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We are evolving so you can thrive at Oak Hills Living Center | News, Sports, Jobs

Oak Hills Living Center exists to support our family, friends and neighbors who can no longer take care of themselves. The community established Highland Manor in 1958 when long term care was needed in New Ulm. In 1995 the community saw that the building needed major repairs and came together to rename and build our current home and in 2003 when the community needed income based housing you again supported this mission .

More than 20 years have passed since our last request for a major community contribution. Our community of seniors is growing and it is our duty to meet the increased demand. For some of you, you may not know that Oak Hills Living Center is a community-owned, not-for-profit, independent, long-term care and assisted living facility. Oak Hills is ownerless, community owned, and governed by a board of directors made up of community members. Our current Board of Directors includes Chris Jensen, Jay Vancura, Dr. Joan Krikava, Barb Dietz, Betsy Pieser, Danielle Marti, Michelle Markgraf, Judi Nelson and James Unke.

For the past six years, Oak Hills Assisted Living has tracked referrals, admissions, and discharges. We had noticed that the studios were no longer desirable for the community. Shortly before 2015 our apartments were always full with a waiting list. The needs of the community were changing and we had more and more requests for larger living spaces and memory care. Unfortunately, our paid private apartments were all studio apartments and we did not have a secure area to care for residents with memory loss. A market study confirmed our observations; however, we did not anticipate how much the need for care would increase. By 2050, people aged 80 to 84 in Brown County would increase by 48% and people aged 85 and over by 34%.

In 2019, the state informed our industry of upcoming assisted living licensing changes that will take effect August 1, 2021. Strategic planning was in the process of developing a plan for how we would respond to the needs of our growing senior population, as well as planning and preparing to meet the new licensing change for assisted living. Then came the pandemic and we were forced to redirect our efforts. We were hoping that the state would push back the deadline because of the pandemic; however, the state has held firm to licensing changes which have required us to continue to explore options to renovate and/or expand our assisted living facility. We have planned different scenarios, renovate, expand or do nothing. Doing nothing meant the future of Oak Hills Living Center was not guaranteed. Where would our friends and neighbors go when they could no longer care for themselves if Oak Hills Living Center ceased to exist?

We need to renovate our existing assisted living facility so people in our community have more options than a 425 square foot apartment. We need to offer additional services with these larger spaces so that we can reserve our qualified nursing home beds for those who need them most. Residents requiring memory care should be in a safe and secure environment where they are free to roam.

Concerns about staffing are valid. There isn’t an organization that isn’t looking for employees. When fully staffed, we have approximately 275 employees in Oak Hills. Currently we have a handful of positions open, however, we do not have temporary contract staff working in our building. How did we do this? Our Board and management have developed a plan to increase the salaries of our direct care staff in October.

The expansion will require 20 to 25 additional employees. We understand this is worrying given the number of vacancies in so many places. We are confident that by investing in our organization and our community, we will be able to fill these additional positions. Generating interest in healthcare and supporting those who want to enter the field is a priority for Oak Hills. Our scholarship program pays tuition fees for individuals pursuing a variety of healthcare careers. The person brings us the tuition statement and we pay it directly to the college or university. We also have a program, OnTrack, which trains practical nurses and many may not be aware that care homes are required to pay tuition for those being trained for their first CNA role. We are committed to developing and supporting our people.

At Oak Hills, we care about people and believe that every life has value. The expansion will cost $13 million and we need to raise at least $2.5 million from the community. While staff and board members may change, the one constant is you. You will always own Oak Hills, it is the home of the community. We need your support.

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More and more small houses are coming to the YK Delta thanks to pandemic relief funds. But are they a good idea?

This story was originally posted by KYUK Public Media at Bethel and is reprinted with permission.

BETHEL — A wave of new housing is coming to the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta. Most of these new units should be of the fashionable tiny house variety. But with households in the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta generally much larger than the national average, some tribes are wondering if smaller houses are right for their communities.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) recently announced nearly $7 million in funding for Aniak, Atmautluak, Napaimute, Newtok, Quinhagak, Toksook Bay, and Tununak to begin construction of 25 new homes this year. The funding comes from federal coronavirus relief funding, which has brought a huge influx of money to Alaska for tribes to build homes.

“Blast is a good term for how much it’s increased,” said Greg Stuckey, administrator of HUD’s Alaska Native American Programs Office.

Since these grants are tied to coronavirus relief funding, tribes must use homes as isolation or quarantine units, at least initially.

“And then, you know, later when COVID is finally over, you can use them to reduce overcrowding in your communities, because that’s a major problem in rural Alaska,” Stuckey said.

About 40% of homes in the Yukon Delta are either overcrowded or severely overcrowded. According to a statewide housing assessment, more than 2,400 homes need to be built to address this issue.

Almost all of the homes that will be built in the YK Delta with these HUD grants will be small homes. They will be smaller than 500 square feet, with the kitchen, bed, and living space in the same room. There will be a separate bathroom, but no separate bedrooms.

Tiny houses have been all the rage in recent years, often touted as an answer to affordable housing. But are they well suited to a region where households are, on average, 50 to 80% larger than the national average?

The Yukon-Kuskokwim delta has already experimented with small houses. The non-profit organization, Coastal Villages Region Fund, built one in Eek in 2018. The organization says it will no longer do so.

“We’ve found that people need more space than a small house with the number of people in the family,” said Oscar Evon, regional business manager at CVRF.

Evon said there were other problems with tiny homes, such as banks not funding mortgages for them. CVRF originally planned for homeowners to buy small houses through mortgages, which would have opened up another route to home ownership in the villages of the YK Delta. Most are currently built and paid for by the regional housing authority or by grants. After moving away from smaller homes, CVRF is now building more traditional three- to four-bedroom homes, which Evon says banks fund mortgages and better meet the needs of families.

“A bigger house gives a family more space to raise their family and sometimes even their extended family,” Evon said.

Some of the tribes that have recently received a HUD grant to build tiny homes have come to the same conclusion. Toksook Bay received $1,035,000 to build five small houses, but Tribal Administrator Robert Pitka Sr. said Toksook Bay would prefer to build larger houses.

“We would choose a two-bedroom house instead of a small house,” said Pitka Sr.

However, Toksook Bay applied for a grant and received funds to build small houses. Pitka Sr. said he believed the grant was specifically for small homes.

“The ICDBG (Indian Community Development Block) grant already had wording in there where it’s for small houses,” Pitka Sr said.

HUD’s ICDBG grant requirements suggest building tiny houses as a way to use grant funds, which may have been enough to convince tribes to include tiny houses in their grant application. Tununak, who also received a grant to build small houses, also said he would prefer to build houses with bedrooms.

Stuckey said HUD did not require applicants to build tiny houses or any particular type of housing, and did not favor applications that included tiny houses. For example, Newtok received the same grant to build three three-bedroom houses.

“It’s self-determination. The tribes decide, the tribes are going to tell me what they’re going to build,” Stuckey said.

If tribes like Toksook Bay decide they prefer to build bigger houses, they will be able to do so. HUD spokeswoman Vanessa Krueger said tribes can submit an amendment to their grant application.

In Toksook Bay, Pitka Sr. said new homes, whether tiny or not, will make a big difference to families currently living in old, unsuitable homes.

“They are moldy. They are cold. They are rotten. They have no water and sewage system. Some are even smaller than tiny houses. And at least a brand new little house would make it 100% better,” Pitka Sr. said.

Pitka Sr. said those families could move into their new homes later this year.

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Sevastopol neighborhood group sues to stop safe parking program for homeless in motorhomes

A Sevastopol neighborhood group has sued the city to end a controversial safe parking scheme planned for the city’s north end for local homeless people living out of their RVs.

On January 21, Friends of Northwestern Sevastopol filed a petition in Sonoma County Superior Court seeking to force the Sevastopol City Council to reverse its decision approving the year-long pilot program on private land. at 845 Gravenstein Highway North.

“Friends recognizes the importance of safe shelter for homeless people. … Friends object to the entire burden of these encampments being concentrated on one neighborhood,” the petition reads.

The legal filing describes the group as representing the interests of “local landlords and tenants, parents of schoolchildren, business owners and operators, and landowners”. It was incorporated as a nonprofit on Jan. 5, according to filings by the California companies.

Sevastopol City Prosecutor and Director Lawrence McLaughlin said the city has hired outside attorneys and will “vigorously oppose” any attempt to block or close the parking lot.

Petition of Friends of Northwest Sevastopol.pdf

The hourly program that would provide support services and space for 22 vehicles is expected to be fully operational by February 15. A delay of more than a week could jeopardize the $368,000 federal stimulus grant package that will fund most of the pilot program, according to Sonoma Applied Village Services, the nonprofit selected to run the site.

“Any delay risks killing the project,” said SAVS president Adrienne Lauby.

SAVS, which is named in the petition with the city, plans to lease the land at a former AmeriGas propane store in the nonprofit St. Vincent de Paul Sonoma County.

Saint Vincent is also named in the petition. Jack Tibbetts, the nonprofit’s executive director and former Santa Rosa city councilman, said the charity had “every intention of moving forward” with the lease.

The secure parking scheme, approved by city council in November, came largely in response to health and safety concerns from neighbors and business owners about a long-running encampment with more than a dozen campsites -buses on Morris Street. The hope is to move as many people as possible from the unauthorized camp, where police have warned campers, to the new ‘RV village’.

The city is also considering an ordinance that would effectively ban RV parking on city streets during the day, alarming some homeless advocates. Council was scheduled to vote on the ordinance on Tuesday, but the item was moved to its next meeting on Feb. 15, city officials said.

Tony Francois, a San Francisco lawyer representing Friends of Northwestern Sevastopol, told The Press Democrat the group considers the secure parking scheme illegal due to a local ordinance prohibiting people from living in campsites. -cars.

Additionally, he said the city council failed to follow the proper permitting process, conduct an environmental review, and give residents enough notice to comment on the scheme.

“The way they proceeded deprived many of the project’s neighbors from exercising their right to comment on the project before it was approved,” Francois said.

City Council approved the RV Village in about a month to meet a deadline that would ensure SAVS received federal funding. Despite the quick turnaround, council members at the time said they aimed to do everything possible to hear residents’ concerns.

McLaughlin, the city attorney, said the program was exempt from the normal permitting process and environmental review because it is a homeless shelter.

But Francis argues that under state law, such a project is only exempt if it is on city-owned property or if the city itself leases the property.

McLaughlin disputes this interpretation. And regarding the local ordinance prohibiting living in vehicles, he said a secure parking program is exempt.

“All of the factual and legal allegations in the lawsuit are incorrect,” McLaughlin said.

Francois said the neighborhood group wants the city to reconsider the secure parking program through the normal permitting process and potentially create smaller RV villages throughout the city so vehicles aren’t concentrated on a single site.

The group plans to ask the court for a stay to immediately suspend the project while hearings are underway. But as of Thursday, Francis had yet to get confirmation that the petition had been officially received due to a lack of court personnel, he said, meaning it’s unclear when a first hearing could be held. be fixed.

You can reach editor Ethan Varian at [email protected] or 707-521-5412. On Twitter @ethanvarian

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Harvard Hillel Hosts Holocaust Remembrance Day Memorial | News

Harvard Hillel held a memorial service on the steps of the Widener Library on Thursday in observance of International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Holocaust Remembrance Day marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp in 1945 and honors the lives of the millions of Jews and civilians who were killed. In his service, Hillel commemorated the life of Ita Warmund, a victim whose name was chosen from the database of Yad Vashem – Israel’s official memorial to the victims of the Holocaust.

College Dean Rakesh Khurana, Dean of Students Katherine G. O’Dair, Associate Dean of Students Lauren E. Brandt ’01, Reverend Matthew Ichihashi Potts, Rabbis Jonah C. Steinberg and Hirschy Zarchi each lit a candle in honor of the victims.

In his speech, Steinberg, executive director of Hillel, stressed the importance of remembering those whose lives were lost in the Holocaust.

“There is hardly a family represented here that has not been touched in some way by the Sho’ah – by the Holocaust – who does not have a wound, which is often a gaping hole, an absence,” Steinberg said.

Despite the loss and tragedy of the Holocaust, Steinberg said it was still important to work toward a “world of unity.”

“That doesn’t mean we go through life traumatized and scared,” Steinberg said. “But that means we go through life wearing that and figuring out how to live forward.”

Harvard Chabad Rabbi Zarchi said in his remarks that revealed knowledge of the Holocaust alone does not guarantee moral choices.

“Today we light a candle for souls with a candle of truth,” Zarchi said. “And perhaps that is what veritas teaches us – that there must be truth in our knowledge and in our wisdom to ensure that this knowledge leads to morality, to ethical living and to ethical choices. “

Addressing the crowd, Khurana said ‘remembering’ is one of the ‘most important human acts’ and stressed the importance of sharing the stories of Holocaust victims, especially with younger generations. .

“Their stories are an essential part of our common humanity, and those who are one, two or three generations apart are committed to understanding these horrific events and telling the stories to the next generation,” he said. . “The Holocaust not only altered the contours of world history, it also shattered the lives of countless families around the world.”

Khurana condemned anti-Semitism, citing the Texas synagogue hostage crisis and the harms of remaining silent in the face of oppression.

“We must not forget the lessons of the Holocaust and the dehumanization it depended on,” Khurana said. “And we must not forget that it is up to each of us, as humans, to decide whether to perpetuate good or evil in the world or remain indifferent.”

Hillel’s memorial was also intended to raise funds for The Blue Card, a non-profit organization that provides financial, emotional and physical support to Holocaust survivors in the United States.

The service ended with a reading from “El Male Rachamim” – a Jewish memorial prayer – by Noa D. Kligfeld ’24.

“May their memory endure, inspiring truth and loyalty in our lives. May their souls be bound by the bond of life. May they rest in peace. And let’s say “Amen,” Kligfeld recited.

