginaw Neighborhood Celebrates Planned Return of Children’s Community Center


SAGINAW, MI – Eight-year-old Asia Pratt was sitting breathlessly laughing next to her friends during a break as she jumped inside the inflatable house set up for an event reconnecting a neighborhood in Saginaw on the south side with an old community center ready to reopen in the coming month.

“I feel very happy,” she said of the celebration going on outside the facility at 3145 Russell. “It was so much fun. I can’t wait to be able to go here.

Organizers say the building – known as “The Nabe” – will likely not open to the community until 2022, but the excitement surrounding the news warranted some sort of block party on Saturday, August 28. The rally included The Nabe’s future target demographic. : Pratt and children his age.

Pratt plans to be the third generation in his family to run and play inside the facility when it reopens. Her father, Michael Pratt, 50, was part of a group of nine adults who formed a non-profit organization and bought the community center where they once played as children.

The Saturday celebration also catered to its demographic age. A DJ played Rick James; Earth, Wind and Fire; Kool and the Gang and other old hitmakers.

Still, the rally seemed to remain focused on the future: more specifically, The Nabe’s potential for the South Side neighborhood that has become largely desolate over the past two decades. Organizers say they hope when the community center reopens it will help revive the area and provide a place to grow up for children living nearby.

Leola Gochett, 80, moved to the South Side neighborhood in December 1970. Her three children spent their youth at The Nabe, known for decades as the Lutheran Charities Neighborhood House Community Center. After several changes of ownership, the building has remained largely unused in recent years, after decades of declining participation.

Gochett said she was delighted to hear that former attendees are planning to resuscitate the community center. She has known the nine members of the association since they played there when they were children.

“I believe in them,” said Gochett, who attended the celebration on Saturday. “This community needs this, to help us get back to the way things were in this neighborhood.”

After purchasing the old building, members of the nonprofit – which bears the same name as the community center – began tidying up the Nabe earlier this summer. It has fallen into disrepair in recent years, so the walls have been repainted, the floors have been repaired and the rooms have been cleaned.

The work remains, organizers say, but the progress of their efforts was visible to anyone who saw the interior of the 24,000-square-foot facility a month ago compared to today.

During the visits organized on Saturday, the participants got a glimpse of this renovated interior. However, much of the event activity at the start of the day took place on the community center lawn and parking lot, which organizers have turned into something that looks like a small fair.

Food vendors were camping on the outskirts of the rally. Children rushed between two inflatable houses and a mobile truck carrying playable video game consoles. Within sight of these children were their parents and other adults socializing to the music of the event.

“I’m so grateful that it brought this community together again,” said Anthony Dent, a 52-year-old man who once attended the community center as a child. “I can’t wait to see how this place will grow when it opens. “

James Carthan, a member of the nonprofit that owns the facility, said the support expressed by the community on Saturday was a sign that more success could be in store for the Nabe.

“It takes a village to raise a child,” said Carthan, 50. “I want this place to be a bright light for the young people of Saginaw.”

Organizers have organized tours of the interior of The Nabe, a Saginaw community center that the owners hope to open within the next year. Here, participants visit a basketball court where a mural was being completed.

RELATED:

Childhood friends reunite to revive Saginaw children’s community center


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Study: Food insecurity and poverty rate increased for Colorado children during pandemic


Referrals to early intervention services, which help young children from birth to 3 years old with developmental skills like speech therapy, also dropped dramatically in the first few weeks of the pandemic, dropping 63% over the course of the pandemic. during the first two weeks of March 2020.

That’s because primary care physicians, who make about a third of all referrals for such support, stopped doing good health checks on children at the start of the pandemic.

Providers aim to provide children with early intervention services in their ‘natural environment’, be it home or childcare – with the aim of making them function at the same level as their peers. said Christy Scott, director of the early intervention program at Colorado’s Office of Early Childhood. “And if we don’t get the early intervention they need, then we might see the ramifications when they get into kindergarten, special education, or even kindergarten.”

Scott said there has been an increase in referrals recently, and advocates for child care are hoping that trend continues.

Household income has fallen and food insecurity has increased

Almost half of households with children have reported loss of employment income since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. At the beginning of March 2021, a third declared having difficulty paying the usual household expenses.

Meanwhile, about 10 percent of Colorado households with children reported not having enough food to eat over the past week.

Black and Latino families have suffered disproportionately, reporting more food and rental insecurity – and more job losses – than white families.

“They entered the pandemic with higher rates of child poverty, higher proportions of children without health insurance, limited access to high quality child care, and kindergarten to grade 12 education.” , Manoatl said. “During the pandemic, they were hit harder than other households (economically)… it’s kind of like an aggravated effect.”


