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Non profit living

New HUD rule to prevent evictions from social housing


WASHINGTON – The Biden administration is trying to prevent evictions from public housing for non-payment of rent, seeking to strengthen protections after the end of the national moratorium on evictions.

Under a new rule from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, tenants in HUD-subsidized public housing cannot be evicted for non-payment without providing them with 30 days notice and information about federal aid emergency rent available. The rule is expected to be published Thursday in the Federal Register.

Technically, the rule would go into effect 30 days after its publication, but a senior HUD official told The Associated Press that public housing authorities across the country must comply immediately. The official, who was not authorized to comment publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity, said the rule change was due to significant concern over a looming wave of evictions as affairs began to unravel. way to court.

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In an official statement due for release on Wednesday, HUD Secretary Marcia Fudge called the change “an important step in making tenants aware of the availability of funds that can help them pay overdue rents and give them more. time to access relief that could prevent deportation. entirely.”

The elements of the new rule are not new. The 30-day notice requirement is part of the original COVID-19 relief program. But the change will come with specific advice for housing authorities on how to direct tenants to the billions of dollars in emergency rent assistance available. It is also designed to give these funds extra time to work their way through the system.

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In addition to residents of public housing, the rule change will apply to those living in project-based rental assistance properties – a program by which private for-profit or non-profit landlords contract with the HUD to provide affordable housing. In total, HUD estimates that the change will affect 4.1 million people.

Officials in the Biden administration have complained in the past that rent assistance funds were hampered by bureaucracy at the state and local levels. The senior HUD official said the dispersal of funds went a bit slower than officials had hoped.

The federal moratorium, a response to the coronavirus pandemic, expired in late August and Congress did not extend it. As the federal government now focuses on injecting money into rental assistance programs, the national moratorium has turned into a patchwork of localized bans, in places like Washington State, Boston and New York State – all expiring at different times.

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The senior HUD official said one of the main goals of the change was to bring all jurisdictions under one banner.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


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Highland Hills apartment resident digs through rubble; First lawsuit filed – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth


The first lawsuit was filed in connection with the destructive natural gas explosion last week at the Highland Hills apartment complex in south Dallas.

The explosion injured eight people, including three firefighters who remain hospitalized and displaced around 250 people.

An injured employee at the apartment complex filed a personal injury claim against Atmos Energy Corporation.

Eriq Davis accuses the natural gas supplier of complex negligence, although investigators have yet to determine the exact cause of the explosion.

Residents displaced by the blast are continuing their recovery efforts.

Abdul Karriem lived in the building that exploded.

Although his unit was spared serious damage, crews demolished the entire 10-unit building after the explosion.

Karriem returned several times to the pile of rubble left behind, wondering if any of his possessions were salvageable.

“When you lose everything you have, being able to come back and get some of it back, it’s a healing process and it’s a victory,” he said.

This is exactly what the trade construction contractor did on Tuesday morning, using his personal mini-loader and a crew.

“We went there this morning with my bobcat and I moved some debris and dug a tunnel,” he said. “I saw living room furniture and said, oh ok, so my bedroom is there. And of course I was able to find my dresser.

Surprisingly, the dresser survived the explosion and subsequent demolition with several personal effects inside.

“My passport was what I went there for,” Karriem said. “I got my passport. I can’t live without it!

Dallas fire crews and investigators are no longer permanently present at the site. The site was entrusted to Atmos Energy investigators as well as to claims adjusters.

Investigators for natural gas suppliers were seen digging holes around the property.

Fire investigators have previously paid close attention to a stove pulled from the debris.

Davis’s attorneys also provided NBC 5 with new details on the moments before the explosion.

“Mr. Davis and other employees were heading to the area unit in question,” said attorney Eric Allen of Zehl & Associates.

Allen says employees and maintenance workers have been dispatched to inspect a building for possible damage from a shooting that happened the night before.

“As soon as they smelled the gas, they called 911,” Allen said.

As Dallas firefighters joined with workers to investigate the possible gas leak, the building exploded.

“Mr. Davis was in the immediate vicinity of this explosion along with the other colleagues. He suffered burns, abdominal injuries and a leg injury,” he said.

The bodily injury lawsuit accuses Atmos of failing to “control and prevent the gas leaks”, “of failing to carry out operations in a safe, reasonable and prudent manner” and of claiming “the injuries and damages that the plaintiff [Davis] suffered in the incident in question were caused by the gross negligence of the defendant [Atmos Energy]. ‘

The lawsuit calls for a jury trial and a million dollars, unless a jury determines a different amount.

“The lawsuit is about obtaining compensation and medical treatment for Mr. Davis,” Allen said.

The lawyer was unable to speak openly about the decision to file a lawsuit against the company and not against the owners of the apartment complex, but pointed to “a story of [Atmos] failing to properly inspect the lines.

“We are in the early stages. We have a rudimentary understanding of what happened and we are conducting an ongoing investigation, ”he said.

NBC 5 has contacted public relations officials with Atmos regarding the lawsuit but has yet to receive a response.

The company has previously said its equipment appears to have performed as expected.

The law firm and residents are still anxiously awaiting what investigators say caused the explosion.

“It’s very likely that we’ll have our own experts and see if we agree with the state’s investigation,” Allen said.

After managing to collect some personal items from his old home, Karriem stopped to say one last prayer.

“I had to shut it down. I wanted to let God know that I am grateful for my life even though I lost all my possessions, ”he said. “I advance.”

However, he is worried about his neighbors, many low-income families who are struggling to recover from the explosion.

On Tuesday, the city of Dallas announced that it is partnering with several organizations to provide the 250 displaced tenants with some kind of one-stop-shop for resources. Residents will be offered assistance in exploring lease termination options and replacing lost documents.

In a statement, the city said:

The City of Dallas Emergency Management Office (OEM), Dallas Public Library, and the Mayor’s and City Council’s Office have coordinated with nonprofits and volunteer organizations active in disaster situations ( VOAD) to provide a Resource Guide and Multi-Agency Resource Center (MARC) at the J. Erik Jonsson Central Library during regular DPL office hours on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Only tenants of Highland Hills Apartments can receive assistance on Tuesday, October 5 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Wednesday, October 6 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Those interested in providing support to the residents of the Highland Hills Apartments are encouraged to donate to the City of Dallas Emergency Relief Fund at the Dallas Foundation, bit.ly/3oqXGVu.
If any non-profit groups are interested in helping displaced residents, they can email [email protected] with their contact details and the resources they provide to include in the resource guide.
While the owners of the Highland Hills Apartments are responsible for housing their displaced tenants, the City of Dallas Emergency Management Office (OEM) helped coordinate the stay at the hotel.


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Waukegan nonprofit helps families in need of diapers


Waukegan Mayor Ann Taylor welcomed volunteers and toured the Waukegan warehouse where baby, toddler and adult diapers, vintage supplies, infant formula, children’s books, baby seats, cars, winter coats and more are waiting to be distributed to the hundreds of families served by Keeping Families Covered.

“I am very impressed,” said Taylor, who on September 20, along with Waukegan City Council, proclaimed September 27 to October 3 as Diaper Awareness Week in the city.

“I knew you offered the diapers, but I didn’t know you had clothes and those other offerings too.”

The non-profit organization that Ann Marie Mathis created 11 years ago in her basement to provide mothers in need with lightly used equipment and clothing has indeed come a long way. Today, diapers, pull-ups and more are stacked over about two floors at his North Oak Grove Avenue facility. The organization serves 1,200 families and 1,800 children per month and is set to distribute 1.5 million diapers this year.

The National Diaper Bank Network, of which Keeping Families Covered has been a member since 2014, estimates that one in three families needs diapers. That is, they cannot afford enough diapers to keep their babies’ buttocks clean, dry and healthy.

The domino effect can include making it more difficult for parents to find and keep work, as daycare centers will not take babies without a sufficient supply of diapers for the day.

“The more I learned about diaper needs, the more determined I was to do everything possible to meet them,” said Mathis, herself a mother of seven children aged 3 to 12.

With the help of a small group of volunteers, Keeping Families Covered operates monthly mobile pantries in Gurnee, Grayslake, Waukegan, Round Lake Park and Kenosha, Wisconsin, and weekly distributions in Highwood.

The agency recently partnered with six other like-minded Illinois nonprofits to form an advocacy coalition to raise awareness of unmet diaper needs.

“A lot of people don’t realize that programs like WIC (the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children) and other government safety nets don’t cover diapers,” Mathis said. . “And efforts to lower the Illinois diaper tax rate have yet to be successful.

“The unmet need for diapers is a major source of stress for parents, especially those who are struggling to make ends meet,” she said. “On average, diapers cost $ 70 to $ 80 per month per child. For families living in poverty, this represents about 14% of their monthly income. These families need help, and we are here for them.

As she walked through the offices and warehouse of Keeping Families Covered, Taylor said she was amazed at the size, scope and efficiency of the operation. The need, she said, is certainly critical.

“All of these items are so expensive,” Taylor said. “They say you can change a child’s diapers for $ 70 to $ 80 a month, but I think that’s a conservative estimate.”

And even that amount breaks the bank of thousands of families, Mathis added.

“Many parents have to choose between groceries and diapers,” she said. “It’s a vicious circle.”

In the diaper packing room during the tour, five volunteers filled packages of 25 diapers each, carefully labeling them by size and preparing them for distribution.

“One thing I would say about this place is it’s so easy to volunteer,” said Gurnee resident Bryan Pearson, who was there with his wife, Sandy. “It’s so well organized.”

Mathis said there are many ways for those interested in volunteering. Thursday Night Wrappy Hours, Neighborhood Diaper Drives, and Saturday Duty Days are just a few examples, with more opportunities listed under the “Help Out!” Heading. ”Tab on keepfamiliescovered.org.

A new changing table sponsorship program has also been launched, with cash donation options ranging from $ 500 to $ 5,000 and benefits ranging from social media ads to the company name and logo on the organization’s 16-foot trailer and box truck.

Mathis said his agency’s partnership with the National Diaper Bank Network allows Keeping Families Covered to buy diapers in bulk at a great price, so every dollar donated is stretched considerably.

Additional sponsorship details are available at keepfamiliescovered.org.

Taylor said she wished Mathis and her team continued success in achieving their goals, including advocating for reductions in sales taxes on items such as diapers and period supplies.

“What you do is really, really important,” the mayor said. “I am so impressed.”

• To submit your news, visit dailyherald.com/share.


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California experiments with social democracy


In summary

A flurry of laws signed by California Governor Gavin Newsom is an experiment in European social democracy. Will it work?

California, as everyone should know by now, has the highest poverty rate in the country, as determined by the Census Bureau when the cost of living is included in the calculation.

While family incomes in California aren’t particularly low compared to other states, our extremely high living costs, especially on housing, mean that those incomes don’t stretch as far as they would. elsewhere.

The Public Policy Institute of California takes it a step further by calculating how many Californians live in near poverty, using a methodology similar to that of the Census Bureau.

In total, more than a third of the state’s roughly 40 million people are in severe economic distress. They are, for the most part, workers in low-paying jobs and their families, and their plight has been exacerbated by the nearly two-year COVID-19 pandemic, which has hit them the hardest both in terms of medical than economic.

Backed by unions, Gov. Gavin Newsom and his fellow Democrats pledged to reduce the state’s high levels of poverty and income disparity and this year generated a basket of bushels of laws that they say will reduce deviations.

California is indeed testing the long-held beliefs of the political left that America should move closer to the European model of “social democracy” by expanding supportive public services and empowering workers in their dealings with it. employers.

The former include increasing eligibility for Medi-Cal, the state health care system for the poor that already covers more than a third of California’s residents, expanding early childhood education childhood to both improve learning outcomes and free up more parents to work, and increase housing expenses for low- and middle-income families.

The latter is a variety of bills that impose new labor and pay standards on industries that employ large numbers of low-paid workers, including clothing production, agriculture, and the ever-growing distribution centers operated by Amazon and other big companies.

“We can’t allow companies to put profit before people,” Newsom said as he signed a law to relax production quotas at Amazon’s huge “distribution centers”.

“The hard-working warehouse workers who have helped support us during this unprecedented time should not have to risk injury or be punished because of operating quotas that violate basic health and safety.” , Newsom added.

“California holds corporations accountable and recognizes the dignity and humanity of our workers, who have helped build the world’s fifth-largest economy,” Newsom said later as he signed a bill banning piece-work in the garment industry centered in Los Angeles.

Newsom also signed bills to extend protections for domestic workers, increase the minimum wage for workers with disabilities, increase criminal penalties for “wage theft” by employers, and provide agricultural workers with smoke protection equipment. forest fires.

This is not, however, a 100% sweep for union-backed legislation. Newsom has vetoed a bill allowing postal voting in elections for the agricultural workers’ union organization and one that would extend paid family leave.

Expanding government services will of course cost the state billions of dollars, which it can afford now as income taxes pour into its treasury, but its sustainability is questionable. California is overly dependent on high-income taxpayers, which means its income plummets during an economic downturn.

New benefits for workers, meanwhile, will drive up costs for employers, potentially prompting some to move their operations and jobs to less expensive locations. The clothing industry is particularly competitive, which is why a large part has already gone abroad.

Higher public and private costs are the flip side of the California experiment in social democracy. Ultimately, Newsom and the legislature cannot repeal the laws of economics.


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Living in the North in brief: 10/03/2021 | Lifestyles


Yoga class scheduled for October 5

INTERLOCHEN – A Vinyasa yoga practice begins at 4 p.m. on October 5 at the Interlochen Public Library. Bring a yoga mat, water, and a towel. Donations are appreciated.

Book folding course at the Bellaire library

BELLAIRE – Sue Geshel is leading a 6 p.m. book folding event on October 5 at the Bellaire Public Library. Fold the pages of a book so that it shows the word “joy”. All supplies provided. Space is limited. Register online or call the library at 231-533-8814.

Glen Arbor Drawing Workshop Set

GLEN ARBOR – David Westerfield is leading the “Drawing Demystified” class from 10 am to 3 pm on October 9 at the Glen Arbor Arts Center. Those 13 and older can learn the basics of drawing, including building shapes, lines, shading, and other techniques. The cost is $ 75 for GAAC members, $ 85 for others. Registration is due October 6 at glenarborart.org.

Basketry sessions on Wednesdays

ALDEN – Dorothy Walter leads the basketry activities from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesdays at the Helena Township Community Center. Experience is not required. A fee of $ 5 covers the material. More information: 231-331-6583.

Money management workshops

INTERLOCHEN – The Northwest Michigan Community Action Agency is presenting workshops on money management from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. October 6 to November 3 at the Interlochen Public Library. These Wednesday events cover consumer protection, debt reduction, banking basics and more. Registration: 231-276-6767 or nmcaa.net/workshops.

Book club meets in Interlochen

INTERLOCHEN – Discuss “Educated” by Tara Westover at 6:30 pm on October 6 at the Interlochen Public Library. Discover the book from the library. Contact: 231-276-6767.

Sons of Norway meets on October 7

SUTTONS BAY —The local sons of Christian Radich Lodge from Norway meet at 6:30 pm on October 7 at the Immanuel Lutheran Church. This monthly event includes a business section and a program. More information: 248-890-9221.

NWS Presents Virtual Book Conference

TRAVERSE CITY – The National Writers’ Series features science author Mary Roach at 7 p.m. on October 7 via a live broadcast. Roach talks about his latest book “Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law”. Find tickets for $ 10.50 each on the NWS website.

Recruitment of mentors

TRAVERSE CITY – Big Brothers Big Sisters is launching the “30 adults in 30 days” campaign to recruit 30 new mentors in October. Mentors (Bigs) meet with mentees (Littles) four to six hours per month. In-person training is offered. Bigsupnorth.com/volunteer

Scheduled peer support events

TRAVERSE CITY – Disability Network Northern Michigan is offering virtual support activities in October.

A group of men meets on Mondays at 10 a.m. via the Zoom app.

Peer advocacy group sessions begin at 2 p.m. on October 7 and the quarantine kitchen continues at 2 p.m. on October 12 and 26.

Spirit Club organizes events on Fridays from 11 a.m. and Wednesdays at 3 p.m. The free program includes exercises led by an instructor.

Race fundraising results published

TRAVERSE CITY – The TVC5K Run the Runway supported the nonprofit Wings of Mercy with over $ 20,000. Over 200 runners participated in the September race at Cherry Capital Airport.

Library sale brings in more than $ 19,000

ELK RAPIDS – Friends of the Elk Rapids District Library raised over $ 19,000 at the Glamor, Glitter and Glitz event in September. The funds will support library events and activities.

The hospital receives a regional grant

FRANKFURT – The Anchor and Heart Endowment of the Grand Traverse Regional Community Foundation recently awarded the Paul Oliver Memorial Hospital. Its new specialty clinic receives a grant of $ 94,320 to provide local patients with services such as cardiology, orthopedic surgery and urology.


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A Year of Service for All: The Key to Rebuilding the Fabric of Our Nation


As our nation moves away from the 20th anniversary of 9/11 and Congress moves closer to requiring women to register for selective serviceI can’t help but think of the 13 soldiers who died on August 26 in Kabul. How they were linked in service to the nation. How they answered the call at such a young age – five of them were only 20 when they died. How they represent a cross-section of America – cities, men and women, different ethnicities, serving side by side on behalf of our great nation.

I can’t help but think about how divided our country has become. We live in individual Americas bubbles – physically and culturally, in person and online. The contrasts between our Americas were highlighted for me recently, during our first family vacation since the pandemic. We were in the Great Basin, on the border of Nevada and Utah, a decidedly rural area, different in every conceivable way from the dense New York suburbs that I call my home. Our motorhome broke down on a washed out gravel road in the middle of a dusty field, and a few good souls came to help us. Through my military service and that of my husband, we instantly forged a connection, a shared humanity, because they helped us out of the gap.

Having been fortunate enough to visit a few national parks on our trip, I remembered the excellent work of the Civilian Conservation Corps. 1930s engineering and the blood, sweat and tears of a representative sample of Americans created the Angel’s Landing Trail in Zion, among many others. What is my generation’s lasting gift to Americans a century from now, I wondered? What will our Angel’s Landings be?

Taking all of these thoughts – our fallen servicemen, our divided country, our aging infrastructure – together, it seems to me that maybe, for so many reasons, it’s time to broaden the conversation of the women signing up for the project – to all 18-25 year olds serving our nation to some extent.

I feel very lucky to be born into a family that values ​​service before oneself. My maternal grandparents both served in World War II and my parents both moved thousands of miles from home to work in the Navajo Nation. These values ​​are, in large part, what drove me to go to West Point and serve in the military.

The irony is that now, over a decade after my military service, living squarely in an unrepresentative slice of America, I realize that my time in uniform has given me far more than I have ever had. never given – and I also realized that national service can be the key to mending the tattered fabric of our national narrative. As our country has become more and more divided, what I appreciate most is that through my service I was able to experience all from America. Like those 13 brave servicemen, I too was side by side with a cross-section of America. I have lived in places very different from where I grew up, be it rural Missouri, the metropolis of Oahu, a German village, or a large base in Iraq. These experiences help me understand, appreciate, respect and love the diverse perspectives of the countless parts of America that exist in our fractured country – and allow me not only to coexist, but to connect and thrive in places. away from where I now call home.

I feel that encouraging more national service or, better yet, making it compulsory, is the most important solution we have to one of the most fundamental challenges we face: fixing the divisions in our country and fundamentally strengthen the fabric that binds all of us together. This fall, as Congress discusses including all women in selective service, let’s take it a step further and start discussing how to include all 18-25 year olds in a national service program.

Service can take many forms, such as joining the military or AmeriCorps, working at a nonprofit, joining a parks system, or teaching at an underserved school. What matters most is not only that the service helps strengthen our country and its citizens, but that it is designed for young Americans to work closely with teammates with significantly different lived experiences, serve in places different from where they come from, do more important work and accomplish difficult feats.

As we work on policy changes to make service mandatory, there are steps we can take now to make service feel mandatory and celebrated. What if recruiters asked about service experience during interviews? What if it was included in college applications? What if there was a way to give diplomas and certifications at the end, who would then help people find future employment? Measures like these can start now to give more credibility to such an important activity.

Imagine a country in which all 18-25 year olds spend a lot of time alongside other Americans who come from very different parts of the country and serve in parts of the country very different from where they grew up. Imagine not only the positive impact this can have on our country’s infrastructure – our 21st Century Angel Landing – but also the impact it will have on every individual. “Other Americas” will no longer feel like foreigners, and we will appreciate the values ​​that unite us all as Americans, which are greater than any political party, demographic, or city big or small in our great country. These experiences will leave an indelible mark on every person who serves, and as a group, it will strengthen our country in ways we sorely need.

Elizabeth Young McNally is Executive Vice President of Schmidt Futures, a philanthropic initiative of Eric and Wendy Schmidt, former partner and global leader of McKinsey Academy, and veteran of service in Iraq in the US military. Liz was also named president of the visiting council of the US Military Academy. A Rhodes and Truman scholar, she began her career as a military police officer in the United States Army. She and her husband John are raising their three school-aged children outside of New York City and taking every opportunity to introduce them to and serve the diversity that makes up our nation.


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Police chief no longer has to live in Broomfield – Greeley Tribune


Broomfield Police Chief is no longer required to live within city and county limits, the city council voted on Tuesday evening.

The ordinance was passed 8-1 with Councilor Elizabeth Law-Evans voting no and Councilor Sharon Tessier absent.

Police Chief Gary Creager announced in June that he was retiring on January 11, 2022 after 40 years in law enforcement. His retirement and the subsequent recruitment process allowed city and county staff to reconsider the residency requirement, the council’s memo said.

“Given the recent and future difficulties in recruiting and retaining law enforcement positions, the reassessment of the residency requirement is timely,” the note said. “The change in the residency requirement will allow staff to expand the pool of potential candidates when recruiting a new police chief to ensure that the city and county are able to attract and retain the chief.” most qualified police officer, regardless of residence. “

Of the 18 municipal staff police departments surveyed in the Denver / Boulder area, only two have a residency requirement, according to data presented during the first reading of the order on August 24.

City Councilor Deven Shaff said he heard concerns from residents about how a police chief who potentially does not live in Broomfield will be connected to the community of Broomfield.

“Our policing department is deeply integrated into every aspect of everything we do,” said Jennifer Hoffman, city and county manager. “And to think that we would pick a police chief who doesn’t embody that just isn’t going to happen.”

Shaff asked if a police chief would be less devoted to the citizens of Broomfield simply because he does not live in Broomfield.

“Resolutely, unequivocally, I can say absolutely not,” Hoffman said.

Law-Evans said his lack of support for the ordinance was not directed against any person or circumstance.

“I know the BPD is tightly integrated into the community. I think it’s important to consider what the situation would look like several years from now, maybe decades later, ”she said. “The comments I have received from my constituents are that it is very important for the chief of police himself to live in our community, to integrate so closely with our community.

Law-Evans said she was ready to draft an amendment to the ordinance that would give preference to applicants who already live or are willing to move to Broomfield, although the Council is not in favor.

Mayor Guyleen Castriotta noted that this was Hoffman’s hire and not Council.

“We should all facilitate this hire by giving it the most leeway to choose from the largest pool of candidates,” Castriotta said.

Before the ordinance was passed, the chief of police and the city and county manager were the only two employees required to live in Broomfield.

The job posting was posted on Wednesday and applications are being accepted until October 27 at 5 p.m.

“The position will report to the City and County Director and will work closely with all city and county departments, community members, faith-based organizations, non-profit organizations and our regional partners,” indicates the list. “As a visible community leader, the police chief will demonstrate and uphold the fundamentals of community policing, that is, position the department as one that ‘politics with and within the community’, as opposed to ‘community policing’.

The annual salary range is $ 175,000 and $ 200,000. For more information, visit Broomfield.org/ChiefOfPolice.


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Parents of shooting victims hope New Haven collaboration will reduce violence – NBC Connecticut


New Haven partners with CT Against Gun Violence (CAGV) to fight violence in the city.

The non-profit organization will engage community members and guide the city’s new violence prevention office.

The CAGV says it will be holding community listening sessions soon to discuss ways to prevent gun violence, in particular preventing it, intervening and also focusing on the after-effects.

The announcement was made at the Healing Botanical Garden in Elm City on Friday.

There, bricks commemorate the lives lost in New Haven to gun violence.

“It’s sad. My heart goes out to all of these moms,” said Pamela Jaynez, who doesn’t want to keep adding names to a path she helped create.

“Ten more bricks are being laid tomorrow and it’s not even for September and October. We go back to the months of June and July for which these are asked. “

Jaynez took NBC Connecticut to see his son’s brick.

Walter Jaynes Sr. would have turned 44 in June. He was killed in 1997.

“He’s been gone longer than he’s lived… It was six days before his 20th birthday when he was murdered.

The grieving mother is hoping New Haven’s collaboration with CAGV will have an impact, a step she believes is in the right direction to stop this growing path of deadly gun violence.

“I had no idea going to this funeral, that one day I would be one of those front row relatives,” said Thomas Daniels, who has the same background as Jaynez.

Her son Thomas was killed in 2009.

“These young murderers don’t know the effect they have on families, and the long-term effects, because for the last two or three years, I’ve just started to live. I just started living, ”said Daniels, who started the Fathers Cry Too group to help others experience what he has.

As New Haven searches for creative ways to fight violence, Daniels hopes all Connecticut communities come together to make a difference.

“It is no longer a black against black crime. Gun violence is everywhere. Death knows no boundaries.

A push for change – a Jaynez says she will never stop doing while her son watches over her.

“Every time I come here and start talking about my son, the chime (starts ringing) and I know he says to me, ‘Yeah, mom, yeah. “”


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10 in-demand jobs of the decade that don’t require a bachelor’s degree


A college degree can put you on the fast track to success in today’s job market by increasing your earning potential and your access to different work opportunities – but higher education is a costly investment that continues to grow. be inaccessible to many.

Over the past 10 years, college costs have increased by about 25%, according to a CNBC Make It analysis of College Board data. Along with these rising costs, student debt has skyrocketed; Americans currently owe over $ 1.73 trillion in student loans.

According to a recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there is a range of jobs that do not require a bachelor’s degree in several industries that are expected to be in high demand over the next 10 years.

Many of these jobs require a high school diploma, an associate’s degree, or a non-degree post-secondary scholarship. A non-degree post-secondary scholarship is a course typically taken in less than two years that teaches you the specific skills or knowledge needed for a job. Community colleges often offer these programs, which can include EMT certificates or library technician training, as two examples, Bureau of Labor statistics division chief Michael Wolf told CNBC Make It.

“It’s a bit of a mishmash,” Wolf says of the job classification. “It’s hard to find a common explanation as to why they are all popular… there are specific reasons why each is in demand, and will continue to be in demand over the next ten years.”

However, three trends are driving the growth of almost every job: increased demand for sustainable energy, an aging population and a renewed interest in personal care during the coronavirus pandemic.

Wind turbine maintenance technicians and solar PV panel installers are expected to be among the fastest growing jobs of the decade due to the climate change emergency and the resulting demand for sustainable energy.

Occupational therapy assistants, physiotherapy assistants, orderlies and physiotherapist assistants will become essential roles as more baby boomers retire and depend on these services. In a recent analysis, the University of Southern California notes that health care costs for this group are expected to be high, as this generation “lives longer, but experiences higher rates of obesity, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension ”.

Wolf specifies that physiotherapist assistants and physiotherapist assistants have separate and distinct roles: assistants are actively involved in providing patient care, while assistants are not involved in providing care, but rather focus on providing care. administrative tasks such as setting up equipment and completing office documents.

After dealing with the exhaustion and isolation induced by the pandemic over the past 18 months, people are investing more in personal services like massages and self-enrichment classes, resulting in increased demand massage therapists and teachers. “People are realizing that focusing and maintaining their personal care is important not only for their mental state, but also for their overall well-being,” said Vicki Salemi, career expert at Monster.

If you are interested in pursuing one of these careers, Salemi recommends that you read job descriptions to identify the skills recruiters are looking for, and read professional publications or blogs for up-to-date industry information. It also helps to have related work experience, she adds, whether through an online certification course, a work-study program at your local community college, or volunteering. in a non-profit organization. “Even if you don’t have any work experience, you can train yourself or follow someone in the field,” says Salemi. “Not only will you gain valuable skills, but you will also be able to meet contacts and references for that next job.”

To verify:

These are the 6 fastest growing jobs of the decade grossing over $ 100,000

How Networking Helped a 23-Year-Old Student Make an “Early Career” Discovery

The 3 fastest-disappearing jobs in the United States over the next decade

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Argus Wesleyan | WesCeleb: Philippe Bungabong ’22 on Freeman Scholarship, Nonprofit Work and American Idol


c / o Yongxi Tan ’22

During his college application, Philippe Bungabong ’22 was looking for an opportunity to further broaden his intellectual horizons. Throughout his time at the university, Bungabong has made himself an indispensable member of several campus communities, including the sailing team, the economics department and the Career Center. Outside of class, Bungabong can be found co-managing his non-profit organization, cooking delicious meals or singing. The Argus caught up with Bungabong on a foggy Tuesday evening over a glass of wine.

Argus: Why do you think you are nominated to be a WesCeleb?

Philippe Bungabong: [Laughs.] I think I was nominated for, well, part of it has to be nepotism.

A: Yeah, WesCeleb is talking about nepotism. [Laughs.]

PB: I have a number of great friends on The Argus, but I also think the other part of that should be the time I spent working at different levels on campus. I have been a residential counselor, I have worked as a teaching assistant for several classes and I am also part of the sailing team. I also sing and write songs and am friends with several people on the artistic side of campus. It’s just a gift, to know different people from different walks of life, and I am honored to be a WesCeleb.

A: Could you tell us more about the Freeman scholarship?

PB: The Freeman scholarship program, as it operated during my year, was that Wesleyan selected one student each from 11 countries in the East and South East Asia regions. I believe the countries are Philippines, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Indonesia, Malaysia, Japan, China, South Korea, Thailand and Vietnam. Of course, this has been a great opportunity to learn Wesleyan at no cost, but I also think the Freeman Scholars community is such a powerful community just to have students who really love to learn and study so many different things. I like the way I study economics and applied data science, but a number of other Freeman fellows are more in computer science or more in environmental studies or government. And they’re always the first, or among the first, groups of people I would tap into for insight into these areas.

A: Speaking of fields of study, did you know you wanted to study economics when you arrived? How did it happen?

PB: I came in thinking I wanted to study something more quantitative. I was either thinking about physics, math, or economics, and I took the three years of first and second year, but I think what I was most excited about was economics, and the ECON300 class, of which I am currently CA. It is a course on quantitative methods in economics. It was in this course that I really realized how economics is an area that will help me see and quantify the systems and interactions in the world.

A: It makes sense! I want to go back to your experiences at Wesyou mentioned that you have met so many different people on campus, people from all walks of life through your engagements. Which were the most valuable in shaping your Wesleyan experience?

PB: My closest friends are on the sailing team. I live with two of my co-captains. I had never sailed before entering college and it was just something I had chosen in first year and kept. I love sport. I also like the people in it. But aside from the sailing team, I would say my time as a tour guide, and now as a senior interviewer, continues to inform my time at Wesleyan. As a tour guide, I continue to introduce Wesleyan to future students, and this has given me a new set of eyes again through which I look at Wesleyan…. I always try to keep finding things that I love about Wes and also things that I want to improve about Wes, or things that I would like them to be different about Wesleyan, all with the goal of communicating why I think Wes might be a good fit for someone. I would say Wesleyan is not a perfect school, but for some people it is the ideal school, and I want to make sure that I am able to communicate that to all the potential students who come here.

A: Speaking of college admissions and helping people find perfect universities, you also run an educational non-profit organization.!

PB: I co-founded CAUSE Philippines when I was a freshman here. I co-founded it with two other low income Filipino students and we really built it with the idea that talent is everywhere, but opportunity not. We wanted to equip other low income Filipino students with the best college education they can receive so that one day they can go home and develop their community for the better, as we believe low income students know the more intimately the problems of their community. focused towards.

A: Could you explain what CAUSE does in particular?

PB: We organize a variety of programming events. We have a mentoring program, where we match mentees (low income high school students) with mentors, who are currently students in the US, UK, Singapore and around the world. We guide them step by step through the university application process, preparing for the SATs, writing their common application activities, their essays, requesting recommendations from teachers, all because it There is no defined infrastructure with which these students can really work, especially in terms of applying abroad.