—Editor Leah J. Teichholtz can be reached at [email protected] Follow her on Twitter @LeahTeichholtz.

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Local non-profit petitions for a minimum wage increase

“Often LGBTQ people tend to be underemployed simply because of the conditions in our state, but we also believe in equality and fairness for all. We want everyone in Nebraska to have the ability to blossom fully,” Aryn said. Okay.

LINCOLN, Neb. (KLKN) — Local nonprofit OutNebraska has begun petitioning to raise the minimum wage in Nebraska.

OutNebraska, a nonprofit organization that empowers the LGBTQ community, has joined the statewide “Raise the Wage” petition.

“Often LGBTQ people tend to be underemployed simply because of the conditions in our state, but we also believe in equality and fairness for all. We want everyone in Nebraska to have the ability to s ‘fulfillment. Part of that is making sure they can afford food, bills, rent,’ said Aryn Huck, community organizer at OutNebraska.

Each week, OutNebraska will dedicate an hour to collecting signatures at its office. The time and places to sign the petition “Raise the salary” can be found here.

The petition says the minimum wage would increase by $1.50 per year for the next three years until it reaches $15 per hour. Petitioners will need to collect signatures from approximately 20% of Nebraska workers, including a percentage in each Nebraska county.

Currently, the minimum wage is $9 per hour in Nebraska.

“Keep it adjusted to the cost of living in the state. So if the cost of living doesn’t go up, it won’t go up, but there will always be an annual review just so we don’t have to start over,” Huck said. “We don’t need to go out and collect signatures every 5, 6, 7 years, instead we can have an annual review that says okay, are we competitive, are we tracking the cost of the life?”

People wishing to sign the petition must be registered to vote in Nebraska for the signature to count. People can register either at OutNebraska during their weekly petition hour or online at the Secretary of State’s website.

If petitioners have received all required signatures by July 7, this will appear on the November ballot.

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ADDF and AFTD Partner to Support Wave Life Sciences’ FTD and ALS Clinical Program

NEW YORK, January 25, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) and the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD) today announced their partnership to support the FOCUS-C9 phase of Wave Life Sciences 1b/2a clinical trial investigating WVE-004 as a potential treatment for C9orf72– associated frontotemporal degeneration (C9-FTD), as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (C9-ALS). The partnership provides an investment from the ADDF and AFTD that will support the assessment of fluid biomarkers, functional assessments and digital biomarkers in FOCUS-C9, potentially leading to clinically meaningful results to inform the development of treatments for DFT.

The ADDF and AFTD made the decision to support the FOCUS-C9 trial following a review of Wave’s clinical research application for the Treat FTD Fund, which supports the development of new drugs to treat FTD. Specifically, members of the Treat FTD Fund Joint Steering Committee, an expert panel convened by the ADDF in conjunction with the AFTD, and the ADDF Scientific Review Committee reviewed and commented on the phase 1b/2a study design, preclinical data supporting the program, and study team references.

“This investment exemplifies many of our priorities: collaboration, innovative science and the development of more rigorous methods for conducting clinical trials,” said Howard Fillit, MD, Co-Founder and Scientific Director of ADDF. “We must work together – as the ADDF and AFTD have done for years – to expand our scientific knowledge of all neurodegenerative diseases so that we can help provide meaningful treatments for people with FTD, Alzheimer’s and other related dementias.”

“The AFTD is proud to support, through the Treat FTD Fund, this innovative and potentially important clinical trial,” said Susan LJ Dickinson, CEO of AFTD. “For so many people living with FTD, this trial represents hope for effective treatments and to ease the journey of the next family facing this disease. Our ongoing collaborations with ADDF and Wave Life Sciences portend a future without this disease, and we are grateful to all clinical investigators and those diagnosed with FTD who will participate in this important research.”

The FOCUS-C9 trial is original in that it is a “basket” type study designed to evaluate the effects of genetically targeted treatment in patients with different disease phenotypes (FTD, FTD with ALS or ALS) that share a common molecular etiology, as has been used in oncology trials but has not yet been applied in neurology and C9orf72 population specifically. Wave’s focus on C9-FTD makes it a unique program in the C9orf72 clinical research landscape. It is also unique in the use of novel oligonucleotide chemistry which has shown enhanced cellular and nuclear uptake.

“We are grateful to the ADDF and AFTD panel of experts for their support and recognition of the innovative approach we have taken to rapidly advancing our clinical program,” said Michael Panzara, MD, MPH, Chief Medical Officer and Head of Therapeutic Discovery and Development at Wave Life Sciences. “In addition to advancing WVE-004 as a new genetically targeted treatment for FTD and ALS, we look forward to sharing the many learnings that will emerge from this trial with the wider medical and scientific communities.”

WVE-004 is a stereopure antisense oligonucleotide designed to selectively target transcriptional variants containing a hexanucleotide repeat expansion (G4VS2) associated with the C9orf72 gene, thus sparing C9orf72 protein. g4VS2 extensions in C9orf72 are one of the most common genetic causes of sporadic and hereditary forms of ALS and FTD.

ABOUT THE ALZHEIMER’S DRUG DISCOVERY FOUNDATION
Founded in 1998 by Leonard A. and Ronald S. Lauder, the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation is dedicated to rapidly accelerating drug discovery to prevent, treat and cure Alzheimer’s disease. The ADDF is the only public charity focused exclusively on funding drug development for Alzheimer’s disease, employing a venture philanthropy model to support research in universities and the biotech industry.

Thanks to the generosity of its donors, the ADDF has awarded over $209 million to fund more than 690 Alzheimer’s disease drug discovery programs, biomarker programs and clinical trials in 19 countries. To learn more, please visit: http://www.alzdiscovery.org/.

ABOUT THE ASSOCIATION FOR FRONTO-TEMPORAL DEGENERATION
Founded in 2002, the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD) is the leading US nonprofit organization working to improve the lives of people with FTD, their care partners, and loved ones. The AFTD promotes and funds research into the diagnosis, treatment and cure of FTD; stimulates greater public awareness; provides information and support to those directly affected; promotes the education of health professionals; and advocates for appropriate and affordable services. To learn more, visit www.theaftd.org.

ABOUT WAVES LIFE SCIENCES
Wave Life Sciences (Nasdaq: WVE) is a clinical-stage genetic medicine company committed to providing life-changing treatments for people struggling with devastating diseases. Wave aspires to develop best-in-class drugs across multiple therapeutic modalities using PRISM, the company’s proprietary drug discovery and development platform that enables the precise design, optimization and production of oligonucleotides stereopure. Driven by a resolute sense of urgency, the Wave team targets a wide range of genetically defined diseases so that patients and families can achieve a better future. To learn more, visit www.wavelifesciences.com and follow Wave on Twitter @WaveLifeSci.

SOURCE Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation

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‘We all have a little PTSD’: Monterey County residents deal with Colorado fire

MONTEREY COUNTY, Calif. (KRON) – “We all have a little bit of PTSD,” Audrey Cray said with a local charity called “All In Monterey.” “When we live in an area that tends to have fires every time we hear about anything, we all get very nervous, very scared.”

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As firefighters continue to battle the Colorado blaze, many people are still displaced from their homes.
The fire is now 35% contained and affects 700 acres.

Many people have had to leave their homes without notice and situations like this can be very scary.

“They don’t know if they’re going to have a home to come to, if they’re going to lose all of their belongings and we’re just a little bit there’s a big, warm hug,” Cray said.

As the Colorado Fire continues to burn, people living west of 3800 Palo Colorado Road toward Highway 1 and south of Bixby Creek in Monterey County are still being evacuated.

“When you’re told to evacuate, you leave with the clothes on your back and there’s so much that you don’t even think about that you don’t grasp,” Cray said.

Cray says they are doing what they can to help.

The non-profit organization provides support to its neighbors in Monterey.

They are currently working with the Red Cross at the Carmel Middle School Shelter.

“We worked with the evacuation center to make sure they had wash clothes, everything they would need at the evacuation centre.”

Meanwhile, firefighters are working around the clock to put out the fire.

U.S. Representative for the Central Coast, Jimmy Panetta, said he met with Cal Fire about their efforts.

“They feel confident, but the terrain is really steep there,” Panetta said. “If you’ve been along Highway 1, which many of your viewers have, you understand how steep and rugged it is.”

Panetta was happy to report that only one structure was damaged and there were no injuries or fatalities.

“The people of this area, the people of Big Sur are hardy, they’re warm, they’re used to these kinds of natural disasters.”

Panetta says he’s calling on everyone to help prevent fires – like this one – from happening in the future.

Although we don’t yet know what caused this fire, he says most of these fires are caused by human activity.

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MU Extension Leads Double Up Food Bucks | Community life

This year, more low-income families in Missouri and Kansas will be able to double their spending power when shopping for fruits and vegetables.

New USDA funding will allow the Mid-America Regional Council to expand the Double Up Food Bucks program in Kansas and Missouri from 80 to 140 locations. The program offers eligible consumers dollar-for-dollar consideration – up to $25 a day – for goods at participating grocery stores and farmers’ markets.

Consumers are eligible if they are enrolled in the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance program, said Londa Nwadike, food safety specialist for the University of Missouri and Kansas State University.

Last summer, MARC – a nonprofit association of cities and counties in the Kansas City area – received a three-year, $4.6 million grant from the National Institute of Food and USDA Agriculture to bring Double Up Food Bucks to more places.

The program has redeemed nearly $3 million in incentives for SNAP recipients since 2015, said Donna Martin of MARC, head of Double Up Food Bucks.

MARC partners with local and regional organizations to implement the program. Through a $757,622 contract, MU Extension will work with farmers’ markets outside of the Kansas City metro area and west-central Missouri.

“This program is a huge benefit for SNAP recipients because they can afford to buy more fruits and vegetables,” said Jollyn Tyryfter, MU Extension’s nutrition and health education specialist, who is working with Nwadike on the project.

“It’s also a great benefit for vendors at local farmers’ markets who are able to sell more fruits and vegetables,” added Jennifer Elms, the newly hired coordinator of MU Extension’s Double Up Food Bucks program.

Nwadike encourages farmers’ market managers and interested vendors to join an informational webinar at noon on Tuesday, February 8. February 11th. For more information, visit extension.missouri.edu/events/2022-selling-at-the-farmer-s-market.

CultivateKC and the West Central Missouri Community Action Agency will continue to serve markets implementing Double Up Food Bucks in Metro Kansas City and West Central Missouri, respectively. For more information, visit www.DoubleUpHeartland.org.

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Leadership Development for Racial Equity

After working 26 years in the for-profit capital sector of our economy and nine years working with the poor, forgotten and demonized people in our society, I see life much differently. I feel like I’ve awakened to a new understanding of the rules of how we interact for the good of society. The Homeboy Way is the “how” of mutuality, compassion and relatedness for a better society.

Homeboy Industries is the largest and most successful gang reintegration program in the world. It was founded and is run by Father Greg Boyle, a Jesuit priest, who dedicates his life to helping men and women get out of the gang lifestyle. By transforming their lives, these men and women show us why people shouldn’t be defined by the worst thing they’ve done. Homeboy has helped thousands of people heal from complex traumas and become contributing members of our society, even when it seems everyone in society has let them down. In many ways, this effort can be seen as a fight against racial and economic inequality – because the population we serve is made up of poor people of color who have never had a fair chance in our society.

As a human services nonprofit, Homeboy has always struggled to secure the financial resources to stay afloat. I came to Homeboy exactly when they needed someone like me with the skills to lead successful organizations. I also came at a time when I needed to know more about myself and my spiritual journey. Working with Homeboy Industries has given me knowledge and insight into my own spirituality and the plight of the people Homeboy Industries serves.

I have made friendships and relationships that are remarkable. I have experienced more heartbreak and more joy in recent years than in my entire life before that. Along the way, almost by providence, I have been able to see how business can be run with a different set of priorities so that everyone benefits: owners, management and those who have never been able to maintain a job but are doing so now. I learned how to help the “unemployable” to become employable. I participated in the development of business models that provide not only economic impact but social impact. Doing business the Homeboy Way is the direction in which we must lead our collective efforts and a roadmap to revamp capital markets.

In today’s environment, we have massive tidal currents around the issues and causes of social injustice and racial inequality. What I didn’t know then, but what I know now, is that I was lucky enough to be on the front line with those involved. I became not only a non-profit CEO of a social service agency, but more importantly, a participant in the fight to bring resources and help to those on the margins of our society.

I learned a lot about leadership development for racial equity. Every organization, be it a non-profit or government agency and especially a for-profit business, must address this issue and strive to improve the lives of everyone around us.

The struggle for any organization is to develop the next generation of leaders from within, and at Homeboy, that’s not just vitally important to the mission, but an order of magnitude more difficult. Our ex-gang population needs to see people like them in leadership roles so that the actions we take are genuine and have the best interest of the client in mind.

Outside organizations have the luxury of hiring mid- to high-level executives into their organization and can groom them to be the best leaders. For Homeboy, to have leaders who share the lived experiences and stories of those we serve – gang life, incarceration and trauma – we must prepare our people from the bottom up. They start as customers to transform their lives and, when ready, become frontline workers, followed by a series of supervisory jobs before moving into middle management. Once in middle management, they acquired a combination of positive leadership and some functional skills. However, going beyond middle management at Homeboy or any organization is about knowing how many other functional skills one can pick up along the way. When one becomes a senior leader, they function like a general manager. This is where the task becomes the greatest challenge, as it is partly about the motivation of the individual and the ability of the organization to provide such learning experiences.

Motivating our clients can be complicated. One of the ideas of our founders is that young people, who are stuck in the gang lifestyle, don’t see themselves living past 30. (That’s one of the reasons tougher sentencing laws don’t deter crime, because they don’t feel like their lives are going to last long anyway.) When they come to Homeboy to change their life, this is the first time they start dreaming and planning a long life. Once they complete our 18-month program, they rightly feel like they’ve accomplished something magical: “What’s next and how can I move up the corporate ladder?” is no longer so far from their thoughts. However, many just want to revel in the life they now have, “the good life”. I’ve had many conversations with interns taking that first step into management and they’re ecstatic and don’t even want to think about the next step. They are now a success for their children, their families, their friends and themselves.