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The Recorder – Regina Curtis is retiring as GCC executive. director of institutional promotion


GREENFIELD – Regina Curtis has amassed a 48-pound stash in thrift stores. From September 1, she will have more time to read them.

Curtis is retiring as Executive Director of Institutional Advancement at Greenfield Community College on August 31, after 16 years on the job. She coordinated the school’s legislative affairs and oversaw its grants office in addition to being the executive director of the GCC Foundation, the nonprofit fundraising arm of the college.

“Community college students stay in their community. They end up living and working within a 25 mile radius, usually. So we are really educating the workforce in this community, ”she said. “This college is exactly where it needs to be.”

Curtis, 62, said she turned legislative affairs over to her colleague Keith Bailey and new recruit Alexis Page took on other responsibilities. She said their abilities reduced her natural anxiety about quitting the job she had been heavily involved in for so long.

She previously worked for State Representative Stephen Kulik and plans to follow her former employer’s advice on retirement – don’t make any additional commitments for at least a year. She intends to continue serving on the board of directors of Rural Development Inc., a nonprofit organization created by the Franklin County Regional Housing and Redevelopment Authority, but wishes to spend more time walking, hiking, kayaking and visiting her son in North Carolina and her daughter-in-law. in Idaho. She would also like to relearn Spanish and knitting.

Curtis grew up in the Detroit area, but has lived in Franklin County his entire adult life. Warwick has been his home for decades.

She worked at the college for 16 years, serving on the Board of Trustees of the GCC Foundation for six years previously, including two as President. Prior to that, she was a campaign volunteer for the school. But that was not his introduction to college. She received her associate’s degree in commerce in 1986 at the age of 28, after taking evening classes for five years while working full time. The average age of a CCG student is around 27, she said.

Curtis then transferred to North Adams State College (now Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts) for another five years to earn a bachelor’s degree, graduating while pregnant with her son. She waited four years before pursuing her Masters of Business Administration in five years.

“I know women who… worked full time and went to school in the evenings with me and had a baby, but I couldn’t… think about that. So I waited until he was 4, then I started at Fitchburg State College (now the University) because, ”she said,“ I only attend public higher education institutions. from Massachusetts that are next to Highway 2. It’s like my jam.

“I never worked full time during all of this,” she added. “It’s just that the career trajectory was made possible thanks to the degrees I acquired along the way, which was possible thanks to GCC. … It is definitely the mission to make higher education accessible to all who want to learn. This is not the case for many colleges.

Curtis also said that many CCG students are, like her, first generation students. She said 48% of them transferred to four-year colleges and 25% were from Hampshire County.

“I’ve always wondered if there is a magical way to survey every employer in Franklin County and find out how many GCC employees (there are),” she said, adding that a third of Greenfield Savings Bank employees are GCC graduates. “It’s quite remarkable.”

Curtis also said that GCC will celebrate its 60th anniversary next year.

“GCC and I are about the same age. Funny – I never thought of it that way, ”she said. “We kind of grew up together. ”

Contact Domenic Poli at: [email protected] or 413-772-0261, ext. 262.


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Can humor, laughter and AI reduce stress for women living with cancer? | New


NEW YORK and WASHINGTON and PALO ALTO, California, August 11, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Sounds like the opening of a classic joke: “Cancer survivor, scientist and doctor walk into bar,” but it’s more of a groundbreaking 8-week study on the mindset and metastatic cancer research using artificial intelligence to study personalized stress reduction strategies for women living with advanced cancer. This study is the result of Saranne Rothberg, a stage IV cancer survivor and founder of the ComedyCures Foundation.

Want to have fun ? Sign up for this groundbreaking study on mindset and metastatic cancer research.

“Humor, laughter, play, meditation, yoga, breathing and visualization techniques were essential in reducing my stress, giving me more energy and hope as I battled three surgeries against the cancer, 44 radiotherapy treatments and more than two years of chemotherapy starting in 1999, “says Rothberg, who no longer has cancer.

As part of this study, she invites other people living with a metastatic diagnosis to create an individualized stress management and relaxation plan, informed by artificial intelligence, to improve their quality of life. Rothberg enlisted the help of Dr. Catherine Grill, neuroscientist and co-founder of Neolth, an award-winning digital health platform from Silicon Valley. Dr. Grill explains, “Mental health is often overlooked when clinicians create treatment plans for cancer patients. I wanted to make mental health support more accessible to patients. We are excited to add Saranne’s expertise and fun strategies, along with original ComedyCures content, to our Neolth platform as part of this important study. ”

Neolth’s chief medical officer, Dr. Claire Wheeler, integrator and psychologist specializing in stress management and author of “Pocket Therapy for Stress” will also supervise the collaborative study as co-principal investigator. Dr Wheeler says, “Women with cancer who participate in stress management and emotional support programs have significant improvements in quality of life, immune markers and even improve their survival rates.”