Apart from that, we also run webinars that are more open to the public, and we do that on topics like how [to] get scholarships abroad, which scholarships are even available. We run these events throughout the year where we really try to bring together talent, not only from the capital of Metro Manila, but also from remote provinces in the Philippines.

A: Beyond non-profit and academic work, you are also an artist! What does music mean to you? You always joke about how you want Ryan Seacrest to work, so tell me about “American Idol” and the role he’s played in your life.

PB: [Laughs] Music has always been an outlet for me. I grew up watching American Idol, Kelly Clarkson, Carrie Underwood from the living room, even though I lived in Manila, Philippines, a 17 hour flight from New York. Growing up, I was always drawn to singing competitions. I think it’s so much fun watching people sing, but also from a competitive point of view, strategizing and trying to win a singing competition. My interest in music really arose from the fact that I grew up watching shows like American Idol, but also growing up in the Philippines, where everyone sings karaoke. So I sang a lot of karaoke growing up, and now music is still my biggest outlet. I rely on a number of songs for whatever mood I’m in. If I can’t find the appropriate song for this moment, and if I have enough creativity in me, I would write the song and my approach to songwriting This is typically what I want to learn from my own experiences , but also wanting to generalize, so that a number of other people can also feel what I felt.

A: It’s really beautiful, isn’t it? The interaction between an audience and the artist and how it reinforces meaning.

PB: Yeah yeah.

A: Well Philippe, we’re kinda friends because of the pandemic.

PB: [Laughs] Yes.

A: [Laughs] Well we were stuck here [on campus] for a long time.

PB: [Laughs] During a very long time.

A: How do you think COVID-19 impacted you and your time at Wesleyan?

PB: The pandemic really made me appreciate the importance of community, of staying in touch with those who matter to you, whatever the circumstances. Of course, respecting the safety and hygiene measures. During the pandemic, I realized that my friends in the Wesleyan community are so important to me and so important to my college experience and that they really add a lot of color to a genre of college learning that was otherwise mostly black and White. When we were all sent home in second year, I realized that, my God, I’m still so lucky to have other Wesleyan students around me.

And when people were sent home, Nalu Tripician, my best friend on this campus, was so far away from me, but we still called every now and then, and that was one of the times I really realized that I wanted to stay in touch with many members of the Wesleyan community and friends that I have met over the years. And now that we’re all in person again, I really try to cherish every moment that I have with my friends in Wesleyan.

A: What advice would you give your freshman?

PB: I would say “breathe”. Breathe and recognize that everything will be fine. Just keep doing your best, but also live in the moment and don’t always think about what to expect.

A: Certainly not! [Laughs]

PB: I think as a senior now I realize that college is really short. And it’s the last four years (unless you’re in graduate school), the last four years of your life that are super structured, after that you’ll be released into the workforce and you’ll have 17 days of paid leave. So for my first year, breathe, have fun, and keep doing your best, but rest assured knowing that if you do your best, you’ll be fine too.

A: In that vein, how did Wesleyan shape you?

PB: I think Wesleyan made me more open-minded, in every sense of the word. I came here from a rather conservative Asian family, studied at a science high school and grew up with the idea that you would only be successful if you studied something in science or something quantitative, but coming to Wesleyan, meeting so many open-minded people like that, also made me realize that there are so many different perspectives that I could learn from, recognize and grow with. It is something that I will strive to keep in my heart even as I leave Wesleyan. Being open to as many experiences as possible, to as many right perspectives as possible, and not always having a clear idea of ​​what is right and wrong on my mind, and being open to changing your mind.

The interview has been edited for length and clarity.

You can reach Magda Kisielinska at [email protected].


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Calendar | News, Sports, Jobs


Editor’s Note: The Sentinel offers nonprofits and other community organizations the opportunity to promote upcoming events in this community calendar for free for three days prior to the event. Events requiring reservations can also be promoted up to two weeks before the reservation date.

Submit articles at least one working week before publication by e-mail, [email protected]; voicemail, (717) 248-6741; online, virtual press room at www.lewistownsentinel.com; or by mail or deposit, The Sentinel, PO Box 588 Lewistown, PA 17044. The publisher reserves the right to modify all submissions.

With all submissions, you must include a phone number for verification purposes. The phone number is not for publication unless otherwise noted.

If your organization would like to add a recurring event (for example, every Monday, third Thursday) that has been canceled due to the pandemic, contact Lifestyles editor Jeff Fishbein, email [email protected], or call ( 717) 248-6741, ext. 108.

Reserve now

Central PA Pink Connection Costume Party – 7-10 p.m. October 9 at Brookmere Winery in Belleville. Tickets cost $ 25 and can be purchased by calling or texting (571) 422-8969 or online at https://bit.ly/3o2xqAT. More information: pinkconnection.org or [email protected]

¯RAP Mifflin County Section Lunch – October lunch at noon on Friday October 15 at Birch Hill Event Center, 1100 N. Pine St., Burnham. The menu will be caprese salad, ham, sweet potatoes, almond green beans, roll / butter, gingerbread. The cost of the meal is $ 14. The program will be “Unusual suspects”. If you plan to attend, please respond to this email, [email protected], by noon on Tuesday, October 12, or by calling (717) 437-6024. Please indicate the number of people present. All retirees from the school are welcome.

Thursday September 30

¯Ace the Interview – 10 a.m. to noon; PA CareerLink Mifflin County, MCIDC Plaza, Bldg 58. Learn the best way to present yourself on paper and in person.

¯Intro to Microsoft Excel – 1 pm to 2:30 pm, PA CareerLink Mifflin County, MCIDC Plaza, Bldg 58. Learn how to use basic Microsoft Excel spreadsheet functionality to create, track, and edit data. Find out how to insert and format formulas, use shortcuts, manage rows and columns, and insert headers.

Bingo – 1 p.m., Yeagertown Senior Center

¯Standard Steel Melt Shop Retirees Lunch – 8:30 a.m. at Yetter’s, McVeytown

Friday October 1

¯Free Community Lunch – 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., New Life Church, 101 N. Beech St., Burnham.

¯ American Red Cross Blood Drive – 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Christ Church, Beaver Springs. Appointment required. For appointments and “Fast pass” visit: www.croixrouge.org.

¯45th annual JCS auction – 4 p.m. and up, McAlisterville Park. Local food trucks, crafts, baked goods, fresh produce, housewares, outdoor items, gift certificates, specialty coffees and themed baskets available. The profits will be donated to the Juniata Christian School.

Kettle Fest – 8 a.m. until dark at Tuscarora Heritage Days in East Waterford. Flea market with free installation. More information: (717) 543-8457.

Saturday October 2

¯Church Hill UMC Art Festival – 9 am-2pm, 199 Woodland Circle. Rain or shine event. Information: (717) 667-3778.

¯Keystone State Muscle Cars Cruise – 5-8 p.m., Londonderry Restaurant and Pub, Reedsville, across from Rutter’s. All cars, trucks, motorcycles are welcome. Meets every Saturday until October 30.

¯45th Annual JCS Auction – All Day, McAlisterville Park. Local food trucks, crafts, baked goods, fresh produce, housewares, outdoor items, gift certificates, specialty coffees and themed baskets available. The profits will be donated to the Juniata Christian School.

Kettle Fest – 8 a.m. until dark at Tuscarora Heritage Days in East Waterford. Flea market with free installation. Auto Show, 10 am-4pm Horseshoe Tournament; Reenactors of the Civil War. More information: (717) 543-8457.

¯ Rescue Our Furry Friends Adoption and Giving Event – 9 am to noon at Blaise Alexander Subaru, Lewistown.

Sunday October 3

¯ Flea Market – 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Lewistown Moose, 80 Brady Lane.

Kettle Fest – 7 a.m. to noon at Tuscarora Heritage Days, East Waterford. Flea market with free installation. More information: (717) 543-8457.

Meetings

Upcoming meetings are posted in the calendar. Missing classmate requests are posted once and repeated only if they are updated. Brief minutes of meetings and photos of class reunions with identified individuals in the order in which they appear are accepted for publication in the Living section. The deadline for submitting reviews is one week before publication. Submit meeting notices to Jeff Fishbein at The Sentinel; email [email protected] or call (717) 248-6741.

1956 Rothrock High School class reunion – noon October 13 at Hoss’ home. More information: Shirley Davidheiser, (717) 248-2746.

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Woofstock, Wags & Whiskers events return this weekend


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Woofstock returns this weekend to Sedgwick County Park.

The Wichita Eagle

If you’re a dog or cat lover, free up your schedule this weekend for two fun outdoor events that organizers say are key to solving pet overcrowding and homelessness in the area. Wichita area. You can celebrate with other pet owners at Woofstock’s 25th anniversary on Saturday at Sedgwick County Park, then attend the Wags & Whiskers Dinner and Live Auction on Sunday night at Chicken N Pickle.

Two of Wichita’s biggest fundraisers for local animal rescue organizations are back in person this weekend after COVID-altered events last year. Both take place outdoors and both will continue their online components to expand their reach during what is described as a banner year for animal inputs at the local and national levels.

Christy Fischer, executive director of the Wichita Animal Action League, says a number of factors have led to an overcrowding problem that she and others are calling the worst they have seen in the wellness industry animal. Among the contributors: elective procedures, which included sterilizations and sterilizations for dogs and cats, were postponed to 2020 as hospitals worried about drug shortages for patients struggling with COVID; some owners have had to abandon animals for financial and housing reasons following pandemic closures; and an adoption rush in 2020 as people worked from home and didn’t travel.

“All of the rescues did a lot of adoptions over a fairly short period of time in 2020 instead of that number of adoptions spanning 12 to 16 months as we would normally see,” Fischer said. “So now adoptions are down across the board because people already have their pets and they’re not necessarily looking for another one. “

Wichita Animal Action League, or WAAL, is one of many state-approved rescue groups working alongside the Kansas Humane Society to help save pets from euthanasia at local shelters simply for want of space or funds for medical needs. KHS is Wichita’s largest privately funded nonprofit animal shelter organization. It cares for 16,000 pets each year through approximately 8,000 pet adoptions and provides spaying / neutering services for low-income people, end-of-life services and community outreach. WAAL is a foster home rescue and does not operate a full time facility. The group rescued approximately 1,100 animals in 2020 from overcrowded shelters and also conducts several community outreach initiatives, ranging from sourcing community pet food banks to approaching owners for neglect or neglect issues. cruelty.

KHS and WAAL said their fundraisers in 2020 brought in less dollars than in 2019 and they hope returning to the in-person events will help fund the community’s unprecedented needs. Here’s how to participate in either of these events:

Kansas Humane Society Woofstock

Woofstock, the Kansas Humane Society’s main annual fundraising event, has drawn up to 10,000 attendees in recent years and temporarily changed its format in 2020 to a drive-thru version of Woofstock and virtual activities. As they return in person for the 25th anniversary of the event, organizers expect the continued spread of COVID to keep attendance lower.

“We understand that not everyone is comfortable attending events right now,” said Ericka Goering, KHS Director of Marketing and Communications. “We’re an outdoor event and we have a big space, so people should be able to spread out. We recommend that those who want to go out, wear a mask and practice social distancing as much as possible. “

Woofstock is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 2 at Sedgwick County Park, 6501 W. 21st St. Anyone 12 years of age and over pays $ 10 to access the festival grounds, which will have 80 vendor booths with freebies . as goods and services for sale, a beer garden, a dozen food trucks on site and live music: the acoustic duo Dangie Music in the morning and the rock band Tequila Ridge in the afternoon.

Dog activities include races, agility lessons and a costume contest. Planned human activities include a play clinic where kids can practice being a vet, raffles for gift baskets, stage contests featuring musical chairs and pet / owner costumes, photo booth and live demonstrations from the Wichita Police Department’s K-9 unit.

Also included in admission: A limited number of free microchips and dog vaccines are available on a first come, first served basis.

Five custom niches created by Commerce Construction Services Inc. will be on display at Woofstock; they are part of the Woofstock online auction which launched on September 20 and ends at 8 p.m. on October 4. or sign up for a VIP package. Tickets are also available at the door on October 2, but you’ll have a better choice of shirt size if you pre-register.

There are two VIP packages: $ 25 includes a t-shirt, event bag, dog bandana and entry to the event while a $ 40 package includes the Woofstock package plus participation in a walk launch at 9 a.m., breakfast, a Woof Walk t-shirt and early entry to the festival grounds.

Those who aren’t comfortable attending can still donate and receive freebies for the event, and KHS is promoting a series of activities online this week ahead of the event. Visit the group’s Facebook page (facebook.com/kshumane) to keep up with daily activity, from bad drawings of animals for a small donation to free photo contests with prizes.

WAAL Wags & Whiskers

This is the seventh year for Wags & Whiskers, the main annual fundraiser for WAAL, which began saving animals in crisis in November 2013. This year’s event was originally booked at a covered venue and the organizers decided to move it to the Chicken N Pickle outdoor area, 1240 N. Greenwich Road.

Doors open at 5 p.m. on Sunday, October 3 and the event runs from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets cost $ 75 per person and there were over 100 left at the start of this week. You will need to purchase a ticket before the end of the day Friday at WAALrescue.org/ww.

Admission includes vegan and non-vegan dinner options, beer and wine, a DJ playing music, and fun activities throughout the night. There will be a dog and cat toy raffle, wine raffle and live auction of 20 items with unique journeys and experiences.

Participants and those at home can bid on the silent auction, which is already live and has end times shifted to Sunday evening. You can register to bid using the same link above. If you can’t attend, Fischer said, consider fostering, volunteering, or donating in some other way described on the WAAL website.

More Upcoming Animal Rescue Fundraising Events:

ICT Dachshund Races, 2 p.m., Saturday, October 9, outside Historic Union Station, 701 E. Douglas: Held in conjunction with ICT Bloktoberfest, the annual Dachshund Races are great fun to watch and all proceeds go directly to Lifeline Animal Placement & Protection. LAPP is a non-profit animal rescue and adoption kennel based in Wichita; learn more about the group at lifelineanimalplacement.org.

In addition to the $ 5 entry fee per dog, funds are raised through a silent auction and raffles open to the public during the event, as well as merchandise. Registration and training from noon to 1:30 p.m. followed by a fancy dress contest for dogs at 1:45 p.m. and race from 2 p.m.

Who Let the Dogs Out 5K / 1 Mile Fun Run, Sunday, November 7, at the Sunflower Building at Sedgwick County Park: You can run with your canine running companion or just run alone; in any case, you will help reduce the overpopulation of pets in our region. This event raises funds for Spay-Neuter Kansas, a non-profit veterinary clinic located at 319 S. Hydraulic that provides low cost sterilization / sterilization to pets in low income households. Learn more about the clinic at spayneuterkansas.com. To register, search for the event name on Facebook and click Book Now, or search for the event on runsignup.com.

Online registration is $ 25 for the 1 mile tailwaggers event and $ 36 for the 5K timed chip event. This includes a t-shirt, a finishing medal and a raffle ticket for gift baskets. Dogs that participate will also receive racing gifts. Register by October 20 to guarantee your shirt size.

Fur Ball, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday, November 13, at The Vail, 210 N. Mosley: Fur Ball is the largest annual fundraiser for Beauties and Beasts Inc., a volunteer-run non-profit animal rescue organization that focuses on saving death row animals at shelters across the Wichita region and their placement in foster homes until adoption. Tickets start at $ 75 per person (beautiesfurball.givesmart.com) and include dinner from Culinary Catering plus two drink tickets. There will be silent and live auctions, photo booth, wine tasting and other activities. Learn more about the organization at beautiesandbeasts.org.


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#AM_Equality: September 28, 2021 – CRH


REPORT FINDS 2.3 MILLION LGBTQ + LATINX ADULTS IN AMERICA: A new report from the Williams Institute has found that of the 11.3 million LGBTQ + adults living in America, at least 2.3 million are Latinx. In addition, the report examined statistics relating to mental health, access to health care and economic characteristics. Williams Institute.

POLICE SERVICES ACROSS THE UNITED STATES CALL FOR LGBTQ + TRAINING: “Not only can training help the LGBTQ community, but it can also help police departments do their jobs better, especially those who are really invested in community policing,” said Christy Mallory, legal director for the Williams Institute of UCLA Law School. “These trainings can really help get to a place where LGBTQ communities feel comfortable working with law enforcement and really empower the police to do their jobs better and safer.” More NBC News.

🩺 GOP BILL WOULD FUND RESEARCH IN HEALTH CARE FOR YOUNG TRANSGENDERS: Last week, Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) introduced a bill that would end public funding for health care research for transgender youth. Specifically, the legislation “would prohibit the use of federal funds for gender transition among minors”. More American Independent.

FROM HOLLYWOOD TO CAPITOL HILL, HERE ARE 12 LGBTQ + LATINX TRAILBLAZERS: In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, Cynthia Silva (@ItsCynthiaSilva) compiled a list of 12 LGBTQ + Latinx pioneers. More NBC News.

?? IN STATES

“BLACK TRANS WOMEN LIKE ME DIE IN TEXAS DUE TO POLITICAL GAMES”: In a comment by Diamond Stylz (@DiamondStylz), she writes: “I urge all allies and LGB people to join me in holding lawmakers to account and denouncing dangerous rhetoric as a violent threat. We must implore them to reject harmful anti-transgender laws and focus on promoting strong non-discrimination policies like the equality law and investing in the programs our communities need to thrive. More Lawyer.

✈️ CALIFORNIA BANS STATE-FUNDED TRAVEL TO OHIO DUE TO ANTI-LGBTQ + ACT: The California Attorney General on Friday announced that California would restrict state-funded travel to Ohio due to Ohio passing the “Medical Practitioner Conscience” clause in June, which has been dubbed ” allowed to discriminate ”. More Cleveland scene.

🌈 THE NEW MINNEAPOLIS NONPROFIT LAUNCHES AN LGBTQ + MENTORING PROGRAM, ONE OF NOTHING IN THE UNITED STATES: A new Minneapolis-based nonprofit called Queerspace Collective (@QueerspaceC) fills a critical void in LGBTQ + mentoring programs. The program hopes to expand nationwide in the coming years. More StarTribune.

ALABAMA ASBL OBTAINED A GRANT TO HELP DOCUMENT LGBTQ + HISTORY IN THE SOUTH: The Invisible Histories Project, a nonprofit that documents the history of LGBTQ + people in the South, received a $ 600,000 grant to document the history of LGBTQ + in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi and the Panhandle of Florida. More AL.

CHARLESTON PRIDE’S REAL RAINBOW ROW TOUR EXPLORES THE LGBTQ + HISTORY OF THE CITY SUNDAY: As part of Charleston Pride Week, the tour will take attendees through the city’s historic neighborhoods as they tell the often-overlooked stories of Charleston’s LGBTQ + community. More Charleston City Paper.

?? CULTURE

NON-BINARY CHARACTERS LIKE ‘GONZO-RELLA’ ENLIGHTEN CHILDREN’S TELEVISION AND ENCOURAGE SELF-ACCEPTANCE: For children whose gender expression may not correspond to preconceived notions of boy or girl, it may be important to see themselves reflected on the screen. More CNN.

TIKTOK’S ELDERQUEER DESIGNERS BRING LGBTQ + HISTORY TO LIFE: A community of older LGBTQ + TikTokers are sharing their life experiences with a younger generation looking for mentorship. More them.

?? GLOBAL EQUALITY

🗳️ TWO TRANSGENDER WOMEN WIN SEATS IN THE NEXT GERMAN PARLIAMENT: Tessa Ganserer and Nyke Slawik made history yesterday by winning seats in the German Parliament in the Bundestag. More The New York Times and Reuters.

?? SCOTLAND IS NOW THE FIRST COUNTRY TO DEMAND LGBTQ + HISTORY IN SCHOOLS: More them.

You have news ? Send us your news and tips on [email protected].Click here to subscribe to #AM_Equality and follow@CRH for all the latest news. Thanks for reading!



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New Life Village near Tampa offers new homes for foster children, new purpose for seniors


As the only intergenerational residential model in the state of Florida to do what they do, New Life Village in Palm River, just east of Tampa, is working to reduce the number of children in foster care. ‘welcome for over a year.

Founded in 2012, New Life Village is helping solve two of the issues plaguing the Tampa Bay area: affordable housing and a foster care crisis.

With their mission being to provide a “supportive environment, within an intergenerational community for children in need of a safe, stable and permanent family experience”, the association’s leadership works on their 12-acre campus which is currently about 1/3 developed.

Earlier in September, the construction of two new buildings that will house 16 families in about a year, increasing the village from around 100 to 170. The new buildings will add to the 32 already existing townhouses, plus a community garden. , paddling pool, swimming pool, playground and football field. Plans further are preliminary, but now include a multi-purpose program building and one-bedroom living spaces for the elderly.

“The community and its program are focused on healing children,” says Mariah Hayden, Executive Director of New Life Village. “We help them overcome their trauma and gain coping mechanisms.”

Seniors living in the Village are all 55 and over and are here for an intentional retirement. They serve as surrogate grandparents, guardians and mentors.

“It’s basically the village elders in the saying ‘it takes a village to raise a child,’” says Hayden.

Being in New Life Village, she explains, prevents these abandoned, abused and neglected children, who usually do not live with their birth parents, from entering the foster care system. This creates a safe place where they can call “home” with their foster family without being stigmatized for being adopted.

The program also works to address the negative outcomes associated with foster care systems, such as low education / graduation rates, homelessness, teenage pregnancy, incarceration, mental health problems and unemployment.

In a survey collected from residents in June 2020, 88% of children had improved their grades since moving in, 100% of children thought they were an important part of the village family, 99% of seniors thought they were leading a determined and meaningful life-in-the-Village project, and 91% of caregivers were convinced that the Village’s family environment was safe. Breaking the cycle of many of the main issues in the foster care system, New Life Village has a positive impact on a variety of issues associated with traditional foster care: a lack of support from loved ones. caregivers, a shortage of foster parents, the impact of trauma and the lack of affordable housing.

“The longer children are placed in foster care, the more they have a physical likelihood of very negative and traumatic outcomes,” says Hayden.

The average household change per child is around three placements per year. Whenever this happens, this child not only loses a sense of family and stability, but is again traumatized by thinking that no one wants them and that he has nowhere to go.

“Children have a need and seniors have a need. Children and the elderly provide for everyone’s needs, so it’s a beautiful yin and yang relationship that provides psychological and health outcomes for both groups.

Of course, there are going to be problems that arise from mixing the generations. “If we go to our grandparents, no matter who we are, no matter how old we are, there’s a good chance they won’t understand some aspect of our life,” says Hayden. “You have the standard and expectations of each generation, and each generation looks at the other generation through that lens. “

From phone etiquette to good manners and work ethics, kids today hold very different values ​​than their elders, she says.

“Our elders come from a generation where you stayed married all your life, you chose a career and it was your career your entire life. The older generation is really attached to the idea that you start a job and move up the ranks. You stay a long time, you respect your elders no matter what, and that’s what the job looks like to them. The younger generation is completely on the other side of that spectrum, ”says Hayden.

The challenges caused by technological innovations and changes in the workplace will never go away.

“Our grandparents had the same problems with their grandparents and so on. … It’s just that things change and that will always be represented in the generations.

What is unique is how a versatile pace of life is based on societal manners.

“Our generation, and I in particular, are still going a million kilometers an hour. I’m still multitasking and do 25 things at a time. It is a blessing and a curse. They are [seniors] not like that, so when they come to the clubhouse and we see them in the community, they stop, take a break and have intentional, very present conversations with you, ”says Hayden. “It’s such a great way to remember to be there, to listen to people and to talk. … It shows us that we have to slow down and be present with each other because life is short.

Living in this type of community is also good for older people, giving them purpose and keeping them healthy and active while participating in the various activities offered by New Life Village. It is not a new concept; the United States is just late. For years, Europe has designed similar communities by incorporating assisted living facilities with college students, bringing in the elderly to daycare centers, etc.

To better understand the need, consider these statistics listed on the New Life Village website:

  • Florida is 3rd in the United States, behind California and Texas with 22,781 foster children;
  • Hillsborough County is # 1 and Pinellas County # 2 in Florida for the number of children in foster care;
  • Since January 2020:
    – 2,366 children were in foster care in Hillsborough County
    – 2,484 children were in foster care in Pinellas and Pasco counties

By going to the Take Action tab on the New Life Village website, you can help them take it one step closer to the end of their construction campaign or make a donation. For example, $ 25 per month allows a senior to participate in their on-site wellness program year-round, allowing them to choose from weekly yoga classes, tai chi classes, trips to the theater, etc.

Being a part of this community has given Hayden the chance to watch these children grow, grow stronger, heal, and gain confidence in who they are.

“From a holistic perspective, it’s just great because it provides a holistic healing context for the elderly and families of children,” says Hayden.

It’s a beautiful blend of culture and perspectives that come with time and age, together in one safe place. In a house.

For more information, see their website, Facebook page, and watch their story on CBN.


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Non profit living

Oregon nonprofit looking to hire staff for home support for people with disabilities


PORTLAND, Ore. (KTVZ) – Advocates for Life Skills & Opportunity (ALSO), a non-profit organization committed to supporting people living with intellectual and developmental disabilities, is looking for several direct support professionals who will support people disabilities and will help them achieve independence and person-centered lifestyle choices.

These positions at ALSO, which is consistently rated by current employees as a preferred place to work, do not require any prior healthcare experience, and the organization will provide all the necessary training.

“Our mission is to stand up for people with disabilities and promote their full inclusion in the life of their community,” said Brett Turner, CEO of ALSO. “As COVID-19 restrictions and economic issues hamper the ability of some employers to hire, ALSO is confidently launching our “The work of the heart is my work” campaign to recruit candidates deeply committed to a profession centered on love and care.

The Direct Support Pro position assists people with a multitude of home care needs, provides accompaniment on social outings and appointments, helps with medication and performs other critical support tasks. The position is eligible for signing and retention bonuses and potentially eligible for the Public Student Loan forgiveness program. ALSO provides a robust benefits package, including medical, dental, vision, LTD checks, life insurance, sick leave, PTO and 401 (k) plan with match up to ‘at 4% (for full-time employees).

Interested candidates can apply directly on the ALSO website: heartworkoregon.com

“I don’t think there’s a more rewarding job with a more people-focused organization statewide than a direct support pro at ALSO,” says Ben McClure, chief engineering officer. systems at OCHIN and chairman of the board of ALSO. “It’s a demanding job, but one that comes with tremendous personal and professional rewards. In short, it is really for people who want to work from the heart.

About ALSO

ALSO is a non-profit organization committed to providing the best residential, employment and assisted living services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. ALSO promotes full community inclusion, creativity, independence and employment opportunities. Our main goal is to ensure that our customers live the life of their choice. ALSO serves people all over Oregon from its Metro Portland, Bend and Klamath Falls locations. For more information, visit alsoweb.org.


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Non profit living

Nonprofit grants propel prosecutor against racial injustice


PHILADELPHIA (AP) – When Deborah Gonzalez took office in January as prosecutor for the Western Judicial District of Georgia, she noticed that too few defendants, especially black defendants, were eligible for a program that promised treatment for drug addiction or mental health, not jail.

Like many court diversion programs elsewhere, potential participants in the Athens-Clarke and Oconee counties programs were disqualified for certain prior charges or contact with police. People living in poverty also struggled to qualify due to the weekly program fees.

“My philosophy is that there is racial injustice and disparities in the way people are treated in this system. And we have to be intentional in the way we approach it, ”Gonzalez said.

With a grant from a national nonprofit criminal justice advocacy group, Vera Institute of Justice, and a local organization, People Living in Recovery, Gonzalez is redesigning the program to make it more accessible.

Many of the changes adopted by states after the death of George Floyd have focused on police tactics and not on racial disparities in the criminal justice system. Nationally, bipartisan congressional talks on overhaul of policing practices ended without a dealnegotiators on both sides said last week, despite promises of change from the Biden administration.

And now groups like Vera are targeting suburban communities to push through criminal justice changes without new laws.

Vera awarded 10 prosecutors approximately $ 550,000 to help reduce racial disparities in prosecutions. Prosecutors in Georgia, Virginia, Michigan, Hawaii, Pennsylvania, Missouri, New York and Indiana – most of whom were elected in the past two years on progressive platforms – are reviewing agendas or policies in their offices that disproportionately affect accused of color.

Some prosecutors handle prosecutions for specific crimes or make diversion programs more inclusive. Others are looking for ways to keep minors out of the criminal justice system all together.

“There was a desire to do more right now, to tackle the system that continues to allow this to happen. So we started to wonder if there was anything more we could do with this unique moment to reimagine what a fair system looks like, ”said Jamila Hodge, former director of the Reshaping Prosecution program with Vera.

In Gonzalez district, for example, about 22% of the district’s total population is black. Of the more than 6,800 people indicted in 2019 and 2020, the majority were blacks. Fewer than 150 people were referred to the trial preparation program, and most came from a county that is only 5% black.

She hopes to double participation in her program by 2022 and will put in place controls to monitor as diversity increases.

Vera will provide assistance for 12 months. The hope is to reduce by 20% the disproportionate number of black and brown people prosecuted and imprisoned in the pilot areas. The grants require prosecutors to partner with local community organizations.

In Washtenaw County, Michigan, where Ann Arbor is located and just west of Detroit, prosecutor Eli Savit is working with a group called My Brothers Keeper to divert colored youth accused of non-violent crimes to a program. intensive mentoring. Savit, who took office in January, said he wanted to focus on interventions that occur with children who act or commit minor crimes.

“What we’re trying to do is come in early without the intervention of the criminal justice system, without creating a case that can hold them back. It can have this cascading effect on their lives. Job applications ask if you’ve ever been charged, not if you’ve been convicted, ”Savit said.

In Chatham County, Georgia, where Savannah is in the northeastern state, Deputy Chief Prosecutor Michael Edwards said an analysis of black men and boys in the criminal justice system revealed that they constituted a disproportionate number of people accused of possession of firearms.

The office, in partnership with Savannah Feed the Hungry, has developed a program called Show Us Your Guns that focuses on people between the ages of 16 and 25 who are in possession of a gun while interacting with police. . Until these young men have used these weapons to commit a crime, they are eligible for the program instead of being arrested or jailed. This requires that they return the weapon in exchange for their participation.

“We do this, knowing that guns are a third rail in conversations in the community. But we know it’s an important way to impact public safety and the lives of these minors and young men, ”said Edwards.

Edwards said the program will be tailored to individuals, seeking needs such as job training, education, mental health and addiction treatment and even partnering with the local YMCA so young men can take care of it. of themselves physically.

“Too often lawsuits are case-based, but we want it to be cause-based – looking at the underlying causes,” Edwards said.

For Shane Sims, the thought of prosecutors in all of these places making plans to consider everyone in front of them, and not just the crime they committed, gives him immense joy. Sims is the executive director of People Living in Recovery, which is working with Gonzalez in Athens, Georgia, to redesign its mental health and addiction diversion program.

He was sentenced to life over 15 years for his role as an accomplice in a theft which resulted in the death of a store clerk. He was 18 and it seemed like no one thought who he was or how he got there – that his parents were addicted to crack and that he was taking care of his younger brother on his own from a young age.

When he got out, after three guards demanded his release, he started working in the community.

“What we’re doing together is realizing that drug addiction is at the heart of so many people who enter the criminal justice system. Historically, minorities have the least consideration in deciding how to handle this, ”Sims said.


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Seiler promotes the benefits of living in the great outdoors | State and region


Melanie Seiler’s life is very much about wellness.

Having a little fun doesn’t hurt either.

In uncertain times like the Covid-19 pandemic, many have pointed out that being outdoors is one of the best remedies for fighting the spread of the disease.

“The Covid-19 pandemic was very difficult to navigate, but an extremely important time to continue health education campaigns and creative ways to keep people active,” said Seiler, Executive Director of Active Southern West Virginia. “We relaunched the organization in 2021 to bring the programs back in person.”

Although her mother Susie Hofstetter’s family is from Ohiopyle, Pa., And her father Bob Seiler’s family is from the Cumberland, Md. Area, Seiler grew up in Fayetteville. It allowed him to appreciate – and understand – how much outdoor fun can be discovered in southern West Virginia.

Prior to his affiliation with Active SWV, Seiler worked for Adventures on the Gorge following the merger of the family rafting business, Songer Whitewater with AOTG in 2011. At Songer, Seiler was responsible for the river for several years and responsible for the river. vacation cabin, and she also spent a lot of time dealing with accounts receivable and human resources.

She has also been a certified ski instructor for 20 years and a member of the National Ski Patrol for 10 years.