Another aspect of developing a career is that you need to be aware of your “work flaws”. When our homies reach “the good life”, it’s after so much deep introspection to transform their lives, they avoid considering another level of introspection concerning life at work. This period of calm can last a few years. Then, for some, they start wanting more and developing more. When that time comes, we can start discussions about further developing business and managerial skills.

We have to keep in mind that the only organizational structure our peeps have known is the gang hierarchy, which is a very different structure from the grassroots-based nonprofit world and the corporate world of matrix organizations. In the world of gangs, the leader must make a call and everyone must follow and listen. When our insiders first become managers at Homeboy, they expect absolute authority, which rarely happens, and so a clash occurs. This can cause them to question their own worth or even stir up a desire to fire everyone. For them, realizing this issue and changing their own mindset usually takes time to overcome.

The final area of ​​challenge is organizational mundane things like emails, phone calls, and report writing. This is where Homeboy’s insiders struggle the most: they don’t see it as a priority, and some see it as “women’s work” and think it’s a waste of their talent. If they refuse to do so, it often becomes their biggest obstacle to career advancement. However, after a lot of “straight talk” type coaching, they come back and eventually come to a point of reconciling these issues.

Even with these challenges, we have wonderful managers who have overcome their obstacles and reached high leadership positions. The effort to develop the leadership team that is partly made up of leaders with family backgrounds requires time, money and, most importantly, a mindset that the entire organization must adopt.

From a broader societal perspective, I believe one of the key drivers will be how to lift more people out of poverty and into quality jobs that ensure growth on the economic ladder. It’s not enough to provide entry-level positions (usually at minimum wage), but work that leads to something more substantial. This would mean an over-investment in terms of developing people’s job skills while they work. A proactive approach for people of color with the same type of lived experience is to provide counseling, mentoring and coaching. I suspect that the same factors that present challenges for Homeboy will be the same factors that other organizations face when trying to really push people up the economic ladder. Our hard-won lessons should be a model for other organizations wishing to follow a similar path and work towards racial equity.


Written by Thomas Vozzo.

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Follow the latest news live on CEOWORLD magazine and get news updates from the United States and around the world. The opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of CEOWORLD magazine. Follow CEOWORLD magazine on Twitter and Facebook. For media inquiries, please contact: [email protected]

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Non profit living

Accountant who embezzled over $1 million from adoption agency sentenced to 4.5 years in prison

A former international adoption agency accountant who stole more than $1.6 million from her employer and her own family was sentenced to four and a half years in federal prison on Wednesday.

U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernandez said he believed the fraud lasted about eight years and involved multiple victims. He said he also considered the COVID-19 pandemic as a mitigating factor when determining his sentence.

Melodie Ann Eckland, 56, of Hillsboro, pleaded guilty to wire fraud, aggravated identity theft, filing a false tax return and willfully failing to collect or pay payroll taxes.

She was also ordered to pay more than $1.6 million in restitution.

The illegal scheme was uncovered in March 2018, when one of the owners of Journeys of the Heart adoption and surrogacy agency received a call from a Premier Community Bank representative requesting information on several company checks that had been presented for payment with a signature of the owner. which appeared to have been tampered with, prosecutors said.

Eckland stole funds directly from the adoption agency’s business account at the bank by using the Journeys of the Heart computer to make unauthorized wire transfers to his personal bank account in the United States and writing checks unauthorized to herself, according to prosecutors.

She also transferred unauthorized funds by computer as a “bonus” from the adoption agency’s bank account to her own bank account.

To hide his fraud, Eckland kept two separate QuickBooks files on the adoption agency’s computer.

To cover the money she had stolen, Eckland applied for loans from at least five loan agencies in the adoption agency’s name, using the agency owners’ names without their permission. Eckland altered the agency’s financial records to give the impression that she owned the agency and was authorized to enter into the loan agreements. As of 2016, Eckland stopped making the agency’s quarterly employment tax payments to the IRS and stopped filing employment tax returns. As a result, the agency owed more than $94,000 in overdue employment taxes.

In yet another cover-up, she transferred $123,900 she had stolen from an account belonging to her deceased brother-in-law’s estate to the adoption agency’s bank account by forging her husband’s signature , according to prosecutors.

Eckland, who worked as an accountant for the adoption agency from 2011 to April 2018, spent her flight money on gifts and living expenses for her adult children, trips to Hawaii, Mexico and Disney World, event tickets, groceries, household items and living expenses, prosecutors said.

As part of the plea agreement, Eckland admitted that the amount of loss she caused to the adoption agency, the owners of the agency, and the estate of her brother-in-law and IRS was over $1,565,000.

“The crimes committed by Melodie Eckland reveal an astonishing level of greed, deceit and callousness towards her victims. Eckland repeatedly victimized the adoption agency and its owners over seven long years, bleeding the organization nonprofit over $1 million,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Claire M. Fay wrote in a sentencing memo.

“The owners of the adoption agency are devastated by the accused’s embezzlement and identity theft. They have worked hard for 26 years to fulfill an important mission: to help children around the world find caring and loving families,” Fay wrote. “However, due to the theft, selfishness and greed of the defendant, the owners feel they can no longer continue financially with the adoption agency.”

Eckland, a mother of two and grandmother of three, began stealing from her employer because she was heavily in debt and felt pressured to support her children and grandchildren, the company’s attorney said. defense Jamie Kilberg. She used the stolen money for household expenses, retail expenses, family support, debts, some travel and repayment of stolen funds, Kilberg said.

Kilberg argued for a maximum sentence of three years, noting that Eckland has no criminal record, is unlikely to commit future crimes, is remorseful and is working hard to repay her victims.

“In my quest to take the financial burdens of my family on my shoulders, I have wronged others,” Eckland wrote to the judge. “It’s just not okay and it’s not the person I want to be. … I want to right my wrong, and I don’t feel like I have the opportunity to do that if I’m incarcerated… I promise to work every day to become a more honest and trustworthy person.

Appearing via video for her remote sentencing hearing, she apologized to her former employers, saying she felt regret and shame for betraying their trust and stealing from them.

“I know better and I should have done better,” she said.

–Maxine Bernstein

Email to [email protected]; 503-221-8212

Follow on Twitter @maxoregonian

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Non profit living

Volunteers wanted for the local nonprofit’s “Dinner Club” to feed terminally ill patients

Welcome Home of Chattanooga provides a community of hope, healing and compassion for those facing serious illness or death with a comfortable living space and family-like care.

Individuals, families and groups are currently providing dinner for residents of Welcome Home of Chattanooga. The love and compassion of the volunteers who provide the meals saves Welcome Home over $10,000 a year and helps residents feel welcome and someone cares.

As Welcome Home expands its reach and services in the Chattanooga area to help more residents, more volunteers will be needed. Volunteers can join the lunch club by contacting welcometochattanooga.org.

The organization’s dinner club allows families, churches and restaurants to bring a meal to residents one evening a month. As a result, almost every night of the month, Welcome Home hosts a Community Dinner which allows residents, staff and volunteers to eat together.

Due to the pandemic, adjustments have been made with the club dinner; many volunteers now drop off dinner or have dinner delivered. General manager Sherry Campbell says the dinner club started organically with a few volunteers providing meals a few nights a week. She says it has now become an essential part of their daily routine.

“We have all experienced loneliness and loss of connection, and it is important to know that we are part of a community larger than ourselves. There are people who care about us and love us. is what our dinner club is all about. We sit around the table, tell life stories, talk about our favorite bands and music, and tease each other. It’s about creating a camaraderie,” Campbell said.

Camaraderie is why volunteer Christie Petty got involved with Welcome Home of Chattanooga four years ago. “My whole family is in Ohio and my kids aren’t home. I’m a very outgoing person and love having the company of the residents,” Petty said.

She heard about the association through a resident who stopped by her work. “I believe God sent him to me. He told me he was staying at Welcome Home and told me everything the staff do for him. Then he told me he was terminally ill. I immediately went to the nonprofit to find a way to help. I don’t know who benefits more from this club, the residents or me.

She provides two meals a month.

Learn more about Welcome Home of Chattanooga:

Welcome Home of Chattanooga is expanding to eventually accommodate ten residents on Quiet Creek Trail. The second phase of the construction project will begin at the end of January. The project will cost around $500,000. If you would like to donate or volunteer to help with the expansion, you can do so online at welcometochattanooga.org.

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Non profit living

Rising adoption of DAO and NFT for just causes is a positive indicator: Raj Chowdhury

Blockchain, like every other technological innovation in history, was designed to improve the quality of life. Decentralization and peer-to-peer networking foster a spirit of collaboration and commitment to changing things for the better.

Raj Chowdhury, blockchain pioneer and founder of HashCash Consultants, foresees increased use of blockchain-based digital transformations for humanitarian, philanthropic and social purposes. Throughout 2021, decentralization has been key to the growth of DAOs, NFTs, the Metaverse, and the future Web 3.0.

Decentralized Autonomous Organizations, or DAOs, take full advantage of the lack of hierarchy by operating on coded smart contracts. Notable global examples involving the use of digital tokens and crowdfunding to make social and economic contributions include streaming projects, independent platforms, charities, and many more. A recent DAO project raised more than $40 million to acquire an early copy of the US Constitution at auction, despite being outbid by a private collector.

Chowdhury has a positive outlook on current market trends and the upcoming future. “Blockchain, like every other technological innovation in history, was designed to improve the quality of life. Decentralization and peer-to-peer networking foster a spirit of collaboration and commitment to changing things for the better,” he says in reference to the growing adoption of blockchain applications for non-profit purposes.

A global consciousness to make the world a better place brings together collectors and crypto enthusiasts. Projects have been launched to help fund cancer research, save the environment and fight poverty. Organizations like UNICEF and the American Red Cross accept donations of crypto assets.

“The growth of technological progress as well as the losses associated with the pandemic direct a collective force towards the social and economic betterment of people

Worldwide,” Chowdhury said.

American HashCash consultants led by Chowdhury have been involved in medicine and space research. Over the years, the company has been actively involved in projects boosting financial inclusion, low-cost remittances and COVID-19 vaccine distribution, as well as child labor prevention and business support/ African nonprofits with blockchain funding channels.

Blockchain innovations such as DAOs, Metaverse, and NFTs, touted as the next global game changers, already hold great promise for social, environmental, and financial betterment. The future can expect more philanthropic efforts and collaborations through charitable blockchain projects.

Raj Chowdhury is the Managing Director of HashCash Consultants and a Blockchain pioneer. Raj pioneered the first interbank implementation of blockchain technology trade finance and remittance transfers between two of the world’s largest banks. Raj is a prominent voice in the Blockchain and Cryptocurrency space and actively engages with policy makers in this area. He is a contributor to Economic Times, Business World, CNNMoney and advises industry leaders on Blockchain adoption. Raj had been a research associate at MIT’s Microsystems Technology Lab. He is a member of Asha Silicon Valley, a non-profit association committed to the education of children in emerging countries. Author of the book “The Dark Secret of the Silicon Valley”, Raj is an investor in blockchain and cryptocurrency companies and an active member of the philanthropic community.

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Holiness of Life Sunday: Practical Pro-Life Resources for Kentucky Baptists | Baptist life

Kentucky Baptist Convention churches across the Commonwealth will join other Southern Baptist churches across the country on Sunday in celebrating and affirming the sanctity of human life – that every person is made in the image of God. .

As you consider how your church can actively uphold the sanctity of life, explore these practical resources:

Q: I would like to partner with a local pregnancy center. How can I locate the closest one?

A: There are nearly 50 Pregnancy Support Centers located throughout Kentucky, and each depends on the financial, volunteer, and prayerful support of local churches. Visit kybaptist.org/pregnancy-resource-centers/ for a list.

Q: Members of my church are interested in sidewalk counseling at the nearest abortion clinic. Where can we train?

A: Speak For the Unborn equips local churches for holistic, gospel-centered pro-life ministry driven by love and seduction. They provide training to congregations interested in counseling women preparing to enter abortion clinics. Learn more at speakfortheunborn.com.

Q: I am unable to adopt or foster and my funds are limited. How can I serve orphans and foster families?

A: Orphan Care Alliance, a Louisville-based ministry that equips and connects Christians with opportunities to serve children in need, recruits believers to serve as life coaches for teens in Kentucky’s foster care system.

After completing orientation training, life coaches are paired with a teen and are expected to spend at least one hour with them once a week for a calendar year, sharing the love of Christ, setting goals, and offering encouragement. . Life coaches are the only unpaid adult in a foster child’s life, a role the Orphan Care Alliance describes as “integral.” Visit orphancarealliance.org for more information on their various ministries.

Q: Our church wants to support foster care and orphan care ministries. What organizations exist in the state?

A: The Baptist Convention of Kentucky is a longtime partner of Sunrise Children’s Services, a Christ-centered nonprofit organization that provides therapeutic foster care, therapeutic treatment, and community services to children in Kentucky. For more information on how you can partner with Sunrise, visit sunrise.org.

All God’s Children in Nicholasville also works with foster children in Kentucky. The Christian ministry offers counselling, daycare, independent living program and training for foster parents. Find out how to volunteer, pray and give on kyagc.org.

Q: There are women in our church who have had abortions, and we want to support them as they heal. Are there Bible studies or small group materials for post-abortion women?

A: Letting go of the secret is a study offering biblical healing to post-abortion women and is frequently used by pregnancy centers and local churches. Visit abandoningthesecret.com for more information.

SaveOne is a ministry offering help and healing to men, women and family members who have been affected by a past abortion. They offer training, small group studies, and resources for churches. Learn more at saveone.org/churches.