Rothberg happily describes: “Each participant will be invited to use the Neolth platform via a mobile device, tablet and / or desktop computer to create their own personalized self-care plan with the help of proprietary technology. from Neolth and many experts. A free subscription to Neolth will be provided to every woman through an innovative cancer and behavior research grant awarded to our ComedyCures Foundation by the Willow Foundation. In previous years, the foundation grant was awarded to Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center.

Co-founder of the Willow Foundation and survivor of stage IV cancer Lea Evert confirms: “Because the pandemic has put even more isolation, health risks and stress on people living with cancer, the Willow Foundation felt that this year’s grant should go to the ComedyCures Foundation in because of his track record of positively impacting the lives of others. in the event of a mental, emotional and / or physical crisis. “

Evert adds, “As a cancer and COVID-19 survivor, Saranne’s authentic vision to seek an immediately scalable and affordable health solution integrating artificial intelligence, technology, as well as the award-winning ComedyCures and Neolth programs, has made the funding of this mindset research very compelling. “

In addition to the many relaxation practices offered by the study, participants will have the opportunity to attend three live online sessions with Rothberg and several of his ComedyCures comedians. Please see the Study FAQs for more information and to register immediately.

ABOUT THE COMEDYCURES FOUNDATION

The ComedyCures Foundation is a 501 (C) 3 non-profit, here 24/7 to tickle fun bones. Through award-winning digital programming and live events, ComedyCures entertains, educates and helps patients, caregivers and frontline workers develop their superpowers of laughter, hope, joy, play and perspective. comical. https://www.ComedyCures.org @ComedyCures

ABOUT NEOLTH

Neolth provides stress and mental health support by providing personalized care on demand through its self-guided platform. This includes relaxation practices, self-care and mental health monitoring, as well as mental health videos. Neolth presents a variety of original content from the ComedyCures Foundation to support people living with cancer. All participants in the ComedyCures study will have free access to Neolth for an extended period. https://www.Neolth.com @Neolth

ABOUT THE WILLOW FOUNDATION

The Willow Foundation (United States) supports research efforts that help link behaviors to better outcomes for patients with advanced and advanced cancer.

https://www.willow.foundation/goals

ABOUT SARANNE ROTHBERG

From the patient with stage IV cancer to the CEO of ComedyCures, Saranne Rothberg is a thought leader, speaker, patient advocate, and health and happiness expert. She started the ComedyCures foundation from her chemo chair in 1999 and is cancer free today, helping over 1 million people at over 1,800 live and digital events around the world to rediscover their funny bones. , their mojo and their lens. https://www.saranne.com @sarannelive

View original content to download multimedia: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/can-humor-laughter–ai-reduce-the-stress-of-women-living-with-cancer-301353265. html

SOURCE The ComedyCures Foundation


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Even if live concerts return, stream here to stay in Michigan


Just days before the pandemic interrupted life in the Detroit metro area and around the world in March last year, Stephen Wogaman, president of the Chamber Music Society of Detroit, was talking on the phone with his brother, a consultant. in computer science.

His brother asked what Wogaman was planning to do about COVID-19.

“I said, ‘Well, I heard about it,'” Wogaman recalls. “He said, ‘You have to be careful.’

Soon he was. COVID completely turned the Chamber Music Society season upside down, as it did all over cultural institutions, forcing them to quickly turn to streaming and webcast performances, which they never had. done before.

But that change – which involved quickly figuring out what equipment was best for streaming, perfecting the audio, and figuring out how to create the best quality webcast – was a step forward for the Chamber Music Society.

Even as he prepares for his 2021-22 season, which begins in September, they aren’t straying from the webcasts they’ve perfected during COVID. They will offer live performances but will stream them at the same time for those who wish to watch from home or from a distance.

“As we come out of this time – with caution – we see it as a way to expand our audience, to facilitate connections from audience members who may not be entirely comfortable coming back,” Wogaman said.

Concerts and live performances may be making a comeback in venues across the region, but streaming is here to stay in some venues, especially when it comes to classical, chamber and folk music. Some say they can reach an even larger audience far beyond Michigan through streaming or those with accessibility issues.

“It’s an important tool and access point,” said Marianne James, executive director of The Ark, a well-known folk music venue in downtown Ann Arbor that aired its popular folk festival in January. . “It doesn’t replace live performances, but it’s something that can really go with that and give artists and performances more reach.”

But could streaming concerts deter people from buying tickets to see shows in person, as some worry? Time will tell us.

Dinner with the DSO

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra, a leader in webcast presentation, has offered digital concerts for years, but expanded its offering during COVID-19 to include its pop concerts. Anne Parsons, CEO of DSO, said several subscribers told her how much they enjoyed the concerts that were broadcast during the pandemic, sitting down to “dine with the DSO.”