“Growing up in the outdoor industry made me feel like everyone had the opportunity to raft and paddle white water or meet friends on bike trails and rock climbing routes. She said. “What motivates me is to later realize the lack of access and interest in outdoor recreation on the part of my peers and my generation.

“I want to express and share opportunities to experience the benefits of being active in the outdoors. “

Her days at Active SWV currently include “a lot of paperwork to keep track of funding requests and reports,” she says. “I really try to provide my people with all the tools and resources they need to do a great job.

“I spend a lot of hours on my computer, but I love going out and talking to groups about our work and free events,” she said.

Active SWV has made huge strides in recent years, Seiler believes.

“Active SWV was formed in late 2014 with a non-profit status, then I was hired as a sole employee in February 2015,” she said. “We quickly acquired a member of the AmeriCorps VISTA service and took to the streets recruiting volunteers to run programs.

“The first two years were tough structuring each program area and building a brand, but it paid off and in 2016 we entered into a cooperative agreement with the New River Gorge National River (today the New River Gorge National Park and Preserve), many county parks and had a handful of children’s clubs in elementary schools in the area. In 2019, we had the highest number of volunteers with over 200 people across our four program areas: Community Captains, Kids’ Running Clubs, Workplace Wellness, and SWV Bike / Walk.

“I am very proud of the trusted partnerships, of the people who have improved their lives through the activity and of the staff who remain cohesive and dynamic,” she added.

As the battle continues to urge children – and adults for that matter – to stay active and not focus too much on computer or phone screens and adopt a more sedentary lifestyle, Seiler says that ‘Active SWV has made progress.

“Active SWV is seeing progress in youth through our Kids Run Club grant program. Surveys before and after show that children achieve the recommended amount of daily physical activity, have less screen time, and 75 percent report being able to get someone home more active with them.

“The progress we are seeing in the region is more collective resources from agencies, organizations and the faith community to reach underserved families and individuals. One collaboration being Adventure Fayette County providing substance abuse prevention and the Icelandic youth model combining survey data with programming solutions. It means finding populations at risk, understanding their challenges in accessing healthier choices, and creating programs with a strong group of volunteers and mentors.

“Throughout the pandemic, Active SWV continued to work with companies as members of the Active SWV Workplace Wellness program. We spend many hours of the day at work or on our computers working remotely. Implementing changes to policies, systems, and the environment to make healthy choice an easy choice has shown results in employee morale, productivity, and increased buy-in to other investments in well-being at work.

Each year, Active SWV – in partnership with WV Health Promotion and Chronic Disease – awards a series of workplace wellness capacity building grants to businesses across the state. This year, they searched for 20 workplaces, each of which will receive $ 1,000. The mission of these grants is to increase access to healthy foods, physical activity and other supports to improve employee well-being. The application period is closed and the winners will be announced on October 1.

The agency created the Kids Run Club program in 2015 with a pilot club, and the program has since grown to reach more than 30 schools and community groups across West Virginia, Seiler said.

“With our comprehensive Kids Run Club manual providing structure to all clubs, trained volunteers lead groups of children through the activities described in the manual,” she explained. “Through these activities, children acquire lifelong skills and strengthen their confidence in their physical activity abilities.

“The goal of the Kids Run Club program is for children to have fun with physical activity and have a positive team experience. It is important to Active SWV that the program is offered free of charge so that all children have the opportunity to participate.

To apply, go to https://activeswv.org/2021/07/fall-kids-run-club-mini-grant-is-now-open/.

Active SWV also sponsors an adult / family / multigenerational program known as the Community Captain program. This is a volunteer-led activity that usually meets once a week. Weekly programs in locations such as Summersville, Fayetteville, Oak Hill, Beckley and Williamson focus on running / walking, Pilates, youth disc golf, Refit, yoga, stand-up paddleboarding and paddling. cycling / walking.

For example, a Wednesday run group from Fayetteville that Seiler and his friends participate in will meet as a three-year free run group in December.

“We started the winter of 2018 thinking that we would come together every Wednesday in December to get through the dark days of winter,” she said. “So we started to meet at 6:15 pm when everyone got out of work and ran down the sidewalks of Fayetteville with the street lights and headlamps.

“Well, the group decided to continue meeting in January, then February, and so on. Every three months or so, we move to a different location and usually end up in a restaurant to eat together. Many people have joined the group over the years and we continue to welcome new people.

“Group responsibility helps keep people and myself,” Seiler said. “You know that your running friends are waiting for you and making the activity more fun in good company.

“Even when it rains and snows, we dress appropriately and go out anyway. Physical activity is good for the body and the mind, and the social connection is good for the mind.

To learn more about the Community Captains program, visit https://activeswv.org/community-captains/.

SWV’s active staff and volunteers have “made a difference in the lives of individuals and improved the health culture in Southern West Virginia,” said Seiler. “This was accomplished by normalizing beginner activities like walking and hiking, and having easy ways to volunteer increased the ways to be active.

“These efforts have been well received and volunteers find that their friends, family, neighbors and coworkers are helping each other remove barriers to an active lifestyle such as transportation, skills, equipment, child care. children and fear of injury. This work is even more important during the pandemic to help people stay healthy and active. “

Seiler, of Fayetteville, is married to Travis Hames and has daughters-in-law Kalila and Delaney.

His favorite outdoor hobbies are telemark, a skiing technique that combines elements of alpine and Nordic skiing; paddleboarding and surfing.

Her hobbies and interests also include raising chickens and adventures with her bird dog.

E-mail: [email protected] or follow us on Twitter @gb_scribe


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Non profit living

Anonymous reader pays Saint-Dominique cancer patient’s debt


Linda Burks owed more than $ 4,000 for her breast cancer treatment at St. Dominic, a not-for-profit church hospital in Jackson who hired a debt collector to sue her. Burks works as a full-time receptionist with Medicare who has started taking extra janitorial shifts to pay his bills.

After a series of investigations which the Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting product, and the Mississippi Free Press republished in its entirety, a woman who read the series took action. Earlier this month, she hooked up with Burks and paid off her medical debt.

“We’re supposed to help each other, aren’t we? Wrote the reader, who wished to remain anonymous. “People helped me when I needed it.”

After receiving treatment for her breast cancer at St. Dominic’s Hospital, Linda Burks had thousands of medical debts, which the hospital sent to collections. Photo by Sarah Warnock

However, St. Dominic Hospital did not change its policies in response to the report.

Burks’ story was part of an investigation into the aggressive debt collection policies of St. Dominic and its debt collectors. Reports revealed that the hospital was billing thousands of Mississippians when these patients should have qualified for free or reduced medical care; inflated patient bills by a third or more with attorney fees, court costs and interest rates by 8%; the wages of the seized patients; money seized from patients’ bank accounts; and sued thousands of patients, many of whom work in low-wage industries like fast food and retail.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the the federal government has given the hospital millions of dollars in pandemic relief funds, but St. Dominic continued to sue patients and even their employees, as the hospital sued over a hundred staff for medical debts.

Burks: “What am I doing? “

Linda Burks was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2016 and received treatment at St. Dominic. She faithfully paid her bill for over a year when she said she noticed Saint-Dominique was no longer automatically withdrawing from her account.

Burks said she proactively contacted St. Dominic, but was told it was too late – her invoice was sent to the collections. Smith, Rouchon & Associates, a Jackson-based collection agency, started calling him, demanding more money from Burks. The debt collector sued her, adding more than $ 1,500 to her bill for legal fees.

Relief sculpture of Saint Francis of Assisi kneeling before an angel
Saint Francis of Assisi (photo) inspired the religious order which now sponsors Saint Dominic Hospital. Photo by Fr. Daniel Ciucci on Unsplash

St. Dominic has annual operating expenses of around half a billion dollars and pays virtually no tax due to its nonprofit status. Experts say suing patients for medical debts is only a tiny fraction of a hospital’s income, but the effects can be devastating for patients. For Burks, this meant she was reluctant to return to St. Dominic for treatment because she feared she would be sued again.

“I’m a cashless receptionist, living from paycheck to paycheck,” Burks wrote to a judge in 2018. “… I want to live, and these tests play a big role for me in whether I stay cancer-free. … What should I do. to do?”

Follow the example of the founder?

In 2019, the Dominican Sisters for St. Dominic’s Health Services sponsorship transferred from St. Dominic Hospital to the Health system of the Franciscan Missionaries of Notre-Dame, whose inspiration, St. Francis of Assisi, was a man born into a wealthy family who gave up his wealth and begged with the poor.

“Let us therefore have charity and humility and give alms because they wash souls from the stain of sins”, François wrote in the 13th century. “For men lose all that they leave in this world; however, they carry with them the reward of charity and alms which they have given, for which they will receive a reward and remuneration worthy of the Lord.

When contacted this week, a spokesperson for the Franciscan Missionaries of Notre Dame, the Louisiana-based health system that owns St. Dominic, reiterated that the hospital no longer directly pursues patients – a policy that took place in July.

“We always want to be compassionate and improve the experience for our patients,” spokesperson Ryan Cross said in an email.

But St. Dominic rarely sued patients directly, relying instead on two local collection agencies to handle the vast majority of medical debt collection lawsuits. The hospital still allows its debt collectors to sue patients, garnish their wages, damage their credit and bankrupt them.

The Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting produced the series. Email reporter Giacomo Bologna To [email protected]. Read Giacomo Bologna’s full series on medical billing in Mississippi:

Part 1: Investigation: St. Dominic’s nonprofit hospital routinely sued patients who could not afford care

Part 2: “It broke my heart”: the tactics of the Saint-Dominique debt collectors cause lasting damage

Part 3: Medical debt lawsuits hurt low-income Mississippians; Here are expert solutions


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Non profit living

Many obstacles for families with dietary challenges | News, Sports, Jobs


WASHINGTON – Many Americans who have struggled to feed their families in the past pandemic year say they have struggled to find how to get help and have struggled to find healthy foods they can afford.

An Impact Genome and Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll finds 23% of Americans say they haven’t been able to get enough to eat or the types of foods they eat. they want. Most people with food issues signed up for a government or nonprofit food aid program in the past year, but 58% still had difficulty accessing at least one service.

And 21% of adults who have difficulty meeting their food needs have not been able to access any assistance. The most common challenge for those in need was a fundamental lack of knowledge about eligibility for government and nonprofit services.

Survey results paint a big picture of a country where hundreds of thousands of households suddenly found themselves food insecure due to the economic disruption of the COVID-19 pandemic

They often found themselves navigating the intimidating bureaucracy of government assistance programs and with limited knowledge of local food banks or other charitable options available.

Black and Hispanic Americans, Americans living below the federal poverty line and young adults are especially likely to face eating problems, according to the survey.

Americans who struggle to afford food also feel less confident than others about their ability to afford healthy foods. Only 27% say they are “very” Where “extremely” confident, compared to 87% of those who do not face dietary challenges.

For housewife Acacia Barraza in Los Lunas, a rural town outside of Albuquerque, New Mexico, the challenge has been finding a steady supply of fresh fruits and vegetables for her 2-year-old son while respecting the family budget.

Barraza, 34, quit her job as a waitress before the pandemic when her son was born. She considered returning to work, but intermittent childcare shortages as the pandemic set in made that impossible, she said. The family lives off her husband’s salary as a mechanic while receiving help from SNAP, the government program commonly known as food stamps.

Despite government help, Barraza said she still scrambles to find affordable sources of fresh vegetables, actively browsing local markets for bargains such as a bag of fresh spinach for $ 2.99. .

“If we don’t always have vegetables, he won’t want to eat them in the future. And then I am worried that he will not get enough vitamins from vegetables in the future or now for his growing body. So it’s really hard. It’s just really hard. she said.

Even those who haven’t lost income during the pandemic find themselves stretching their food dollars at the end of the month. Trelecia Mornes of Fort Worth, Texas works as a customer service representative over the phone, so she was able to work from home without interruption.

She earns too much money to qualify for SNAP, but not enough to easily feed the family.

She decided to take distance education with her three children at home over fears about COVID-19 outbreaks in schools, which took school lunches out of the equation. Her job responsibilities prevent her from picking up free lunches offered by the school district. She takes care of her disabled brother, who lives with them and receives SNAP benefits. But Mornes said that $ 284 a month “Lasts about a week and a half. “

They try to eat healthy, but budgetary considerations sometimes lead them to prioritize cost and longevity with “canned soups, maybe noodles – things that last and aren’t that expensive”, she said.

Radha Muthiah, president of the Capital Area Food Bank in Washington, said the difficulties reflected in the survey are evidence of a new phenomenon brought by the pandemic: families with no experience of food insecurity are suddenly in need, without knowledge of charitable options or experience in navigating government assistance programs.

“It’s all new to them” she said. “Many people and families, especially those experiencing food insecurity for the first time, don’t know all of their options. “

Many are reluctant to engage directly in government programs such as SNAP and WIC – the government’s parallel food aid program that helps mothers and children. Muthiah said reluctance often stems either from frustration with paperwork or, among immigrant communities, from fear of endangering their immigration status or green card applications.

The survey shows that overall, about 1 in 8 Americans regularly get their supplies from convenience stores, which typically offer less nutritious foods at higher prices. This experience is more common among Americans with dietary issues, with about 1 in 5 frequenting convenience stores.

Reliance on convenience stores is a particularly troubling dynamic, Muthiah said, as the options there are both more expensive and generally less nutritious. Part of the problem is just habit, but a much bigger problem is the lack of proper groceries in “Food deserts” that exist in the poorest neighborhoods of many cities.

“Sometimes they’re the only quick and efficient option for many people to get food,” she said. “But they don’t get the full range of what they need in a convenience store and that has a lot of negative health effects.”

The survey shows that half of Americans with dietary challenges say extra money to pay for food or bills is needed to meet their dietary needs.

Fewer consider reliable transportation or enough free food for a few days, such as in emergency food parcels, or free prepared meals at a soup kitchen or school as necessary resources to meet their food needs, although the majority states that this would be helpful.

Gerald Ortiz of Espaeola, New Mexico, bought a 2019 Chevrolet pickup truck before the pandemic, then lost the office job he had for 20 years. Now he’s scrambling to make the monthly payment of $ 600 and gets by with charity and just eating less. His unemployment benefits ended this month.

“I make sure that the payment for my truck is made” Ortiz said, as he sat in a line of around 30 cars waiting to collect food from a charity, Barrios Unidos, near Chimay. “After that, I, I just eat once a day” he said, pointing to her stomach. “That’s why you see me, I’m so thin now.”

He applies for several jobs and survives on charity and all the produce he can grow in his garden – peppers, onions, cucumbers and watermelons.

“It was depressing. It’s been, like, stressful and I have anxiety. he said. “Like, I can’t wait to find a job. I don’t care what it is right now.

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Non profit living

Powell meets a changing economy: fewer workers, higher prices


WASHINGTON – Restaurant owners and hoteliers are struggling to fill jobs. Delays in the supply chain drive up prices for small businesses. Unemployed Americans unable to find work even with record high job vacancies.

These and other disruptions to the U.S. economy – the aftermath of the viral pandemic that erupted 18 months ago – appear likely to last, a group of nonprofit business owners and executives said on Friday. to Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell.

The business challenges, outlined during a “Fed Listens” virtual panel discussion, highlight the ways the COVID-19 epidemic and its delta variant continue to transform the U.S. economy. Some event attendees said their business plans are still evolving. Others have complained of sluggish sales and fluctuating fortunes after the pandemic eased this summer, then escalated over the past two months.

A d

“We are living in truly unique times,” said Powell at the end of the discussion. “I’ve never seen these kinds of supply chain issues, I’ve never seen an economy that combines drastic labor shortages with a lot of unemployed … So it’s an economy that evolving very quickly, it will be very different from the one (before).

The Fed chairman asked Cheetie Kumar, a restaurant owner in Raleigh, North Carolina, why she is having such a hard time finding workers. Powell’s question goes to the heart of the Fed’s mandate to maximize employment, as many people who worked before the pandemic have lost their jobs and are no longer looking for them. When – or if – these people resume their job search will help determine when the Fed can conclude that the economy has reached the peak of jobs.

Kumar told Powell that many of his former employees have decided to quit the restaurant industry for good.

A d

“I think a lot of people wanted to change their lives, and we lost a lot of people in different industries,” she said. “I think half of our people have decided to go back to school.”

Kumar said her restaurant now pays a minimum of $ 18 an hour, and she added that higher wages are likely a long-term change for the restaurant industry.

“We can’t get by and pay people $ 13 an hour and expect them to stay with us for years and years,” Kumar said. “It just won’t happen.”

Loren Nalewanski, vice president of Marriott Select Brands, said his business was losing out to similar challenges as many former employees, especially housekeepers, left for other jobs that recently raised wages. Even the recent cut to a federal unemployment supplement of $ 300 per week, he said, has not led to an increase in the number of job seekers.

A d

“People have left the industry and unfortunately they are finding other things to do,” Nalewanski said. “Other industries that may not have paid that much … are (now) paying a lot more.”

Jill Rizika, president of Towards Employment, a non-profit workforce development organization in Cleveland, said she sees the stark disconnect every day between companies posting millions of job vacancies. and those struggling to find work and escape poverty. About 60% of the people her organization helps find jobs have criminal records, she said, and 65% have only high school diplomas. Many parents, especially mothers, are still unable to return to full-time work.

“They tried to work but because of the epidemics, the children are being sent home from daycare or school, which makes their schedules unmanageable,” said Rizika. “Where the digital divide comes in: a young mother tried remote working but didn’t have enough broadband to make it work.

A d

Small businesses are also grappling with rising costs, with little relief in sight, some participants said. The Fed has accelerated its plans to start withdrawing its low interest rate policies, in part because of concerns about rising inflation.

Larry Andrews, chairman of Massachusetts Growth Capital, a state agency that supports small businesses, said that during a recent tour of the state, a cafe owner told him that the price of a case of eggs had skyrocketed since the pandemic. Another restaurant owner said a jug of cooking oil went from $ 17 to $ 50 – “if you can get it.”

“The speed and intensity of this slowdown – and the speed of the recovery in many areas – is unprecedented in modern times,” said Powell in prepared remarks at the start of the event. “The business plans have been reworked, the outlook has been revised and the future continues to be tainted with uncertainties.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


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Expanded Child Tax Credit Means My Son Will Have More Options Than Me – Press and Guide


I remember finding out that I was about to become a mother. I felt fear take hold of me. My brain stopped. I remember crying, but I had no tears. I remember trying to run, but couldn’t move.

No one had prepared me for motherhood – my own mother abandoned me when I was not even 2 years old. The father of my child was violently abusive. My life was unstable and I was afraid that another human being would depend on me.

Things are so much better now. My son, Caleb, is entering kindergarten and he is the light of my life. We’ve been through so much together, but we’re doing it.

One thing that helps more than words can express is the expanded new child tax credit. Adopted as part of the Biden administration’s COVID-19 relief program, it puts money in our bank account – and the bank accounts of almost every parent in this country.

This credit is on track to lift half of all children living in poverty, including mine. This will help them lead safer and happier lives into adulthood.

My own early childhood was filled with trauma.

After our mother left us, my father had to take care of all of us children. He did his best, but he didn’t know how to access social services for us. When he got sick, we lost everything. We ended up living in a tent “village” under a bridge, where I had to cook for 50 people for the next seven years.

I was just a child.

I was afraid of people in the streets, of students at school, even of being with others where I lived. When I took action and skipped school, I was put in juvenile detention for truancy. The years that followed saw cycle after cycle of abuse, instability and trauma.

But eventually I found help. When I was 18 and on the run, I found a job at a homeless shelter called Covenant House and moved in. They helped me get ID and taught me about social services and how to get them.

I didn’t know there was help available for someone like me. I became a team leader there and my life began to change. Now I’m an advocate for a nonprofit called RESULTS, which trains and helps people fight for policies that help families like mine survive and thrive.

Along the way, I learned something really important: Many of us who grew up in abusive situations just don’t have access to mental health services, so we end up in abusive relationships. adulthood. And many others who experience the trauma of poverty simply don’t know how to get help.

Before the COVID-19 relief program, I would never have been able to access the child tax credit – I was just too poor. And complex paperwork and bureaucratic requirements also put other help out of reach.

But now families like mine, and all other families with children, are receiving life-changing assistance right in their bank accounts. I can’t tell you how much of a difference it makes.

Thanks to the Child Tax Credit, Caleb will not suffer the tremendous trauma I suffered as a child. His life will be better. He will have the love and economic support he needs to thrive.

We are the richest nation in the world, but too often we have abandoned our poorest children, like my mother abandoned me. But if we have the political will, we can make smarter economic choices like these to give all children a safe and secure childhood.

Not only will Caleb prosper, but we in society as a whole will.

La’Shon Marshall lives in the Detroit metro area and is a poverty advocate with the RESULTS Educational Fund. This editorial was distributed by OtherWords.org.


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Haitian group in Houston seeks to help refugees coming from the border – Houston Public Media


Migrants, many from Haiti, wait to board a bus to Houston at a humanitarian center after being released from the United States Border Patrol after crossing the Rio Grande and turned into asylum seekers, on Wednesday, September 22, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas.

As the United States orders the deportation of thousands of Haitian migrants crossing Mexico to Texas, a local nonprofit is dealing with those who have already made it to Houston.

Organizers of the nonprofit Houston Haitians United this week called for volunteers to cook and translate Haitian dishes, helping to bridge the linguistic and cultural divide. The organization has looked after relief efforts and recently worked with Mayor Sylvester Turner’s office to organize supplies drives in the wake of the devastating earthquake that rocked Haiti this summer.

HHU is also using its platform to denounce immigration policies aimed at deporting recently arrived Haitians.

“Some people walked two months to come to the United States just to be deported to Haiti and start from scratch,” said James Pierre, president of HHU. “It’s heartbreaking because a lot of money, blood, sweat and tears have been invested in trying to find a better life.”

According to the Houston Chronicle, up to 3,000 additional Haitian refugees are expected to pass through Houston on their way to other destinations in the country. Most or all of those who do will have come from Del Rio, where tens of thousands of migrants were waiting under the international bridge between Del Rio and Mexico.

Florida and northeastern states like New York and New Jersey have historically been stopping places for the Haitian diaspora. There are over 500,000 Haitians living in the United States, nearly half of whom live in Florida.

Pierre is a transplant from Florida who says there are thousands of Haitians in the Houston area alone, and his organization is a way to build a community here.

“When I moved to Houston 18 years ago, it wasn’t around, you know? ” he said. “Haitians have been here since the 1970s. But the reason we created HHU was that they were here, people move here every day.

Buses arrive at a shelter in northwest Houston run by the Mormon Church since Monday evening, with two to three buses of about 65 people each, greeted by HHU volunteers, organizers said.

Rolanda Charles, the group’s secretary, helped coordinate volunteers via social media, posting a call for people who speak Haitian Creole and who can help make large casseroles of comfort food like chicken stew and Diri Kole, Haitian-style rice and beans. plate. Charles also posted the bus arrival times.

“We were there from 6:30 p.m. to almost three in the morning, distributing food, translating, putting people in touch… with their friends and families who are currently in the United States and helping them buy those bus tickets or tickets. ‘plane. to bring them home,’ Charles said.

As of Thursday, the number of Haitian migrants at the Del Rio Bridge had fallen to around 4,000, according to information from the Associated Press. About 1,400 had been returned to Haiti on 13 flights under the pandemic public health authority known as Title 42, while 3,200 others are in U.S. custody and under treatment, several thousand more returning to Mexico, according to the AP.

For those who are allowed to stay in the United States at least for the time being, Charles was hopeful that more organizations would help them along their journey, especially after seeing heartbreaking footage at the border.

“Every person, however they get to the border – whether they stay there or have to go back – must be respected,” Charles said. “They must be treated with respect, dignity and humanity. We are people at the end of the day. We are not animals. We are human beings.

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Where to give Halloween candy


There’s no better time to give back and spread the joy than a holiday – Halloween included! If you are looking to make a positive impact in someone’s life this Halloween, you may want to consider donating candy to those who could use a treat to lift their spirits. Whether you’re planning to give back on your own or looking to instill charitable values ​​in your kids after a treat, read on to learn more about where you can give Halloween candy this spooky season.

United Way

United Way is a non-profit organization whose mission is “to improve lives by mobilizing the benevolent power of communities around the world to advance the common good”. The organization is known for hosting Halloween events for kids and making the holidays a little more special for underserved communities. Visit their website to find your local chapter and learn about Halloween candy donation.

Ronald McDonald House Charities

Ronald McDonald Houses is a non-profit organization that seeks to support families struggling with serious childhood illness. Because these children are unable to go out and make treats, many Ronald McDonald House chapters will accept unopened Halloween candy to share with children with illness and their families. Find your local and ask whether or not they could use candy donations to help spread the Halloween joy.

Operation Gratitude

Operation Gratitude proudly distributes candy to deployed troops, local military units, veterans and first responders. Complete the registration form and pair up with a local military unit, first responder service, or veterans organization. If no match can be found, you can always send your candy to the organization’s Candy Processing Center in Los Angeles.

Operation Shoebox

Operation Shoebox sends thoughtful care packages to troops and is known to include candy, especially during the holidays. Other sugary treats they’ll accept as donations for their treatment packages include individually wrapped granola bars and cookies. Visit their website to learn more about the donation.

Local organizations

Sometimes you don’t have to look far to tell the difference. Call your local pantries, nursing homes, and shelters to see if they would be interested in accepting new unopened Halloween candy. There is something special about giving back to your own community and doing something positive for other members.


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American Dream Center in Tulsa helps families integrate into the United States


The American Dream Center in Tulsa helps families from other countries settle in Oklahoma.

Founder Casey Jones told News On 6 they have helped nearly 100 families this year. Jones grew up in Oklahoma, then began to travel and live abroad.

“I have lived abroad, I have lived in Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Ivory Coast,” Jones said.

Friends helped him adjust to life in other countries. When Jones returned home, he realized that there were people moving to Oklahoma from outside the United States who needed the same help and guidance as overseas. , so he created the American Dream Center.

“We are helping immigrants and refugees adjust to America,” Jones said.

The non-profit organization provides immigration legal services, it helps people find jobs, it even provides a translator who does errands, like going to the DMV a bit easier.

“We walk alongside them and help them navigate the ins and outs of our system,” Jones said.

American Dream Center has already helped 90 families this year and hundreds since the doors opened in 2017, including people like Ariana Wilson, who immigrated to the United States with her triplets from Venezuela.

“This country has opened the door to new life,” Wilson said. “Sometimes God sends angels into your life.”

Wilson thinks these angels are at the Dream Center. She said that before moving to the United States, she was robbed several times at gunpoint, would not have electricity for weeks, and could not regularly access the medications her son took. need. Jones and his team helped Wilson and his family gain Temporary Protected Status.

“We can help inexpensively since we’re a non-profit organization,” Jones said. “These people have left their friends and family, their culture, their language to try something new. We have to accept them, welcome them and help them succeed because if they succeed, we succeed.”

The American Dream Center has said it is ready and willing to help Afghan refugees in the coming months, but has not yet been contacted.

For more information, visit the American Dream Center website here.


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Family stranded in Afghanistan returns home to SoCal – NBC Los Angeles


When the Kashefi family first arrived in Southern California in March 2017, it was because Bashir Kashefi had finally been granted a safe exit, after working for the US government for over a decade.

But a summer trip to visit family went very badly for the Kashefi, who arrived in Afghanistan in June with a return trip scheduled just days before the country fell to the Taliban.

In a video sent to NBC4, Bashir Kashefi said he fears for the lives of his family.

“We have tried to leave Afghanistan more than nine times,” he said. “We went to the airport to catch a plane, but unfortunately because there were too many people, it was difficult to get in.

He says repeated attempts by members of the US government have also proved unsuccessful.

And when the American troops withdrew, he says he almost gave up all hope.

“Coping with life right now in Kabul, Afghanistan… it’s so difficult right now and more difficult than ever,” Kashefi said.

Kashefi served as the basis for an April 2017 NBC4 story about a local nonprofit called Miry’s List. Miry Whitehill started the charity to help refugee families resettle in the United States. The Kashefi family were one of the first families Miry’s List helped find an apartment, furnish it, and put them on track to thrive in the United States.

Bashir Kashefi has become the Miry’s List ambassador – an achievement – of what the association is capable of doing, even appearing in a special Belmont Shores TedX Talk, sharing his story of starting over.

Miry’s List announced its Emergency Action Fund in August 2021, following the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan, which led to donations from Lady Gaga to help resettle refugee families.

So it’s no surprise that Miry’s List stepped in again to help the Kashefi family return home.

A group of volunteers – they call themselves the Hive – ensured that the Kashefi family did not feel the trauma of returning to the United States as they did when they arrived.

“They’re in a life and death situation one way or another,” says Laurel Felt, a Hive volunteer. “World events conspired against them. They didn’t do anything wrong. They brought nothing on themselves.

The Hive raised funds to cover the costs of living the family overseas and to cover bills at home to keep them up to date when they return.

“We really wanted to make sure the rent was paid, the utilities were paid, certainly the cell phone because that was our lifeline for him,” said Shareef Mustafa, Hive volunteer. “We wanted to make sure that their repatriation to the United States was not filled with the same anxiety as when they arrived in 2017.”

And good news arrived on Monday morning – with the Kashefi family sharing photos from Doha, Qatar. They were out of Afghanistan safe and sound.

“Bashir confirmed that they all slept well last night for the first time in a long time,” Felt said.

The family’s return to Southern California and their home in Anaheim, however, is still unclear. It will likely cost additional money and effort from the volunteers, who hope to see Kashefi in the United States soon.


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Diapers and push-ups desperately needed for children living in Village of Hope – Orange County Register


Orange County Rescue Mission is in desperate need of diapers for toddlers and young children living in Village of Hope, a transitional living center for homeless families.

The association is looking for diapers in sizes 5 and 6, as well as diapers and wet wipes for boys and girls 3T-4T.

“We have received generous community donations of newborn and small infant diapers, but the continued need for larger diapers and retractable diapers is often underestimated,” said Jim Palmer, president of the Orange County Rescue Mission.

The increase in homelessness in the wake of the pandemic has contributed to this continued need, the mission said.

Those wishing to donate or organize a diaper drive can drop off their donations at the Village of Hope at 1 Hope Drive, Tustin, 92782. Donations can also be made online and delivered to this address.

For more information, visit rescuemission.org/urgent-baby-needs.

The facility’s donation warehouse is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Sunday.

Upcoming fundraisers

The Orange County Community Foundation is hosting a fundraiser on Wednesday, September 22 for 17 local nonprofits, seeking to raise $ 200,000.

The 24-hour Ignition Potential event will support programs that help Orange County youth.

Participants include Assistance League of Irvine, Child Creativity Lab, Court Appointed Special Advocates, Early Childhood OC, Giving Children Hope, Helping Others Prepare for Eternity, Irvine Public Schools Foundation, Kid Healthy, Kidworks Community Development Corporation, MOMS Orange County, Parentis Foundation , Pretend City – Orange County Children’s Museum, Scholar’s Hope Foundation, Literacy Project, Prentice School, Orange County Youth Center and YMCA.

To donate, go to igniting-potential-giving-day.ocnonprofitcentral.org or bit.ly/2VOfvSz

The Santa Ana Chick-fil-A at 3601 South Bristol St. will contribute 20% of sales from 4 pm to 7 pm Tuesday, September 22 to the non-profit MOMS Orange County if you mention “Spirit Night”.

Donations for MOMS

Eat chicken, help a mom.

The Santa Ana Chick-fil-A at 3601 South Bristol St. will contribute 20% of sales from 4 pm to 7 pm Tuesday, September 22 to the non-profit MOMS Orange County if you mention “Spirit Night”.

MOMS Orange County helps moms caring for newborns and pregnancy health, helping improve birth outcomes, infant health and development.

Body Spa Salons, a concept that leases space to beauty professionals, has opened an 8,000 square foot location at 3333 West Coast Highway in Newport Beach. The company rents spaces to specialists in hair, nails, skin, massage and medical / wellness care such as weight loss services, medical spas, vitamin infusions and acupuncture. (Courtesy of Body Spa Salons)

New spa debuts in NB

Body Spa Salons, a concept that leases space to beauty professionals, has opened an 8,000 square foot space in Newport Beach.

Spa salon at 3333 West Coast Highway rents spaces to professionals specializing in hair, nails, skin, massage, and medical / wellness treatments such as weight loss services, medical spas, herbal teas of vitamins and acupuncture.