And Embrace Grace offers a program and training for churches to create support groups for women who have chosen life for an unplanned pregnancy. A KBC church has already successfully started an Embrace Grace group. Visit kissgrace.com for more details.

Q: What is KBC doing to equip churches for pro-life ministry?

A: The Kentucky Baptist Convention launched the Friends of Life Kentucky initiative to mobilize Kentucky Baptists to support pregnant women and advocate for unborn children.

While the initiative is still in development, churches can expect regional conferences, active support of a proposed pro-life constitutional amendment in Kentucky, and a survey of attitudes and perspectives that will shape the strategy. across the convention. Follow the ongoing initiative at friendsoflifeky.org.

Q: Where can I find updates on pro-life issues in Kentucky?

A: Subscribe to our newsletter, The Morning Briefing, for weekly articles on the most relevant pro-life issues here in the state.

From updates on pro-life legislation to monthly reports on the number of abortions to personal stories of families impacted by unplanned pregnancies, Kentucky Today is committed to providing coverage on abortion, the adoption, foster care and other pro-life topics.

Tessa Redmond reports on pro-life issues for Kentucky Today. She is a member of First Baptist Church in Taylorsville, Kentucky, where her husband serves as minister of music and youth.

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Non profit living

New CEO of Lawndale Christian Health Center tackles health inequities in the neighborhood where he grew up

NORTH LAWNDALE – The Lawndale Christian Health Center has appointed Pastor James Brooks as CEO of the community clinic.

Brooks was previously the chief administrator of the community health center ministry. Brooks was born and raised in Lawndale and is also senior pastor at Harmony Community Church, where his father previously served as senior pastor.

Her experiences growing up in North Lawndale and coping with challenges on the West Side “give me great perspective” on the health needs of the community, Brooks said.

“This experience has informed how I will lead going forward,” Brooks said.

Since the health center grew out of the Lawndale Christian Community Church in 1984, it has always been driven by a mission to uplift the West Side. Church members initially sought to establish the health center with the goal of improving long-standing health inequalities faced by people living on the West Side by making high-quality care affordable and accessible. to residents.

“It had very humble beginnings,” Brooks said. “We are integrated into the community. This means that our residents have access to us. Our mission is to share the love of Jesus by promoting wellness in Lawndale and our neighboring communities.

What began as a small clinic and basketball court for residents to exercise has grown into one of North Lawndale’s major flagship institutions. Lawndale Christian Health Center is a safety-net hospital that accepts sliding scale payments, and 40% of patients are uninsured. 75,000 people in the area rely on Lawndale Christian Health Center for primary care, Brooks said.

The nonprofit organization operates a state-of-the-art fitness center that residents can join for just $15, as well as multiple event spaces, a seniors’ center, pharmacy, eye clinic, and several satellite clinics in the West Side. The Lawndale Christian Health Center also runs a neighborhood’s only cafe, the Green Tomato Café, “where the community can gather and have a great meal,” Brook said.

Despite major advances in improving access to health care, people in the region still face huge health disparities. According to a 2015 report from Virginia Commonwealth University, residents of parts of the West Side have an average life expectancy 16 years lower than that of inner-city residents. This gap isn’t just due to shortcomings in clinical care, the study showed: it’s also due to social conditions, including disinvestment, segregation and a lack of grocery stores.

One of Brooks’ management priorities is to build community partnerships to improve the social conditions that lead to chronic health problems. Lawndale Christian Health Center is already engaged in such initiatives, such as its medication-assisted treatment programs to support recovery from opioid addiction and its partnerships with more than 20 shelters to serve homeless people, it said. he declares.

“We want to be a better collaborator and partner with organizations that are on the ground, trying to make a difference in the social determinants of health. When we look at violence, when we look at homelessness, transportation, we want to partner with those who have that role and come in as a health care provider,” Brooks said.

Brooks also intends to follow the mantra of Lawndale Christian Community Church founder, coach Wayne Gordon, who often said, “We are better together. The health center has worked with local churches on a campaign called One Lawndale which aims to unite the black community of North Lawndale with the Latino community of Little Village as part of the common social challenges facing each neighborhood.

“Our main campus borders both communities. As an anchor institution, we have a great opportunity to bring people together and break down the walls that divide us,” said Brooks.

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Non profit living

Haymarket sues Itasca over village rejection of drug rehab center

The Haymarket Center on Tuesday filed a federal discrimination complaint against the village of Itasca, claiming elected officials violated civil rights laws by denying the association’s request to open a center for the treatment and recovery of blood drug addiction in the county town of DuPage.

The lawsuit opens a new legal front in a two-and-a-half-year controversy over the project. After more than 35 public hearings, Itasca administrators unanimously rejected Haymarket’s proposal in November to turn a closed Holiday Inn into a 240-bed rehabilitation center.

The complaint describes the board’s decision as “intentionally discriminatory, arbitrary, capricious, baseless and unreasonable”. The lawsuit also names Mayor Jeffrey Pruyn, the Itasca Planning Commission, Itasca Fire Protection District, Itasca Elementary School District 10 and Superintendent Craig Benes as defendants.

The complaint alleges that officials violated the Fair Housing Act and other laws that give people with substance use disorders the same rights as people with disabilities.

Federal prosecutors have also launched a separate investigation to determine whether the village is in violation of anti-discrimination laws.

Village officials did not immediately return requests for comment.

From the start, Haymarket faced an uphill battle in his second attempt to deliver treatment services within DuPage to help fight the scourge of opioid addiction. In 2020, 112 people died from opioid overdoses at DuPage, a dismal record and a 17% increase from the 96 reported in 2019.

Almost four years ago, Haymarket, a Chicago-based supplier, was turned down an offer to start a 16-bed satellite program at Wheaton.

But Haymarket met strong resistance in Itasca.

Resident opposition group argued the facility would put a strain on police and fire emergency services, despite assurances from Haymarket that it would contract with a private ambulance supplier to manage, at a minimum, the basic resuscitation calls generated by the establishment. Haymarket has also committed to contract with an additional private ambulance company if required.

“The biggest barrier we face in tackling substance use disorders is stigma – it prevents those in need from getting treatment and hinders the availability of more life-saving treatment.” Haymarket President and CEO Dan Lustig said in a statement announcing the lawsuit. “Expanding immediate access to care for people with substance use disorders, regardless of their ability to pay, has been the mission of the Haymarket Center for over 46 years. We are committed to creating a full new treatment center in an area that faces a significant shortage of treatment beds and programs as the need for these services continues to increase.

Access Living, a disability rights organization, represents Haymarket in court. The group raised the issue of ADA compliance in a June 2020 letter to village prosecutors. Two attorneys for Access Living said Haymarket should have been allowed to apply for a special use permit to operate as a healthcare facility.

Instead, Itasca officials saw the project as a request for planned development, arguing that the proposed use of the property represented mixed residential and medical use.

“The intentional and orchestrated discriminatory conduct in key government entities in Itasca is designed to interfere with the rights of the Haymarket Center, the people with disabilities it serves and their families,” said Senior Counsel for Access Living, Mary Rosenberg, in a statement. “The concerted actions to delay and deny the functioning of the Haymarket Center healthcare facility have had and will continue to have devastating consequences for those in need of treatment for substance use disorders.”

The mayor of Itasca made his first detailed comments on Haymarket’s plans by reading a statement prepared before the board of directors voted against the project.

“At first it was clear that the potential financial burden from Haymarket would be heavy on Itasca,” said Pruyn.

There was also talk of soliciting state subsidies to ease the potential financial burden on the village. But the mayor said Itasca could not count on “unknown dollars”.

“It was clear to elected officials, county officials and local officials,” said Pruyn, “that one of the smaller communities was going to have to absorb 100% of the costs, risks, and burden of maintaining d ‘a facility that would accept residents beyond Itasca. “

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Non profit living

The Bronx fire is New York City’s deadliest blaze in decades


Credit…David Dee Delgado for The New York Times

Wesley Patterson was in the bathroom just before 11 a.m. on Sunday when his girlfriend knocked on the door to say she saw flames coming out of another unit.

It only took a few moments for the apartment to fill with smoke, said Mr Patterson, who has lived in the building for 20 years.

“We were just trying to breathe,” said Mr. Patterson, 28. He rushed with his girlfriend and brother, who lives with the couple, to a back window.

He tried to open it but the frame was so hot he burned his hands. When he opened the window he started yelling at the firefighters who were helping a family in the 3M apartment. Firefighters couldn’t reach them yet, he said.

Mr Patterson said he had to keep opening and closing the window to prevent smoke from entering as he called for help.

“I was screaming, ‘Please help me! Please come and get us! ‘ “, he said.

The family tried to open the door, but the apartment was flooded with more smoke.

“I was thinking about my son and wondering if I was ever going to see him again,” Mr. Patterson said.

It was around 11:20 a.m. Mr Patterson said he and his family were taken out of the window by the fire department.

“I’m glad we made it out safe and sound, but I still can’t believe that happened,” he said.

Dana Nicole Campbell, 47, was in a nearby park, working as a gardener for the city, when one of her four teenage children called to say smoke was entering their third-floor apartment. Ms Campbell said she told them to put wet towels at the foot of the door to prevent more smoke from entering the apartment and barricading itself inside the apartment.

Then she rushed to the building and arrived in time to see her children jump out of the third floor window. They landed on a mattress and garbage bags that people had put there as a makeshift landing pad. Ms Campbell later said she was grateful her children were unharmed.

“You can be here tomorrow with broken legs,” she said. “You can’t be here tomorrow with the smoke inhaling.”

Firefighters helped Cristal Diaz escape with his two aunts, aged 49 and 65, and three cousins, from their smoky apartment on the 15th floor. Ms Diaz, who left the Dominican Republic two years ago, only took her phone and ID with her when she left. “We don’t know what to do right now, and tomorrow I’m supposed to be working,” said Ms. Diaz, who works as a cashier. The family is currently staying with friends.

Ms Diaz said she was drinking coffee, as she does every morning when disaster struck.

“I thought, will this be the last time I have coffee with my family?” Ms. Diaz, 27, recalled, still in shock.

Members of the Wague family stood at the corner of Avenue Tiebout and Rue Folin, huddled together, some under blankets, after escaping from their third-floor apartment.

Mamadou Wague was awakened by one of his children. “I get up and there is smoke in the children’s rooms,” said Mr Wague, 47.

As the family rushed out of the apartment, one of Mr Wague’s children cried that their sister, Nafisha, 8, was missing. Mr Wague rushed to her bedroom and found her sitting on her bed screaming, he said. Mr. Wague grabbed her and ran out.

Ahouss Balima, 20, lived on the ninth floor of the building, with his three younger sisters and his parents. He and his family had fallen asleep on Sunday morning when he was awakened by the sound of someone crying for help.

Mr Balima went to wake his family and they rushed downstairs, only to be told by the firefighters on the 6th floor that they couldn’t come down any further because it was too dangerous.

After finally being rescued by firefighters, one of her sisters was rushed to hospital, and she was still in critical condition on Sunday evening.

By 3:30 p.m., the fire was under control and a slight odor of smoke persisted in the air. Several residents were standing nearby. Some wore sneakers, others wore winter coats, and a few had blankets wrapped around their shoulders. A few people huddled under nearby scaffolding to escape the biting wind. Several held their phones close to their faces to assure affected family members that they were alive.


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Non profit living

Susan Ann Lacy Obituary | Star Tribune


Lacy, Susan Ann December 3, 1945 January 3, 2022 Sweet and loving Susan, younger daughter of Isabel and Eugene Lacy, sister of Patrick, (Marilyn), Jean Ryberg, (Bernie), Jack, (Diane), Michael, Mary Cohea, (Kent), several nieces, nephews and cousins, passed away peacefully from complications from Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Susan loved going to church and was a member of St. Thomas the Apostle for over 70 years, attended Opportunity Partners for many years and her zest for life was working at JUUT Solon in downtown Minneapolis for 27 years. where she was much loved by all. and received awards and recognition for his service to the company. The employees there were all “Day Makers” and made Susan’s morning job so special. Living independently from the age of 50 and later receiving help from his REM care team. Susan moved to live at the Roseberry House group home, where she was once again loved and cared for. Special thanks to all the staff at Roseberry for their unwavering support to Susan and the wonderful team at the Guardian Angels Hospice who helped send Susan into the arms of her mother and father. Susan has had many Guardian Angels along the way helping her navigate life. Susan’s family is grateful to everyone we knew and those we didn’t know who took her under their wings and kept her safe. – Memorials can be sent to the Guardian Angels Hospice, Elk River, Minnesota, or any local non-profit charity of your choice. The memorial service will be announced in early spring.

Posted on January 9, 2022


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Non profit living

Live news: Rising staff absences in England over Christmas add pressure to NHS


Britain’s richest 10% own nearly half of all the country’s wealth, according to pre-pandemic data, even as inequality has remained stable for the 14 years leading up to March 2020.

A tenth of households held 43% between April 2018 and March 2020, data from the Office for National Statistics showed today, which revealed huge differences between income groups, ages and regions.

In contrast, the bottom half of the population held 9 percent. Wealth inequality as measured by the Gini coefficient, however, remained stable over the 14-year period, the ONS said.

The numbers are the most comprehensive set of data on the distribution of wealth, but exclude the period of the pandemic, when the total increased, separate data from the ONS showed.

The richest 1% of households hold more than £ 3.6million, compared to £ 15,400 or less for the bottom 10%.

There were striking differences in age, with the median wealth of those aged 55 below the statutory retirement age being around 25 times that of those aged 16 to 24.

The upper region was the South East, which has seen one of the fastest increases in average wealth since 2006. Its median wealth of £ 503,400 was about three times that of the North East, at £ 168,500. , the region with the lowest wealth. .

London has an average of £ 340,300, reflecting the lowest home ownership rate in the country, low participation in private pensions and declining median wealth in the last period. Still, he owns 15 percent of the wealth, possibly due to his higher real estate values.