“When we have these gigs, they’re one of a kind,” Parsons said, referring to the pop gigs. “They tend not to be captured and they should be – and shared with the world.”

For this year’s Concert of Colors, the Midwest’s largest free music festival that runs through Monday, the format was a mix of live, broadcast and broadcast performances. Last year’s Concert of Colors, which was fully streamed, recorded 162,000 plays and views.

“We don’t want to give this up entirely,” said Ismael Ahmed, longtime founder and director of Concert of Colors.

But like James at the Ark, Wogaman agrees that streaming is not an alternative to live music. He said there is “no doubt” that hearing music in person is the “superior” way to experience it, but the pandemic has caused bands like his to rethink their approach. in some ways.

“A webcast captures this incredible sense of collaboration,” especially when it comes to chamber music, Wogaman said. “And that brings you to the front row when you’re in your living room.”

Learning curve

Even before Wogaman got out of the car after that phone call with his brother – who works with Gartner, a well-known company that does IT consulting work – he was already thinking about the bedroom’s next steps. He called the manager of his next act in March and asked if they would rather broadcast their performance than perform live, offering to pay 40% of their fees.

“The following week, two days after the World Health Organization declared the pandemic, we had an audience of 3,000 people watching our first webcast,” said Wogaman, who noted that it was is five times the audience they would have had in person.

Three weeks later, they aired another show. In total, since COVID, the Chamber Music Society of Detroit has broadcast over 30 concerts to date with over 60 other music presenters across the country on its CameraMusic platform, reaching audiences of nearly 200,000 across six continents. .

The Ark also launched a series of live concerts during COVID called the Ark Family Room series. They broadcast over 100 live shows.

“People really appreciated having access to this,” James said. “It was a great way to keep performers and audience members together.”

But it has been a learning process for the sites. The Chamber Music Society of Detroit has invested more than $ 10,000 in streaming material – they now use a live video streaming platform called Resi – and Wogaman has even started broadcasting streaming services at his Episcopal Church in Birmingham to train more.

“Personally, I learned to do it all – all the technical webcast stuff,” Wogaman said. “It’s not that we hired someone. We bought the equipment, we learned how to use it, we bought the licenses for the streaming equipment.”

One thing they noticed with the Wogaman Church webcasts is that people who didn’t normally attend church, or who could be considered recluses, “were suddenly much more connected than they were. never have been. Because they were able to attend the service. “

This approach could also help aging clients who cannot attend live shows for all kinds of reasons.

“For me, the most exciting thing about this ability that we have spent hundreds of hours learning and tens of thousands of dollars obtaining is now that we are able to do things that we cannot do. ‘Never even imagined possible,’ Wogaman said. “We flipped a switch and there it is.”

Every program that the Chamber presents this year, they will also be broadcast. They will also sell digital subscriptions for concerts and something called Digital Plus which will allow customers to attend two concerts in person as well.

In fact, the Chamber Society of Detroit now has so much streaming equipment – which Wogaman has driven all over the Midwest and East to broadcast concerts – that they are creating a set that they plan to set aside for them. non-profit groups.

Blessing and curse

The DSO launched its on-demand digital archive of performances called DSO Replay in 2015, making it the first streaming archive of any American orchestra. The orchestra was already a leader in webcasting its performances.

But not all cultural institutions have turned to streaming.

Streaming performances are not yet something the Michigan Opera Theater has looked at, said Christine Goerke, MOT’s new associate artistic director, “but I think it’s here to stay on course.”

“There are things that were made especially for streaming. It’s a different animal,” Goerke said. “Creating a piece designed to be filmed as if you were watching a movie? There’s another art form. It’s different from what we do. Maybe we’re creating something brand new.”

The Metropolitan Opera’s Live in HD series shows its operas in more than 2,000 theaters across the country and in 70 countries around the world. But there is a downside to these HD shows, Goerke said.

“When these HD shows came on, it was a wonderful thing for people who lived far away, but it also reduced the number of subscribers,” she said. “They could just go to their movies instead of driving three hours to see a live show. It’s a blessing and a curse.”

James de l’Arche said the fear of deterring live audiences is something they also encounter with the artists they book. She said there was “general reluctance” on the part of some artists to stream their performances.

“Artists are really focused on wanting to be in a room with people” right now, she said.

Nevertheless, L’Arche is studying the performances it could still broadcast and the equipment it will need. He will likely begin with his free Artist Spotlight series when he returns this fall.