The company has 11 sites in California, Nevada and Arizona. For more information, visit bodyspasalons.com.

  • Justine Cromer is the new director of Goodwill at the Tierney Center for Veteran Services in Orange County. She is a retired US Air Force Lieutenant Colonel with 28 years of military service in the Air Force, Air Force Reserves and Air National Guard. (Courtesy of Brocoff Photography)

  • Gynecologist-oncologist Antonio Castaneda has joined Hoag Gynecologic Oncology. He comes to Hoag from the Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University. (Courtesy of Hoag)

  • Paul Fleck, partner at the law firm Atkinson, Andelson Loya, Ruud and Romo, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based non-profit organization. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

  • GK Kannan, vice president of research and development at Grifols, a Los Angeles-based biopharmaceutical company, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

  • Jay Lee, family physician and co-founder of Family Medicine Revolution, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

  • Robert Handy, former police chief and assistant faculty member at Arizona and California universities, has joined the board of directors of Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit. (Courtesy of Waymakers)

Moving

Justine Cromer is the new director of Goodwill at the Tierney Center for Veteran Services in Orange County. She is a retired US Air Force Lieutenant Colonel with 28 years of military service in the Air Force, Air Force Reserves and Air National Guard. As Director of the Tierney Center for Veteran Services, Cromer will lead strategic planning, project implementation, collaboration and innovation for the Goodwill program. She started her new role on September 1st.

Gynecologist-oncologist Antonio Castaneda has joined Hoag Gynecologic Oncology. He comes to Hoag from the Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University. Her research and expertise covers a wide range of gynecologic oncology issues, from the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for women with early-stage cervical cancer to the incidence of ovarian metastasis. in small cell neuroendocrine tumors of the cervix.

On board

Waymakers, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit, has added four new members to its board of directors, including Paul Fleck, Robert Handy, GK Kannan and Dr. Jay Lee.

Fleck is a partner at Atkinson, Andelson Loya, Ruud and Romo, a firm of professional lawyers, with a focus on federal, state and local employment and labor laws.

Handy is a former police chief and was an adjunct faculty member at the universities of Arizona and California.

Kannan is vice president of research and development at Grifols, a global biopharmaceutical company based in Los Angeles.

Lee works in family medicine and co-founded the Family Medicine Revolution, a popular social media brand.

Venture capital financing

Vibrato Medical, a medical device startup in Irvine, closed a $ 4 million Series A funding round led by Newport Beach-based Horowitz Group.

Vibrato also received a $ 1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

The money will support a clinical trial of the company’s non-invasive wearable device designed to treat patients with critical limb ischemia, peripheral artery disease, directly from their homes.

Vibrato’s technology is based on ultrasound research which has shown increased tissue perfusion and vessel growth. The company believes that the approval and commercialization of its device could reduce the costs of the current average annual treatment.

The 10th edition of the Getzlaf Golf Shootout, held on September 11 at the Monarch Beach Golf Links, raised $ 800,000 for CureDuchenne, a non-profit organization focused on finding a cure for muscular dystrophy by Duchenne. Seen here are Ryan Getzlaf, Jeff Frieden of F&F Capital and title sponsor, Zandy Davidson, Ryder Getzlaf and David Bradley.

Good work

The 10th edition of the Getzlaf Golf Shootout, held on September 11 at the Monarch Beach Golf Links, raised $ 800,000 for CureDuchenne, a non-profit organization focused on finding a cure for muscular dystrophy by Duchenne.

The event, hosted by Anaheim Ducks captain Paige and Ryan Getzlaf, included a golf tournament, awards reception and dinner.

Status Update is compiled from press releases from Editor Karen Levin and edited by Editor-in-Chief Samantha Gowen. Send high resolution articles and photos to [email protected] Allow at least a week for publication. Elements are edited for length and clarity.


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Colleges expand mental health services for students


The COVID-19 pandemic has created an increased need for mental health services in colleges as students grapple with the social and economic consequences of closed campuses, online learning, and in some cases, loss of life. illness or death of their loved ones. Now, as most institutions return to more normal in-person operations, they are relying on telehealth mental health services to provide assistance to students, whether on campus or off campus.

“We have seen that many schools are focusing more on their services and making sure that they offer a health and wellness offering such as telehealth and teletherapy,” said Seli Fakorzi, director of health operations. mental health at TimelyMD, a telehealth provider. “Campuses are now wondering if they are offering enough services that offer virtual and in-person support. “

In June 2020, TimelyMD found that 85% of students reported experiencing increased stress and anxiety due to the pandemic and uncertainty about continuing with their education. Another survey from the Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement found that 53% of freshmen reported a substantial increase in mental and emotional exhaustion. Due to the increased need for services, institutions are strengthening their mental health resources for the fall semester. And given the wide range of student needs and living and learning situations – on-campus, off-campus, in-person, remote, hybrid – many institutions are using technology in innovative ways to deliver advisory services. and support to all who seek them.

T. Anne Hawkins, director of the Carruth Center for Counseling and Psychological Services at the University of West Virginia, said she and her team recognize they need to do something “outside the box” for the next semester. fall. So they established a one-year partnership with Talkspace, an online platform and app that connects students with licensed therapists. Students can send text, audio, photo and video messages to their therapist anytime, as well as schedule live video sessions. Hawkins said the partnership is especially helpful for out-of-state students because of telehealth licensing laws. As of the semester started on Aug. 18, 178 students have signed up for the app, Hawkins said.

“We know some of our students haven’t returned and are out of state or elsewhere in the state navigating virtual learning,” Hawkins said. “Our goal is really to increase mental health services to support students and help them manage the events of the pandemic and get back to in-person learning.”

She added that the university has a “large menu” of mental health resources, both in person and virtually. In addition to seeing counselors on campus during office hours, WVU students have 24/7 access to the Crisis Text Line, a mental health service where they can text a trained counselor. live that responds to messages privately. Students can text the counselor, who asks questions, empathizes, and actively listens. ProtoCall is another mental health service that students can call for crisis intervention and stabilization, as well as for referrals for network providers and other resources.

Such programs hold great promise in helping students. Studies have shown that teletherapy can be just as effective as face-to-face therapy in treating post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety, as one researcher said. The New York Times. Even before the pandemic, researchers from the Milbank Memorial Fund, a nonprofit health foundation, drew similar conclusions, also pointing out that behavioral telehealth can cost less than in-person visits and affect more people as well.

“What we’ve seen is that telehealth is essentially as effective as face-to-face psychotherapy – and retention rates are higher,” said David Mohr, director of the Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies at Feinberg. School of Medicine at Northwestern University. the American Psychological Association.

At Belmont University in Tennessee, Katherine Cornelius, director of counseling services, said students were torn between the need for in-person or virtual mental health services. In the first two weeks of classes, the institution saw a 60% increase in the number of counseling appointments compared to 2019, Cornelius said. His office has worked to increase access to mental health for non-traditional students, including graduate students or those in full-time employment.

“Over the past few years, we’ve really focused on improving access to care and reducing barriers,” Cornelius said. “Telehealth has been a huge benefit for this. Students don’t have to go to campus, and we’ve seen that a lot of students are really concerned about their health, so they really feel more comfortable doing virtual tours.

Before the onset of the pandemic, Belmont purchased Therapy Assistance Online, a virtual self-help platform that offers self-guided tools, educational and interactive modules, reviews, and progress tracking tools, to which all students , teachers and Belmont staff have free access. This fall, the school also purchased TimelyCare from Timely MD, which provides free virtual physical and mental health support and is available 24/7 to all students at Belmont, Cornelius said.

“Student life doesn’t end at 4:30 pm when our office is closed. A lot of them are just getting started, ”Cornelius said. “So TimelyCare kind of fills the gap after working hours. “

At the University of Virginia, Nicole Ruzek, director of counseling and psychology services, said students were grappling with issues beyond the pandemic. Many have felt the impact of racial injustice following the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, among others, at the hands of police, as well as the anxiety over the climate crisis and the 2020 presidential election. which divides. She said students seemed to like in-person and virtual counseling, so her department offers hybrid options. In 2018, the university contracted with SilverCloud, a virtual mental health platform that focuses on digital therapy, to give students access to informational videos, mental health quizzes and interactive tools.

In addition, the university signed a contract with TimelyMD “to continue to meet this demand for service,” said Ruzek. The contract allows students to have 24/7 virtual access to individual counseling, psychiatric services and on-demand support with a healthcare professional.

“Some students really appreciate having telehealth as an option. It can be much more convenient if they don’t want to travel, ”said Ruzek. “Having that option to be able to engage with a mental health provider, through a remote service, I think it’s really helpful. Then there are other students who really want to be seen in person.

Cooper Union, a private college in New York where the majority of students commute, has had to develop mental health resources that meet with students while they are on campus and when they are at home, said Chris Chamberlin , dean of students.

“We are small and we are trying to capitalize on our geography and all the resources that are available to us here in New York and in our neighborhood to provide students with significant access to care,” Chamberlin said.

In partnership with TimelyMD, Cooper Union created Cooper Care, an online app and platform that gives students 24/7 access to virtual healthcare providers. Chamberlin said that using Cooper Care with the institution’s own counseling program created “maximum flexibility” for students to meet their needs. He added that students are encouraged during Welcome Week to download and configure the Cooper Care app so that in the event of a crisis, they can immediately access help.

And it’s not difficult to engage students in telehealth resources if campuses standardize their use, said Fakorzi of TimelyMD. 24-hour services like TimelyCare can connect students with help during late hours and early when in-person care is not available in a crisis.

“If the problems boil over at 4 am I think it’s definitely a benefit for campuses to have a backup program to say, ‘Hey, this is also a place you can get help. “” said Fakorzi. “But it also gives the campus the security of knowing the help is there.”

There is always a stigma around helping with mental health, said Cornelius, of Belmont. Some students are concerned about confidentiality, while others come from backgrounds where mental health treatment is not the norm. And there is greater stigma against students struggling with mental health issues other than depression and anxiety, she said, including bipolar disorder and trauma.

Ruzek of the University of Virginia said the shift to more virtual mental health resources has opened up access for students from families or cultural backgrounds who do not typically seek mental health help.

“They don’t even have to come through our doors anymore,” Ruzek said. “They can connect with us electronically and we can put them in touch with the right resource without their parents knowing, if they don’t want their families to know, or even without their peers knowing if they are. are in a private location. “

Chamberlin agreed, saying the switch to telehealth “created access in a way that did not exist before”, when many mental health resources were confined to a certain time and place on campus. .

“More and more students are engaging in our virtual programming, whether it’s seeing a therapist remotely or attending a workshop they normally couldn’t do,” Chamberlin said. “I also think we’ve continued to do a number of things virtually that we could have done in person, because we also know that people learn differently and engage differently.”


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Get addicted to Colorado Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop


Drifters co-owner Beckie Clarke finishes brewing coffee in the downtown New Castle boutique.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

There’s a new buzz to pick up in Old Town New Castle.

Combining the West’s love for trout fishing and potent elixirs, Colorado Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop truly reflects highland culture at its best.

As the great Colorado River rushes a few hundred yards from its back porch, New Castle’s freshest cup of coffee in town offers both a full coffee bar and, yes, an entire fishing section. fly.



“Who doesn’t love coffee and fly fishing, seriously?” Wonders co-owner Kyla Hemelt, 36, standing behind the rustic cafe’s caramel-colored wooden bar adorned with a school of fish to the side. “Or, who doesn’t like coffee in the river?” “

Housed in a high-ceilinged historic monument in the heart of New Castle’s West Main Street, guests can sip locally brewed coffee while sinking into the welcoming furnishings greeting the front door. Palates can enjoy the Bonfire artisan roaster based in Carbondale. Hemelt said Drifters will soon sell two in-house mixes using this primary supplier.



For every bag sold, 3% of the proceeds will go to Fish For Change, a Denver-based nonprofit that promotes international fly fishing programs. Specifically, the funds will help sponsor a member of the Coal Ridge High School Fly Fishing Club.

Drifters co-owner Kyla Hemelt chats with business partner Beckie Clarke in the downtown New Castle boutique.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

Beyond its roasted benefits, Drifters offers so much, like sweet treats, breakfast burritos, and homemade tea, called “Here, Fish, Fish.” Source: Moving Mountains Tea Company in Steamboat Springs.

But uniquely adapting to that ragweed of organic coffee harvested from small farms in the Roaring Fork Valley and high mountain tea is a recreational expertise. Meet 40-year-old co-owner Beckie Clarke, there’s a good chance she’ll serve you a hot cup of Jo before she talks about trout pretty quickly.

Clarke is from Fernie, British Columbia, Canada. There she ran a fly fishing guide outfit for 17 years.

“My heart runs through the waters of these mountains and I know them very intimately,” she said. “Unlike these waters, everything is new and great. It’s just a completely different fishery. It’s pretty epic.

Not surprisingly, Colorado Drifters offers recreational opportunities in harmony with the landscape. Stand-up paddleboard rentals, fly fishing lessons, and qualified fly fishing guides are available for trips along the Colorado River Valley, a world-famous artery that sometimes jumps with 16-inch trout. inches.

Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop in downtown New Castle.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

To catch these behemoths, the next customer is a sip of fresh coffee to check out the vast collection of Colorado Drifters flies backwards.

“We probably have the most flies in the valley,” Clarke said. “We have minimal space there, but we focused on the flies. You should choose two things that you are really good at when starting a business.

Products available at Drifters Coffee and Fly Shop in downtown New Castle.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

While fly fishing can be an expensive habit, Colorado Drifters’ selection is all about modesty. All fly rods are priced from $ 80 to $ 150.

“Everything that we have chosen to go to this store has been specially chosen for our community,” said Clarke. “We definitely want tourists, but we want to support local people and families and make things affordable, because rivers are our passion.”

“We are not fancy,” she added. “We are a family.”

Clarke and Hemelt first met during the height of COVID-19. Hemelt, a mother of two, grew up “living the river life” as a native of Gunnison. She started hanging out with Clarke, a mother of three who was passionate about the subject of trout.

One day, the two new friends noticed that something was missing in the restaurants of Old Town New Castle: a coffee shop.

“There was no cafe and there was no fly shop,” Clarke said.

Drifters in downtown New Castle is a combination of cafe and fly shop.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

After spending many late nights texting each other and ultimately making a business plan, Clarke and Hemelt acquired the storefront and began work on the building in May. By the time they opened the doors, “New Castle arrived,” said the owners.

Now, locals have a place to sip an early morning coffee in the mountains and bask in the Colorado Drifters mantra.

“The river brings everything to life, but it’s also what brought us together,” said Hemelt. “It brings people together.”

A wide variety of flies available at the Drifters Coffee and Fly store in downtown New Castle.
Chelsea Self / Post Independent

Journalist Ray K. Erku can be contacted at 612-423-5273 or [email protected]


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San Antonio nonprofit train provides guide dogs for visually impaired Texans


San Antonio – Since 1989, Guide Dogs of Texas, a non-profit guide dog provider, has worked to train and supply guide dogs for the visually impaired in Texas.

This group professionally breeds, trains, and pairs guide dogs with owners statewide. It is a service that brings friendship, freedom and mobility to those who need the help of guide dogs.

Judy St. Clair has been legally blind since 1993, and she has said that only her ability to travel independently with a guide dog has positively impacted her life.

“We trust each other and that’s a factor of trust. With a wand you basically have to know where you’re going, but that’s great because you can still hurt yourself. The dog will see something in advance and protect you, ”said Sainte-Claire.

According to the Guide Dogs of Texas, puppies are placed with volunteer puppy breeders until they are 14 to 16 months old. The San Antonio group said it had been successful in dealing with the future number of guide dogs, even in a pandemic, and needed a “puppy breeder” to support the program.

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Patty McCauley is a puppy breeder who has lived with her dog “nugget” since she was eight weeks old. She said she had played with the idea of ​​volunteering for a while, then decided how much her service would help those in need.

“I just raised a puppy, gave it love, took it out and introduced it to people, the environment and what the average person encounters every day, and I know you give back to someone. ‘a. I think it’s pretty awesome to know that you can help someone on your own, ”said McColly.

According to the group, “No previous experience is required and all training is provided. “

“Puppies are responsible for teaching puppies etiquette and providing them with a social experience for the first year of their life,” a nonprofit said.

Puppies also attend monthly meetings to share ideas and information, work on training techniques, and participate in social gatherings.

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Guide dog instructor Amy Samora said dogs do more than just increase mobility and independence.

“The dog brings a lot of happy faces, and it really encourages people to go to our customers to get involved with them, and it also brings all of this great social relationship.” Said Samora.

Guide dogs are obedient and friendly, but the instructor said it was important not to pet the guide dog. Guide dog owner St. Clair says he will not allow the dog when wearing the harness.

“If I let someone touch her with the harness, she would want to go too far and play. It would be fun, and the general idea of ​​working with a guide dog would be a distraction. But they will continue to focus, ”said St. Clair.

Guide dogs in Texas charge only $ 1 per specially trained dog, but the cost of breeding and training guide dogs can run as high as $ 50,000.

For more information or to register for the program, please visit www.guidedogsoftexas.org, call 210-366-4081 or email @ guidedogsoftexas.org.

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San Antonio nonprofit train provides guide dogs for visually impaired Texans

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Non profit living

Fourth Live Update from Stimulus Control: Child Tax Credit Extension to 2025, New Payment in California, Unemployment Benefits …


Securities

AOC announces efforts to expand federal unemployment benefits until February 2022. (Full story)

– New projections on Social Security Cost of living adjustment for 2022 emerge. (Whole story)

President Biden fails to convince Sen Manchin to support the $ 3.5 billion spending bill

Seventeen states have seen increase in unemployment claims Last week. (Whole story)

A new bill to extend federal unemployment benefits until February 2022 emerges on Capitol Hill. (Whole story)

– How do I register a newborn baby for monthly child tax credit payments? (Whole story)

Last week, initial unemployment claims have increased for the first time in recent months. (All the details)

800,000 New Yorkers lost unemployment benefits when federal programs ended. (Whole story)

September Child Tax Credit Payments Sent, when will the money arrive in the banks (More information)

– Fourth federal stimulus check not in the $ 3.5 billion reconciliation invoice (full story)

Some US states send their own stimulus payments (More information)

Overview of the three dunning checks adopted by Congress. (Details)

Useful information / links

California Golden State Stimulus Checks:

California Tax Franchise Board to Send 2 million additional Golden State Stimulus checks Friday September 17th.

– How to Track Your Golden State Stimulus Check

– Who can receive a second Golden State Stimulus check? (Details)

– When can I expect my $ 600 Will Golden State Stimulus in California Happen? (Details)

– What state programs exist for Americans who lost their unemployment benefits? (All the details)

IRS distributes third payment of the child tax credit (Find out how you can unsubscribe from the monthly CTC)

Some of our related press articles:


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Lewisville nonprofit ‘Haitian Pilgrims’ strive to improve living conditions in Haiti – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth


Observing the immigration situation of more than 10,000 Haitian migrants at the Texas border is difficult for a local missionary group.

“They are doing their best with what they have,” said Haitian Pilgrims President Sue Ogle. “They are a wonderful, loving and hardworking people and I really love the people of Haiti.”

Ogle is president of the Lewisville Haitian Pilgrims Missionary Group. It was founded by some members of St. Philip the Apostle Parish in Lewisville in 1999.

Ogle has been traveling for work in Haiti for 20 years.


Haitian pilgrims

“In fact, I lived in Haiti and taught in a school that we built there in 2014, period 2015,” Ogle said.

Ogle saw the struggles in Haiti with his own eyes.

“The situation is extremely desperate,” Ogle said. “Over the years, the economy has declined at a rate of about 2% per year.”

Ogle added: “People are on their feet and the children get up very early in the morning to go to the wells to get water to take away so the family can have water to cook for a day and clean themselves for a while. a day.”



Haitian pilgrims

Ogle said even some organizations trying to help can cause problems.

“Unfortunately, some very large nonprofits send a significant amount of food up for sale, which undermines farmers who cannot sell at the price the larger organization can sell,” Ogle said.

Ogle and Haitian pilgrims strive to improve life in Haiti, especially in rural areas. They have built schools and teach agricultural programs among their other initiatives including health, clean water and leadership.



Haitian pilgrims

Ogle said the situation on the Texas border is just a glimpse of the desperate situation in Haiti and what is fueling their migration.

“Desperation gives them strength,” Ogle said. “They don’t have opportunities in Haiti and of course we are the land of opportunities.”

Haitian pilgrims will continue to share this opportunity to try to make things better in Haiti.

To learn more about the mission of Haitian pilgrims and ways to donate, click here.


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Non profit living

How parents can find their strength and resilience


Parents facing issues such as violence, drug addiction, and food or financial insecurity often feel blamed, humiliated and judged by society. Even well-intentioned initiatives designed to help them focus only on the issues and challenges they face, as if that was their entire story.

But a new group of community parenting programs recognize the multitude of strengths and wisdom inherent in these parents. These programs help parents recognize what they are doing well, trust their own expertise, honor their resilience, and bear witness to the importance of their love for their children.

Three organizations supported by GGSC’s Raising Caring, Courageous Kids initiative have worked to help parents recognize their individual parenting strengths, promote positive bonds with their children, and improve their ability to raise caring and resilient children. Participation in these programs often causes parents, as well as children, to begin to strengthen their sense of purpose in the world and to articulate their goals and dreams for the future.

Resilient parenting at the Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota

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Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota (LSS) works with families to create stability and success in the home. LSS helps parents involved, or at risk of involvement, in the child protection system.

After listening to the concerns and needs of parents, they created the online program “Resilient Parenting” —a blended learning experience with a combination of online units, face-to-face meetings and activities. interactive learning. The program promotes character strengths such as purpose, gratitude, forgiveness, and love. For example, mindfulness activities can involve breathing, yoga, or visualization breaks that parents can try.

Woven into the program were stories voiced by real parents going through similar experiences. Hearing from other parents offered hope and helped participants trust their own parenting decisions. It also helped create what Carol Dweck, professor of psychology at Stanford University, calls a “growth mindset,” in which parents in the program came to believe their basic abilities might be. further developed through hard work and dedication.

Heather Kamia, director of metro youth and family services at LSS, says they created a parenting program that has met parents in their community “where they are.” “We had to start from the assumption that all parents were the experts on their child. That they had ideas and experiences to share, ”she said. “To develop a productive partnership with parents, we also had to recognize [that] systems they may have experienced before have left many without confidence in this ability. “

According to Andrea Hussong, professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, this kind of strength-based partnership was essential. “It is important to work in partnership with parents around the knowledge that already exists and to help them remove the obstacles that prevent them from acting on this knowledge,” she explained.

Making the program virtual allowed parents to learn at their own pace and in a safe space. “Parents talked about feeling respected. They felt that the content could be really valuable to any parent, not just families involved in the system, ”Kamia said. LSS’s culturally relevant programming, which recognizes how systemic racism and lack of access to needs such as child care, wages and essential technology can affect a parent’s confidence in their child’s education , helped parents trust their own wisdom and positioned them to be able to guide their children to do the same.

Inspiring Grace and Resilience at UCAN

Chicago’s nonprofit UCAN strives to build strong youth and families through education and empowerment. They developed the “Inspiring Grace” program for young parents between the ages of 18 and 20 living in Chicago neighborhoods with high levels of violence, family and community trauma, and a lack of resources, including education and training. employment.

Once a week for six weeks, parents participated in dinner, discussions and activities focused on building resilience and improving parenting skills. Activities included planting seeds to represent forgiveness, marking the stones with aspects of their life they wanted to keep or let go, mindfulness through guided pictures, practicing benevolence by speaking into a mirror, and (most popular activity) creating vision boards. Parents wrote down their thoughts on their life purpose and who they wanted to become and wrote those thoughts on decorative vision boards that they presented to the group.

One vision was “to buy one of the abandoned buildings in the neighborhood for my son so that he always had a place to live”, another “to teach my children what love is”.

The creation of the vision boards made it possible for parents to see themselves in a better light and envision their possible inheritances, and even led to increased happiness. “These exercises led to aha times, in which parents could say, ‘Yes, I do. Yes, I have a sense of purpose. Yes, I help people. Yes, I show love! Said Karrie Mills, co-host of the program.

Velma McBride Murry, Professor of Human and Organizational Development at Vanderbilt University and Scientific Advisor at UCAN, says for these parents, “The consequences of negative childhood experiences are long-standing and the effects can be passed on from generation to generation, with which parents interact and raise their own children. She explained that the program was designed to disrupt the ripple effects of trauma on families through love, forgiveness and purpose.

Mills says it was essential to ensure that any trauma experienced by these parents did not obscure their ability to recognize their parental potential. They were encouraged to recognize the things they did regularly that helped others and showed their ability to love.

Murry says living in a home where parents are supportive and loving creates a sense of self-worth, self-acceptance and self-esteem in children. Having this internal trust can serve as a protective factor for children, reducing their dependence on their peers as a source of validation. She adds that these protection processes are essential when young people live in communities with an increased likelihood of exposure to violence.

Citywise: mentoring and more

Citywise specializes in individual, school and community mentoring programs for 8-12 year olds living in low income urban areas of the UK. Their goal is to develop character strengths in young people, including resilience, self-control, good judgment and fairness.

To be more successful with children, program officials also recognized the importance of involving parents. To help determine what services to offer parents, “they started out by listening, hearing what people are looking for, what they are trying to accomplish with their own parenthood,” according to Hussong.

The program has evolved over time to include parents who attend and participate in mentoring sessions, receive regular communications about the child’s mentoring experiences, and get tips and suggestions for activities that families could do. together.

Hana Bútorová, Director of Citywise Glasgow, says: “Most of the time the parents of the children we worked with were only contacted if something was wrong or something was going on that was difficult. So, we just started contacting them frequently with the right stuff, with quotes from mentors telling us how awesome the kid is today… inviting parents to celebrate their kid’s progress.

Perhaps more importantly, they created informal ways for families to interact, such as “Family Fun Days” and family game and craft clubs. These interactions allowed parents and guardians to reflect on key areas of the program such as self-control and identifying emotions, things they may not have learned when they were younger. “I think that was the biggest advantage of the program: just creating a space for them to start talking more explicitly [those] things, ”Bútorová adds.

Participation in family activities has allowed the character growth of children (and sometimes adults!) To occur naturally. For example, board games allowed parents and children to discuss concepts such as taking turns, the need for patience and honesty. Citywise research found that children who participated in family activities achieved the highest level of character building.

It was especially meaningful for some parents to hear from counselors that their children wanted to participate because they had loving and engaged parents (not just because of games or snacks). When a parent had “realized his value as a parent to his child … it made him feel like his love was doing something important here,” Bútorová said. For parents living difficult lives, this recognition offered a renewed sense of purpose.

Courses for parents

For all parents, these community programs offer many lessons. An important concept they encourage is to reject the idea of ​​having to be “the perfect parent” before trying to raise children in any meaningful way. What parent has not felt this pressure? But the perfect parent does not exist! Children learn resilience when they have the opportunity to watch their parents make mistakes and bounce back.

Realizing that there are no perfect parents means that we are all “work in progress”. As these organizations demonstrate, being an active “work in progress” benefits children. Modeling self-reflection, discovering and leveraging inner parenting strengths, and working alongside children to develop character strengths together can be a rewarding and fulfilling family experience.

Another important lesson is not to be afraid to ask for and accept help from those around you. It is an act of courage, not weakness. When parents have a supportive community and opportunities to discover their strengths, they can better develop a nurturing environment for their children.

Hussong says experts are learning there is no big secret to parenthood; parents may need a variety of tools and habits to establish an environment that is most supportive of their children’s unique needs. “It’s not just the modeling or the communication you use or just the types of activities and things you do with your child, or how you respond to them when they are having difficulty or when they are successful. to demonstrate a positive character and virtues, ”she said. “It’s all of those things.”


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Afghans are likely to find Georgia a more welcoming place than former refugees


Heval Mohamed Kelli, 11, believed his family were going on vacation after crossing the Syrian border into Turkey in 1996, when his father paid smugglers to take them to safety in Germany.

He was unaware at the time of the political persecutions his father, a lawyer, was facing in Syria or how life was going to change drastically as they mostly lived in resettlement camps for the next few years in a unknown country.

Kelli eventually settled in Clarkston in 2001, where he and his family still lived in poverty, but the opportunities for better education and professional mobility sparked optimism they did not have in the camps. German refugees. Two decades later, Kelli watches with keen interest as hundreds of thousands of Afghans flee their country after the Taliban declared control when the United States ended its role in the longstanding conflict.

Kelli was 17 when he arrived in America and did not speak English. He now works at Northside Hospital as a cardiologist. It’s a piece of the American dream that started small as a teenage refugee working as a diver to support his family. Now he is inspired to help refugees and others living in underserved communities in the United States.

Heval Kelli, center, a Syrian refugee whose family moved to Clarkston in 2001 watches with keen interest Afghan refugees waiting to find new places to live after US troops withdraw from their home countries. Kelli is a cardiologist at Northside Hospital, Photo credit Emory University

“These Afghan refugees come from a very unfortunate situation, it is so sad to see what is happening,” he said. “They are just happy to be in a safe place for them. But I tell them, I think this is the only country in the world where you could come here. I have lived in the Middle East and I don’t think I would have become who I am if I hadn’t been here.

Approximately 123,000 people have flown from Afghanistan and 50,000 are currently undergoing security screening at military bases in preparation for reintegration into American communities.

Tens of thousands of Afghans who worked directly with the US government started leaving the country a few months ago and many arrived after a August evacuation. The majority of these refugees have special visa status which will allow them to clear basic security hurdles more quickly.

The Associated Press reported this week that officials in the Biden administration have started briefing governors and mayors in 46 states of the number of people from the first wave of 37,000 evacuees to be expected in the coming weeks, including more 1,000 refugees expected to arrive in Georgia.

A coalition of Atlanta nonprofits, including New American Pathways, will likely begin helping individuals and their families find housing, employment and other supports soon, as many relocate. in apartments and rental homes in Georgia, primarily in the Metro Atlanta area.

Larger numbers of refugees will go through an even more complicated process as they have yet to apply for permanent status as they seek to pass a more rigorous background check.

Finding enough affordable housing for those allowed to relocate to the United States will be a major challenge that will also benefit from the kindness of strangers. While resettlement groups typically pay a few months of rent, Airbnb provides temporary housing across the country to 20,000 Afghan refugees.

The Biden administration has asked Congress for $ 6.4 billion for the resettlement of Afghan refugees, with targets of 65,000 by the end of September and another 95,000 by September 2022, according to the AP.

Over 90% of people served by American Pathways and other local groups pay their own expenses within six months. There is a strong system of support from the religious community and beyond in the greater metropolitan area and among ethnic groups that depend on each other, said Emily Laney, director of development for New American Pathways.

“Even before the 1980 Refugee Act, groups were resettling refugees in Georgia,” Laney said. “It’s really so intense. There have been a lot of really traumatic events in the last few weeks, and we have the resources to support them.

“The people who have gone through some of the worst things humanity has to offer, these refugees are strong, resilient and courageous,” Laney said.

The amount of resources spent on refugee resettlement has been slashed under the administration of former President Donald Trump through federal policy changes reducing refugees admitted each year to less than 23,000 in 2018 compared to plans last year. year of former President Barack Obama to admit 110,000.

During Trump’s tenure, Muslim-majority countries in the Middle East were among the countries targeted by tighter restrictions hampering the path to a green card.

According to the New American Economy, a nonprofit refugee research organization, Afghans made up less than 2% of the total number of refugees who immigrated to the United States between 2002 and 2018.

The Biden administration has raised its goal of admitting refugees to 125,000 people this year. It’s an unrealistic benchmark due to dwindling resources, but it’s a much better direction than the previous four years, according to Jeremy Robbins, executive director of America’s New Economy.

“It’s our biggest competitive advantage that people want to come here and work hard, but it masks the fact that it’s really hard to do if you don’t speak the language, if you don’t have the network, or if you can find a job by yourself. ” he said.

“Having a big influx of people from Afghanistan right now is something you can expect to have a backlash,” Robbins said. “But one thing that’s different now is that I think the circumstances in which this happened, seeing people who risked their lives to help us win this war all of a sudden hanging on the air libre has really brought about a big change that seems to be very bipartisan. “

Georgia Republican Governor Brian Kemp signaled his willingness to take in controlled Afghan refugees shortly after the Taliban took control of their country last month. This contrasts with the stance taken in 2015 by his compatriot Republican and former governor Nathan Deal against the resettlement of Syrian refugees fleeing a bloody conflict in their country of origin.