The Gini coefficients, which measure inequalities, showed that London was the region with the most unequal distribution.


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Non profit living

Community hero: saving animals, a long-standing ambition for a resident of Ramona


Jeanne Cannon says she doesn’t feel like a hero, but she’s saved and trained enough animals over the years to deserve praise.

Now around 70, the longtime Ramona resident has spent 30 years saving animals, primarily for the non-profit Help for the Homeless Pets.

Cannon, a mother of three grown children, said she got involved with the organization after meeting its founder Bea Hoskins. Cannon was working at Ramona Animal Hospital when Hoskins brought a dog from Newfoundland for an exam.

“I loved him and adopted him,” said Cannon, who discovered she had a lot in common with Hoskins and formed a friendship that spanned 30 years. “Bea invests a lot of money and effort in the animals she takes in and she mainly welcomes dogs with special needs, small ones.”

Hoskins said the dog was one of two Newfoundlanders who were thrown from a van in front of her as she picked pomegranates on a property near Highland Valley Road.

“She is a true compassionate and caring friend who has never let me down,” Hoskins said of Cannon. “He’s someone you can count on in the worst of times. We have always leaned on each other’s shoulders. He’s someone you don’t meet every day.

In addition to saving animals in Ramona and neighboring communities, Hoskins has rescued dogs and cats as far as Siberia. Cannon has helped save stray animals in Mexico. Sometimes dogs with special needs that have been injured or abused are brought to the United States.

But these days, Cannon mostly gathers supplies due to health concerns.

Hoskins said Cannon was rewarded, along with the other volunteers, for working tirelessly and without pay.

“Every little money we have goes to animals,” said Hoskins, who founded Help for the Homeless Pets in Ramona in 1993. “We never hired any employees.”

Cannon said she always had an affinity for animals, even though her parents never had more than one small dog. As a girl, she played with a farm set instead of dolls.

“It’s always been in my blood from the start, even though I wasn’t raised that way,” she said.

By the time Cannon met Hoskins, she had already been living in Ramona for a decade with her husband, Jerry. While the couple were building their home in Ramona, they acquired a number of animals, including horses, pigs, sheep and chickens. By the time their house was built two years later, they had set up a whole farm.

“The animals just kept on multiplying and when we moved here to four acres we ended up taking things that people didn’t want anymore,” Cannon said. “My husband called them drive-bys. People were dropping off animals.

“We had pets and we did wildlife rescues for a while and had some exotics. Our barn was always full and we had a variety of things. I had lots of interesting wildlife including skunks and raccoons. These are animals that have improved and have for the most part been released. “

As their menagerie grew, local school children visited his home to take lessons on his animals. Cannon would teach them vocabulary words, such as the difference between nocturnal and daytime, and also how to care for animals and be responsible pet owners.

Hoskins said she felt blessed to have met Cannon and a few others who genuinely care about animals and can be counted on to help them. Even if it means getting up in the middle of the night to set a living trap for a lost or abandoned animal.

“The rewards are when these animals recover and trust people again,” Hoskins said. “Not all of them do. If we can find loving homes for them, that’s the rewarding part. These are the highlights. “

For a decade, Cannon also helped the San Diego Humane Society bring animals to nursing homes. Cannon told the elderly how she acquired the animals and how she took care of them.

When her daughter, Lisa, was 11 and involved in a 4-H club, she wanted to learn how to breed guide dog puppies. As Cannon learned more about training guide dogs, she became a leader. Thanks to Guide Dogs for the Blind, Inc. in San Rafael, Cannon took dog owners to stores and other places to teach them how to get dogs to behave in public.

She volunteered with guide dogs for the blind for 18 years. Lisa also continued to breed dogs with her husband after her marriage, and together the family has raised over 20 guide dogs.

In addition to his work with animals, Cannon has also contributed to other causes. One provided respite care to caregivers of terminally ill patients through the Elizabeth Hospice. Cannon said her 14 years volunteering with Elizabeth Hospice has been a rewarding experience.

One day, she met a woman at the checkout of a grocery store who told her about the Heart to Heart organization and its mission to help people in Romania who had lost their homes and jobs and were without food or clothes.

Cannon organized a clothes drive, recruiting local schools who held contests to see who could make the most clothes.

“The kids would get rid of last year’s wardrobe anyway,” Cannon recalls. “For a month, we put the clothes together and separated them into boys ‘and girls’ clothes, tops and bottoms, and approximate sizes. We put them in boxes of bananas that I continued to collect in grocery stores. “

Eventually, Cannon said they had enough clothing to fill a large storage unit. With financial help from the local wireless technology company Qualcomm, they put the clothes in a shipping container and shipped them to Romania.

“I have had many wonderful opportunities to live a life of love and I am blessed to have encountered these things,” said Cannon, noting that the first congregational church in Ramona that she attends has a motto of living a life of love. love life. “And that’s also my mission statement to be who I am. It suits us perfectly.

Over the years, Cannon has said that she has parted ways with many animals, but she still has four pigs, a few goats and alpacas, a llama, a deer, a miniature horse and an emu in addition to a few dogs and cats.

“If I was young and could live my life, that’s all I would do is continue to save animals that need a home,” she said, adding that she appreciates the help she receives from her husband. “This is my main reason for being, is to help animals and we have done a lot of it over the years.”

How to help

Anyone interested in helping Help for the Homeless Pets, a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit, can send donations to PO Box 1406, Ramona, CA 92065.

Animal adoptions are organized in conjunction with the AmazingDogs.org website at least twice a month at the Poway PetCoach store and at a private residence in Carlsbad, Hoskins said. Adoption event schedules are posted on the website.

For more information call 760-789-4483 or email [email protected]


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Non profit living

Clinic works tirelessly during pandemic to help impoverished patients


BRUNSWICK COUNTY (WWAY) – A local clinic run by volunteers is working to keep their patients and their community safe in the fight against COVID-19.

Studies show that people living in rural communities are twice as likely to die from COVID-19 as those living in metropolitan areas. The New Hope Clinic offers free medical care, tests, vaccines and, yes, hope to anyone living below 150% of the poverty line in Brunswick County.

The New Hope Clinic serves between 500 and 600 residents of Brunswick County living below the poverty line and unable to afford health care. Dr. James Boston worked with the clinic for more than two decades, treating chronic illnesses of the uninsured until they were eligible for Medicare at age 65.

“If you have uncontrolled diabetes at 65, you can be on dialysis, you can be blind, you can have lost your limbs,” he said. “It is therefore important that those people who do not have access to health care have health care. “

The non-profit clinic is run by six staff members and over 100 medical volunteers who return because they care about their patients. During her years as CEO, Sheila Roberts says she has seen doctors and patients form special bonds here. For the most part, it is their only source of care.

“It’s really telling for some people who haven’t had certain experiences in life,” she said. “You just want to bring everyone home with you. “

Already a staple of health care in Brunswick County, when the pandemic hit, the New Hope Clinic was one of the first free clinics in North Carolina to get vaccinated. Boston remembers its patients being hesitant. During his years in the clinic, some were more willing to listen to him than other providers.

According to Boston, “Some people will trust above all if they have seen me for about a year, they might have some trust in what I’m trying to explain to them. But it is a process.

Feeling a responsibility to the community in which they volunteered, the staff spent endless hours educating and talking with the locals. They finally vaccinated more than 2,000 people in early 2021.

“From February to May, with a huge one, we called them Sheila’s Army,” said New Hope Pharmacy Director Hailey Murray, “but with lots of volunteers, we ran vaccination clinics on the car park.”

And although the pandemic has dried up many resources the nonprofit usually relied on and reduced the number of volunteers able to help, Murray said those who can…. do. Many continue to help in addition to their full-time health care jobs.

“Because we thought it was the right thing to do,” she explained. “And I think a lot of us during the pandemic had to do something to feel like we were helping instead ofto wring our hands. I feel very strongly that I need to be of service in my community. And that’s a great way for me to do it.


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Non profit living

Beloved Puerto Rican chocolatier Cortés opens ridiculously good restaurant in the Bronx


For nearly 93 years, the Cortés family have been making chocolate in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, creating a brand as well known on these islands as, say, Hershey’s is here in New York. Particularly famous for their hot chocolate, they opened their first restaurant in 2013 in Puerto Rico’s Old San Juan, an all-day cafe with an extensive menu of both savory and sweet.

Last week, after several pandemic delays involving the construction of the current building in which they reside, the family finally opened their second Chocobar Cort̩s, on Alexander Avenue in Mott Haven. Here they serve a mix of savory and sweet Рwith a menu that is suitable for breakfast, brunch, lunch, snacks, drinks (alcoholic and / or chocolate) or dessert Рand based on a feast that I had earlier this week in the friendly, vibrant space, this is one of the best new restaurants in town right now.

That Chocobar Cortés landed in the South Bronx is no accident. As Carlos Cortés, who runs the restaurant arm of the business, told Gothamist: “If you’re Puerto Rican or Dominican, you grew up with our chocolate. So for us it was important to come to where our food is. community in New York. I “I have lived here for 15 years and have seen how many quintessentially Puerto Rican or Dominican neighborhoods, like Williamsburg or the Lower East Side, have lost their essence due to gentrification. And so if Mott Haven is going to be the next frontier in terms of downtown expansion, it’s important for us to plant our flag and say, yes this neighborhood is going to change, but we the Puerto Rican and Dominican community are going. be included. We’re going to be a part of what this change will look like. “

The food here is great, and while almost everything on the menu has chocolate as an ingredient in one way or another, the inclusion is subtle most of the time. The Top Notch Chocoburger, for example, is a thickly textured, oily patty (eaten more like a meatball than a typical burger) topped with melted cheddar, onion, lettuce, and tomato, and served with a mixture of curly fries. The chocolatey part of the dish is in the ketchup, which is served on the side and is very good when spilled all over the rest of the plate.

The platters and sandwiches featuring steak, chicken, and roast pork are also light chocolatey, with a little cocoa in the meat. And one of the best things I ate involved no discernible chocolate, a Mallorca Iberica sandwich of salted serrano ham, a strong manchego and a layer of guava butter squeezed between the sweet bread of the same name Purto Rican, which the restaurant specially prepared by the local South Bronx bakery Il Forno. It’s a sensational comfort food.

Meanwhile, other dishes are extremely chocolatey. There’s Chocolate French Toast, Chocolate Vanilla Pancakes with Strawberry Marmalade, and a wonderful Chocolate Grilled Cheese Sandwich, which doesn’t hide any ingredients and is a must order. The chocolate-cheese combo is a sort of Cortés signature; their legendary hot chocolate comes in nine different varieties here – I’ve had the traditional Puertorriqueño – and each is served with a little chunk of cheddar on the side, which you drop into your drink like a lump of sugar.

The menu in the South Bronx is pretty much the same as what you’ll find in Old San Juan and was developed by Cortés business owner Ricardo De Obaldia. The secret weapon here, however, appears to be chef Maria Martinez, originally from Quebradillas, Puerto Rico, who had ten years of experience in New York kitchens before leading things on Alexander Avenue. She has a knack for balancing delicate blends in a way that gives everything a chance to shine. To give another example, his mangú, or mashed plantain, is superb, even buried under three eggs coulis, sprinkled with chorizo ​​and splashed with hot sauce. The food is fun, sure, but Martinez is a really good cook.

The space is divided into two rooms, the main dining room with a full bar to the right and a counter service store to the left with coffee and hot chocolate, a few pastries and lots of Chocobar products and provisions. Both are filled with specially commissioned works of art (“my family’s other passion,” as Cortés puts it), including pieces from their non-profit organization Fundación Cortés, like the framed images of the super -Afro-Puerto Rican comic book heroine, La Borinqueña, created by Bronx native Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez.

Read more: Meet La Borinqueña, the Puerto Rican superhero from New York

“The community here is amazing,” says Cortés, who lives a few blocks from the restaurant. “One of the perks of being here in the South Bronx is that everyone is thrilled to collaborate and help make this community something different and special. You can feel that commitment on so many different levels. whether it’s other businesses, local government, or all the folks who live here. I had grandmothers who came by asking me just so they could sing our jingle. They tell me : “Thank you so much for coming here, thank you for opening in the Bronx. I am going back to my childhood. ‘”

Chocobar Cortés is located at 141 Alexander Avenue at the corner of East 134th Street. To follow @chocobarcortesbx for hours, which are in flux right now. Dinner to come. Seating inside only for now. (718-841-9310; chocobarcortes.com)



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Non profit living

Obtaining results awards: a year in review


ORLANDO, Florida – Each week, as part of the News 6 Getting Results Award segment, we spotlight people in Central Florida who are going above and beyond and making a difference for their neighbors.

The people and how they chose to help were as diverse as the communities they served.

As this year draws to a close, we thought it was a great time to reflect on their stories and the moments that impacted so many people.

[TRENDING: Become a News 6 Insider (it’s free!)]

We started the year in Brevard County, where Brevard Mask Makers volunteer Marsha Plog made masks for students and the elderly.

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Mary Ann Laverty spent her days driving across the county, delivering supplies and finished masks to those in need.

“We have so many talented sewers and seamstresses in our community who were willing to help, but they had certain limitations,” Laverty said. “We have made over 35,000 masks that we have donated to the community and we continue to be strong. “

It might be hard to remember now, but at the time, the COVID-19 vaccine was just starting to become available and people were struggling to get appointments through online portals.

Linda and Richard Griffing, who are retirees, tried several times, but each day the date schedule was full before they could register.

“You were going to the site and you couldn’t get anything,” recalls Richard Griffing. “Suddenly all the appointments are gone. Boom, end of story, ”added Linda.

But Mary Steele used her spare time and computer skills to help those who couldn’t register.

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“I just hope if it was my mom someone would help her,” Steele said when asked why she spends most of her free time helping others.