“We have learned so much and the public has come so far and accessed this technology,” said James. “A lot of people were reluctant like in ‘I won’t do this.’ Others have found that they really like this access. “

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The logic of Cori Bush’s fight for the moratorium on evictions


Cori Bush knows the violence that can stem from homelessness – and how it so often begins with deportation. Local surveys have found that from 12% to almost half of people living on the streets blame the eviction for their homelessness. Bush, who is now the Democratic Representative of the United States from Missouri, lived in a Ford Explorer with her then husband and two young children for three months after the family was deported in 2001.

It considers the right to housing to be a central principle of environmental justice. Homelessness and housing insecurity, she argued, hamper families’ ability to access the resources – clean water, fresh food, heating and air conditioning – needed to survive. The past year has been particularly deadly for homeless people, as relentless heat waves, poor COVID-19 precautions and unhealthy air quality levels exacerbated by wildfires and pollution have made life on the streets even more dangerous. At the same time, cities across the country have decided to criminalize housing settlements and limit the rights of the homeless.

“I don’t want anyone else to have to go through what I’ve been through, ever,” Bush told The Associated Press. So when the White House said last week it couldn’t extend the federal moratorium on evictions – which has banned evictions since March 2020 to curb the spread of COVID-19 – by possibly letting it expire, it took the fight in hand. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities estimated that 11.4 million adult renters were on the verge of eviction.

For four nights, Bush slept outside the United States Capitol, demanding that President Joe Biden extend the moratorium. In the end, she and her congressional allies won. On Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, issued a new moratorium on evictions that will last until October 3. which would cover areas where 90 percent of the US population lives. The CDC’s new moratorium comes after the Biden administration claimed it did not have the power to extend the eviction ban – and after some localities have already started resuming evictions. (Despite the moratorium, declining state protections and inadequate legal services have led to at least 450,000 evictions during the pandemic, according to the Princeton University Eviction Lab.)

Representative Cori Bush speaks with supporters outside the United States Capitol to call for an extension of the federal moratorium on evictions on July 31, 2021. Photo by Joshua Roberts / Getty Images

In a column for Time last week, Bush denounced the “consequences of our government’s failure to provide the basic necessities that people need to survive.” On the same day, she introduced a “Homeless Bill of Rights,” which calls on Congress to end homelessness in the United States for good by 2025 by investing in affordable housing, universal housing vouchers and social services for people most likely to live on the streets.

While many environmental activists, including the Sunrise movement, have called the new moratorium a victory for climate justice, Bush and other housing advocates argue that protection is one of many that must be instituted to ensure housing and environmental justice for America’s most vulnerable .

Julian Gonzalez, a water policy lobbyist with nonprofit group Earthjustice, says issues such as unaffordable public services are another front in the fight to ensure housing security. (Disclosure: Earthjustice is a Grist advertiser.)

“The affordability of utilities, especially the affordability of water, is a big part of the housing crisis and environmental justice,” Gonzalez told Grist. “Eventually the moratorium on evictions is going to be lifted and people are going to be grappling with bills, and they are going to have their water and electricity cut off – with that comes displacement and eviction.”

This is especially important, according to Gonzalez, because while there are state and national programs to provide assistance for energy bills, there are none for water. Households across the country face billions of dollars in utility debt, and hundreds of thousands of homes face utility cuts. Earthjustice and other organizations across the country are calling for the inclusion of water and utility assistance programs in the next congressional infrastructure bill, which in its current version only includes a pilot low-income rural water assistance program in 40 towns without authorized funding.

Courtney McKinney, director of communications at the nonprofit Western Center on Law and Poverty, said the United States should create a system that permanently limits the prevalence of evictions. The center is working to create state-based legal aid funds, dubbed the “homelessness prevention fund”. Across the country, only 10 percent of tenants who go through eviction proceedings have legal representation, compared to 90 percent of landlords.

The eviction creates an endless cycle of substandard housing, McKinney argues. According to Princeton’s Eviction Lab, 70% of evicted tenants experience serious quality-of-life issues in the next home they move into.

“Across the country, the climate is making the situation even more dire,” McKinney told Grist. “In the West, in particular, climate change, substandard housing and homelessness are a deadly reality in the future.”




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Jam to Low-Down Blues with Hurricane Jerry Loos at the Westerwood Blueberries and The Blues Concert


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

COLUMBUS, Ohio, Aug 4, 2021 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) – The Westerwood Senior Living Community is hosting a Blueberries & The Blues Summer Concert from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Friday August 13, 2021, featuring the local blues artist Hurricane Jerry Loos. Relax in the shade as you listen to soft blues and celebrate Columbus blueberry season with chilled blueberry limoncello cocktails and savory treats created by Chef Marshall of Westerwood.

“We are delighted to welcome Hurricane Jerry and showcase Chef Marshall’s culinary skills,” said Lisa Burkhart, Executive Director. “These events are a great way for us to showcase our great community. Participants will be able to meet residents and team members, and schedule community tours.