Witnessing current events was an overwhelming experience for Muska Haseeb, an Afghan refugee turned American citizen, as the Taliban regained control after two decades of sacrificing American troops and treasures and the dashed hopes of Afghans who sought more help. opportunities in their country.

Haseeb’s family moved to Phoenix in 2012 after spending six years in Pakistan as a refugee to escape the physical abuse her mother suffered in Afghanistan for working as an administrative assistant.


(left to right) Muska Haseeb, sister-in-law Madina Haider, brother Syed Haider, niece Marwaha, nephew Sultan and mother Haseeba Aria. Photo by Kulsoom Rizvi & Andrew Oberstadt / International Rescue Committee

Today Haseb’s mother is a social worker and her 27-year-old daughter runs her own fashion business and will soon be starting school at the University of Texas in a pre-medical program.

“I really wish they could do something about this in the future because nobody wants to stay under Taliban rule,” Haseeb said. “I’m definitely going to want to be a motivation for any new refugee, whether from Afghanistan or any other country. I want them to see that (the United States) is the land of opportunity and that we can certainly pursue our dreams and goals and that we can become something here.

Clarkston from Georgia to welcome remaining Afghan refugees

Clarkston, a town in DeKalb County where more than half of its 13,000 residents were born overseas, is likely to receive an influx of Afghan refugees via New American Pathways and other resettlement agencies in the coming months.

Clarkston became a home town for many refugees, earning it the nickname of Southern Ellis Island. It offers affordable rental housing and is small enough that newcomers can walk to schools or its small downtown area, while still providing enough public transportation to get around Atlanta’s two largest counties. .

Immigrants frequently take on low-paying minimum-wage jobs and other lower-paying positions as they adjust to life in a new country.

For some refugees who settle in Clarkston, this means daily trips to Gainesville to work in the chicken processing plants.

Yet Clarkston’s leadership was not so welcoming to foreign nationals and refugees settling in the city as recently as the past decade.

In 2013, the former mayor of Clarkston helped ban the resettlement of new refugees. A few years later, when Ted Terry was elected mayor, the moratorium was lifted. He has set in motion an attitude of acceptance within government that continues to push the community toward inclusion as more refugees become citizens, vote and run for office.

“I think we finally hit a kind of critical mass of voters who were like, in fact, we think refugees are a positive thing. And we don’t want to go back in the history of Clarkston. We want to look to the future and move forward, ”said Terry, who is now DeKalb County Commissioner.

Refugees are known to contribute to the economy of their new country almost upon arrival. Their crime rate in their community is generally low. And they own businesses or attend college at a higher rate than the average American.

Although Kelli lived in a poorer area of ​​Clarkston while he was finishing his studies, the town offered an enclave that could have been much worse for a Muslim family who had recently arrived in America shortly after 9/11.

“We always say we got scared more than anything,” Kelli said. “I think Clarkston was such a loving community that really offered protection from the harassment we might have faced.

With the withdrawal of American forces from Afghanistan now complete, Catholic Charities Atlanta will continue to help evacuated families find new homes, as it has done for the past 20 years.

“Rebuilding your life is not easy,” said Vanessa Russell, CEO of Catholic Charities Atlanta. “These brave families escaped with just what they could take. They are courageous, resilient and optimistic about their future. We will welcome these families with a grateful heart and help them integrate and thrive in their new home here in Atlanta. “


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Non profit living

Friendly Neighborhood ‘Dealer of Hope’ Fuels Federal Way


Louis Guiden is known as Federal Way’s “hope dealer”.

Since 2008, the Good Shepherd Youth Outreach of Federal Way has provided mentoring and character development skills to youth in the area. When the pandemic struck, the association pivoted its mission to tackle food insecurity among black and brown families in Federal Way.

“With their children at home, families are running out of food… it was the emergency for us,” said Guiden, 47, executive director of the association. “We have to respond to the need which right now is hunger. ”

Good Shepherd Youth Outreach of Federal Way is one of six finalists from the Western Region in the 2022 Chick-fil-A True Inspiration Awards competition.

The True Inspiration Awards began in 2015, in honor of Chick-fil-A founder S. Truett Cathy. The grant awards celebrate and support nonprofits dealing with education, hunger or homelessness that are run by black people or serve communities of color, according to the organization.

Voting began on September 4 and continues through September 25 through the Chick-fil-A app.

Good Shepherd Youth Outreach of Federal Way was founded by Guiden in 2008. The aim of the organization is to provide mentorship to youth of color through academic support, character development, life skills education and training. support for prevention and intervention.

Feeding Our Community was launched in April 2020. Since then, approximately 2.5 million pounds of food and over 28,000 meals have been served to local families from the Guiden drive-style weekly distribution program started at The Boys and Girls Club of Federal Way.

A team of about 15 people organize the drive-thru distributions each week, including young people from local middle and high schools who receive a stipend for their work, and additional volunteers from the community.

“It went from 15 to 20 cars a week to 120 cars a week,” Guiden said. The pandemic has allowed Guiden to refocus the mission of his program, moving to meet the most immediate needs of the community.

Black, Indigenous and Colored (BIPOC) families make up about 80% of those served by the association, Guiden said. Food is provided through partnerships with the Peacekeeper Society, Food Lifeline and Northwest Harvest.

Few food banks or distribution centers are run by Blacks or BIPOC, Guiden said, leaving a void in the provision of culturally relevant and culturally appropriate foods.

Guiden and his team understand the needs of the people to whom they provide food, and in return, there is a sense of understanding.

“As a black African American man living in Federal Way for 22 years, it really gave me a deep connection to my community, serving food,” he said. “It connects me to the community at large… The fight against food insecurity has given me so much hope, so much enthusiasm, so much love. ”

While Guiden and his team feed the community, people often drop off homemade meals, treats and other tokens of appreciation at distributors.

The True Inspiration Award nomination allowed Guiden to step back and realize the power of his work. If his nonprofit wins, the funds would be used to further develop the Community Empowerment Center, Feeding Our Community and Brothers Bout Business programs.

“It gave me the fuel I needed… I’m like, ‘What else can we fix in Federal Way? What can we do as an organization now to solve the problems of this community? ”

Moved from Louisiana to the Pacific Northwest in 1993, Guiden said he arrived with five dollars in his pocket. A work-related incident shortly after his move left him with a traumatic brain injury, an ankle fracture requiring 12 reconstructive surgeries and constant pain.

He found strength in his story through his faith and his wife. Guiden sees himself as a Sankofa bird, a symbol of his West African heritage that reminds people that “we must keep moving forward by remembering our past,” Guiden said.

By embarking on his own journey, he made sure to plant a seed to strengthen the capacities of future generations.

In its 22 years of mentoring and dedication to the youth of the community, Good Shepherd Youth Outreach has served over 180 youth and families.

“I’m the hope dealer,” he said. “I help people deal effectively with overwhelming pressures. ”

For more information or to get involved, visit www.gsyowa.org.

Local Federal Way youth are primarily responsible for the drive-thru food distribution each week.



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Non profit living

Northern Alabama Food Bank Tackles Child Hunger


HUNTSVILLE, Alabama – Food insecurity continues to be an issue the Northern Alabama Food Bank is working to alleviate.

While some sit down to dinner each night, others wonder if they will go to bed hungry. Some of these people are children. Instead of focusing on learning at school or playing with friends, they worry about when the next meal is.

“You know, if we are to have a vibrant and prosperous community, children need to be able to learn and grow without having to worry about hunger,” said Bobby Bozeman, director of development for the Food Bank of North Alabama. They strive to beautify the future and the present by providing food to those in need.

One thing many people may not realize is how widespread food insecurity is in northern Alabama. According to the Food Bank, 1/4 of northern Alabama’s kids don’t know when they’ll have their next meal.

“When kids have to deal with this, it’s virtually impossible to focus on other things, be it clubs, activities, their studies or athletics,” said Bozeman. “When you’re focused on hunger, that’s all you can think of.”

Fortunately, there are nonprofits like the Food Bank that help ease this burden. Bozeman said they distribute food to partners who run backpack programs and help with mobile pantries set up at elementary schools in Huntsville.

For those fortunate enough not to have to think about where their next meal is coming from, there are opportunities to help through the food bank.

If you are interested in helping local families, one of the best things you can do is donate. To help them in their efforts to end hunger, click on ‘Donate’ at https://www.foodbanknorthal.org/. Every dollar donated provides nearly seven meals.

You can also volunteer to help. While many businesses and nonprofits grapple with the job, Bozeman says the food bank is in luck.

“Huntsville is a very passionate community that gives back and obviously we face sales like everyone else, but luckily a lot of people have come to work for us,” he said. “Nonprofits don’t always offer the best, but we try to be competitive and give our people a living wage. ”

You can find a link to become a volunteer on the organization’s home page, as well as information on how to get food aid and program information on the Food Bank’s website.


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Non profit living

Hello Kitty arrives at the new Sanrio store in Irvine; Madison Reed opens 2 stores – Orange County Register


Hello Kitty, Chococat, My Melody, and Keroppi head over to UC Irvine.

There’s no word on what classes they might take, but the popular characters will soon be on sale at a new Sanrio store that will debut at the University Center in early October.

The Japanese company is known for making kitschy characters and collectibles. Wendy Hsu is the franchise owner of Sanrio Irvine.

The store will sell the latest versions of Sanrio and limited edition collectibles such as back-to-school items, stationery, clothing, accessories and housewares.

Hello Kitty, Chococat, My Melody and Keroppi arrive at Orange County in a dedicated Sanrio store. The store filled with plush toys, stationery, clothing, accessories and housewares opens Oct. 2 at the University Center near UC Irvine. Address: 4255 Campus Drive (Courtesy of Sanrio)

Sanrio Irvine, which opens on Sunday, October 2, will have sections dedicated to plush, clothing, beauty and stationery walls, as well as space for Hello Kitty and friends.

Address: 4255 Campus Drive Ste-B-142; Hours: 11 am to 7 pm, Monday to Thursday; From 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. from Friday to Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday.

  • Madison Reed, a San Francisco-based do-it-yourself hair dye startup, opens its first Orange County locations, one at Tustin Market Place on El Camino Real (September 15) and the other at Fashion Island at Newport Plage (Sep 23). The startup specializes in matching colors and can apply the dye in their Madison Reed Hair Color Bar. (Courtesy of Madison Reed)

  • Madison Reed, a San Francisco-based do-it-yourself hair dye startup, opens its first Orange County locations, one at Tustin Market Place on El Camino Real (September 15) and the other at Fashion Island at Newport Plage (Sep 23). The startup specializes in matching colors and can apply the dye in their Madison Reed Hair Color Bar. (Courtesy of Madison Reed)

  • Madison Reed, a San Francisco-based do-it-yourself hair dye startup, opens its first Orange County locations, one at Tustin Market Place on El Camino Real (September 15) and the other at Fashion Island at Newport Plage (Sep 23). The startup specializes in matching colors and can apply the dye in their Madison Reed Hair Color Bar. (Courtesy of Madison Reed)

Madison Reed opens its first OC locations

Pandemic lockdowns have left millions of dyed, highlighted and swept women in quarantine at home with no living room and few good ways to hide those pesky roots.

Some women just let it grow, while others turned to startups offering DIY hair dye kits.

One of them was Madison Reed, a do-it-yourself hair dye startup in San Francisco that exploded early in the pandemic months. The company is opening its first locations in Orange County, one at Tustin Market Place on El Camino Real (September 18) and the other at Fashion Island in Newport Beach (September 23).

CEO Amy Erret told Yahoo Finance last summer that Madison Reed saw her sales increase 12-fold as the pandemic changed lives as we knew it.

“I’m not happy that it took a pandemic for this to happen,” she said in July 2020. “I’d rather it didn’t happen. But I think it proves that the coloring of the hair is really important to people emotionally.

The startup uses unique color matching technology in their kits, which can be mailed to clients, or a professional can match and apply the color in a Madison Reed coloring bar. The company says it employs licensed colorists and uses products that are ammonia-free, paraben-free, and cruelty-free.

Addresses: 3003 El Camino Real, Tustin (next to the White House / Black Market); 313 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach.

Fullerton’s Women’s Transitional Living Center, under the leadership of CEO Mark Lee, is raising the minimum wage for its full-time employees to $ 22.44 from $ 18.27. The nonprofit’s salary increases benefit 26 of its 49 part-time and full-time employees. (Courtesy of Bill Nichols and the Women’s Transitional Living Center)

Nonprofit salary increase

The Women’s Transitional Living Center in Fullerton is increasing its minimum hourly wage for full-time employees from $ 18.27 to $ 22.44.

The nonprofit’s salary increases benefit 26 of its 49 part-time and full-time employees.

The new wage standard was based on the Living Wage Calculator created by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology so that a single adult without children could afford adequate housing, food and other expenses.

The WTLC said it previously relied on the Southern California nonprofit compensation report to determine a market rate for staff positions. The nonprofit, said chief executive Mark Lee, now recognizes that such reports are based on a system with “built-in inequalities that undermine people in lower paid positions.”

“Our new compensation standard is no longer influenced by external unfairness factors,” Lee said in a statement. “This positive change has been made possible by the dedication and commitment to the WTLC that our staff demonstrate every day.”

The non-profit organization helps individuals and families escape domestic violence and exploitation by providing resources aimed at independent living. WTLC has 24 hour bilingual telephone support at 877-531-5522 or can be contacted by email / text at [email protected] For more information, visit www.wtlc.org.

Moving

Yunkyung Kim has been appointed COO of CalOptima in Orange. Kim returns to CalOptima after leaving Blue Shield of California Promise Health Plan, where she was Vice President of Medi-Cal Growth and Vice President of Medi-Cal Performance. She has 20 years of experience in the healthcare industry. CalOptima provides state-funded health care coverage for low-income children, adults, seniors, and people with disabilities in Orange County.

Good work

The Orange County Community Foundation raised $ 144,502 from 450 donors to Protect & Preserve, a day of giving to support the county’s open spaces and marine protected areas. The money will go to seven local nonprofits that help protect marine areas along the 12 miles of Orange County coast. Participating organizations included Laguna Canyon Foundation, Laguna Ocean Foundation, Newport Bay Conservancy, OC Habitats, Ocean Defenders Alliance, Pacific Marine Mammal Center and The Ecology Center.

Ralphs and Food 4 Less raised $ 100,000 in donations for their Hunger Action Month campaign. Proceeds will support Cal State Fullerton’s permanent pantry for students, Homeboy Industries’ Feed HOPE program and “Fill the Fridge,” an ongoing campaign that benefits Project Angel Food, the Los Angeles LGBT Center and the Los Angeles Unified School District.

The City National Bank recently presented a check to the Small Business Development Corporation of Orange County as a Community Reinvestment Act grant to help small businesses. From left to right, Eduardo Brugman, news director of SBDC-OC; Theresa Don Lucas, City National Bank CRA Officer; Richard Lee, Senior Vice President of Commercial Lending at SBDC-OC; City National Bank SVP Sal Mendoza. (Courtesy of City National Bank)

Subsidies

The Orange County Small Business Development Corporation received $ 20,000 in Community Reinvestment Act bank grants that will help the organization guide entrepreneurs and small business owners through tough times or expansions. The association received a grant of $ 10,000 each from City National Bank and CIT Bank this summer. the money will go to its entrepreneur loan fund which lends directly to businesses.

Milestones

Stretto, an Irvine-based technology and services company, was recognized at the 15th Annual M&A Advisor Turnaround Awards as Turnaround Product / Service of the Year. This recognition marks the second consecutive year that Stretto has received this award for its services. Stretto was also honored in the Chapter 11 Reorganization of the Year category.

Laguna Cafe and Grill was honored as Local Restaurant of the Month for August by MP Cottie Petrie-Norris (District 74). Laguna Woods Restaurant is known for its all American-style cuisine and breakfast. The Laguna Cafe was founded by Richard Martinez and is co-owned by Tammy Martinez and Monja Chavez.

Editor’s Note: This post has been updated to correct Madison Reed’s opening date to Tustin.

Status Update is compiled from press releases from Editor Karen Levin and edited by Editor-in-Chief Samantha Gowen. Send high resolution articles and photos to [email protected] Allow at least a week for publication. Elements are edited for length and clarity.


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Local files | News, Sports, Jobs


Lt. Darryl Ng, Civil Air Patrol Commander of the Maui County Composite Squadron, will be the guest speaker at the Lahaina Sunset Rotary Club Virtual Reunion at 5:30 p.m. on September 21.

For more than 50 years, the 57th Maui County Composite Squadron has served the community, responding to Hurricane Iniki and famous Eddie Aikau research, according to a press release. Ng will share history and information about the squadron as well as its main mission and programs in Maui.

Club members and guests are welcome to attend the meeting via Zoom. To receive a meeting link, contact Joanne Laird at [email protected]

*****

Pizza Charity founder to speak to Rotarians

The Rotary Club of Kihei-Wailea will welcome Jonathan Yudis as a guest speaker at its virtual meeting on Wednesday at noon.

Yudis is the founder of the “Charity Pizza in Maui” community service project, which provides hot meals to homeless people in Maui.

The Zoom room will open at 11:30 am for communion. The Zoom meeting ID is 829 1334 8817; the access code is 081120.

For more information, contact Allan Weiland at [email protected]

*****

Shelter to host an adoption event

The Maui Humane Society will be hosting an adoption event from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on September 18.

No appointment is necessary and there is no adoption fee. Prospective pet parents can participate in the Maui Humane Society’s 10-day Paws to Adopt trial program.

In addition to the animals that await their homes forever, there will be food trucks and live entertainment at the event. Social distancing and masks are mandatory.

For more information, visit www.mauihumanesociety.org.

*****

Bezos donates to Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity Maui received a personal donation from Jeff Bezos, Founder and Executive Chairman of Amazon.

“We are incredibly grateful for the support of Mr. Bezos”, said Sherri Dodson, executive director of the association. “We are in the process of expanding our home security repair and modification program for low income kupunas and / or homeowners with disabilities, so this donation could not have come at a better time. Sadly, so many of our low income seniors live in unsanitary conditions and just need a helping hand. This donation will help us build our capacities and allow us to continue our mission. Everyone deserves a safe and decent place to live.

*****

Children’s advocacy group receives donation

The Friends of the Children’s Justice Center of Maui received a personal donation from Amazon Founder and Executive Chairman Jeff Bezos.

“This donation comes at a crucial time for us due to the overwhelming increase in service requests we have received during the COVID pandemic, as well as the broader needs we have seen in the community,” said Paul Tonnessen, executive director of the Friends of the Maui Children’s Justice Center.

The nonprofit organization provides assistance to abused and neglected children, promotes the prevention of child abuse and neglect, and supports the Maui Children’s Justice Center, which is part of the State Judiciary. Hawaii.

For more information about the Friends of the Maui Children’s Justice Center, contact Tonnessen at 986-8634 or visit mauicjc.org.

*****

Bezos donates to boys and girls clubs

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Maui is one of many local nonprofits that have received a personal donation from Jeff Bezos, founder and executive chairman of Amazon.

“We want to send a huge mahalo to Mr. Bezos and his team for his support and for recognizing the incredible value that Maui’s nonprofits provide,” said Kelly Maluo-Pearson, CEO of Boys & Girls Clubs of Maui.

The nonprofit said it would use the donation to continue providing its evidence-based programs that help young people learn, develop social skills, express themselves creatively and participate in events. sports.

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Saginaw Neighborhood Celebrates Planned Return of Children’s Community Center


SAGINAW, MI – Eight-year-old Asia Pratt was sitting breathlessly laughing next to her friends during a break as she jumped inside the inflatable house set up for an event reconnecting a neighborhood in Saginaw on the south side with an old community center ready to reopen in the coming month.

“I feel very happy,” she said of the celebration going on outside the facility at 3145 Russell. “It was so much fun. I can’t wait to be able to go here.

Organizers say the building – known as “The Nabe” – will likely not open to the community until 2022, but the excitement surrounding the news warranted some sort of block party on Saturday, August 28. The rally included The Nabe’s future target demographic. : Pratt and children his age.

Pratt plans to be the third generation in his family to run and play inside the facility when it reopens. Her father, Michael Pratt, 50, was part of a group of nine adults who formed a non-profit organization and bought the community center where they once played as children.

The Saturday celebration also catered to its demographic age. A DJ played Rick James; Earth, Wind and Fire; Kool and the Gang and other old hitmakers.

Still, the rally seemed to remain focused on the future: more specifically, The Nabe’s potential for the South Side neighborhood that has become largely desolate over the past two decades. Organizers say they hope when the community center reopens it will help revive the area and provide a place to grow up for children living nearby.

Leola Gochett, 80, moved to the South Side neighborhood in December 1970. Her three children spent their youth at The Nabe, known for decades as the Lutheran Charities Neighborhood House Community Center. After several changes of ownership, the building has remained largely unused in recent years, after decades of declining participation.

Gochett said she was delighted to hear that former attendees are planning to resuscitate the community center. She has known the nine members of the association since they played there when they were children.

“I believe in them,” said Gochett, who attended the celebration on Saturday. “This community needs this, to help us get back to the way things were in this neighborhood.”

After purchasing the old building, members of the nonprofit – which bears the same name as the community center – began tidying up the Nabe earlier this summer. It has fallen into disrepair in recent years, so the walls have been repainted, the floors have been repaired and the rooms have been cleaned.

The work remains, organizers say, but the progress of their efforts was visible to anyone who saw the interior of the 24,000-square-foot facility a month ago compared to today.

During the visits organized on Saturday, the participants got a glimpse of this renovated interior. However, much of the event activity at the start of the day took place on the community center lawn and parking lot, which organizers have turned into something that looks like a small fair.

Food vendors were camping on the outskirts of the rally. Children rushed between two inflatable houses and a mobile truck carrying playable video game consoles. Within sight of these children were their parents and other adults socializing to the music of the event.

“I’m so grateful that it brought this community together again,” said Anthony Dent, a 52-year-old man who once attended the community center as a child. “I can’t wait to see how this place will grow when it opens. “

James Carthan, a member of the nonprofit that owns the facility, said the support expressed by the community on Saturday was a sign that more success could be in store for the Nabe.

“It takes a village to raise a child,” said Carthan, 50. “I want this place to be a bright light for the young people of Saginaw.”

Organizers have organized tours of the interior of The Nabe, a Saginaw community center that the owners hope to open within the next year. Here, participants visit a basketball court where a mural was being completed.

RELATED:

Childhood friends reunite to revive Saginaw children’s community center


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Study: Food insecurity and poverty rate increased for Colorado children during pandemic


Referrals to early intervention services, which help young children from birth to 3 years old with developmental skills like speech therapy, also dropped dramatically in the first few weeks of the pandemic, dropping 63% over the course of the pandemic. during the first two weeks of March 2020.

That’s because primary care physicians, who make about a third of all referrals for such support, stopped doing good health checks on children at the start of the pandemic.

Providers aim to provide children with early intervention services in their ‘natural environment’, be it home or childcare – with the aim of making them function at the same level as their peers. said Christy Scott, director of the early intervention program at Colorado’s Office of Early Childhood. “And if we don’t get the early intervention they need, then we might see the ramifications when they get into kindergarten, special education, or even kindergarten.”

Scott said there has been an increase in referrals recently, and advocates for child care are hoping that trend continues.

Household income has fallen and food insecurity has increased

Almost half of households with children have reported loss of employment income since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. At the beginning of March 2021, a third declared having difficulty paying the usual household expenses.

Meanwhile, about 10 percent of Colorado households with children reported not having enough food to eat over the past week.

Black and Latino families have suffered disproportionately, reporting more food and rental insecurity – and more job losses – than white families.

“They entered the pandemic with higher rates of child poverty, higher proportions of children without health insurance, limited access to high quality child care, and kindergarten to grade 12 education.” , Manoatl said. “During the pandemic, they were hit harder than other households (economically)… it’s kind of like an aggravated effect.”


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The Recorder – Regina Curtis is retiring as GCC executive. director of institutional promotion


GREENFIELD – Regina Curtis has amassed a 48-pound stash in thrift stores. From September 1, she will have more time to read them.

Curtis is retiring as Executive Director of Institutional Advancement at Greenfield Community College on August 31, after 16 years on the job. She coordinated the school’s legislative affairs and oversaw its grants office in addition to being the executive director of the GCC Foundation, the nonprofit fundraising arm of the college.

“Community college students stay in their community. They end up living and working within a 25 mile radius, usually. So we are really educating the workforce in this community, ”she said. “This college is exactly where it needs to be.”

Curtis, 62, said she turned legislative affairs over to her colleague Keith Bailey and new recruit Alexis Page took on other responsibilities. She said their abilities reduced her natural anxiety about quitting the job she had been heavily involved in for so long.

She previously worked for State Representative Stephen Kulik and plans to follow her former employer’s advice on retirement – don’t make any additional commitments for at least a year. She intends to continue serving on the board of directors of Rural Development Inc., a nonprofit organization created by the Franklin County Regional Housing and Redevelopment Authority, but wishes to spend more time walking, hiking, kayaking and visiting her son in North Carolina and her daughter-in-law. in Idaho. She would also like to relearn Spanish and knitting.

Curtis grew up in the Detroit area, but has lived in Franklin County his entire adult life. Warwick has been his home for decades.

She worked at the college for 16 years, serving on the Board of Trustees of the GCC Foundation for six years previously, including two as President. Prior to that, she was a campaign volunteer for the school. But that was not his introduction to college. She received her associate’s degree in commerce in 1986 at the age of 28, after taking evening classes for five years while working full time. The average age of a CCG student is around 27, she said.

Curtis then transferred to North Adams State College (now Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts) for another five years to earn a bachelor’s degree, graduating while pregnant with her son. She waited four years before pursuing her Masters of Business Administration in five years.

“I know women who… worked full time and went to school in the evenings with me and had a baby, but I couldn’t… think about that. So I waited until he was 4, then I started at Fitchburg State College (now the University) because, ”she said,“ I only attend public higher education institutions. from Massachusetts that are next to Highway 2. It’s like my jam.

“I never worked full time during all of this,” she added. “It’s just that the career trajectory was made possible thanks to the degrees I acquired along the way, which was possible thanks to GCC. … It is definitely the mission to make higher education accessible to all who want to learn. This is not the case for many colleges.

Curtis also said that many CCG students are, like her, first generation students. She said 48% of them transferred to four-year colleges and 25% were from Hampshire County.

“I’ve always wondered if there is a magical way to survey every employer in Franklin County and find out how many GCC employees (there are),” she said, adding that a third of Greenfield Savings Bank employees are GCC graduates. “It’s quite remarkable.”

Curtis also said that GCC will celebrate its 60th anniversary next year.

“GCC and I are about the same age. Funny – I never thought of it that way, ”she said. “We kind of grew up together. ”

Contact Domenic Poli at: [email protected] or 413-772-0261, ext. 262.


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Can humor, laughter and AI reduce stress for women living with cancer? | New


NEW YORK and WASHINGTON and PALO ALTO, California, August 11, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Sounds like the opening of a classic joke: “Cancer survivor, scientist and doctor walk into bar,” but it’s more of a groundbreaking 8-week study on the mindset and metastatic cancer research using artificial intelligence to study personalized stress reduction strategies for women living with advanced cancer. This study is the result of Saranne Rothberg, a stage IV cancer survivor and founder of the ComedyCures Foundation.

Want to have fun ? Sign up for this groundbreaking study on mindset and metastatic cancer research.

“Humor, laughter, play, meditation, yoga, breathing and visualization techniques were essential in reducing my stress, giving me more energy and hope as I battled three surgeries against the cancer, 44 radiotherapy treatments and more than two years of chemotherapy starting in 1999, “says Rothberg, who no longer has cancer.

As part of this study, she invites other people living with a metastatic diagnosis to create an individualized stress management and relaxation plan, informed by artificial intelligence, to improve their quality of life. Rothberg enlisted the help of Dr. Catherine Grill, neuroscientist and co-founder of Neolth, an award-winning digital health platform from Silicon Valley. Dr. Grill explains, “Mental health is often overlooked when clinicians create treatment plans for cancer patients. I wanted to make mental health support more accessible to patients. We are excited to add Saranne’s expertise and fun strategies, along with original ComedyCures content, to our Neolth platform as part of this important study. ”

Neolth’s chief medical officer, Dr. Claire Wheeler, integrator and psychologist specializing in stress management and author of “Pocket Therapy for Stress” will also supervise the collaborative study as co-principal investigator. Dr Wheeler says, “Women with cancer who participate in stress management and emotional support programs have significant improvements in quality of life, immune markers and even improve their survival rates.”

Rothberg happily describes: “Each participant will be invited to use the Neolth platform via a mobile device, tablet and / or desktop computer to create their own personalized self-care plan with the help of proprietary technology. from Neolth and many experts. A free subscription to Neolth will be provided to every woman through an innovative cancer and behavior research grant awarded to our ComedyCures Foundation by the Willow Foundation. In previous years, the foundation grant was awarded to Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center.

Co-founder of the Willow Foundation and survivor of stage IV cancer Lea Evert confirms: “Because the pandemic has put even more isolation, health risks and stress on people living with cancer, the Willow Foundation felt that this year’s grant should go to the ComedyCures Foundation in because of his track record of positively impacting the lives of others. in the event of a mental, emotional and / or physical crisis. “

Evert adds, “As a cancer and COVID-19 survivor, Saranne’s authentic vision to seek an immediately scalable and affordable health solution integrating artificial intelligence, technology, as well as the award-winning ComedyCures and Neolth programs, has made the funding of this mindset research very compelling. “

In addition to the many relaxation practices offered by the study, participants will have the opportunity to attend three live online sessions with Rothberg and several of his ComedyCures comedians. Please see the Study FAQs for more information and to register immediately.

ABOUT THE COMEDYCURES FOUNDATION

The ComedyCures Foundation is a 501 (C) 3 non-profit, here 24/7 to tickle fun bones. Through award-winning digital programming and live events, ComedyCures entertains, educates and helps patients, caregivers and frontline workers develop their superpowers of laughter, hope, joy, play and perspective. comical. https://www.ComedyCures.org @ComedyCures

ABOUT NEOLTH

Neolth provides stress and mental health support by providing personalized care on demand through its self-guided platform. This includes relaxation practices, self-care and mental health monitoring, as well as mental health videos. Neolth presents a variety of original content from the ComedyCures Foundation to support people living with cancer. All participants in the ComedyCures study will have free access to Neolth for an extended period. https://www.Neolth.com @Neolth

ABOUT THE WILLOW FOUNDATION

The Willow Foundation (United States) supports research efforts that help link behaviors to better outcomes for patients with advanced and advanced cancer.

https://www.willow.foundation/goals

ABOUT SARANNE ROTHBERG

From the patient with stage IV cancer to the CEO of ComedyCures, Saranne Rothberg is a thought leader, speaker, patient advocate, and health and happiness expert. She started the ComedyCures foundation from her chemo chair in 1999 and is cancer free today, helping over 1 million people at over 1,800 live and digital events around the world to rediscover their funny bones. , their mojo and their lens. https://www.saranne.com @sarannelive

View original content to download multimedia: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/can-humor-laughter–ai-reduce-the-stress-of-women-living-with-cancer-301353265. html

SOURCE The ComedyCures Foundation


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Even if live concerts return, stream here to stay in Michigan


Just days before the pandemic interrupted life in the Detroit metro area and around the world in March last year, Stephen Wogaman, president of the Chamber Music Society of Detroit, was talking on the phone with his brother, a consultant. in computer science.

His brother asked what Wogaman was planning to do about COVID-19.

“I said, ‘Well, I heard about it,'” Wogaman recalls. “He said, ‘You have to be careful.’

Soon he was. COVID completely turned the Chamber Music Society season upside down, as it did all over cultural institutions, forcing them to quickly turn to streaming and webcast performances, which they never had. done before.

But that change – which involved quickly figuring out what equipment was best for streaming, perfecting the audio, and figuring out how to create the best quality webcast – was a step forward for the Chamber Music Society.

Even as he prepares for his 2021-22 season, which begins in September, they aren’t straying from the webcasts they’ve perfected during COVID. They will offer live performances but will stream them at the same time for those who wish to watch from home or from a distance.

“As we come out of this time – with caution – we see it as a way to expand our audience, to facilitate connections from audience members who may not be entirely comfortable coming back,” Wogaman said.

Concerts and live performances may be making a comeback in venues across the region, but streaming is here to stay in some venues, especially when it comes to classical, chamber and folk music. Some say they can reach an even larger audience far beyond Michigan through streaming or those with accessibility issues.