We visited the Greenwood Place Assisted Living Center. Mary Ann Ball has written to us to congratulate the staff there for keeping her parents safe and in a good mood during COVID security protocols.

“One day it was raining and the staff was there with umbrellas saying that was what we were doing,” Ball said. “Our loved ones need to see family.

We met a school resources manager who is changing perceptions.

Assistant Brian Jensen has been the School Resources Manager at Mollie Ray Elementary School for the past three years and wins over students and their parents, one semester at a time.

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“Kids who when I started here didn’t even speak to me in large part because of my uniform,” Jensen recalls. “Now they come to see me every day. “

From the moment he arrived on campus, Jensen made it his mission to get involved. Netisha Thornelant’s parents learned about it. Thornelant nominated him for the News 6 Getting Results Award.

“Well I sent the email because I know Channel 6 comes at a price for results and with everything going on between police interactions, especially with minorities, I think Deputy Jensen is someone who provides that good example of police interaction with our youth. “

We met Jerry Vaughan, a veterans advocate who goes to great lengths to honor the last wills of the men and women who have served our country.

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Vaughan collects vintage uniforms as part of his Dover Detail project. Uniforms are used for veterans who wish to be buried in the uniforms they wore while on duty.

“One of the last things he did was ask me to find a uniform for him so that when he got out he could go out however he wanted,” Vaughan said as we watched him put on a uniform. the WWII Navy to decorate it. veteran Philip Bradstreet, who died at the age of 94.

We were there the day longtime children’s champion Linda Sutherland retired. Sutherland was Executive Director of the Healthy Start Coalition of Orange County for 20 years.

She was nominated by her colleague Jarred McCovery.

“We made the decision to name Linda, it was a no-brainer,” said McCovery. “She’s just accomplished so much during her tenure here, everything she’s done for families, it made perfect sense to nominate her for this award.”

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We showed you horseback therapy at Freedom Ride Stables in Orlando. Every day for almost 20 years, riders of all ages have climbed these magnificent giant creatures and become one with nature. Staff and customers are eagerly awaiting the new facilities a few miles away.

We have witnessed the friendship in the alleys of the Villages. The Special Friends Bowling Club meets weekly to provide activities and socialization for village residents with special needs.

Ray Kleczowski has been organizing the meetings for over 20 years.

“There are no faults here.” Kleczowski said, as dozens of people played, laughed and cheered around him. “This is how life should be. “

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We saw Paddle With A Purpose volunteers cleaning up our waterways. The organizer, JR Tanhgal, is a leader with several non-profit organizations in the region.

“I don’t think people realize the magnitude of what he does,” said volunteer Briona Jones. “The amount of money he raised for different organizations. “

We have featured several people who dedicate their time to help feed their neighbors. Mike Hayes took advantage of his restaurant experience and opened a non-profit kitchen called God’s Table.

Shereece Mitchell turned her knowledge of healthy eating and exercise into a drive-thru pantry called Butterfly Lifestyle.

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Kelli Marks started Backpack Buddies to help feed children in their Orange City community.

And Deryl Ames helped build and stock a small pantry in his St. Cloud neighborhood.

Finally, with a new year upon us and hope for the future, we saw a special group of volunteers remember the service members we lost in 2021.

Volunteers from the Cape Canaveral Ladies were on hand for every funeral at Cape Canaveral National Cemetery while no other friends or family could attend.

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“There are times when I’m here where some of these services touch me and I find myself in tears,” Debra Griffin, president of the Cape Canaveral Ladies, told us.

The coming year will certainly have more surprises in store for you, but as we have seen, your neighbors never fail to “get results” and we will be there to share them with you.

If you know someone “Getting Results”, use the form below to let us know. You may see them featured in the coming weeks.

Copyright 2021 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All rights reserved.


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Non profit living

A sober living house that closes its doors after decades of service | News


After providing homes for thousands of people with no place to go for more than 20 years, Griffin’s Gate in east Bakersfield will soon be closing.

The understated residential house, which the nonprofit Casa de Amigos has operated on a historic property on Monterey Street since 1999, will close on Friday. Its founders say providing the service has become unaffordable as funding has dried up.

“It’s a little bittersweet,” said Jack Hendrix, who founded Griffin’s Gate with his adopted son Pepe after retiring as a teacher at East Bakersfield High School. “That was the difficult part of the decision to close the doors because there were still people who needed this place, but we can’t provide it anymore just because we don’t have the money. “

Griffin’s Gate served as a place of refuge for people with addiction and mental health issues, parolees, and people who needed medical attention after a hospital stay but lacked a place to receive this care. The association has used contracts with organizations like Kern Behavioral Health and Kern Medical Center to stay afloat, but organizers now say those contracts are no longer available.

At a time when homelessness appears to be at its peak in Kern County history, the community is losing one of the few places ready to welcome people.

“We have helped a lot of people in the community,” said Pepe. “I am sad that we are closing. I really like this kind of work.

One of the people Griffin’s Gate has helped is Hal Joyner. Around 2002, he was addicted to methamphetamine and on his way to jail. Instead, he ended up staying on the Monterey Street estate for three years as he got his life back on track.

He now occupies the position of house manager, a position which will expire at the end of the year.

“I made a lot of good friends,” he said. “I am still friends with a lot of them. I watched the changes he made in people’s lives.

Reyes Gamino, one of the last residents of the house, reflected on his stay at Griffin’s Gate on Monday afternoon.

“I feel good here,” he said. “I’m still pretty young and I don’t like to be a burden on anyone. Here I can still live a semi-normal life.

Gamino first stayed on the property in 2019 after being hospitalized with complications from congenital heart disease. After leaving the county, he returned after his ex-wife died of coronavirus last month.

He is now looking for a place to live with his children and will be allowed to stay on the property until he is successful.

“To find real hearts like that is difficult,” he said of the Griffin’s Gate operators. “It’s more of a house than anything else.”

The home is known for much more than its work with the homeless and disadvantaged. Built in the late 1800s by a major Italian immigrant, it is known as one of the oldest houses in Kern County.

Hendrix plans to rent the house to tenants until he decides to sell the property. He said he started the house to provide him with an activity when he retired, and since he wasn’t golfing it was the right thing to do.

It’s been over 20 years since the doors to this historic home were opened for charity, and after such a long time it can be hard to know what to do next.

“People were like, ‘Why are you wasting your time with these people? They’ll never do anything, ”Hendrix said. “I have always been an optimist. I felt like people needed a chance sometimes. They needed a place to rise.

He described the closure as frustrating and fondly recalled the time he spent leading the operation.

“Over the years,” he added, “we’ve had a lot of people come and see if we’re still here and tell us they’re grateful to have a place to be.”

You can reach Sam Morgen at 661-395-7415. You can also follow him on Twitter @smorgenTBC.


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Non profit living

‘Insecure’ plus: HBO comedy leaves with satisfying confidence


We carry a common set of expectations in the series finals, and “Insecure” co-creator Issa Rae can’t resist them. As she ends our time with her alter ego Issa Dee, Rae ticks several boxes on the bingo card closer to the Universal Series – answering lingering questions, delivering happy endings, tying bows on wishes.

But it’s all part of the larger meaning of Rae and his characters Issa (Rae), Molly (Yvonne Orji), Tiffany (Amanda Seales) and Kelli (Natasha Rothwell) arriving at this finish line. If the farewell of every great show can be summed up with a succinct moral, this invites us to look back not with nostalgia for what might have been, but with total appreciation.

Moreover, each episode title of “Insecure” answers a question. How are Issa and Molly, asks the pilot? “Insecure as f ** k.” So it goes through the second season of “Hella” (“Hella Great”, “Hella Shook”) and the omnipresent ambience of uncertainty of the third, captured in titles such as “Better-Like” and “Ready-Like “, describing how 30-year-old life generally feels like one sets a course by their ambitions.

RELATED: We’re Not Ready To Give Up On “Insecure”

It involves seeing a lot of goals and directions, but not quite getting to where you want to be when you expect it to be. It was the greatest story in Issa’s life and that of Molly’s. If you identify with this show, you know it. Season 4, “Lowkey” season (with episode titles such as “Lowkey Distant”, “Lowkey Done” and “Lowkey Lost”) expresses the latent frustration and resentment of being stuck on a set, the genre that can make best friends match up against each other… or propel us to a new place.

This explains the decisive “Okay ?!” complete every fifth title of the season. Each reads in different ways depending on the tenor of that week’s story, expressing everything from frustration (“Failure, okay ?!”) to resignation (“Choice, okay ?!”) “).

By announcing “Everything Gonna Be, okay? The finale reassures its audience – and Issa, who chats with the personal mirror at the start of the 41-minute episode and sighs, “I just want to quickly move forward to the part of my life where everything is fine.” Trust the title.

“Insecure” ends on its own terms, an unsecured victory on television and certainly not with shows centered on non-white actors and characters (a truth that “Insecure” co-creator Larry Wilmore can attest to). We take for granted the praise and status this one has earned over his breathtaking five seasons – a coat that Rae, along with showrunner Prentice Penny and everyone else in his cast, wear with a pride lacking in arrogance.

Certainly, “Insecure” paved the way for shows like Amazon’s “Harlem” and Starz’s “Run the World”. But “Living Single”, the ’90s Fox sitcom, which followed six friends living in Brooklyn Brownstone before “Friends.” Deprived of the level of promotion received by its Warner Bros. counterpart, it was canceled at the end of a curtailed season in 1998 despite its continued popularity with black audiences.

Another “Insecure” predecessor, “Girlfriends”, ended in 2008 without their quartet receiving their farewell flowers. So if Rae, who wrote the Penny-directed finale, places Issa in a classic two-princes contest between Lawrence (Jay Ellis) and Nathan (Kendrick Sampson), recognize that this is the making of a moment that black characters, actors and writers don’t usually appear on television.

It is also the creator of Issa Dee and Molly Carter who grants the wishes expressed by these best friends in the very first episode. Take note of this. The last few seasons of our favorite shows usually inspire a full rewind of the series, which many “Insecure” fans did regularly anyway. But to fully savor the end of the show, which is satisfying in itself, just revisit the series premiere.

That was only five years ago, but five years ago it was a lifetime, a feeling that Rae and Penny play with throughout the conclusion. The first features Issa when she is 29 and working for “We Got Y’all”, the archetypal nonprofit dedicated to serving a segment of the population that its founder and staff do not understand.

Issa is the only black person working there and Molly is in the same situation in her law firm. And it’s one of the freeway markers we can use to measure how far their stories and the show itself have traveled since 2016.

When “Insecure” first launched, producers believed it was essential to feature white characters in shows that focused on black stories to broaden their audiences. But “Insecure” didn’t lose its white audience when the show dropped its white characters after Issa and Molly quit their old jobs. In 2018, Rae confirmed at an event in Cannes that the show’s audience was 62% white.

And that shouldn’t be surprising. All great shows speak to everyone. This one offers reassurance and reassurance about the challenges of thriving in our 30s, when many of us are still figuring out what we want to do and how we want to live as we sink deeper into the midst of careers. in which we may not have imagined ourselves. . Aspiring to be unique, and better, is an ideal that “Insecure” defends and which also appeals to American history.


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The show differs from the above by representing this philosophy through visions of black excellence as uniqueness. This is expressed through her avant-garde fashion sense, her hairstyle play, hazy and alluring music, featuring tracks from emerging artists, and the dreamy visual style established by executive producer Melina Matsoukas, who set the tone by directing much of its first season and episodes of the second season.

We see it in its distribution, of course; “Insecure” raised the profile of all of its stars, introducing Orji and Seales to a wider audience and pulling Rothwell’s enormous talent out of the writers’ room to give him one of the funniest roles on television. (She’s also one of the highlights of the limited series “The White Lotus.”) And we witness it in Rae’s meteoric rise to become one of Hollywood’s most sought-after talents, both as an actor and producer.

The questions this show asks at the start are the same ones Issa, Molly, and their loved ones carry with them five years later, and into the future, as many of us do. Issa has always been able to answer some of those questions that had once blocked her.

“How different would my life be if I was really looking for what I wanted?” She asks hypothetically in front of an elementary school class during the series premiere. In turn, the children make her feel small with their inquiries: “Is that what you always wanted to do?” “Are you single?” “Why aren’t you married? “

From there, Issa and Molly continue to question everything about their careers, their love lives, each other. “Where are we going?” “Are we here?” »« Am I official? ”

It goes “Everything is going to be, okay ?!” the correct final answer as well as a statement of determination and confidence – not just for the characters but for everyone watching.

“You’ve gone from We Got Y’all to ‘I have mine’,” one of Issa’s relatives told him, marveling at how far we’ve come and perhaps reminding us to appreciate our own travels around the world. ‘uncertainty. And that ensures that this show will keep talking to us long after we’ve gone our separate ways.

The “Insecure” series finale airs Sunday, December 26 at 10 p.m. on HBO. All episodes air on HBO Max, which premieres the behind-the-scenes documentary “Insecure: The End” on Sunday, December 26.

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Non profit living

Pastor Monroe’s work to help underserved creates believers


Pastor Heather Boone once dubbed a campaign to buy a larger church for her growing community mission the “Miracle on Second Street,” and some say the title still applies to the neighborhood she remodeled. to help the under-served.

Oaks Village, a Monroe nonprofit that serves thousands of struggling residents each year, and its dynamic leader have drawn attention to their attention even on the little things that can change lives, from products to clothing to ‘interview. Boone recently won USA Today’s Best of Humankind Awards, and that award made her even more determined to serve.

If his mission was not simple, the way forward is now.

“We just want the world to know what we’re doing in this little corner,” Boone said. “And we hope others will replicate what we do.”

His victory caught the national attention of Boone and his team. She said this would only amplify their mission and broad reach in Oaks Village, with its grocery store, daycare, tutoring, addiction recovery, health clinic and more.