RSVP today for The Blueberries and The Blues concert by calling 614-368-1209 or visiting https://www.liveatwesterwood.org/events/. And be sure to enter to win one of four Fresh Thyme Market gift certificates and a basket full of all things blueberries.

Hurricane Jerry Loos began playing guitar in the late 1960s and worked for decades at local recording studios in Columbus Ohio. A versatile guitarist, Jerry has worked with a wide range of independent artists playing styles such as Gospel, Rock, Blues, Jazz, Country and more. Jerry enjoys many styles of music but plays blues / rock in his band “Hurricane Jerry and Stormfront”

Listen to Hurricane Jerry on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaHC4215onQ.

Westerwood is also hosting a Resident Lifestyle Brunch at 10 a.m. on August 18, 2021. In addition to enjoying a delicious free brunch, residents and the dedicated team will share what makes Westerwood a great place to enjoy. the life. They will also share updates on the exciting new outdoor amenities that are being added to the 23-acre campus! RSVP today by calling 614-368-1209 or visiting https://www.liveatwesterwood.org/events/.

Westerwood, formerly Friendship Village Columbus, is a quaint 23-acre nonprofit retirement community rooted in northeast Columbus. It is minutes from downtown Westerville and the University of Otterbein. The active resident community enjoys lifelong learning, artistic pursuits, exercise, giving back and connecting with nature. Westerwood offers a full continuum of best-in-class care, including a Life Care contract.

This wooded oasis offers restaurant quality cuisine cooked from scratch, wellness classes with a personal trainer, an art studio, carpentry and gardens in a friendly atmosphere where ageless spirits can satiate their curiosity. . Westerwood is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit charitable community. It is classified as a community of choice by the Holleran group in recognition of an exemplary culture of resident engagement. Westerwood is SAGECare Platinum Certified, has received the Columbus CEO Top Workplaces Award six years in a row, and has received the Best of Business: Retirement Community award. Learn more at https://liveatwesterwood.org/.

#SummerConcert #HurricaneJerryLoos #OurCampusYourCanvas #SeniorLiving #ColumbusBlueberrySeason

NEWS SOURCE: Westerwood Life Care Community

This press release was issued on behalf of the information source (Westerwood Life Care community) who is solely responsible for its accuracy, by Send2Press® Newswire. Information is believed to be accurate but is not guaranteed. Story ID: 73980 APDF-R8.2

© 2021 Send2Press®, a press release and electronic marketing service of NEOTROPE®, California, United States.

To view the original version visit: https://www.send2press.com/wire/jam-to-low-down-blues-with-hurricane-jerry-loos-at-the-westerwood-blueberries-and-the- blues-concert /

Disclaimer: The contents of this press release were not created by The Associated Press (AP).


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Bloomington tent residents face ‘eviction’ as restaurant prepares to open


Jamie stands shirtless on a vacant lot on the west side of Bloomington. He is wearing jeans that his brother gave him. Behind him are flattened tents, blankets and clothing sprawled out on an asphalt, concrete and weed floor as the sun dries out these essentials after recent torrential rains.

The Indescribable Lot is what Jamie and about half a dozen other people call home. It will soon house a Panda Express restaurant. Bloomington City Council has approved plans to build the restaurant at the location along West Market Street.

The property runs along a busy highway not far from the highway. It is surrounded by gas stations, restaurants and other shops. It is not a residential area at all, with the exception of this tent city.

Some McLean County social service providers say tent towns have been a problem in Bloomington for decades. Advocates say the plight of the tent dwellers points to a bigger problem that has not been addressed.

As state and federal governments lift moratoriums on evictions related to the coronavirus pandemic, these residents will soon face their own type of eviction.

Jamie is 33 years old. He does not give his last name. He has lived in a tent in this vacant lot for almost three years.

Jamie’s brother checks him regularly and gives him clothes and a place to shower.

“He came over here and (said) ‘Jamie get in the car’, where are we going, Disneyland? ‘ Jamie asked. “No, we are going home. You’re going to get cleaned up.

Jamie said he was staying at the Salvation Army’s Safe Harbor shelter in Bloomington. He said he went to work in Texas and had to come back to Bloomington to help his brother. He said the Salvation Army would not take him back. Jamie has other people looking after him.

Her cousin Chris has been living in the camp for a few weeks. “I came here and found my cousin and I’m not going to leave him alone here,” Chris said.

Chris said he was worried about his cousin’s safety. He said he sent Jamie to the hospital three times due to seizures. Chris said there were always people looking for trouble there. Jamie said he had been doing drywall since he was 14 and believed he had a chance to return to work.

“I have my old boss’s number and he told me that once I got together and got my meds and stuff, he said he would put me back to work,” he said. Jamie said.