“It’s an important tool and access point,” said Marianne James, executive director of The Ark, a well-known folk music venue in downtown Ann Arbor that aired its popular folk festival in January. . “It doesn’t replace live performances, but it’s something that can really go with that and give artists and performances more reach.”

But could streaming concerts deter people from buying tickets to see shows in person, as some worry? Time will tell us.

Dinner with the DSO

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra, a leader in webcast presentation, has offered digital concerts for years, but expanded its offering during COVID-19 to include its pop concerts. Anne Parsons, CEO of DSO, said several subscribers told her how much they enjoyed the concerts that were broadcast during the pandemic, sitting down to “dine with the DSO.”

“When we have these gigs, they’re one of a kind,” Parsons said, referring to the pop gigs. “They tend not to be captured and they should be – and shared with the world.”

For this year’s Concert of Colors, the Midwest’s largest free music festival that runs through Monday, the format was a mix of live, broadcast and broadcast performances. Last year’s Concert of Colors, which was fully streamed, recorded 162,000 plays and views.

“We don’t want to give this up entirely,” said Ismael Ahmed, longtime founder and director of Concert of Colors.

But like James at the Ark, Wogaman agrees that streaming is not an alternative to live music. He said there is “no doubt” that hearing music in person is the “superior” way to experience it, but the pandemic has caused bands like his to rethink their approach. in some ways.

“A webcast captures this incredible sense of collaboration,” especially when it comes to chamber music, Wogaman said. “And that brings you to the front row when you’re in your living room.”

Learning curve

Even before Wogaman got out of the car after that phone call with his brother – who works with Gartner, a well-known company that does IT consulting work – he was already thinking about the bedroom’s next steps. He called the manager of his next act in March and asked if they would rather broadcast their performance than perform live, offering to pay 40% of their fees.

“The following week, two days after the World Health Organization declared the pandemic, we had an audience of 3,000 people watching our first webcast,” said Wogaman, who noted that it was is five times the audience they would have had in person.

Three weeks later, they aired another show. In total, since COVID, the Chamber Music Society of Detroit has broadcast over 30 concerts to date with over 60 other music presenters across the country on its CameraMusic platform, reaching audiences of nearly 200,000 across six continents. .

The Ark also launched a series of live concerts during COVID called the Ark Family Room series. They broadcast over 100 live shows.

“People really appreciated having access to this,” James said. “It was a great way to keep performers and audience members together.”

But it has been a learning process for the sites. The Chamber Music Society of Detroit has invested more than $ 10,000 in streaming material – they now use a live video streaming platform called Resi – and Wogaman has even started broadcasting streaming services at his Episcopal Church in Birmingham to train more.

“Personally, I learned to do it all – all the technical webcast stuff,” Wogaman said. “It’s not that we hired someone. We bought the equipment, we learned how to use it, we bought the licenses for the streaming equipment.”

One thing they noticed with the Wogaman Church webcasts is that people who didn’t normally attend church, or who could be considered recluses, “were suddenly much more connected than they were. never have been. Because they were able to attend the service. “

This approach could also help aging clients who cannot attend live shows for all kinds of reasons.

“For me, the most exciting thing about this ability that we have spent hundreds of hours learning and tens of thousands of dollars obtaining is now that we are able to do things that we cannot do. ‘Never even imagined possible,’ Wogaman said. “We flipped a switch and there it is.”

Every program that the Chamber presents this year, they will also be broadcast. They will also sell digital subscriptions for concerts and something called Digital Plus which will allow customers to attend two concerts in person as well.

In fact, the Chamber Society of Detroit now has so much streaming equipment – which Wogaman has driven all over the Midwest and East to broadcast concerts – that they are creating a set that they plan to set aside for them. non-profit groups.

Blessing and curse

The DSO launched its on-demand digital archive of performances called DSO Replay in 2015, making it the first streaming archive of any American orchestra. The orchestra was already a leader in webcasting its performances.

But not all cultural institutions have turned to streaming.

Streaming performances are not yet something the Michigan Opera Theater has looked at, said Christine Goerke, MOT’s new associate artistic director, “but I think it’s here to stay on course.”

“There are things that were made especially for streaming. It’s a different animal,” Goerke said. “Creating a piece designed to be filmed as if you were watching a movie? There’s another art form. It’s different from what we do. Maybe we’re creating something brand new.”

The Metropolitan Opera’s Live in HD series shows its operas in more than 2,000 theaters across the country and in 70 countries around the world. But there is a downside to these HD shows, Goerke said.

“When these HD shows came on, it was a wonderful thing for people who lived far away, but it also reduced the number of subscribers,” she said. “They could just go to their movies instead of driving three hours to see a live show. It’s a blessing and a curse.”

James de l’Arche said the fear of deterring live audiences is something they also encounter with the artists they book. She said there was “general reluctance” on the part of some artists to stream their performances.

“Artists are really focused on wanting to be in a room with people” right now, she said.

Nevertheless, L’Arche is studying the performances it could still broadcast and the equipment it will need. He will likely begin with his free Artist Spotlight series when he returns this fall.

“We have learned so much and the public has come so far and accessed this technology,” said James. “A lot of people were reluctant like in ‘I won’t do this.’ Others have found that they really like this access. “

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The logic of Cori Bush’s fight for the moratorium on evictions


Cori Bush knows the violence that can stem from homelessness – and how it so often begins with deportation. Local surveys have found that from 12% to almost half of people living on the streets blame the eviction for their homelessness. Bush, who is now the Democratic Representative of the United States from Missouri, lived in a Ford Explorer with her then husband and two young children for three months after the family was deported in 2001.

It considers the right to housing to be a central principle of environmental justice. Homelessness and housing insecurity, she argued, hamper families’ ability to access the resources – clean water, fresh food, heating and air conditioning – needed to survive. The past year has been particularly deadly for homeless people, as relentless heat waves, poor COVID-19 precautions and unhealthy air quality levels exacerbated by wildfires and pollution have made life on the streets even more dangerous. At the same time, cities across the country have decided to criminalize housing settlements and limit the rights of the homeless.

“I don’t want anyone else to have to go through what I’ve been through, ever,” Bush told The Associated Press. So when the White House said last week it couldn’t extend the federal moratorium on evictions – which has banned evictions since March 2020 to curb the spread of COVID-19 – by possibly letting it expire, it took the fight in hand. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities estimated that 11.4 million adult renters were on the verge of eviction.

For four nights, Bush slept outside the United States Capitol, demanding that President Joe Biden extend the moratorium. In the end, she and her congressional allies won. On Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, issued a new moratorium on evictions that will last until October 3. which would cover areas where 90 percent of the US population lives. The CDC’s new moratorium comes after the Biden administration claimed it did not have the power to extend the eviction ban – and after some localities have already started resuming evictions. (Despite the moratorium, declining state protections and inadequate legal services have led to at least 450,000 evictions during the pandemic, according to the Princeton University Eviction Lab.)

Representative Cori Bush speaks with supporters outside the United States Capitol to call for an extension of the federal moratorium on evictions on July 31, 2021. Photo by Joshua Roberts / Getty Images

In a column for Time last week, Bush denounced the “consequences of our government’s failure to provide the basic necessities that people need to survive.” On the same day, she introduced a “Homeless Bill of Rights,” which calls on Congress to end homelessness in the United States for good by 2025 by investing in affordable housing, universal housing vouchers and social services for people most likely to live on the streets.

While many environmental activists, including the Sunrise movement, have called the new moratorium a victory for climate justice, Bush and other housing advocates argue that protection is one of many that must be instituted to ensure housing and environmental justice for America’s most vulnerable .

Julian Gonzalez, a water policy lobbyist with nonprofit group Earthjustice, says issues such as unaffordable public services are another front in the fight to ensure housing security. (Disclosure: Earthjustice is a Grist advertiser.)

“The affordability of utilities, especially the affordability of water, is a big part of the housing crisis and environmental justice,” Gonzalez told Grist. “Eventually the moratorium on evictions is going to be lifted and people are going to be grappling with bills, and they are going to have their water and electricity cut off – with that comes displacement and eviction.”

This is especially important, according to Gonzalez, because while there are state and national programs to provide assistance for energy bills, there are none for water. Households across the country face billions of dollars in utility debt, and hundreds of thousands of homes face utility cuts. Earthjustice and other organizations across the country are calling for the inclusion of water and utility assistance programs in the next congressional infrastructure bill, which in its current version only includes a pilot low-income rural water assistance program in 40 towns without authorized funding.

Courtney McKinney, director of communications at the nonprofit Western Center on Law and Poverty, said the United States should create a system that permanently limits the prevalence of evictions. The center is working to create state-based legal aid funds, dubbed the “homelessness prevention fund”. Across the country, only 10 percent of tenants who go through eviction proceedings have legal representation, compared to 90 percent of landlords.

The eviction creates an endless cycle of substandard housing, McKinney argues. According to Princeton’s Eviction Lab, 70% of evicted tenants experience serious quality-of-life issues in the next home they move into.

“Across the country, the climate is making the situation even more dire,” McKinney told Grist. “In the West, in particular, climate change, substandard housing and homelessness are a deadly reality in the future.”




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Non profit living

Jam to Low-Down Blues with Hurricane Jerry Loos at the Westerwood Blueberries and The Blues Concert


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COLUMBUS, Ohio, Aug 4, 2021 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) – The Westerwood Senior Living Community is hosting a Blueberries & The Blues Summer Concert from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Friday August 13, 2021, featuring the local blues artist Hurricane Jerry Loos. Relax in the shade as you listen to soft blues and celebrate Columbus blueberry season with chilled blueberry limoncello cocktails and savory treats created by Chef Marshall of Westerwood.

“We are delighted to welcome Hurricane Jerry and showcase Chef Marshall’s culinary skills,” said Lisa Burkhart, Executive Director. “These events are a great way for us to showcase our great community. Participants will be able to meet residents and team members, and schedule community tours.

RSVP today for The Blueberries and The Blues concert by calling 614-368-1209 or visiting https://www.liveatwesterwood.org/events/. And be sure to enter to win one of four Fresh Thyme Market gift certificates and a basket full of all things blueberries.

Hurricane Jerry Loos began playing guitar in the late 1960s and worked for decades at local recording studios in Columbus Ohio. A versatile guitarist, Jerry has worked with a wide range of independent artists playing styles such as Gospel, Rock, Blues, Jazz, Country and more. Jerry enjoys many styles of music but plays blues / rock in his band “Hurricane Jerry and Stormfront”

Listen to Hurricane Jerry on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaHC4215onQ.

Westerwood is also hosting a Resident Lifestyle Brunch at 10 a.m. on August 18, 2021. In addition to enjoying a delicious free brunch, residents and the dedicated team will share what makes Westerwood a great place to enjoy. the life. They will also share updates on the exciting new outdoor amenities that are being added to the 23-acre campus! RSVP today by calling 614-368-1209 or visiting https://www.liveatwesterwood.org/events/.

Westerwood, formerly Friendship Village Columbus, is a quaint 23-acre nonprofit retirement community rooted in northeast Columbus. It is minutes from downtown Westerville and the University of Otterbein. The active resident community enjoys lifelong learning, artistic pursuits, exercise, giving back and connecting with nature. Westerwood offers a full continuum of best-in-class care, including a Life Care contract.

This wooded oasis offers restaurant quality cuisine cooked from scratch, wellness classes with a personal trainer, an art studio, carpentry and gardens in a friendly atmosphere where ageless spirits can satiate their curiosity. . Westerwood is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit charitable community. It is classified as a community of choice by the Holleran group in recognition of an exemplary culture of resident engagement. Westerwood is SAGECare Platinum Certified, has received the Columbus CEO Top Workplaces Award six years in a row, and has received the Best of Business: Retirement Community award. Learn more at https://liveatwesterwood.org/.

#SummerConcert #HurricaneJerryLoos #OurCampusYourCanvas #SeniorLiving #ColumbusBlueberrySeason

NEWS SOURCE: Westerwood Life Care Community

This press release was issued on behalf of the information source (Westerwood Life Care community) who is solely responsible for its accuracy, by Send2Press® Newswire. Information is believed to be accurate but is not guaranteed. Story ID: 73980 APDF-R8.2

© 2021 Send2Press®, a press release and electronic marketing service of NEOTROPE®, California, United States.

To view the original version visit: https://www.send2press.com/wire/jam-to-low-down-blues-with-hurricane-jerry-loos-at-the-westerwood-blueberries-and-the- blues-concert /

Disclaimer: The contents of this press release were not created by The Associated Press (AP).


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Non profit living

Bloomington tent residents face ‘eviction’ as restaurant prepares to open


Jamie stands shirtless on a vacant lot on the west side of Bloomington. He is wearing jeans that his brother gave him. Behind him are flattened tents, blankets and clothing sprawled out on an asphalt, concrete and weed floor as the sun dries out these essentials after recent torrential rains.

The Indescribable Lot is what Jamie and about half a dozen other people call home. It will soon house a Panda Express restaurant. Bloomington City Council has approved plans to build the restaurant at the location along West Market Street.

The property runs along a busy highway not far from the highway. It is surrounded by gas stations, restaurants and other shops. It is not a residential area at all, with the exception of this tent city.

Some McLean County social service providers say tent towns have been a problem in Bloomington for decades. Advocates say the plight of the tent dwellers points to a bigger problem that has not been addressed.

As state and federal governments lift moratoriums on evictions related to the coronavirus pandemic, these residents will soon face their own type of eviction.

Jamie is 33 years old. He does not give his last name. He has lived in a tent in this vacant lot for almost three years.

Jamie’s brother checks him regularly and gives him clothes and a place to shower.

“He came over here and (said) ‘Jamie get in the car’, where are we going, Disneyland? ‘ Jamie asked. “No, we are going home. You’re going to get cleaned up.

Jamie said he was staying at the Salvation Army’s Safe Harbor shelter in Bloomington. He said he went to work in Texas and had to come back to Bloomington to help his brother. He said the Salvation Army would not take him back. Jamie has other people looking after him.

Her cousin Chris has been living in the camp for a few weeks. “I came here and found my cousin and I’m not going to leave him alone here,” Chris said.

Chris said he was worried about his cousin’s safety. He said he sent Jamie to the hospital three times due to seizures. Chris said there were always people looking for trouble there. Jamie said he had been doing drywall since he was 14 and believed he had a chance to return to work.

“I have my old boss’s number and he told me that once I got together and got my meds and stuff, he said he would put me back to work,” he said. Jamie said.

Jamie said he was taking medication for the seizures and for his mental health. Now he says his old boss no longer works for himself. Jamie is not optimistic, he will call back.

Jamie said he made do with his father’s monthly Social Security check and all the money he could get by begging. Jamie said he already won $ 80 in 20 minutes.

Bob is basically in the same situation as Jamie. Bob is 58 years old. He stands next to Jamie, sporting a graying beard, a face mask under his chin, and a vintage Chicago Cubs t-shirt. Bob said he had been living in the tent camp for a few years. He has done flooring for a living but cannot access the ground floor of the job market.

“Give me a rug, I can put it up,” beamed Bob, but said he couldn’t find a job either. He said shelters would not take him because of his criminal record. He said he received monthly disability checks. He said he needed a place to clean up for a job interview.

Homeless Services

These services are available at Bloomington-Normal, including from a religious organization that feeds them. Bloomington’s Abundant Life Church delivers non-perishable food weekly to the homeless population of Bloomington-Normal. The church also maintains a pantry and clothing and serves hot lunches daily.

Pastor Roy Koonce said he’s worried about whether those living in Tent City will have a place to go.

“That’s a great question and I don’t have an answer for what they will do,” Koonce said. “I know that if they come here, we’ll do our best to help them.”

Koonce said the church had no shelter but would offer all possible help to anyone who came to its door. Koonce said the church has rules but will not permanently reject anyone.

“I’m 68 and for the first time in my life, I feel like I have my goal,” Koontz said. “I like to do what we do. I like helping people. I like the success rate.

“It breaks my heart when I see someone who can’t.”

Bloomington’s two homeless shelters, Safe Harbor and Home Sweet Home Ministries, have said they don’t reject anyone who needs a place to stay, unless their history or behavior suggests it is. a threat to staff or other residents. But both shelters have had limited capacity for much of the past year due to pandemic restrictions.

Roy Koonce of the Abundant Life Church has said he would like the city of Bloomington to do more to help its homeless residents. He said the police are generally trying to avoid the problem.

“A lot of wanderers and homeless people sleep in the parking lot because they all get some heat to keep the ground from freezing (in winter). The police, all they do is go through there and chase these guys away. They don’t stop them, ”Koonce said.

Police intervention

Koonce suggested that an arrest would help some homeless people begin a process to seek medical attention and other treatment.

Town of Bloomington

Greg Scott

Bloomington Acting Police Chief Greg Scott said officers can’t arrest anyone if homeless residents don’t commit a crime.

“What they’re doing there isn’t specifically illegal,” Scott explained. “The State of Illinois and even the Supreme Court of the United States have made decisions that have said it is their First Amendment right to do these things.”

Scott said homeowners must file a trespass report before police arrest anyone. In the case of the proposed restaurant, Scott said no one had filed a complaint. Scott said the homeless population needs social services, not police intervention.

“It really doesn’t help anything,” Scott said.

Accommodation possibilities

A Bloomington City Council member said he would agree that jail is not the solution for people with no roof over their heads. Jeff Crabill said the goal should be permanent housing. Crabill said he was not sure what the city could do to better facilitate this, other than calling attention to the problem and encouraging more landlords to rent to people through a rapid relocation program.

“They just don’t want to have someone in their apartment or their house who is homeless. There is a stigma to this. I think some owners want to avoid this if they can, ”Crabill said.

Jeff Craybill speaking into the microphone

Emilie Bollinger

Jeff Craybill

The PATH Crisis Center in Bloomington recently launched the relocation program. The association secured funding from the CARES Act to provide short-term housing for people during the pandemic to limit the risk of the spread of COVID-19.

Karen Zangerle recently retired as Executive Director of the nonprofit group. She said tent cities have been around in Bloomington for decades. Zangerle said that there is often a certain culture in these wanderer communities that can make relocation difficult.

“People who live in tent cities like it because they don’t have anyone to tell them what to do, they have no responsibility to follow,” Zangerle said. “It’s a bit like a big camping trip.

Zangerle said PATH has asked outreach workers to meet with tent dwellers and other homeless people to discuss their options for a permanent place to stay. She said some will welcome the aid and some will not.

“What ultimately happens is that a certain group of them will find a new place and they will leave,” Zangerle said, adding that a large part of the tent city’s population is moving to the south when the weather gets colder.

Where to go from here

Bob, a resident of Tent City, said he plans to move soon, regardless of the restaurant’s schedule. “When it’s cold we have to go somewhere,” he exclaimed, but added that he was not sure where he was planning to move.

Jamie said once the proposed restaurant moves in, it will likely end up across the street behind the McDonald’s where he lives.

“It’s the only other place we can go,” Jamie said.

Jamie and Bob both laugh at the feeling that they don’t want help.

“We’ve tried and tried and tried and tried and they avoided us,” Jamie said.

“We’ll get there one way or another,” Bob said.

Where and how they will do it remains an open question. These two tented city dwellers think they’ll have to rely on their experience and survival instinct when their home from the last few years is uprooted for a fast food franchise.

It is not known when Panda Express plans to take over the West Bloomington site to begin construction. The company did not return any messages seeking comment.


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Non profit living

Some residents oppose new plan to provide safe camping for homeless people in Los Angeles city parks – NBC Los Angeles


LA City Council is considering a plan that could separate parts of public parks for safe and secure camping sites for people who are homeless. And the news is not well received by locals.

Westchester Park and Mar Vista Park are two of the locations suggested in a feasibility study commissioned by LA City Councilor for District 11, Mike Bonin. Neighbors in Westchester point to picnic tables, ball fields and parking lots all cramped with tents that have grown exponentially during the COVID pandemic.

“No matter where they set up a safe campsite in Westchester Park, it’s going to affect us,” says Beth O’Rourke, director of youth sports for West Side rugby clubs. “We witnessed urinating in public, we saw excrement on the ground, around the field. The toilets are unusable for an adult and even less for a child.

The City of LA Parks and Recreation Department has been renovating the fields in recent weeks, but some residents say the tents lining the perimeter prove the priority is not on the kids using the park, but on the homeless people who abuse it.

“I don’t feel like they respect the fact that it belongs to everyone. Just for them, ”says Becca Prismantis, a Westchester resident who says she had to take her kids to nearby towns for their lacrosse teams.

Earlier this year, Bonin requested a feasibility study for an alternative to encampments and suggested part of Westchester Park and Mar Vista Park. NBC4 viewers shared photos showing campsites had invaded the softball fields.

“What we are proposing is to allow those who are here now to be in a certain section,” Bonin explained at a city council meeting in May. “Give them security, sanitation, services, install them in housing while restoring the rest of the park for general and public use. “

But some parents say the damage is done; teams have had to move to other parks, parents have had to leave their home neighborhoods to take their children to play – and all because they don’t feel safe in their own local park.

“I see things are taken care of, I see it’s just out of control,” says Prismantis.

But Stephanie Tatro says she has two young children whom she often brings to the park and feels very safe, even at night.

Tatro is a co-founder of the local Grass Roots Neighbors nonprofit and says she has gotten to know many of those who call Westchester Park home.

“I see a lot of uses happening in this park as well as the people who live here who are not housed and who are trying to take the next step in their lives and improve the circumstances,” Tatro says.

She believes the park is big enough for children and the homeless and denies any danger lurking nearby.

“I don’t see how the tents prevent access. Full access is available, ”she said.

But as the NBC4 I-Team first reported on May 20, crime is on the rise near parks and schools in Los Angeles where homeless settlements abound. NBC4 cameras caught brawls, weapons used to harass and threaten homeless people and angry parents over what they say is the city’s lack of interest in addressing the root causes of roaming.

Six days after the NBC4 report, Bonin lobbied city council to provide park space for homeless neighbors.

“I will gladly take all of these things off the table if people can come up with better solutions,” he told voters and colleagues at the May meeting.

Westchester parents say they have an idea.

“A different solution would be to send them or move them to a place that doesn’t take the kids away,” says O’Rourke. “It’s like homeless people are allowed to live here, but children are not allowed to play here.

The results of the feasibility study are expected in early August. Some residents argue that this will not be enough because the study does not take into account the community impact of such a plan, which they say would be a failure.


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Non profit living

Mother whose son was shot and killed offers help to families affected by gun violence

HAMPTON, Virginia – A mother who lost her son to gun violence has founded a non-profit organization to help other grieving parents after losing a child.

The support group is called MM2K, which stands for “Mommies Matter to Kyyri”.

Sevhn Doggette’s son Kyyri was 25 when he was shot and killed in August 2017. It happened in Charlotte, North Carolina, where Doggette now lives.

She tells News 3 that she is from Hampton Roads and comes here often, and when she heard about the recent violence involving young people, she felt compelled to publicize her organization.

Doggette says MM2K initially provides a listening ear to grieving moms and dads. She also said they have licensed therapists who volunteer their time.

“As for the different mechanics to help them go through, basically every day because it’s like a roller coaster ride for us,” Doggette explained.

As part of the support services, they sometimes even accompany parents to court in the face of the person (s) accused of having killed their child.

“Now you have to deal with this,” she added. “I’m also facing a life sentence and haven’t even committed a crime.”

Related: Norfolk Mother Who Lost Son To Gun Violence Hosts New Podcast to Help Grieving Families

Doggette says that while MM2K is active in Charlotte, she also hopes to host community events in Hampton Roads. She encourages families affected by gun violence to reach out.

More information about MM2K can be found here.

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Non profit living

Beloved Alabama Officer Surprised By Wheelchair Accessible Van

OPELIKA, Ala. (WRBL) – The eastern Alabama community continues to rally around Mike “Robo” Roberson, a former Auburn and DARE police officer who served nearly three decades before catastrophic strokes didn’t force him to retire.

Soon, a $ 40,000 home improvement project with the Chattahoochee Fuller Center funded by your donations will provide a wheelchair-friendly bed and bathroom for Robo and his wife. Another blessing hit their Opelika driveway on Thursday.

“We’ve taken care of your house and needed some wheels for you, so here’s your new pickup truck,” Josh Datnoff, president of the Auburn Firefighters Association, shared the fantastic news to Robo and his family. Tears of joy and hugs followed the surprise announcement. The Gunners Motorcycle Club, Auburn Firefighters Association, Franklin Tire, CP Wrecker, Tiger Body and Paint have collaborated to donate a wheelchair accessible van.

“Very exciting because now he’s mobile he can go out and do the things he wants to do and live with ease,” said Jacquelyn Roberson.

Robo’s wife, Jacquelyn, is his dedicated caregiver. The couple can no longer sleep in the bedroom of their Opelika house because Robo cannot go upstairs. Instead, Robo sleeps in his wheelchair, Jacquelyn by his side on another chair in their living room on the first floor. Robo says it would be great to rest comfortably in a bed and take a shower, which he hasn’t been able to do for several months. It was difficult for them to travel as it was difficult to get Robo out of his wheelchair and get him into a vehicle. He needed a van with a ramp.

When Josh Datnoff of the Firefighters Association heard about Robo’s situation, he began raising money for the Fuller Center remodeling project of adding a bed and tub on the ground floor for the couple. . Datnoff then began looking for a way to help Robo and his wife travel more easily to see friends, family, and doctors as he continued his recovery.

“The van was my uncle’s van and he passed away. So we gave it to a close family friend, and she had it for about three years. She got better and didn’t need the ramp anymore, so they donated her to the Auburn Firefighters Association so we could get her ready for Robo, ”Datnoff said.

The Gunner’s Motorcycle Group helped secure repairs and maintenance to the pickup truck, in addition to raising money for the home improvement project. So on Thursday when the van was handed over to Robo and his family, it was hard to say who was happier – Robo or the friends who gave him the keys.

“When you see a grown man cry, it brings tears to your eyes. Especially since it’s a surprise. I’ve been wiping my eyes since I’ve been here, ”said Cody Post, owner of CP Wrecker Service.

On the back of the van, Gunners Motorcycle Club President Ruben Garza asked Robo if it would be okay to put three tribute stickers to late Auburn Police Officer Will Buechern on the back. Robo readily agreed. Buechner was a Gunner brother and loved his biker family. The Gunners are known for their generous hearts and ongoing community service. Garza says Buechner would have loved to see Robo, his former Auburn police brother, receive a van to help him.

“We should do this for anyone who needs help. But, so often, you can’t do it on your own, and we’re just happy to help in any situation. This is what we do as a club. That’s what gunners do, ”Garza said.

Meanwhile, Robo’s house renovation project will begin soon. The Chattahoochee Fuller Center Project will keep us updated on a volunteer schedule and opportunities. We hope everyone will join a community effort to help one of Auburn’s favorite officers who gave his life to serve the citizens and students within our schools. Volunteers receive a free t-shirt with Robo on the back.

The Fuller Center Project is a nonprofit group that builds and renovates homes for families in need. The group primarily serves in Chambers County, but in 2019 the group contacted families in Lee County devastated by the March 3 tornadoes and built 18 homes in 7 months for the survivors.

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Non profit living

Life Changes hosting a hygiene campaign

RENO, Nevada (KOLO) -Providing the necessities for those working towards a better future. Life Changes is looking for your donations to fuel its hygiene campaign.

The agency has grown to include 11 properties in Washoe County, helping reintegrate men and women, safe homes, sober and transitional lives and more. Many times after a person leaves the hospital, whether homeless or in prison, they often have very little to themselves.

This is where you come in. Toothbrushes, toilet paper, deodorant, feminine hygiene products, makeup and other daily necessities… your donations will be of great help!

“We get them back on their feet, we put them in school, that’s one of the positive things we try to do with each of them, and then they get a job and slowly start to re-integrate into society. and end up moving. on their side and to have their own apartment ”, explains Lisa Moore, she is the president of the association.

There are two drop-off points. Flirty Lash at 180 West Peckham Lane, Suite 1060 or at one of the Life Changes properties, 529 West Second Street, you will see a locked box to place items.

You can also donate money by donating to https://www.thelifechangecenter.org/donations/

Copyright 2021 KOLO. All rights reserved.

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Non profit living

Closure of Mary’s Kitchen, a sanctuary for the homeless, would be a “tragedy” for those who depend on it

For Derek King and many like him, Mary’s Kitchen is a sanctuary.

King, who has been homeless for almost a decade, found Mary’s Kitchen in Orange at a time when he had reached his limits. Malnourished physically and spiritually, he was ready to give up.

Mary’s Kitchen provided her with food, a shower and clothes. It helped restore something that many homeless people had to give up when they lived on the streets: dignity.

He found a new meaning in the relationships he established and the spirituality fostered by the leadership of the association.

“There are times when the fear of living for nothing strangles you,” King said in an interview this week with Mary’s Kitchen.

King’s story is not uncommon.

Charles Cousert hadn’t eaten in days before finding Mary’s Kitchen, where he was given food and clothing.

He said he would have died if it hadn’t been for the association.

“This place is literally a blessing,” Cousert said. “It’s a sanctuary.

Craig Lasky and America Sanchez are biking at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13th.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

Homeless people who rely on Mary’s Kitchen said it was the only place they could find whatever they needed. Led by Gloria Suess, the association offers three meals, six days a week, to anyone who requests them. Showers and laundry facilities are also available, and the association receives mail for hundreds of customers.

After speaking with over half a dozen homeless people this week, it’s clear anyone can approach Suess with a problem they’re having and she’ll try to fix it.

During a visit to the association this week, Michael Lohse, accompanied by his dog Mildred, approached Suess and thanked her for helping him pay for the late registration of his car. Like other visitors to the site, Lohse, a victim of three strokes, has had a hard time. He said the nonprofit gave him $ 440 for the $ 1,300 he needed so he could drive again.

“Whatever you need, you’ll get it from Gloria,” said Patrick Hogan, volunteer at Mary’s Kitchen.

But after the city sent a letter of formal notice last month ending the association’s lease, the homeless people who rely on Mary’s Kitchen are now wondering what they will do if it is closed.

On June 18, the city sent Mary’s Kitchen a formal notice terminating its lease three years earlier. The city is giving the association until September 18 to vacate the property and they’ve asked Mary’s Kitchen to provide the city with a move plan within two weeks.

The letter from the city, signed by City Manager Rick Otto, indicates that the city has been a leader in Orange County in supporting the efforts of the homeless. However, Mary’s Kitchen is the only homeless service provider listed in the city’s housing component.

Marie’s kitchen has been operating in Orange since the mid-1980s, and at its current location at 517 W. Struck Ave., since 1994. Mary’s Kitchen is a humble, non-profit organization run by donations and volunteers, some of whom are themselves even homeless.

Natalie Wolf, center, and other volunteers prepare meals for the homeless at Mary's Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday, July 13.

Natalie Wolf, center, and other volunteers prepare meals for the homeless at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday, July 13.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

While Otto’s letter praises Mary’s Kitchen, it goes on to state that the association’s actions only serve to “enable roaming and can no longer be supported by the city.”

The letter says there has been an increase in crime and police calls from Mary’s Kitchen. The city says this has created an “unreasonable demand for municipal services.”

The letter also states that the city recently approved an affordable housing project nearby, which is “incompatible” with Mary’s Kitchen, which is located at the end of an industrial dead end. An Orange Police Department headquarters is across the street. There are no houses on the street.

Suess, the association’s president and CEO, said in a phone interview that Mary’s Kitchen had already complied with city requests to install security cameras and a security guard.

“Whatever they asked us to do, we did it,” Suess said.

Suess said the city does not want Mary’s Kitchen to serve people who are not from Orange, but that is inconsistent with the nonprofit’s mission to serve all who are hungry.

“We don’t judge who deserves food or not,” Suess said. “We take care of those who really need help.

“… I don’t think Orange understands, all these people who have considered Mary their home for all these years, where are they going to go?” Where do they get their mail from? Where are they going to shower? Where are they going to eat?

Mike Harrison, a volunteer at Mary's Kitchen in Orange, cooks meals for the homeless on Tuesday, July 13.

Mike Harrison, a volunteer at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange, cooks meals for the homeless on Tuesday, July 13.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

Mary’s Kitchen and some members of the community back off.

The association hired lawyer Brooke Weitzman, who sent a letter to the city on July 9 saying the city’s notice did not include a substantial reason for prematurely terminating a rental agreement. He asks the city to cancel his letter.