“She’s a great woman,” said Robert Tucker, a former resident of the Oaks shelter who now works there. “… This is not a job for her. It’s his life. “

The program had humble beginnings, with twists and turns and miracles reflecting the scriptures she often shares for inspiration.

Boone grew up in Detroit, where the 45-year-old said she was “a very bad teenager.”

Through a religious awakening and conversion at the age of 20, Boone joined the African Methodist Episcopal Church, met her husband, Britton, and became a youth pastor.

“Once I found God, I wanted to help other young people not to go through all the trials I went through,” she said.

Over a decade ago, Boone was assigned to lead a small congregation in Monroe. The denomination leaders wanted to relocate her after three years, “but I really felt that God had called us here,” she said. “My husband and I made the decision to start our own ministry. “

Inspired by a Bible passage referring to God’s people, the couple launched Oaks of Righteousness in 2012, meeting for the first time at a community center and school. The following year, they bought a building that once housed a Salvation Army church, which also housed shelter for the homeless during the colder months, Boone said.

The first winter drew over 90 people and convinced the Boones to establish a year-round facility. Guided by prayer, they moved into space while working to raise enough money to do so.

Then came what they called a divine turn of events which brought forth an abundance of blessings.

Learning that the Archdiocese of Detroit was selling the nearby St. Joseph’s Church, which had several buildings, Boone embarked on a “Miracle on 2nd Street” fundraising campaign. Supporters raised over $ 320,000 purchase the property in 2016, which paved the way for upgrading the shelter as well as expanding or creating initiatives under the umbrella of Oaks Village.

Today the shelter has 75 beds, with separate floors for men, women and families. Clients are offered help finding housing, recovering from drug addiction and more.

Among them is Eric Uselton, who recently moved there after meeting Britton Boone on the job. He said he lived in a motel in Detroit and spent hundreds of dollars a day on drug addiction.

This month, Uselton marked 35 days of abstinence. Before heading back to a bunk bed one recent night after volunteering to install spotlights outside, he praised the Boones and their work which he calls transformative.

“If I had stayed where I was, I would have ended up in jail or dead,” Uselton said. “They have their hearts in the right place and they do it for the right reasons. They don’t do it to get credit or anything like that. They do it because they are Christians and want to help.

News of this aid regularly draws hundreds of visitors to the mostly volunteer-run “campus” as well as numerous partnerships.

Boone has seen a growing need since the COVID-19 pandemic.

The US Census Bureau estimates that 9.7% of Monroe County residents live in poverty. According to the website of the national network of food banks Feeding America, the county has a food insecurity rate of about 11.9%.

Boone estimates that Oaks Village, which has an emergency pantry, summer lunch cafe and soup kitchen, serves up to 10,000 meals each year.

The donated items come from supporters such as David Voggenreiter, 16, who arrived with his father on Monday to unload canned goods, bread and other items.

The Monroe County Middle College student discovered the site while preparing for a civic engagement project and immediately decided to contribute. “It feels good to be able to help people,” Voggenreiter said.

This is the objective of the association, which also has a “clothes closet” full of accessories, toiletries and free household items as well as a free health clinic which has opened its doors. doors in 2019.

The clinic is run by medical staff from the ProMedica health system and dedicated volunteers such as Sandy Libstorff, a retired registered nurse who first met Boone after helping deliver a patient living at the homeless shelter. -shelter.

Much of their work is now focused on COVID-19 testing, Libstorff said, as well as on patients who “have had bad experiences with mainstream medical care and are suspicious”.

Noting that some patients have reported diabetes or high blood pressure and cholesterol without any transportation to reach fresh food, Boone and his team worked to acquire an old party store shortly before Christmas 2020 and turn it into one. neighborhood market with fresh produce.

Village Market opened this year through a partnership with Meijer, which supplies the products.

“Pastor Boone’s unique approach to bringing fresh food to an underserved community was compelling to us, and something we were delighted to support,” said Frank Guglielmi, senior director of corporate communications at Meijer.

The store participates in a state program that allows EBT / Bridge card users to ‘double’ their fruit and vegetable purchases and is a partner in the special federally funded supplemental nutrition program for women, infants and children. children. He also owns a cosmetics business, tutoring space, and products from a local independent dairy.

All of this “means access to the community,” Boone said as he stood in an aisle wearing a black shirt emblazoned with the words “Be kind.”

“We understand that we don’t have everything because we are still a very small store. But when you don’t have transportation, you can get the things you need.

Recognizing a need for some residents of the shelter and others in the neighborhood looking for work sparked another business. Acorn Children’s Village, which opened last year in a donated building renovated through an Art Van charity challenge that raised over $ 50,000, offers free, low-cost child care for children. children up to 5 years old.

It’s licensed for over 30 kids who “love to learn and grow with us,” said Becky McCollum-McCrea, who helped start the installation and working on it.

The longtime educator argues that the long waitlist for his classrooms is a testament to the community’s need and Boone’s vision.

“She has a genuine love for people, and I’ve seen miracles happen because of her,” McCollum-McCrea said. “In my entire life of involvement in the church, I have never seen anything like this happen. I just feel like God is giving him ideas on what is needed or what to do and before long it will come true.

This prompted Libstorff to nominate Boone to the USA Today competition, which recognizes “everyday people who have demonstrated the highest level of kindness, compassion and persistence,” her website said.

His nomination joined more than 600 others before an advisory committee selected the finalists and 72,000 votes were cast to determine the 11 winners.

In a ceremony broadcast live this month to announce the winners, NBC personality Jenna Bush Hager, daughter of former President George W. Bush, described Boone as “living a life of service.”

The accolade underscores the commitment of a pastor who is known to donate bedding if someone else needs it, Libstorff said. “She has dedicated her whole life to helping people. She is an incredible woman.

Tucker acknowledged his support for helping him quit drugs, embrace spirituality, and become a homeowner. “My fall has become a rise,” he said.

Kellie Vining, a member of Monroe City Council whose precinct includes the non-profit organization, said that “her generous spirit has rubbed off on a lot of people. She has a true pastor’s heart.”

Boone is now focused on the future. Amid her daily watch and long hours meeting with residents, she hopes to find support for a program to build affordable housing on plots near the market.

With her businesses making headlines, she gets calls from across the country to repeat the success.

“There is a role model we can give them,” Boone said. “It has been amazing because we want to be successful and multiply. “

[email protected]


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Three lives transformed through the healing power of tissue donation, plus 27 tissue donors who have helped heal thousands of lives to be part of the Donate Life 2022, “Courage to Hope” Rose Parade float


Honoree’s Stories Highlight the Life-Changing Power of Cornea, Skin, Bone, and Musculoskeletal Tissue Transplants, and the Saving Power of Organ Donation

LOS ANGELES, December 23, 2021– (BUSINESS WIRE) – Three men and women whose lives were saved and healed thanks to the generosity of others through donated corneas and tissue will be among the 54 participants in the Donate Life Rose Parade® on January 1, 2022 in Pasadena.

The 2022 Donate Life, “Courage to Hope” float is the centerpiece of a national effort to reach large audiences with the important message that organ, eye and tissue donation saves and heals lives. The three tissue recipients, as well as 27 floral portraits or floragraphies of cornea and tissue donors, represent the healing and transformative power of tissue donation.

Thanks to tissue donors, millions of people are healed each year and thousands of lives are saved. Tissue from a single donor can touch the lives of more than 75 people. Some of the tissues that can be donated include vital heart valves and skin grafts for burn survivors. Other tissues that are crucial in helping to heal and restore mobility include bone, ligament, and nerve allografts, among others.

Donate Life 2022 float tissue recipients include the following float riders:

Kim McMahon, a 63-year-old flight attendant whose involvement in organ, eye and tissue donation began when her 16-year-old son William suddenly needed a transplant. liver in 2004. Unfortunately, he passed away in 2005. Kim started a non-profit association. William Memorial Foundation to champion the cause of organ, eye, tissue and blood donation. In 2021, at the age of 63, Kim underwent eight-hour spinal fusion surgery, receiving donor bone to repair and strengthen her spine.

Chris Brown, a 36-year-old tissue recipient from Georgia. In March 2019, Chris’s right arm was traumatically amputated. A few months later, Chris began to suffer from chronic pain. Chris was referred to a neurosurgeon who explained that injured nerves from the amputation were the cause of the pain and recommended surgical repair of the nerves. During the procedure, Chris’s nerves were rebuilt by connecting them to nerves in his shoulder muscle. There were large gaps that had to be filled with donated tissue. Thanks to a gracious gift from a donor, Chris is back at work, back on the baseball field with his four children and living pain free.

Aliza Marlin, a 52-year-old New Yorker whose float participation is sponsored by CryoLife. Aliza’s journey with congenital heart disease and tissue donation began when she was diagnosed with aortic stenosis. She had her first open heart surgery at the age of 8, her second at 18 and her third at 27. In 2015, Aliza experienced overwhelming exhaustion. An emergency visit to his cardiologist confirmed endocarditis, an infection of the heart that required pulmonary valve replacement. Aliza received a heart valve from a young woman in New York City and is grateful to her family who, in the midst of their grief, chose life.

The Donate Life Rose Parade float, produced by OneLegacy, is made possible by more than 40 sponsors. The 2022 float will honor 54 participants, including 19 riders and walkers who are either living donors or recipients of organs and tissues.

The 2022 Donate Life float, “Courage to Hope”, features the majestic Winged Lion of Venice in Piazza San Marco or St. Mark’s Square in Italy, in the midst of the Venetian Gothic architecture of the Doge’s Palace or the Palazzo Ducale and quintessential Venetian gondolas and canals. As the world’s most visible campaign to inspire organ, eye and tissue donation, the Donate Life Rose Parade is calling on viewers to help more than one million people in need of organ transplants, eyes or tissues each year. Register today to become an organ, eye or tissue donor by visiting DonateLife.net.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211223005370/en/

Contacts

Ross Goldberg
818-597-8453, x-1
[email protected]

Tania Llavaneras
213-503-9285
[email protected]


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“The time is right” for COVID-19 vaccines, recalls, experts in retirement homes and care – News


(Credit: Wachiwit / Getty Images)

With the omicron COVID-19 variant in 73% of coronavirus cases and on the rise, the country is three weeks away from an increase that could potentially overwhelm the healthcare system. That’s why “now is the time” to get vaccinated – or get vaccinated – against the virus, to enter winter with maximum protection, public health and long-term care experts said Tuesday. .

The long-term care industry aims to vaccinate – or provide booster shots – to all eligible residents and staff by the end of 2021, said David Gifford, chief medical officer of the American Health Care Association / National Center for Assisted Living. . Gifford hosted a virtual town hall on Tuesday co-hosted by LeadingAge and AARP, to answer questions about the virus and vaccines for those who work or live in long-term care facilities.

Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary Admiral Rachel Levine, MD, has recommended diaper protection through vaccination, booster shots and masking to help contain the spread of COVID-19 and its variants.

“We never imagined the pandemic would last this long,” Levine said, adding that the aging service industry’s response to the pandemic has come at the cost of “great personal sacrifice.”

“But there is hope,” she said. “Unlike 2020, last winter, we have the power to protect ourselves.

Fully vaccinated and stimulated individuals have a 10-fold lower rate of obtaining COVID-19, showing that existing vaccines work against omicron, Levine said. The country averages over a million recalls a day, she said, but cases are doubling every two or three days as the omicron spreads across the country.

Natural immunity is not enough to protect individuals against omicron, Levine added.

“The boosters offer people optimal protection against this new variant,” she said. “Do not wait.”

Rogerson Communities President and CEO Walter Ramos, JD said the education provided by the Boston-based seniors’ residence nonprofit in 2020 has helped him achieve a rate of 90% vaccination in its communities. The organization is also approaching a 90% recall rate, he added.

Bringing in experts who “looked like the people who live and work in the facilities we manage and own”, as well as those who speak multiple languages ​​and understand the culture of each community, was important to build confidence in vaccines and reminders. . Ramos said.

“We take the time to meet people where they are,” he said. “I cannot stress enough how important it is for them to have a comfort level to receive the boosters.”

Rogerson has worked with pharmacies and local vendors to provide on-site vaccination clinics or off-site vaccine access to mobile residents and staff, Ramos said.

Levine said she is supporting an effort to get booster shots in the arms of all eligible people by the end of this year, to provide maximum protection for the coming winter. She referred to President Biden’s speech on Tuesday afternoon on the White House’s efforts to step up its fight against COVID-19, including increasing access to free tests, increasing the capacity of hospitals and working to obtain more shots.

“Now is the time,” Levine said. “We can’t give up because COVID-19 doesn’t stop.

“Staying one step ahead of the virus and protecting communities against COVID-19 with safe and effective vaccines and boosters is critical, especially in the context of the evolution of the virus and the new variant. omicron, ”she added.


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To open homeless shelters, NYC leaned on a landlord with a turbulent history


In addition to owning dozens of buildings used as shelters, Mr. Levitan has another steady source of income – he operates a for-profit maintenance business, Liberty One, which maintains several of his properties. In the building it bought in 2018 in College Point, Queens, the maintenance company received more than $ 800,000 in the past fiscal year – money that also comes from the city, according to the budget documents.

The city’s procurement rules require the nonprofit groups that run the shelters to control costs by soliciting at least three independent service offers. But in two cases – identified in an independent audit and a lease – Mr. Levitan asked nonprofit groups to use his business without bidding, the Times found.

Mr Levitan said there was “no requirement” for nonprofit groups to hire his company. However, Mr McGinn, the city’s spokesperson, said a review, conducted in response to questions from The Times, discovered such a provision in a group’s lease. He called the arrangement inappropriate and said it would be changed.

Mr Levitan also owns an extermination company used in at least one of the new shelters, according to city records and a company disclosure. When ants infested parts of the apartment building in the Mott Haven neighborhood of the Bronx, his company, Squash Exterifying, was called in to help.