Jamie said he was taking medication for the seizures and for his mental health. Now he says his old boss no longer works for himself. Jamie is not optimistic, he will call back.

Jamie said he made do with his father’s monthly Social Security check and all the money he could get by begging. Jamie said he already won $ 80 in 20 minutes.

Bob is basically in the same situation as Jamie. Bob is 58 years old. He stands next to Jamie, sporting a graying beard, a face mask under his chin, and a vintage Chicago Cubs t-shirt. Bob said he had been living in the tent camp for a few years. He has done flooring for a living but cannot access the ground floor of the job market.

“Give me a rug, I can put it up,” beamed Bob, but said he couldn’t find a job either. He said shelters would not take him because of his criminal record. He said he received monthly disability checks. He said he needed a place to clean up for a job interview.

Homeless Services

These services are available at Bloomington-Normal, including from a religious organization that feeds them. Bloomington’s Abundant Life Church delivers non-perishable food weekly to the homeless population of Bloomington-Normal. The church also maintains a pantry and clothing and serves hot lunches daily.

Pastor Roy Koonce said he’s worried about whether those living in Tent City will have a place to go.

“That’s a great question and I don’t have an answer for what they will do,” Koonce said. “I know that if they come here, we’ll do our best to help them.”

Koonce said the church had no shelter but would offer all possible help to anyone who came to its door. Koonce said the church has rules but will not permanently reject anyone.

“I’m 68 and for the first time in my life, I feel like I have my goal,” Koontz said. “I like to do what we do. I like helping people. I like the success rate.

“It breaks my heart when I see someone who can’t.”

Bloomington’s two homeless shelters, Safe Harbor and Home Sweet Home Ministries, have said they don’t reject anyone who needs a place to stay, unless their history or behavior suggests it is. a threat to staff or other residents. But both shelters have had limited capacity for much of the past year due to pandemic restrictions.

Roy Koonce of the Abundant Life Church has said he would like the city of Bloomington to do more to help its homeless residents. He said the police are generally trying to avoid the problem.

“A lot of wanderers and homeless people sleep in the parking lot because they all get some heat to keep the ground from freezing (in winter). The police, all they do is go through there and chase these guys away. They don’t stop them, ”Koonce said.

Police intervention

Koonce suggested that an arrest would help some homeless people begin a process to seek medical attention and other treatment.

Town of Bloomington

Greg Scott

Bloomington Acting Police Chief Greg Scott said officers can’t arrest anyone if homeless residents don’t commit a crime.

“What they’re doing there isn’t specifically illegal,” Scott explained. “The State of Illinois and even the Supreme Court of the United States have made decisions that have said it is their First Amendment right to do these things.”

Scott said homeowners must file a trespass report before police arrest anyone. In the case of the proposed restaurant, Scott said no one had filed a complaint. Scott said the homeless population needs social services, not police intervention.

“It really doesn’t help anything,” Scott said.

Accommodation possibilities

A Bloomington City Council member said he would agree that jail is not the solution for people with no roof over their heads. Jeff Crabill said the goal should be permanent housing. Crabill said he was not sure what the city could do to better facilitate this, other than calling attention to the problem and encouraging more landlords to rent to people through a rapid relocation program.

“They just don’t want to have someone in their apartment or their house who is homeless. There is a stigma to this. I think some owners want to avoid this if they can, ”Crabill said.

Jeff Craybill speaking into the microphone

Emilie Bollinger

Jeff Craybill

The PATH Crisis Center in Bloomington recently launched the relocation program. The association secured funding from the CARES Act to provide short-term housing for people during the pandemic to limit the risk of the spread of COVID-19.

Karen Zangerle recently retired as Executive Director of the nonprofit group. She said tent cities have been around in Bloomington for decades. Zangerle said that there is often a certain culture in these wanderer communities that can make relocation difficult.

“People who live in tent cities like it because they don’t have anyone to tell them what to do, they have no responsibility to follow,” Zangerle said. “It’s a bit like a big camping trip.

Zangerle said PATH has asked outreach workers to meet with tent dwellers and other homeless people to discuss their options for a permanent place to stay. She said some will welcome the aid and some will not.

“What ultimately happens is that a certain group of them will find a new place and they will leave,” Zangerle said, adding that a large part of the tent city’s population is moving to the south when the weather gets colder.

Where to go from here

Bob, a resident of Tent City, said he plans to move soon, regardless of the restaurant’s schedule. “When it’s cold we have to go somewhere,” he exclaimed, but added that he was not sure where he was planning to move.

Jamie said once the proposed restaurant moves in, it will likely end up across the street behind the McDonald’s where he lives.

“It’s the only other place we can go,” Jamie said.

Jamie and Bob both laugh at the feeling that they don’t want help.

“We’ve tried and tried and tried and tried and they avoided us,” Jamie said.