“The notice does not meet substantive and procedural standards for early termination of the agreement,” the letter said. “The only reference to the lease in the notice indicates that the City can terminate the agreement, but it does not specify any reason supported by the terms of the agreement.

“Despite the recognition of the critical support Mary’s has received over the years, the letter draws baseless conclusions that are simply not supported by the facts, in effect blaming Mary’s Kitchen for the city’s failure to resolve the crisis. housing, the health care needs of its poorest residents, and everything and all other issues in the public space outside of Mary’s Kitchen property. Certainly nothing in the lease places the onus on Mary’s Kitchen to address the City’s failures to meet the needs of low-income and homeless people.

Weitzman’s letter also calls on the city to determine the environmental impact of closing Mary’s Kitchen in order to comply with California’s Environmental Quality Act.

The letter says water and soil may be contaminated by the loss of hygiene facilities at Mary’s Kitchen and other public spaces could be affected as homeless people are forced to move.

“The immediate shutdown of a service provider leaving around 150-200 people a day without this safe place to sit, receive meals to eat and clothes to wear, access mail, access hygiene facilities, use a laundromat and more will inevitably have an impact on the environment, ”the letter said.

Weitzman also argues that the lease termination violates the city’s housing element, which requires the city to take into account the homeless, low-income people, the elderly and people with disabilities – all of whom frequent Mary’s Kitchen. Weitzman notes in the letter that Mary’s Kitchen is the only homeless service provider in the city listed in its housing element.

The letter notes that the city must “make adequate provision in its housing element for the existing and anticipated needs of all economic segments of its community, including its homeless population.”

Patrick Hogan has a glass of water at Mary's Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13.

Patrick Hogan drinks a glass of water at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

Orange City spokesman Paul Sitkoff said in an email he could not comment on the closure of Mary’s Kitchen due to a possible ongoing litigation.

Weitzman said on the phone that she wondered who in town was leading the effort to shut down Mary’s Kitchen after decades of existence.

“There was no public meeting, so I know the letter is from the city manager, but who is it? Said Weitzman. “This sort of thing would normally be a decision of city council, especially given the long history of community service. It is not clear because there has been no public involvement.

Mary’s Kitchen is currently collecting signatures from supporters to show the city how crucial it is to the community. Suess said she wanted a few thousand signatures before sending them to the city.

The community also supports the association. Several members of the public showed up at a city council meeting on Tuesday night to criticize the city and express their support for Mary’s Kitchen.

“This city has lost its soul,” resident Heidi Zimmermann said at the meeting.

Pancho Sambrano shares lunch with her cat Ice Cream at Mary's Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13th.

Pancho Sambrano shares lunch with her cat Ice Cream at Mary’s Kitchen in Orange on Tuesday July 13.

(Scott Smeltzer / Personal Photographer)

The city declined to provide crime statistics on Mary’s Kitchen, despite its allegations of increased crime in the area. The city called the association a “nuisance” in its letter, but there was no sign of it during a visit to Mary’s Kitchen this week.

Dozens of people had lunch and chatted among themselves. Some slept in the shade.

Everything fell silent as Suess recited a prayer through a megaphone. Many stood up and some took off their hats.

“Send blessings to Mary’s Kitchen,” Suess said.

“Amen,” they said.

For those who meet regularly at the shrine, losing Mary’s Kitchen is more than losing access to food and possessions. The camaraderie and support from Suess, volunteers and others gives them hope and meaning.

“I come here more for the community than the food, even though the food is pretty good,” said Starla Acosta, who has lived in her car for about five years, the same time she comes to Mary’s Kitchen.

Acosta met his close friend Ron at Mary’s Kitchen. She calls him her little brother.

Ron, who declined to give her last name, said Mary’s Kitchen helps all kinds of people. For many, it helps support them as they go through a difficult time in life.

Since Ron was injured at work two years ago, he’s been a regular visitor to Mary’s Kitchen. He has a job now, but he keeps coming to see his friends.

Ron said he couldn’t sleep the night he heard about the potential closure of Mary’s Kitchen.

“It would be a tragedy,” he said.

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Non profit living

New York’s plan to move homeless people out of hotels blocked by judge

The mayor’s claim that hotels should free up rooms for tourists is challenged by the industry itself.

“It is absolutely imperative for many hotels that this program continue,” said Vijay Dandapani, president of the New York Hotel Association last week. Even counting the homeless, occupancy rates are low, he said, and the lack of demand has driven down room prices in hotels open to the public.

But the hotels, many of which were concentrated in Manhattan neighborhoods in Hell’s Kitchen and Chelsea, have drawn community opposition since the start of the program. Neighbors complain that hotel residents use drugs, hang out, steal from shops and harass passers-by.

One hotel, the Lucerne on the Upper West Side, a few blocks from Central Park, has been the subject of a months-long political battle in a stronghold of liberalism after nearly 200 men, many struggling with addiction problems, were transferred there.

Some residents have welcomed the men. Many did not and strongly pressured the city, which tried to transfer them to a hotel in another affluent area of ​​the city center, to face a lawsuit there.

Last week, the men had been moved out of the hotel and back to shelters.

One of them, Mike Roberts, 36, offered a dispatch on Sunday from his new home in the East Village.

He sleeps in a room with seven or eight cabins that each house three or four men. If he reaches out from his bed, he can touch the next one.

Unlike his room at Lucerne, the one in the refuge has no air conditioning. Mr. Roberts often wakes up in the middle of the night soaked in sweat, and he cannot walk around because if he leaves the shelter between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. he loses his bed. Needless to say, his room does not have a private shower or TV.

“Here when I wake up I’m in a cabin,” he said. “It’ll be three people around me sleeping, one snoring, one probably getting high, or a guy pacing up and down. Who wants that? “

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Non profit living

Voto Latino fights Latinos’ reluctance to vaccinate against COVID

Maria Teresa Kumar, President and CEO of Voto Latino, a nonprofit organization for the Latin American community, was confused when her own mother told her she would not be getting the COVID-19 vaccine. It took two months for Kumar to convince his mother, who works in the health sector and had been vaccinated, her and her children, all her life, to make an appointment. What had held her mother back were the videos she had watched imparting false accounts, especially one that showed a man pretending to be a pharmacist, warning in Spanish not to be vaccinated, Kumar recalls, “because it was a technology never introduced to humans before. “

The spread of misinformation and misinformation surrounding the COVID-19 vaccine is common among a range of U.S. populations, including within the Latino community. In an April survey by Voto Latino, 40% of Latinos said they had received material saying the vaccine was not working. In order to urgently overcome this, especially as the Delta variant spreads, Voto Latino uses his behavioral learnings to fight far-right disinformation during elections to rally people to get shot, as he did so to register them to vote in 2020. For the organization, it is essential to maintain a large and influential electoral bloc healthy and confident in the government so that it continues to exercise its right to vote in the to come up.

Although the number is improving, the uptake of the vaccine by Latinos has been 1.2 times less than among whites in the majority of states. This is the case with other ethnic groups, such as blacks, with whom Latinos share some of the same barriers to access, such as frontline work that prevents employees from taking time off or lack of care. adequate health. Additionally, like the black community, Latinos have had their own dark experiences of being subjected to medical racism by the US government, including a history of forced sterilization of women in Los Angeles and Puerto Rico.

Misinformation around the COVID-19 vaccine compounds already existing fears. Some messages mistakenly claim that the vaccine is not scientifically reliable, and others that it causes infertility. More outlandish claims include that it contains a microchip or that it transforms you in zombie. Part of the reason these myths are so common among the Hispanic community is that Facebook doesn’t crack down on disinformation in Spanish to the same extent as it does in English. Once the information arrives on WhatsApp, it can then spread virally without any control. Of those who said they saw “harmful” information about the vaccine, 53% said it had been on Facebook and 43% on messaging apps.

The promoters of this disinformation are often individuals or groups who create digital content based on talking points from far-right cable news, radio shows or politicians, says Ameer Patel, vice president of programs. by Voto Latino. These bad actors can then receive donations from the followers, which not only fund the wide dissemination of lies, but can allow them to make a living from the practice. “One of the things we’re really seeing is there’s this great appetite to fund the flow of misinformation and disinformation,” he says. When a particular message resonates with a certain community, they tap more into that idea; for example, the myth of infertility has been particularly powerful among young Latinos, Patel says, perhaps because of popular family or religious beliefs.

With the CDC is already reporting that Latinos are 2 times more likely to be infected with the virus than whites, and 2.3 times more likely to die, Voto Latino has decided to help fight false narratives by implementing the Latino anti-disinformation laboratory with the Media Matters association. Although Voto Latino focuses on voting, Kumar says a healthy community that trusts government is essential for democracy, calling misinformation about vaccines “the most morbid form of voter suppression.” She adds, “If you don’t trust your government to take care of you and keep your family healthy with a vaccine, what’s the possibility that you can convince someone to vote?

The group is also in a privileged position to deliver its conclusions on the fight against far-right disinformation during the 2020 campaign. During this cycle, bad actors aimed to suppress the vote among certain blocs, and Voto Latino retaliated with strategies that ended up registering 426,964 voters, a record for the organization. They ran explanatory ads to educate people about the registration process, used peer-to-peer texting where volunteers sent personalized texts to people from local numbers, and encouraged people to contact likewise their friends and family. The idea was that receiving messages from people like them, whom they could relate to, would be more compelling than receiving impersonal, generic memos.

Now, the group is adopting similar behavioral techniques for the immunization campaign, with an ad campaign focusing on messages from people like them, rather than an unknown healthcare professional, for example. One of the two best-tested ads features a sixth-grade teacher expressing feelings of returning to school safe after being immunized, which Kumar says touches both educational and economic reasoning. The other features a woman who admits to being scared at first, “because it was new”, but who eventually received the photo and said it felt liberating. Importantly, both also point out that shooting is free, which a lot of people either don’t know or are told otherwise. Overall, the message is “optimistic but practical” and focuses on getting back to normal. As with his electoral strategy, Voto Latino does not laugh at any idea, however absurd it may be. “If you make fun of someone for their beliefs, they tend to turn around because they don’t mean they’re wrong,” Kumar says. “It’s the worst way to chat with someone.”

Voto Latino targets the 28% of people who said they were hesitant about the vaccine, rather than those “who are at the bottom of the rabbit hole” and more difficult to convince (again, a strategy similar to the election ). “We are entering the nooks and crannies of people’s internet,” Kumar says, referring to the targeting technique of showing their ads to people who have previously watched disinformation videos. They are currently running the ads on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

So far, they’ve been effective in calling for action: According to Google results, released last week, people who saw the ads were 54 times more likely to search for ‘get a covid vaccine’ than those who did not; and there was an overall spike in that search term of 7,171% in Florida, 5,856% in Texas, and 4,330% in California, the three states with the largest Latin American populations. And vaccination is increasing: As of July 4, 34% of people who had started their vaccination in the previous 14 days were Latin American, even though they represent only 17% of the population. Kumar says she believes the same methods could be used on other hesitant population groups, such as older whites and immigrant enclaves.

Success so far suggests that simply showing people care – to “give them love, attention and information in a non-judgmental way” – is a strategy. effective persuasion, both to promote vaccines and to maintain an active growing political voice in the long term. With her mother, what ultimately worked was the personal message of “Why wouldn’t someone want you to be healthy?” Why wouldn’t someone want you to see your grandchildren? “

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Non profit living

More Nursing Homes and Seniors’ Homes are Closing Their Doors Due to the Impact of COVID

The nursing home operated by Alaris Health on John F. Kennedy Boulevard in Guttenberg was old. Built long before there were concerns about isolating large numbers of residents to stop a virus that could spread like wildfire, it was small and could hold up to four people per room.

And now it’s closed.

The long-term coronavirus pandemic has claimed the lives of more than 7,800 long-term care residents in New Jersey.

It also had a big impact on nursing homes.

Since March 2020, three state care facilities have closed, according to state data, highlighting not only changes COVID has brought to standards of care, experts say, but also growing financial instability in the state. nationwide industry. In each of the previous two years before the deadly virus hit, there has been only one nursing home closure in New Jersey, according to the state Department of Health.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has put increased financial pressure on nursing homes and assisted living providers who already operate on very low margins,” said James McCracken, President and CEO LeadingAge New Jersey, the statewide association of nonprofit elderly care organizations.

Nationally, industry officials predict long-term care providers could lose $ 94 billion in the pandemic and warn that more than 1,800 facilities could eventually close their doors.

The closures in New Jersey, meanwhile, also suggest that the financial pressures felt by long-term care facilities due to COVID may have made nonprofits such as those represented by LeadingAge particularly vulnerable.

Medicaid, a joint federal and state program that helps pay nursing home fees, serves as a safety net for people with limited incomes and resources. But the reimbursement rate in New Jersey remains far too low, critics lament. At the same time, not all for-profit nursing homes will accept Medicaid or may limit the services and beds provided to Medicaid patients, unlike nonprofit organizations.

“Faith-based and mission-oriented organizations are particularly affected because they traditionally care for those in need, regardless of their ability to pay,” McCracken said of the financial crisis caused by the pandemic.

One of the facilities that closed in the state this year – the Armenian Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Emerson – was operated on a non-profit basis. The Villa at Florham Park, an assisted living facility and also a non-profit organization, is also closing. The establishment, which has already relocated all of its residents, has submitted a closure plan to the state, according to a spokesperson for the Ministry of Health.

More recently, the St. Francis Residential Community in Denville, a non-profit independent living facility for seniors operated by The Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother, also said it was closing for financial reasons, although it was not have not linked their problems to COVID. The closure will displace 75 people who live there, including 10 nuns of another order, the Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Conception of the Mother of God. They did not respond to requests for comment.

The Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother, owners of the property since 1895, said in a statement that as the buildings and infrastructure on campus aged, “it has become increasingly difficult to fund maintenance and operations. renovations necessary to maintain the financial viability of the community. “

Although they have not yet filed a notice of intent regarding the closure with the Ministry of Community Affairs, which is authorizing the installation, they have withheld the Springpoint, a non-profit organization that operates 27 retirement homes, to help with the closure and find suitable housing for current residents.

A Springpoint spokeswoman said they had has created a limited number of leases at one of their facilities, The Oaks in Denville, which will be made available to residents of St. Francis and the sisters who live there, based on financial need.

St. Francis Residential Community, an independent living facility in Denville that houses 75 residents and plans to close.Google Street View

McCracken said a more robust reimbursement system is needed to support providers who care for the most vulnerable.

“Nonprofit providers are resident-focused and I am saddened when faith-based organizations close because they cannot afford to continue their ministries,” he said.

Her concern was echoed by Laurie Facciarossa Brewer, the New Jersey long-term care ombudsman, who questions whether faith-based institutions and other nonprofits are having a harder time weathering the effects of the health emergency. public COVID-19, including reduction of occupancy rates.

“At least one national study has shown that nonprofit long-term care facilities are more effective at controlling COVID-19 infections,” she said. “This may suggest that these facilities had better staff ratios and provided more nursing hours, a key indicator of quality in a long-term care facility and the most important tool to combat the spread of the infection.”

The loss of such organizations, said Facciarossa Brewer, “is bad news for people in need of nursing home care in New Jersey.”

Andrew Aronson, president and CEO of the Health Care Association of New Jersey, which represents long-term care facilities in the state, said the pandemic has caused an economic crisis on all long-term care providers, “regardless of the ownership structure”.

Nationally, a recent survey by the American Health Care Association and the National Center for Assisted Living, representing more than 14,000 nursing homes, assisted living communities and other long-term care facilities across the country , revealed that most homes in living communities are now operating at a loss.

This survey indicated that only a quarter of nursing homes and assisted living communities were confident they could last a year or more, citing increased expenses or lost income. There are also fewer inhabitants.

“Even though cases of COVID in long-term care are at historically low levels, providers are struggling to recover from the economic crisis the pandemic has brought about,” said Mark Parkinson, President and CEO from the Association. “Too many facilities operate on tight budgets simply because policy makers have not committed the appropriate resources, and this can have devastating consequences.”

CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES: Live map tracker | Newsletter | Home page

To ensure the stability of the long-term care industry, Aronson said lawmakers and officials must provide short-term economic support and address the chronic underfunding of Medicaid, which only covers about 70% of the cost of caring for a patient in a retirement home.

The problem, however, goes beyond Medicaid funding.

The isolation requirements of sick and infected residents in nursing homes that were never designed to contain a virus like COVID have demonstrated the inadequacies of many older facilities that may no longer be economically viable.

The Alaris Health nursing home in Guttenberg, which looked after nearly 100 residents, was a relatively small facility. Approved for 108 beds, it had an average of 91 residents during the pandemic. But the retirement home, built in the 1960s, also needed modernization. Many of its rooms were set up for up to three and four people, and officials said it was difficult to isolate patients with COVID-19.

Even before the pandemic, the nursing facility had ongoing work issues and union officials complained that their members were working with expired contracts, many of those who had been sick on the job with the coronavirus ended up over later responsible for thousands of medical bills. Its operators had also considered a plan to demolish the facility and replace it with a 15-story residential building overlooking the Manhattan skyline.

In the aftermath of the pandemic, Alaris Health announced last year that it would close the nursing home and began moving residents to other facilities. According to the state’s health department, it closed in January.

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Ted Sherman can be reached at [email protected]. Follow him on twitter @TedShermanSL.

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Non profit living

COVID demonstrated the immense value of higher education communities (opinion)

When I first started quarantining, well over a year ago, I felt like I had been bowled over in a modernized Danteen hellish landscape. Not one of the deepest circles, where you’re frozen in ice and someone gnaws at your head. Just one of the upper benevolent spheres, where you wander aimlessly between your desk and the refrigerator, endlessly refreshing the New York Times home page. As usual, but on top of that.

What I felt was the strange lived experience of reverse: this literary device – famous employee in Dante Hell – where the suffering of a sinner imitates the nature of his sin. Let the punishment match the crime.

Before COVID-19 hit, modern life had already left us atomized, uprooted, addicted to our smartphones. Over the past year, that life has ironically intensified: we have spent our days locked in our one-bedroom apartments, every human connection mediated by a screen, torn from our communities.

The college classroom was no exception. Just weeks after the start of the pandemic, higher education Jeremias were already prophesying a world in which a Brady Bunch of jerky, pixelated faces would become a permanent educational standard. But despite the tribulations of the past year, I came away reassured that liberal residential education never be completely supplanted by e-learning. Screens simply cannot offer what students are looking for: the chance to live and learn with their peers in tight-knit educational communities.

I have made a career of co-creating educational communities, first at Deep Springs College, then with my own nonprofit, Tidelines Institute (formerly the Arete Project), which runs similar shorter duration programs. By tearing apart such communities, COVID-19 has highlighted their immense value. The pandemic, it seems, will pass. As we begin to think about the fall semester, now It’s time to reinvent and reinvigorate educational communities when the doors of the academy finally reopen.

What is an educational community? Part of it is a social community, as it can happen in a dormitory or a sports team. But it is also an intellectual community, with a dynamic life outside the classroom. The educational community opens up from the classroom to personal relationships, extracurricular, work, meals: lived together and oriented towards learning.

The educational community is the best thing a residential college has to offer. The two together prove that education is not just about mastery of content, but the growth of the human being as a whole. Although I am happy to remember a few things about The Divine Comedy, the truth is, I forgot a lot of material from my undergraduate years. It’s not that the content wasn’t important. It is because he played the role of second violin in the vibrant world of inquiry, debate, experimentation and social relations that have gathered around him. In college, I shared this world with a small group of peers and professors. The academic content provided a substrate and sustenance, but it was within the community that my education took place. This is where I grew up.

This is what so many young people are looking for in their college experience. That’s why every college tour guide speaks convincingly about these ramblings all night long about the meaning of life they enjoy with their roommate. This is why a former student of an intensive humanities program advised incoming students to forgo the 1 p.m. class: so that the cohort discussions started in class can continue over lunch and early after. midday.

And that is precisely what online education will never supplant. Administrators charting a post-pandemic path for their institutions would do well to consider both the scientific evidence and the financial prognosis in favor of educational communities. Substantial research links tight-knit cohorts to a range of positive learning outcomes, including literacy and critical thinking gains, improved performance in STEM courses, and perseverance in college. Online education, on the other hand, can often be associated with higher attrition rate, larger success gaps and widespread student dissatisfaction. And for numbers lovers, while the price of online education can have immediate financial appeal, alumni donations are dismal among online education beneficiaries. Alumni donate to places where they have created memories, formed friendships, and made the transition to adulthood with their peers. (Deep Springs, for example, has an enviable alumni donation rate of almost 50 percent.)

It is true that Deep Springs and Tidelines Institute are outliers, striving to bring the educational community to its most vital embodiment. We did this by creating small islands where a small number of inhabitants – students, staff and faculty – participate equally in shared work and a shared world. While not completely abjuring hierarchy or division of labor, any member of the community can chair a hiring committee or swing a hammer, analyze Hegel, analyze data, or lead a camping trip.

These two institutions exist outside of the “normal” academy, but they offer courses that can be adapted for traditional colleges. Indeed, many institutions already offer educational communities of one kind or another. For those who don’t – or want to create more – here are some general precepts.

  • Cohorts are essential. Educational communities must be porous but made up of a dense network of relationships. It must be possible for individuals to really know each other. Six could be a minimum size, while 50 could be a maximum.
  • Students must share a lasting intellectual experience. The content itself can vary widely but should include at least one ongoing course, ideally for a minimum of a year. Directed studies at Yale University is one example.
  • Experiential opportunities work wonders. They strengthen relationships with students, forge community identity, and help students integrate theory and practice. Wild nature and civilization at the University of Montana effectively coupled substantive courses and outdoor exploration.
  • Diversity is a necessity. Educational communities are at serious risk: that students may self-select from groups of peers who look alike, think and act alike. But peer learning is crucial in such communities, which means students have to come with different backgrounds and beliefs.
  • … but not always. Some students thrive in communities where they share common stories with their peers. This is especially true for students from marginalized backgrounds, for whom a strong community can be a deciding factor in college perseverance. the ScHOLA²RS House at the University of Connecticut offers one of many excellent models.
  • The shared meals are excellent. The shared living space is even better.

Educational communities do not need to be totalizing; after all, it’s not The secret story. They can include French majors and physics majors, football stars, climate change activists and classical pianists. They can manifest in the form of formal programs like those mentioned above or, more simply, they can occur spontaneously.

I know how great it is to create a new program. Faculty members without this bandwidth can still cultivate educational communities. They can encourage seminars to adjourn directly to lunch or coffee where conversations can continue informally. They may advise students to set up directed readings with a handful of their peers. They can connect students with similar interests. And, where formal programs exist, they can point students in the right direction.

The pandemic has shown us how precious and necessary educational communities are. Nowhere else in modern life do we have the spaces and structures that can support such communities, and believe me, I watched. They are the product and the pride of residential colleges alone. When we finally get out of this mundane hell, let’s be ready to help them thrive.

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Non profit living

Elderly residents will be relocated as Eventide plans to sell historic Moorhead building

Eventide Senior Living Communities announced on Wednesday, July 7 that the Fairmont store located at 801 2nd Ave. N. will close its doors. The nonprofit intended to vacate the building as part of its long-term plan, but a pipe leak that caused extensive water damage has accelerated that timeline.

“We had known for some time that the Eventide Fairmont building would ultimately not allow us to meet the needs of our residents,” Eventide President and CEO Jon Riewer said in a statement. “With the recent water damage, we have had to carefully consider the future of the Fairmont and how it aligns with our mission to better serve seniors. “

Eventide purchased the Fairmont building in 1994, said Carrie Carney, spokesperson for Eventide. It was previously the Fairmont Creamery Company, which closed in 1980. The building opened in 1924 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

It’s unclear what the next step is for the building, but Eventide said it will work to sell the Fairmont building to a local developer with experience in preserving historic buildings.

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“We are grateful for the time we have spent at Eventide Fairmont and the fact that it has enabled us to serve many residents over the years and are confident that the new owner will take a special interest in the next chapter of the building. Fairmont Creamery, ”said Riewer. “The sale of the Fairmont allows our organization to focus on further growth and investment on our Eighth Street campus in Moorhead, which will best serve the seniors in our community today and in the future.

Eventide determined that it could not reconfigure the building’s layout to meet residential needs, particularly in the eastern addition. Other reasons for shutting down the facility include the lack of a commercial kitchen, limited areas that could be used for common areas, and a lack of amenities. Most apartments do not have kitchens and Eventide cannot renovate the building to meet regulations required by Minnesota law, the organization said.

“The investment required to make these changes goes far beyond what makes financial or programmatic sense,” Riewer said. “The needs and wants of today’s seniors continue to evolve and it is our responsibility to meet them.

Eventide plans to move the 53 residents of the Fairmont out of the building over the next 90 days. The organization has said it will not close the facility or transfer ownership of the location until all residents have new homes.

Some will be able to move to Eventide’s Linden Apartments in Moorhead, and the organization is working with other senior communities to find housing for residents, Carney said.

The 17 memory care residents will be moving to the Linden Apartments, which recently opened a memory care addition there, Carney said.

Staff will be permitted to work at other Eventide locations in the Fargo-Moorhead area. No deadline for leaving the building has been set, Carney said.

In addition to its Moorhead locations, Eventide has facilities in North Dakota at Fargo, West Fargo, Jamestown and Devils Lake.

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Non profit living

Chicago Palestinians have connection to distant homeland

Every time Fidaa Elaydi buys fresh falafel for $ 3.99 a dozen from a bakery in Palos Hills, she gives her three children a Palestinian cooking lesson.

Elaydi remembers longing for his father every time he eats sesame bread from Jerusalem, as it reminds him of his own childhood, when he sold loaves of this bread while living in the Gaza Strip.

“I try to make accessible to my children here the parts that were not accessible to my parents in the refugee camp, while helping them understand the nuance,” said Elaydi, 33, a Palestinian refugee from the refugee camp. third generation and an immigration attorney who lives in the southwestern suburb of Justice.

When she tells them about their Palestinian identity, she focuses on the beauty of the area her parents told her stories about when she was growing up – the oranges of Jaffa, the vastness of the Mediterranean Sea and eating figs and pomegranates. directly on the trees.

“I’m just trying to tie everything together … to strengthen their bond with their homeland,” she added.

Fidaa Elaydi with her daughter at one of the recent pro-Palestinian protests in Chicago.
Courtesy photo

This continued connection to their homeland was brought to light recently, when hundreds of people took to the streets of the Loop to show their support for the Palestinians in their conflict with Israel.

the Arab America website estimates that 85,000 Palestinians live in greater Chicago, representing 60% of Chicago’s Arab population.

The community is scattered throughout the metropolitan area, but Arabic road signs are so common in some southwestern suburbs – around Bridgeview, Oak Lawn, and Worth – that the area has been called “Little Palestine.”

“The Palestinians kind of settled in this area, and they chose to stay with each other and build this tight-knit community. If you drive into South Harlem you will see bakeries, dessert shops, jewelry stores, and small grocery stores – anything that cites the names of cities in Palestine, ”Elaydi said.

the Arab-American Action Network, a non-profit community center established in 1995 on the southwest side, is one of several centers for the community. Social services, advocacy work, education, engagement of women and youth, and cultural events are some of the outreach services and programs offered by the network.

This community is linked by a history of conflict and displacement. The region the Palestinians call home includes much of today’s Israel. American Palestinians living in Chicago are just one part of a larger network of Palestinians living in the United States and around the world who connect to their struggle through storytelling, activism, justice social and sometimes simply by existing.

Elaydi’s four grandparents were forced to leave their homes in 1948, a date known to some as Israel’s War of Independence but to others as the “Nakba,” in Arabic for disaster.

They ended up in a refugee camp in Gaza, where Elaydi’s parents grew up until his father, accompanied by his mother, moved to the United States as a student.

“Because Palestinian history is inherently a story of dispossession, displacement and exile, I never believed that my connection, or my Palestinian identity, was less than a Palestinian living between [Jordan] River and the [Mediterranean] Mer, ”she said.

Ahlam Jbara immigrated to Chicago in 1974 when she was two months old. She returned to the West Bank with her family in 1986. But the following year, six months after the first Palestinian intifada, or uprising, her family returned to Chicago.

“I always say that the two years I lived there shaped who I am today,” said Jbara, 47.

Ahlam Jbara speaks at an event organized by the Palestinian American Center at Oak Lawn in 2019.

Ahlam Jbara speaks at an event organized by the Palestinian American Center at Oak Lawn in 2019.
Provided

This 73-year conflict continues today and resumed earlier this year in Jerusalem, where Palestinians faced brutal Israeli police tactics at the Al-Aqsa Mosque during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan in April.

This, combined with threats to evict dozens of Palestinian families from their homes in the Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood of East Jerusalem by Jewish settlers, was followed by the Hamas group firing long-range rockets into Jerusalem and launching Israel from it. heavy airstrikes on the Gaza Strip.

At least 230 Palestinians were killed, including 65 children and 39 women, and 1,710 people were injured, according to the Gaza health ministry. Twelve people in Israel, including a 5-year-old boy and a 16-year-old girl, were killed.

The 11-day explosion of violence ended on May 20, with a ceasefire agreement between Israel and Hamas.

During the conflict, American Palestinians and their supporters took to the streets of Chicago and around the world.

The sense of community connection here reflects decades of organization and institution building, said Hatem Abudayyeh, executive director of the Arab American Action Network.

Abudayyeh, the son of Palestinian immigrants, is also national president of the US Palestine Community Network – a grassroots group that is also part of the Chicago Coalition for Justice in Palestine, an umbrella organization for pro-Palestinian groups in the region, including including American Muslims. for Palestine, Jewish Voices for Peace and Students for Justice in Palestine.

“We were able to react like we did with masses of people because we have institutions. Because we’ve established a tradition and history of community organizing in the city and in the United States as a whole for a long, long time, ”said Abudayyeh.

Coalition rallies closed parts of the loop as protesters demonstrated outside the Israeli consulate, waving Palestinian flags.

Aviv Ezra, Israel’s consul general in the Midwest, said the latest situation was not about the situation in Sheikh Jarrah, but rather the actions of Hamas, which he said “used every pretext … State of Israel.

Protesters hold up a banner for the Coalition for Justice in Palestine during a march through the loop on May 12, 2021. The coalition is an umbrella organization for a number of pro-Palestinian groups in the Chicago chapter.

Protesters hold up a banner for the Coalition for Justice in Palestine during a march through the loop on May 12, 2021. The coalition is an umbrella organization for a number of pro-Palestinian groups in the Chicago chapter.
Ashlee Rezin Garcia / Sun-Times

In mid-June, the ceasefire was tested when hundreds of Israeli ultra-nationalists, some chanting “Death to the Arabs,” marched through East Jerusalem to celebrate Israel’s capture of the region in 1967. The Palestinians then sent incendiary balloons into southern Israel, causing several fires in parched farmland. Israel carried out airstrikes and more balloons followed.

About a week later, there were clashes between Palestinians and Jewish settlers in an area of ​​Jerusalem where settler groups are trying to evict several Palestinian families, officials said last week.

Thousands of people demonstrate in favor of Palestine and march through the loop, Wednesday evening, May 12, 2021.

Thousands of people demonstrate in support of Palestine and march through the loop on May 12, 2021.
Ashlee Rezin Garcia / Sun-Times

The growing awareness of systemic racism in the United States sheds a different light on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict for some Americans, says Wendy Pearlman, professor of political science at Northwestern University.

“This language of rights and equality also ties into Black Lives Matter and social justice protests in a way that, at least in the American context, people are starting to see in a new light that puts rights. of man in the foreground and it is difficult for Israel and its allies to delegitimize, ”she added.

Tarek Khalil, a member of the Chicago branch of American Muslims for Palestine, said the rallies are “cries for justice, liberation and equality.”

“It is worth it that I am an activist here, because the government that represents me is the same government that provides the same entity that is the source of the oppression of my people – $ 3.8 billion a year in financial, military and diplomatic assistance, ”said Khalil, 36, who grew up in Chicago and lives in Bridgeview but spent four years of his childhood living in the Silwan neighborhood of east Jerusalem.

“It’s personal but also political,” Khalil said. “It is essential that we pressure our government to formulate policies that are not contrary to the values ​​we preach every day.

Contribution: Associated Press

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Non profit living

Joint Fundraiser for Aloha United Way Introduces New Bath and Body Collection

Image courtesy of MANAOLA Hawai’i website.

Hawaiian Electric and luxury Hawaiian fashion label MANAOLA Hawaiʻi have launched presales of a new environmentally conscious bath and body collection as a fundraiser for Aloha United Way.