“We’ll get there one way or another,” Bob said.

Where and how they will do it remains an open question. These two tented city dwellers think they’ll have to rely on their experience and survival instinct when their home from the last few years is uprooted for a fast food franchise.

It is not known when Panda Express plans to take over the West Bloomington site to begin construction. The company did not return any messages seeking comment.


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Non profit living

Some residents oppose new plan to provide safe camping for homeless people in Los Angeles city parks – NBC Los Angeles


LA City Council is considering a plan that could separate parts of public parks for safe and secure camping sites for people who are homeless. And the news is not well received by locals.

Westchester Park and Mar Vista Park are two of the locations suggested in a feasibility study commissioned by LA City Councilor for District 11, Mike Bonin. Neighbors in Westchester point to picnic tables, ball fields and parking lots all cramped with tents that have grown exponentially during the COVID pandemic.

“No matter where they set up a safe campsite in Westchester Park, it’s going to affect us,” says Beth O’Rourke, director of youth sports for West Side rugby clubs. “We witnessed urinating in public, we saw excrement on the ground, around the field. The toilets are unusable for an adult and even less for a child.

The City of LA Parks and Recreation Department has been renovating the fields in recent weeks, but some residents say the tents lining the perimeter prove the priority is not on the kids using the park, but on the homeless people who abuse it.

“I don’t feel like they respect the fact that it belongs to everyone. Just for them, ”says Becca Prismantis, a Westchester resident who says she had to take her kids to nearby towns for their lacrosse teams.

Earlier this year, Bonin requested a feasibility study for an alternative to encampments and suggested part of Westchester Park and Mar Vista Park. NBC4 viewers shared photos showing campsites had invaded the softball fields.

“What we are proposing is to allow those who are here now to be in a certain section,” Bonin explained at a city council meeting in May. “Give them security, sanitation, services, install them in housing while restoring the rest of the park for general and public use. “

But some parents say the damage is done; teams have had to move to other parks, parents have had to leave their home neighborhoods to take their children to play – and all because they don’t feel safe in their own local park.

“I see things are taken care of, I see it’s just out of control,” says Prismantis.

But Stephanie Tatro says she has two young children whom she often brings to the park and feels very safe, even at night.

Tatro is a co-founder of the local Grass Roots Neighbors nonprofit and says she has gotten to know many of those who call Westchester Park home.

“I see a lot of uses happening in this park as well as the people who live here who are not housed and who are trying to take the next step in their lives and improve the circumstances,” Tatro says.

She believes the park is big enough for children and the homeless and denies any danger lurking nearby.

“I don’t see how the tents prevent access. Full access is available, ”she said.

But as the NBC4 I-Team first reported on May 20, crime is on the rise near parks and schools in Los Angeles where homeless settlements abound. NBC4 cameras caught brawls, weapons used to harass and threaten homeless people and angry parents over what they say is the city’s lack of interest in addressing the root causes of roaming.

Six days after the NBC4 report, Bonin lobbied city council to provide park space for homeless neighbors.

“I will gladly take all of these things off the table if people can come up with better solutions,” he told voters and colleagues at the May meeting.

Westchester parents say they have an idea.

“A different solution would be to send them or move them to a place that doesn’t take the kids away,” says O’Rourke. “It’s like homeless people are allowed to live here, but children are not allowed to play here.

The results of the feasibility study are expected in early August. Some residents argue that this will not be enough because the study does not take into account the community impact of such a plan, which they say would be a failure.


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Non profit living

Mother whose son was shot and killed offers help to families affected by gun violence

HAMPTON, Virginia – A mother who lost her son to gun violence has founded a non-profit organization to help other grieving parents after losing a child.

The support group is called MM2K, which stands for “Mommies Matter to Kyyri”.

Sevhn Doggette’s son Kyyri was 25 when he was shot and killed in August 2017. It happened in Charlotte, North Carolina, where Doggette now lives.

She tells News 3 that she is from Hampton Roads and comes here often, and when she heard about the recent violence involving young people, she felt compelled to publicize her organization.

Doggette says MM2K initially provides a listening ear to grieving moms and dads. She also said they have licensed therapists who volunteer their time.

“As for the different mechanics to help them go through, basically every day because it’s like a roller coaster ride for us,” Doggette explained.

As part of the support services, they sometimes even accompany parents to court in the face of the person (s) accused of having killed their child.

“Now you have to deal with this,” she added. “I’m also facing a life sentence and haven’t even committed a crime.”

Related: Norfolk Mother Who Lost Son To Gun Violence Hosts New Podcast to Help Grieving Families

Doggette says that while MM2K is active in Charlotte, she also hopes to host community events in Hampton Roads. She encourages families affected by gun violence to reach out.

More information about MM2K can be found here.

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