Five gift options from “Lei Puakenikeni” from MANAOLAcollection – priced at $ 22 to $ 56 – is available for pre-order on the Mākeke pop-up website through July 31 and orders processed in October.

“All proceeds from sales will go to AUW’s ALICE Fund, which brings together people, resources and sustainable solutions to help make the community stronger and more resilient.”

the Lei Puakenikeni The collection uses only sustainably and ethically sourced ingredients, natural fragrances and biodegradable packaging for the special line made in Hawaii, which is also cruelty-free and vegan. Product samples will be available at MANAOLA stores in Ala Moana and Pearlridge shopping centers and pre-sale orders will also be taken in-store.

Fundraising items include a coconut and soy candle ($ 22), a bath set with shampoo and conditioner bars ($ 26), a home diffuser with bamboo reeds ($ 44 ), a gift set with a bath soap and shampoo and conditioner bars in a burlap bag ($ 50) and a gift set with a bath soap, moisturizing body lotion and a candle in a burlap bag ($ 56).

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“We’re always looking for new and creative ways to support AUW and our community, and we researched MANAOLA because they embrace the same commitment to communities, Hawaiian culture, sustainability, and customer service that we also value,” said said Bob Krekel, Hawaiian Electric. Director of Business Processes and Continuous Improvement and Chairman of the Employee Fundraising Committee. “MANAOLA is also known for their high quality and innovation and we are proud to collaborate with them on a new product launch and fundraising. Together, we hope for a successful campaign that will uplift our community through these trying times and help build a resilient Hawai’i. “

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW THE AD

The launch of a bath and body collection by MANAOLA marks a new venture for the innovative fashion house known for its indigenous art and an opportunity to support a small local business on the island of Hawai’i while giving back to the community. The new line also elevates the exotic and fragrant puakenikeni flower which holds deep meaning for the brand’s founder, Manaola Yap.

“The collection was inspired by fond memories of his tūtū and acts of kindness, generosity, love and aloha, which is our way of life,” said Zachary Pang, CEO of MANAOLA Hawaiʻi. “When Hawaiian Electric reached out to MANAOLA to collaborate on creative ways to kāko’o (support) our local community through Aloha United Way, the answer was simple, together is the only way to thrive as a community. It is especially important for us to support the Native Hawaiian community and through the ALICE initiative we are able to reach the non-profit agencies that serve these community members through programs that honor culture, strengthen skills and increase access to resources.

The ALICE initiative refers to employed people with limited income and limited assets who are hard-working, full-time Hawaiian residents, sometimes many jobs and still living on paychecks. Funds raised will benefit programs designed to help residents with increased income potential and / or reduced household expenses; better access to social service delivery and community resources; and the development of financial capacities and “soft skills”.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW THE AD

“These are often the first steps a family can take towards a more solid economic foundation. If we are to rebuild our communities to be better and more equitable than before, we believe it is important to help those who are struggling to make ends meet and living on the brink of poverty, ”said Emmaly Calibraro , Vice President of Resource Development and Donor Relations at AUW. She noted that before the pandemic reached Hawai’i, 42% of the population were ALICE or lived in poverty. Estimates put that number at 59% post-pandemic.

“We would like to thank Hawaiian Electric and MANAOLA for creating this fundraiser that will ultimately benefit those who need it most. We continue to be encouraged by the creativity of each organization and their total commitment to building the communities of Hawai’i, ”Calibraro added.

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Non profit living

$ 99 million in rental assistance for returned Floridians

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) – About $ 99 million in unspent rental assistance to help Floridians living in affordable housing has been returned to the state after the agency overseeing the program struggled to shell out the money.

The Florida Housing Finance Corporation, which was established by the Florida legislature to help develop and support affordable housing, received $ 120 million in federal rent assistance funding last year as part of the CARES law. Florida used the money to create a coronavirus relief fund, intended to help tenants catch up on rent who live on properties that FHFC finances and have lost jobs or income due to the pandemic.

Taylore Maxey, press secretary for the non-profit organization, said she has distributed around $ 13.2 million to help tenants in 373 multi-family developments across the state. In total, FHFC said it received 786 requests for assistance but only 521 were approved. And about $ 99 million has been returned to the Department of Economic Opportunity to be reallocated to other pandemic programs.

“There’s no way to water it down: this strategy has been underused,” said Trey Price, executive director of the FHFC. “But all that considered, I think we did a good job with the time constraints we were facing and the resources given to us.”

Nonprofits that have tried to help affordable housing residents take advantage of rent assistance and push back eviction notices, including the Miami Workers Center and the Community Justice Project, said the problem is that some landlords will not participate in rent relief programs because of the requirements. they place on the owners.

To participate in the FHFC program, for example, landlords had to waive late fees and agree not to increase the rent until January 2021, while also pledging not to turn down lease renewals for late tenants. rent or report them to the credit bureaus. They also had to agree not to initiate new eviction requests and to suspend ongoing evictions for a period of time.

However, Price said he believed the biggest obstacle to disbursing the funds was that tenants had to pay 30% of their household income in rent to be eligible, a prerequisite which was later removed.

He said a separate program run by the non-profit organization, in which FHFC contracted with 119 local government housing offices to distribute rent assistance, was much more successful. According to figures provided by the association, $ 98.3 million in rent assistance and $ 18.1 million in mortgage relief were spent as part of this strategy.

Price said FHFC returned the unspent money before the deadline set by the CARES Act, which required all funding to be used by December 31, 2020 or returned to the federal government. Former President Trump ultimately extended that until the end of 2021 when he unexpectedly signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act in December.

He waited to sign the $ 900 billion COVID relief plan until December 27, just days before many provisions of the CARES Act expired, including federal unemployment and the paycheck protection program. . The moratorium on deportations from the country was also about to end.

Price said the uncertainty over whether or not Trump would sign an extension put the Florida Housing Finance Corporation in a difficult position.

“There was a real question of whether President Trump was going to sign or veto this bill,” Price said. “At this point, we needed to start moving (the unspent money) to the state of Florida. You don’t just snap your fingers and move $ 99 million. There was a bit of a rush. “

Christina Pushaw, spokesperson for Gov. Ron DeSantis, said the decision was made to “pull out” the unused money because this bill awaiting Trump’s signature contained $ 25 billion in aid to the government. dedicated rental, including $ 1.4 billion for Florida. Pushaw said the money returned by the Florida Housing Finance Corporation had been reallocated “to support the state’s ongoing pandemic response spending,” but couldn’t say exactly what it was being used for.

But it’s unclear why the governor’s office was confident he would receive this money, given Trump’s reluctance to sign the Consolidated Appropriations Act, which passed both the House and the Senate with bipartisan support. Pushaw did not immediately respond when asked for further details.

In a video posted to Twitter, Trump at the time called the bill a “disgrace” and called on lawmakers to “get rid of unnecessary and unnecessary pieces of this legislation and send me an appropriate bill.” , referring to the provisions of the 5,593 -page legislation allocating money to foreign aid, environmental projects and the arts and humanities.

“It’s called the COVID Relief Bill, but it has almost nothing to do with COVID,” Trump said, toppling lawmakers and even some of his own aides, who were in tense negotiations over the package. for months. Trump was also unhappy that the bill only included $ 600 stimulus payments for Americans and said he wanted to issue checks for $ 2,000.

However, Capitol Hill residents were quick to point out that some of the unrelated projects that received funding were programs that Trump included in his 2021 fiscal budget. His critics also ignored that Steven Mnuchin, Trump’s secretary of the Treasury, was the one who negotiated the figure of $ 600.

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Non profit living

Summerville teenager helps community members escape homelessness | New

SUMMERVILLE – One of the most obvious priorities in helping someone get out of homelessness is finding a place for them to live.

But what happens when they move into a space with nothing but a crate full of clothes and rent money?

“The difference between having a bed or not really changes all day long,” said John Michael Stagliano, 18, a lifelong Summerville resident.

Stagliano is also the founder of Home Again, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing furniture and household items to families leaving behind their old conditions and moving into new homes.

It all started with Stagliano volunteering at a Summerville homeless shelter, where he learned that residents’ needs don’t end with just leaving the shelter.

Over the past five years, Home Again has supplied the homes of nearly 500 people and helped raise thousands of dollars for local shelters.

Stagliano managed to accomplish all of this before graduating from high school.

“You can always do something to help someone else,” he said.

While acquiring something as simple as furniture may seem small to some people, it has been life changing for those who have benefited from Home Again. Connie Ross, one of these recent furniture recipients, said the organization’s help took a lot of stress away.

“Because I had nothing,” she said. “Not even a chair to sit on.”

Do something right

Ross now has two jobs – one at a local fast food restaurant and another for a cleaning service. She recently moved into a new apartment after being homeless for over a year. Between November and this summer, she was living at Hope’s House, the homeless women’s shelter at Dorchester County Community Outreach.

Before getting a place in the shelter, she had also spent a year living in her car while recovering from drug addiction. She said she still remembers the rainy nights sitting alone in her car, including during the pandemic, which compounded the isolation.

“I’ve had a few nights of crying, but not a lot,” Ross said. “You just have to find your inner strength.”

She became homeless after leaving a space where she lived with others. Ross learned that someone loaded furniture and other items in his name and damaged his credit.

This caused him to spend most of the pandemic in his car.

Summerville sees need for affordable housing options but struggles to find a place

“I had to pay off a lot of debt,” she said.

She was able to keep both of her jobs and save money, enough to eventually afford her own place.

The shelter did not allow women to buy anything because everything was given. “It was a breath of fresh air,” she said.

When Ross was finally able to find a place to stay, she hooked up with Home Again. Stagliano and his team gave him a bed, lamps, crockery, toiletries, a TV and more.

She said that as a black woman it felt good to see someone willing to help her. When looking for apartments after fixing her credit, she said there were times she could see that property managers were disappointed when they found out about her race.

With Stagliano being so young and doing so much volunteer work in the community, it was inspiring, she said.

“He’s doing something right,” she said. “And I think people should support him in any way they can.”

Who gets help

Home Again recipients ranged from people like Ross to entire families and local veterans. Stagliano said what he expects the most in his job is to see the change in personalities in people when they get help.

He remembers helping a veteran who slept on his apartment floor for at least a week.

When they visited him after delivering the furniture, he noticed that he was more social with his neighbors and happier overall. He said he had the same level of excitement when he saw two children jump on the beds his team brought them.






Back home

John Michael Stagliano (left) prepares to prepare a bed for veteran Timothy Hall on June 19, 2021. Stagliano founded Home Again, which helps provide furniture and household items to families emerging from homelessness and moving to new accommodation. Brad Nettles / Staff




It was a sense of accomplishment that Stagliano knew well from having spent much of his childhood volunteering.

Volunteering and giving back to the community is something the Stagliano family know well.

In addition to Home Again, John Michael’s sister Katie founded and runs Katie’s Krops. This is another Summerville nonprofit that creates community gardens to support food drives to end hunger.

This organization was formed after Katie grew a 40-pound cabbage when she was in third grade. John Michael was 4 at the time.

Cabbage then fed nearly 300 people and propelled Katie towards the launch of Katie’s Krops. The nonprofit now spans 31 states across the United States with dozens of community gardens.

Summerville's Katie's Krops reflects on more than a decade of national community garden work

“I think it was just meant to be,” Katie said. “The entire Summerville community as a whole, they have been amazing.”

Years later, while preparing meals at a Summerville homeless men’s shelter called Home of Hope, John Michael began helping residents of the shelter obtain furniture. He and his family would solicit the community for donations. After joining the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center and supporting homeless veterans, Home Again was born.

“It really changes lives and helps bring families together,” Katie said. “I couldn’t be prouder to be his sister.”

Without this giant cabbage, the family is not sure the two nonprofits would have taken off. But, they said the enthusiasm for supporting the community would have always been there.

“It’s kind of who we are as a family,” said Stacy Stagliano, mother of John Michael and Katie.

She said she never imagined that any of her children would oversee the organizations. With Home Again, she said she was surprised because John Michael has always been her shy child.

“They just see the possibilities,” Stacy said.

Without the support of the community, she said nonprofits would never have had the impact they are having now.

John Michael agrees.

“I couldn’t do it on my own,” he said.

During the height of the pandemic, Home Again was not receiving many calls. John Michael’s best guess was that, unfortunately, few families were getting out of homelessness.






Back home

John Michael Stagliano (center) and his father, John Stagliano, unload furniture with the help of veteran Timothy Hall on June 19, 2021. John Michael founded Home Again, which helps provide furniture and household items to families who emerging from homelessness and transitioning to new housing. Hall needed a bed and furniture. Brad Nettles / Staff




But recently with vaccines there has been a noticeable increase in awareness. Community support is therefore always welcome and necessary, he said.

Along with Ross, she said she was not only grateful to Home Again, but also to the community of Summerville in general for supporting her so much.

She can’t wait for her turn to do the same for someone else.

To support the association, go to Home Again Facebook page or send an email to [email protected]

Summerville's non-profit community garden Katie's Krops opens its first outdoor classroom

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Non profit living

Stimulus Check Live Fourth Update: Can It Be Approved In July? Tax Refund, $ 3,600 Child Tax Credit Portal …

How has personal and disposable income changed throughout the pandemic?

With new personal income data released in May by the Commerce Department on June 25, a clearer picture of the economic recovery is starting to emerge.

The Department of Commerce defines personal income as “income received by, or on behalf of, all persons from all sources.” This includes wages, social security, unemployment benefits, etc.

From January to March 2020, before the pandemic really took hold of the United States, personal income in the United States was $ 18.95 billion. For the same period in 2021, this figure was $ 22.1 billion. The largest increase in recent history, largely due to the fact that 70% of unemployed people earned more than when they were workingg.

In April and May, those numbers started to decline, which many economists believe two factors.

The first being that of January and March 2021, revenues hit record highs after sending the second and third stimulus checks.

The second reason is related to the continuous movement of people re-enter the labor market. If the unemployed start working where they earn less than they were when they were receiving benefits, this number will decrease.

Total income from unemployment benefits has fallen in recent months from a high level of $ 556.4 billion, after the federal $ 300 per week topper was first sent, to $ 458 billion in May as the The unemployment rate has plummeted and claims for benefits have reached an all-time high since the start of the pandemic.

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Non profit living

Tiger Global leads $ 31.5 million investment in interactive edtech quiz

Quizizz, an Indian startup that makes learning more interactive so that students find it interesting to spend more hours studying, said on Wednesday it had raised $ 31.5 million in a new round funding.

Tiger Global led the five-and-a-half-year-old startup’s Series B round. Yahoo co-founder Jerry Yang and existing investors Eight Roads Ventures, GSV Ventures, Nexus Venture Partners also participated in the new round.

Quizizz, which concluded its previous funding round in March of this year, has raised $ 47 million to date. The new round puts it at around $ 300 million, I heard earlier this month.

“When we were kids it was so hard to focus on studying. Our thesis is that with children now living in a world with so many distractions, there is a need to make learning more interesting, ”said Ankit Gupta, co-founder and CEO of Quizizz, in an interview with TechCrunch.

With Deepak Cheenath, the other co-founder of Quizizz, Gupta began the startup’s journey at a non-profit school in Bangalore, where they built several prototypes. That same year – 2015 – the duo engaged closely with teachers and students in the United States and turned to Quizizz, Gupta said.

On Quizizz, teachers and the community develop gamified courses for students. (Teachers don’t have to build these lessons. For concepts they want to explain to students, if lessons exist, many use them instead. The platform now offers over 20 million quizzes. )

These lessons made the learning more engaging for students, Gupta said. The platform also allows teachers to identify in real time which students are struggling to grasp a concept and then fill those gaps, he said.

The platform covers a range of topics including IT, English, Math, Science, Social Studies, World Languages, and the Creative Arts.

Over the years, Quizizz has grown organically across the world and many classrooms are now using the platform, Gupta said. The platform is now used by teachers in more than 120 countries, with students answering more than 300 million questions on Quizizz every week. In the United States, which is currently Quizizz’s largest market, more than 80% of K-12 schools use the platform, he said.

“During the pandemic, Quizziz made the transition to online education seamlessly. Now that we’re back in the building, I’ve used it almost exclusively. Creating, finding and modifying courses using Quizizz has become almost a hobby for me, ”said Rory Roberts, math professor at Brigantine Community School, in a prepared statement.

“This week, we ran user tests with teachers in California, saw a video of students cheering on their classmates in an auditorium in Kenya, and received a thank you note from a group of teachers wearing t – Quizizz brand shirts in Indonesia. We are incredibly proud of the role our growing team and community of teachers have played in this movement, ”said Cheenath of Quizizz.

The startup plans to deploy new capital to expand its team in the United States and India to keep up with its growth. It is also seeking to forge partnerships to accelerate its international expansion.

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Non profit living

Stimulus Check Live Fourth Update: Can It Be Approved In June? Tax Refund, $ 3,600 Child Tax Credit Portal …

Securities:

Biden reflects on his comments on additional infrastructure spending

– The California legislature prepares to pass the $ 262.2 billion spending plan

– Bipartite bill on infrastructure approved and inclusion of a fourth dunning check (all the details)

– State unemployment data shows signs of a slow recovery in some states

Some non-profit organizations keep pushing for additional stimulus control (full details)

– More than half of the states are end federal unemployment benefits (full story)

Kentucky offers $ 1,500 back-to-work bonus

– Judge orders Indiana to continue paying unemployment benefits amid pandemic, including $ 300 Weekly UI Booster (full story)

Texas workers sue state to continue additional weekly unemployment benefit of $ 300 (full details)

White House answers questions about labor shortages caused by generous federal unemployment benefits (full story)

Fourth dunning check linked to lower retail spending (full story)

IRS threw: Child Tax Credit Update Portal and Child Tax Credit Eligibility Assistant

– The petition for recurring stimulus checks goes beyond 2.4 million signatures. Sign it here

– The IRS has confirmed that the Child tax credit payments will start July 15 (full story)

$ 10 billion fund for homeowner stimulus checks (how to apply)

– Many American taxpayers are still waiting for their tax refund (full story)

Louisiana announces it will end $ 300 unemployment compensation recall end of July, becoming the first state ruled by Democrats

Twenty-six US states, almost all led by the GOP, are early termination of supplementary unemployment insurance (full story)

– You can follow your third raise check using the IRS online Get my payment tool

Read some of our related press articles:

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Non profit living

BizWest honors healthcare professionals with Health Care Heroes awards – Greeley Tribune

BizWest on Thursday recognized the contributions of healthcare workers and organizations to the well-being of the Boulder Valley and northern Colorado areas with the 2021 Health Care Heroes Awards.

The following people and groups represent the winners and finalists in the various Health Care Heroes categories:

Public Service

Honors an individual or organization – inside or outside of healthcare – for their leadership focused on a particular healthcare problem or need. The applications were assessed on criteria such as the impact on health care in the community and how they met a need that might not otherwise have been met.

  • Winner: Sunrise Community Health
  • Finalist: H2 Fabrication
  • Finalist: Noëlle Rodriguez

Distinguished service

Honors a healthcare administrator who has demonstrated leadership excellence within their organization during COVID-19. Candidates were assessed on the leadership provided during the pandemic, ensuring worker safety, quality patient care, and immunizations for the community.

  • Winner: Lauren Shimp, Columbine West Health & Rehab Facility
  • Finalist: Fred Pitzl, Good Samaritan Society Fort Collins Village
  • Finalist: SCL Health Good Samaritan Medical Center

COVID-19 frontline nurse

Honors a nurse who has demonstrated excellence, dedication and perseverance in meeting the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. Candidates were assessed on their performance during the pandemic, going beyond their usual duties and responsibilities.

  • Winner: Joel Bitler, Columbine Health Systems
  • Finalist: Cheryl Baum, New Mercer Commons ALF / Columbine Health Systems
  • Finalist: Amy Provopulos, UCHealth Mountain Crest

Healthcare innovator / researcher

Honors a person or organization for an innovation in medical technology or research. Priority was given to breakthroughs that contributed to testing, treatment, safety gear or vaccines against COVID-19.

  • Winner: Michael Lindsey, Thermal Strike Ranger
  • Finalist: UCHealth
  • Finalist: Banner Innovation Group

COVID-19 frontline health worker

Honors an individual who has demonstrated excellence, dedication and perseverance in meeting the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, including doctors, paramedics, paramedics and emergency service personnel and others. Candidates were assessed on their performance during the pandemic, going beyond their usual duties and responsibilities.

  • Winner: Jennifer Hogestad, UCHealth
  • Finalist: Rebecca Jackson, Columbine Health Systems
  • Finalist: Mo Lyons, Banner Health

Mental Health Provider of the Year

Recognizes a mental health care provider who has positively impacted their organization and / or patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Candidates were assessed on their performance during the pandemic, going beyond their usual duties and responsibilities.

  • Winner: Alicia Milar, SummitStone Health Partners
  • Finalist: Janina Fariñas, La Cocina
  • Finalist: Adena Kling, Longmont United Hospital Centura

COVID-19 Healthcare Allies Award

Honor someone outside of mainstream health care who excelled during the COVID-19 pandemic, including firefighters, law enforcement, and representatives of civic and non-profit organizations. Applicants were assessed on how well the person went beyond their normal duties to support healthcare workers and the community at large.

  • Winner: Foothills Unitar Church
  • Finalist: AMR
  • Finalist: UCHealth Northern Colorado Foundation

Nursing and Assisted Living Facility of the Year

Recognizes the best nursing and assisted living facility or group in the region. Applicants were assessed based on their response to the COVID-19 pandemic and how they prioritized the physical, mental and emotional well-being of patients.

  • Winner: Good Samaritan Society Fort Collins Village
  • Finalist: Garden Square at Westlake Assisted Living
  • Finalist: Tamara Gebhardt, New Mercer Commons ALF / Columbine Health Systems

COVID-19 support worker

Includes non-physician and non-nurse members of the multidisciplinary team, such as physician assistants, CNAs, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, medical imaging, researchers, technicians, etc. beyond their usual tasks and responsibilities.

  • Winner: Gloria Gonzalez-Engle, Boulder Community Health
  • Finalist: Jeremiah Martinez, Boulder Community Health – Sterile Treatment Service
  • Finalist: Marilyn Schaefer, UCHealth Greeley Hospital

Volunteer Award

Recognizes an unpaid volunteer for service in a health care organization. Applicants were assessed on criteria such as seniority, impact on the organization and how well they met a need that might not have been met otherwise.

  • Winner: Mark Meyer, Boulder Community Health
  • Finalist: Emily Kemme, UCHealth
  • Finalist: Fuerza Latina

BizWest has received over 100 nominations for the Health Care Heroes program. The judges included Gene Haffner, Julie Johnson Haffner, Charlie Harms, George Hayes, Joel Montbriand and Ron Secrist, all veterans of the healthcare or nonprofit sectors.

Health Care Heroes was sponsored by Anthem BC / BS, H2 Manufacturing Solutions and The Weld Trust. A healthcare coalition that included Boulder Community Health, Centura Health Avista Adventist Hospital, Columbine Health Systems, Good Samaritan Society Communities of Northern Colorado, and SCL Health Good Samaritan Medical Center also contributed.

© 2021 BizWest Media LLC

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Non profit living

Moratorium on evictions will expire at the end of June

In Together’s offices, the association is receiving more and more calls, as a federal moratorium on evictions is due to end on June 30. “So we see a lot of fear, a lot of panic,” said Together President and CEO Michael Hornacek. According to Hornacek, the organization has seen an increased need for aid since the start of the pandemic, from food to housing and utilities. “It’s all coming to an end at the same time. And I think we’re trying to do our best to prepare to respond,” he said. Hornacek said that not only are they seeing an increase in the number of people needing help, but the requests themselves are also different. “So instead of seeing a rent request of $ 750 to pay a month’s rent, we could see six to nine months, and the request is going to be $ 6,000 to $ 9,000,” Hornacek said. worried because homeowners may again file evictions, the fallout could happen quickly. “If we evict, you know, hundreds and thousands of homes in our community, where do these people go? Can the shelter system handle this? Are they going to be on the street? Will they live in their car? “Says Hornacek. Rental assistance is available, but requests can take time. Together works with the Metro Area Continuum of Care for the Homeless. MACCH is the administrator of about 20 million dollars in federal rent assistance. Executive Director Randy McCoy said there is still about $ 15 million to be made from this federal money. However, once the landlord and tenant submit the required documents, it may still take two to three weeks for the money to come out. late or if you are not sure how you are going to pay the July rent now, start an application early to avoid any kind of market instability. housing or loss of your housing, “McCoy said. In addition to this federal money, McCoy said, there are dollars available from private philanthropy and other grants. In total, McCoy said MACCH has already provided $ 10 million in aid in 2021. “So the need is still quite strong in the Omaha community. You know, we were hoping 2021 would be less in demand, but I say it’s at least on par with what we’ve seen in 2020, if not slightly better at this point, “McCoy said. The nonprofits are hoping landlords can give tenants some time to get this done. financing and paying the rent, before you evict them. ”You don’t really see it until it’s all over, and then all of a sudden this summer, if you see more homeless people on the streets or in cars, you’ll see it, but then it’s too late, “Hornacek mentioned.

In Together’s offices, the association is receiving more and more calls, as a federal moratorium on evictions is due to end on June 30.

“So we see a lot of fear, a lot of panic,” said Together President and CEO Michael Hornacek.

According to Hornacek, the organization has seen an increased need for assistance since the start of the pandemic, from food to housing and utilities.

“It’s all coming to an end at the same time. And I think we’re trying to do our best to prepare to respond,” he said.

Hornacek said that not only are they seeing an increase in the number of people needing help, but the requests themselves are also different.

“So instead of seeing a rent request of $ 750 to pay a month’s rent, we could see six to nine months, and the request is going to be $ 6,000 to $ 9,000,” Hornacek said.

He worries, as homeowners may again file evictions, the fallout could happen quickly.

“If we evict, you know, hundreds and thousands of homes in our community, where do these people go? Can the shelter system handle this? Are they going to be on the street? Will they live in their car? Hornacek said.

Rental assistance is available, but requests can take time.

Ensemble works with the Metropolitan Area Continuum of Care for the Homeless.

MACCH is the administrator of approximately $ 20 million in federal rent assistance.

Executive Director Randy McCoy said there is still about $ 15 million to be made from that federal money.

However, once the landlord and tenant submit the required documents, it can still take two to three weeks for the money to come out.

“If you’re currently late or don’t know how you’re going to pay July rent now, start an application early to avoid any sort of housing instability or loss of your home,” McCoy said.

In addition to that federal money, McCoy said there were dollars available from private philanthropies and other grants. In total, McCoy said MACCH has already disbursed $ 10 million in aid in 2021.

“So the need is still pretty strong in the Omaha community. You know, we were hoping 2021 would be less in demand, but I’d say it’s at least on par with what we’ve seen in 2020, if not slightly higher. at this point, ”McCoy said.

Nonprofits are hoping landlords can give tenants some time to secure that financing and pay the rent, before they evict them.

“You don’t really see it until it’s all over, and then all of a sudden this summer, if you see more homeless people on the streets or in cars, you will see it, but then it’s is too late, ”Hornacek mentioned.

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Non profit living

Collaboration Expands Quality Addiction Treatment Services at University of Miami and Across Ohio

DOWNTOWN, Minn .– (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – The nonprofit Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation provides addiction care, as well as recovery, family and educational services to Ohio residents, including students at the University of Miami, with its RecoveryGo ™ telehealth solutions, which are now available to anyone living in the state. A long-standing collaboration with The Haven at College, which has been providing services to the University of Miami since 2018, has helped facilitate Hazelden Betty Ford’s expansion in Buckeye State.

“Our virtual ambulatory care and other telehealth resources and services are proving to be effective and convenient, and have allowed us to expand access and reach more people as addiction problems skyrocket amid the crisis. pandemic, ”said Hazelden Betty Ford, President and CEO Mark Mishek. “Ohio has been at the center of the drug addiction epidemic, and we are grateful for the opportunity to collaborate with the University of Miami and other partners to help bring healing and hope to more. individuals, families and communities. ”

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is the nation’s largest nonprofit provider of addiction treatment, mental health care, recovery resources, and related prevention and education services, with sites across the country , extensive telehealth solutions and a growing network of collaborators across healthcare.

The Haven at College is a member of the Hazelden Betty Ford Patient Care Network and has provided outpatient drug treatment and recovery support services to students at the University of Miami in Oxford, Ohio, for over two years. Now refocusing resources in her home state of California, The Haven at College worked with officials at the University of Miami to ease the transition to Hazelden Betty Ford’s clinical services and ensure that students encountered no lack of access to professional help.

“It was really important for us to have a smooth transition with a quality treatment provider, and no one is better at substance abuse treatment than Hazelden Betty Ford, so we’re thrilled,” said Sharon Weber, co-founder of The Haven at University. In addition to her high-quality, evidence-based treatment services, Hazelden Betty Ford also provides extensive recovery, family and educational services, meaning Miami students and student service professionals will have access to even more resources than before. ”

Hazelden Betty Ford’s Intensive Outpatient and Insurance-Eligible Virtual Drug Treatment Services are now available for the first time not only to University of Miami students, but also to people from all corners of the world. Ohio, including rural underserved areas.

“No matter where you live in Ohio, if you have commercial health insurance and a computer, you and your family are now eligible to participate in therapy without traveling,” said Laura Adams , Hazelden Betty Ford’s Senior Director of Outreach for Ohio.

Designed to replicate her on-site patient care experience, Hazelden Betty Ford’s Virtual Substance Use Disorder Treatment Services combine group therapy and one-on-one counseling sessions via encrypted law-compliant video technology for more of security. To access Hazelden Betty Ford’s treatment previously, Ohio residents had to go to a facility in another state. Now they can access it directly from their homes.

Other RecoveryGo ™ resources and services now available in Ohio and nationwide include a free one-day virtual family program, available in English and Spanish; a virtual program for children; and many digital recovery support tools, such as mobile apps, podcasts, and an online peer community. In addition, Hazelden Betty Ford prevention experts seek to increase their support for Ohio’s school systems by expanding their services to graduate students; and its professional training consultants, already active in Ohio, are available to collaborate with more treatment centers, hospitals, health systems and recovery organizations, as well as public health leaders. from Ohio who want to implement virtual care and other evidence-based behavioral health solutions.

“By providing more opportunities for quality treatment and ongoing support, and working with others in Ohio who are also committed to reducing the negative impact of addiction, we can bring hope and healing to people.” underserved rural areas and others statewide, ”said James Ahlman, executive director of the East Hazelden Betty Ford region.

An industry leader and long-time provider of telehealth solutions, Hazelden Betty Ford moved all of its “outpatients” nationwide at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, to a robust virtual platform that includes a effective virtual drug testing system and other best practices to ensure the highest levels of confidentiality, security and quality. A year later, Hazelden Betty Ford has now provided virtual ambulatory care to thousands of people across the United States.

First results from the Butler Research Center show that Hazelden Betty Ford’s Virtual Intensive Outpatient (IOP) treatment is working well, with patients discharged “against medical advice” at a significantly lower rate than previous IOP patients on site – a good indicator of positive results in the field. long term results. Based on preliminary results at 1 and 3 months, Hazelden Betty Ford also observed little or no difference between on-site and virtual IOP patients with respect to: reported cravings, mental health symptoms, sobriety, confidence in sobriety, attendance and quality of life support group.

“Virtual drug addiction care is here to stay,” Ahlman said. “More than a stopgap solution during the pandemic, telehealth fills important gaps in the behavioral health care system, allowing many patients to take a first step that they would otherwise have delayed and dramatically expanding access. If these preliminary results hold up for the long term, virtual care is expected to create new transformative opportunities for the thousands of people in Ohio and millions across the country struggling with substance use.

See www.RecoveryGo.org or call 1-800-I-DO-CARE for more details and resources.

About the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is a force of healing and hope for individuals, families and communities affected by addiction to alcohol and other drugs. As the nation’s leading nonprofit provider of comprehensive inpatient and outpatient drug treatment and concomitant mental health care for adults and youth, the Foundation has 17 locations across the country, with extensive solutions. on-site and telehealth and a network of collaborators across health care. With a legacy that began in 1949 and included the founding in 1982 of the Betty Ford Center, the Foundation today also includes a Graduate School of Addiction Studies, a Publishing Division, a Center for Addiction Research, recovery advocacy and thought leadership, professional and medical training programs. , school-based prevention resources and a specialized program for children growing up in families struggling with addictions. Learn more about www.HazeldenBettyFord.org and on Twitter.

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