Mr Levitan said he started the maintenance and extermination business to streamline operations and provide better services.

In the more than two decades he has been entangled in the machinery of homeless people in New York City, Mr. Levitan has been repeatedly accused of neglect and poor conditions in some of his buildings.

In 2014, elected officials fought against plans to open a permanent shelter in Elmhurst, Queens, at the former Pan American Hotel, which was owned by a limited liability company linked to Mr Levitan. Residents of that apartment building, which housed hundreds of homeless families, reported bedbug infestations, peeling lead paint and a lack of heating or hot water. The New York Daily News published a video, provided by tenants, of a growing horde of rats near a children’s playground.


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Celebration of five centenarians, all “young at heart”


According to Ellen Gordon, director of resident life at Kaplan, it was the biggest celebration of 100-year-old residents to date in the assisted living community run by the non-profit Chelsea Jewish Lifecare. She said the five people, who participate in daily recreational and social activities, are proof that the aging process can be a process of grace, dignity and humor.

“Each of them has something to teach us,” she said. “They are wonderful.”

At the party, guests of honor were seated at a circular table in the center of the room, surrounded by around 35 of their fellow citizens and staff. Each winner wore a special pin and either a tiara or a bow tie because, as Gordon said, “You are always ladies and gentlemen. “

Left to right: Thelma Taylor, 100, Marty Lawson, 101, and Leon Ditchek, 101. They are all members of the Century Club.
Suzanne Kreiter / Globe Staff

As guests enjoyed appetizers and a birthday cake, Gordon paid tribute to each winner: Taylor for her social commitment and daily exercise; Lawson for appreciating each generation, including the children he volunteered with at the on-site preschool before the pandemic; Ditchek for keeping up to date with the news while retaining his signature sense of humor; Morocco for giving back through volunteering; and Regis to live on his own terms.

Gordon then toasted champagne and sparkling apple cider. As the room filled with neighbors, friends and caregivers raised their glasses, she said, “God bless you and let all of us in this room take lessons from five of them on how to live well our life. life. Yours!”

Between kudos from his supporters, Ditchek said he was as surprised as anyone when he turned 101 on February 28. A native of New York and a World War II veteran, he moved to Kaplan Estates several years ago to be closer to his family in Ipswich.

“I lived on my own and didn’t eat very well,” said Ditchek, who enthusiastically maintained his habit of watching CNN in the assisted living facility. “All the food here is very good.”

In fact, Ditchek has said he’s especially happy to celebrate alongside Lawson, with whom he eats all three meals.

“Marty is a good man,” said Ditchek. “I am honored to be by his side.

“And I’m honored to be here with him,” said Lawson, a retired businessman who turned 101 on Nov. 9. “I never dreamed that I would be 100 years old. I thought 75 would be my limit. I think it’s very appropriate to draw attention to people who have turned 100 and over. ‘appreciate.

Taylor, who turned 100 on March 10, worked in retail and office administration until the age of 85. At Kaplan Estates, she enjoys all daily activities including arts and crafts, current events, and exercise classes.

“I’m lucky. It’s nice to be around people and keep busy, especially at this age,” she said.

“It’s wonderful to come together and see so many of us still active,” added Morrocco, a retired accountant and avid ballroom dancer turned card shark who celebrated her 101st birthday on August 10. The year before, her friends from the Peabody Senior Center, where she volunteered for nearly 30 years, arrived in a van adorned with a photo of Morocco to celebrate with her at Kaplan Estates.

Asked about her secret to longevity, the Moroccan replied: “Good Italian genes!

“You can either do something or sit down. I’d rather have a homework assignment, ”she added, joking that a kid 100“ sounded like 1000. And now I’m so old. Older, in fact!

Marblehead pianist Bill Sokolow closed the party with a performance of “Young at Heart,” after which he drew laughs and cheers for congratulating Regis on passing his age in the lyrics to the song “What if you had to survive until 105 / Look at all you ‘I’ll shoot from being alive.

“You beat the song by two years!” He said to a smiling Regis.

As the winners accepted balloons and plants to take back to their apartments, Morocco took one last look around.

“The party was amazing,” she said. “I am very grateful that I had this time to take advantage of it.”

Cindy Cantrell can be reached at [email protected].

Thelma Tayor, 100, tasted sparkling cider during the party.
Thelma Tayor, 100, tasted sparkling cider during the party. Suzanne Kreiter / Globe Staff
Kay Morrocco, 101, helps Rose Regis, 107, with her badge.  While there are differing opinions on why Century Club members live such long and independent lives, there is general agreement that they are proof that the aging process can be a process of aging. dignity, joy and humor.
Kay Morrocco, 101, helps Rose Regis, 107, with her badge. While there are differing opinions on why Century Club members live such long and independent lives, there is general agreement that they are proof that the aging process can be a process of aging. dignity, joy and humor.

Suzanne Kreiter / Globe Staff


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These rock stars to perform Lou Reed and Sex Pistols albums at concert to benefit mental health – Daily News


Since 2018, Jane’s Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro and Billy Idol guitarist Billy Morrison have joined forces to host an annual celebrity concert that raises funds for the nonprofit MusiCares to benefit mental health treatment.

The show, dubbed Above Ground, did not take place in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but will resume for its third installment on Monday, December 20 at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles. It will feature a host of special guest musicians including Corey Taylor, Slipknot frontman, Foo Fighters drummer Taylor Hawkins, Sugar Ray’s Mark McGrath, Jane’s Addiction Perry Farrell, singer Etty Lau Farrell, Idol rocker. and guitarist Steve Stevens and more.

“I missed it last year, because Billy and I fell in love with the cause, with the mission statement; we fell in love with the job and all the things that are needed to make this show happen, ”Navarro said in an interview with Zoom.

“It’s actually quite a different experience from our day jobs,” Morrison added on the same video call. “This kind of show is so different in terms of production, and when Dave said we fell in love with the job, it’s because he doesn’t show up and play ‘Jane Says’ or ‘Rebel Yell’ . We can do it with our eyes closed, but we really have to work on this show. “

  • Jane’s Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro (left), Ministry’s guitarist Al Jourgensen and Billy Idol Billy Morrison perform at the Above Ground benefit party for MusiCares at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles in 2019 (Photo by Jim Donnelly)

  • Jane’s Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro (left) performs with singer Juliette Lewis during the Above Ground benefit concert for MusiCares at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles in 2019 (Photo by Jim Donnelly)

  • Jane’s Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro (left) performs with Tenacious D frontman and actor Jack Black to benefit Above Ground for MusiCares at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles in 2019 (Photo by Jim Donnelly)

  • Each year, Jane’s Addiciton guitarist Dave Navarro (left) and Billy Idol guitarist Billy Morrison host Above Ground, a star-studded benefit concert that raises awareness and raises funds for mental health for MusiCares. This year’s event will take place on Monday, December 20 at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles.

Faithful to the tradition of choosing influential two-act musical releases – an American act and a British one – for the evening, the performers will cover all the songs in order from Lou Reed’s 1972 album “Transformer” and the Release of the Sex Pistols in 1977. “Don’t forget the bullshit, here are the Sex Pistols. “

In 2018, artists from the “Above Ground” lineup performed 1980s “Kings of the Wild Frontier” by Adam and the Ants and the eponymous 1967 album by The Velvet Underground and Nico. In 2019, they took on David Bowie’s 1972 “The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars” and the 1969 Stooge’s self-titled debut album.

“Every year we have to dive deep into these records and find parts that we maybe a little overlooked or missed when we just listened to them and we really dissect them and kind of go into the songs and doing that process is rewarding. , frustrating, distressing, ”said Navarro.

“And scary,” Morrison added, laughing. “Right before this interview, we go through the songs on the show and ask ourselves, ‘Are we doing something right? Is everything alright ?’ “

“It’s a little scary because we choose the albums that mean the most to us,” Navarro continued. “We want to render the greatest possible service to these albums. Therefore, there is no harsher criticism of our sound than Billy and I. Lots of bands do covers, and Billy and I are in a cover band called Royal Machines, but for Above Ground we tried our best not to just do our version of the songs, we try to get as close as possible. the sound of the album and it’s difficult.

Navarro said he chose Reed’s “Transformer” to play because “it was one of the most interesting and provocative albums I’ve ever heard.”

“If you listen to the lyrical content and the message Lou is talking about on this record and think about the climate today – but then you think about the climate when he wrote these things – that was light years ahead. on his time, “he said. noted. “He was basically saying these are people living their lives and doing well and just as complete and whole as you or me or anyone else.”

Morrison agrees.

“Hearing ‘Transform’ and someone singing about different sexualities, drugs and all that stuff affected me a lot,” Morrison added. “The other thing we’re trying to do with this show is play albums that you can’t go and listen to. We’re not going to play a Coldplay album. We love Coldplay, but they still exist. So we play albums that you can’t listen to live.

“The greatest album of all time for me – being British and being a teenager when it was released – is ‘Never Mind the Bollocks’,” Morrison continued. “It changed my life and I was very loud about it.”

The recipient of the evening, MusiCares, is an organization that provides funds and resources to workers in the music industry, and with so many of those people out of work and unable to tour or create over the past 18 In recent months, fundraising and efforts to encourage open talk about mental health is imperative, Navarro and Morrison agree.

“When we started this concept, it was before COVID and it was very necessary,” Morrison said. “Dave and I felt that we both suffered from trauma and mental health issues, but our philosophy is really very simple and it’s okay to ask for help. So if he and I can be really public about, listen, we’ve been there, we’ve been asking for help, and we’ve been very lucky to get some help, and we’re now living a loving life and fulfilling, so can you. It’s pre-COVID. Imagine the world now as we are? This message must be spread more than ever.

There’s also an on-site auction with artwork donated to raise more money by artists such as Morrison and Navarro, contemporary street artist Shepard Fairey, and Los Angeles-based graffiti artist Risk.

“I don’t know how we do this,” Navarro said with a laugh. “It’s not just us. It’s everyone who comes to perform and is part of it. Getting back to sanity, which is the most important aspect, at the end of the day here you are looking at two ex-junkies. It is therefore clear that we can overcome what causes suffering. “

Above ground 3

With: Billy Idol, Taylor Hawkins, Perry and Etty Farrell, Corey Taylor, Mark McGrath, Steve Stevens and more

When: 7 p.m. Monday, December 20

Or: Fonda Theater, Los Angeles

Tickets: $ 59.50 on AXS.com


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New famous free store | News, Sports, Jobs


MARQUETTE – The New Free Boutique is currently celebrating the fifth anniversary of its grand opening. It’s a small store with a big goal. A little story reveals how a group of determined organizers joined the community and enabled The New Free Store to supplement more than 1,175 families in need with some of the basic necessities of life.

In 2014, some members of a local church made a commitment to help community members who were experiencing financial difficulties. The group held a series of free clearance sales in the basement of their church, which soon became known as the “The free store”. The organizers have solicited donations from the community in order to be able to supplement the necessities of life for free as many people in financial difficulty as possible. The group worked tirelessly and formed an all-volunteer non-profit organization, renamed “The new free store.” In 2016, the store moved to a small apartment building in Harvey.

Adopt the philosophy: “In God’s economy, there is always enough” the store continues its mission of serving those who need it most with clothes, linens, towels, sheets, blankets and other lightly used items to help others lead healthier lives. New personal hygiene and housekeeping products are also distributed each month and are mainly purchased through grants from community organizations. All items in the store are free for registered participants.

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Craig Sincock to receive highest honor at Living Legends of Aviation Awards


Craig Sincock, Owner, President and CEO of Avfuel Corporation, will receive the Kenn Ricci Lifetime Aviation Entrepreneur Award 2022 at the 19th Annual Living Legends of Aviation Awards. The award is the highest honor awarded during the ceremony on January 21, 2022.

When Sincock, a passionate aviator with a keen business sense, acquired Avfuel 37 years ago, he sought to disrupt and reinvent the aviation fuel supply chain. His tenacity has led to Avfuel’s evolution from a regional fuel distributor to a leading global supplier of aviation fuel and full service, offering everything from refueling equipment and comprehensive training programs. , aviation insurance and sustainable development solutions.

Sincock has dedicated his career to shaping and supporting the aviation industry. In this capacity, he was instrumental in reinventing the role of fuel distributors. Its competing counterparts quickly followed its business model and the industry changed forever.

Under Sincock’s leadership and entrepreneurial vision, the Ann Arbor, Michigan-based company has grown rapidly on a global scale. Avfuel now operates in 149 countries and serves more than 5,500 air services with more than 3,000 refueling locations worldwide, including more than 650 Avfuel-branded FBOs. Today, Avfuel supports all sectors of aviation including FBOs, Airports, Commercial Operators and Helicopters, Airlines, Cargo / Freight, and the Military.

Sincock sees his business as a way to serve the community through philanthropic initiatives, including health research, flight and aviation medical training institutions, veterans organizations, and aviation scholarships. . Sincock is an ATP pilot who frequently flies Avfuel planes.

Illustrating Ricci’s energy, enthusiasm and success, Sincock will also be inducted into the prestigious “Living Legends of Aviation” – an elite group of remarkable people with extraordinary accomplishments in aviation and aerospace. The Legends have over 100 accomplished men and women in their ranks, including entrepreneurs, innovators, industry leaders, astronauts, record breaking, pilots turned celebrities and celebrities who became pilots. Legendary actor John Travolta is “the official ambassador of aviation”.

The 2022 Living Legends of Aviation Awards will be held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, honoring the new honorees of the year.

The Kiddie Hawk Air Academy, a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit, annually produces the Living Legends of Aviation Awards. Kiddie Hawk’s mission is to give children ages 4-7 their first flying lesson.


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As violence increases in Haiti, aid groups struggle to help


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FILE – People line up for food aid in Camp Perrin, Haiti on August 20, 2021, six days after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake struck the region. The United Nations agency estimates it needs $ 97 million to help 1 million people in Haiti next year. (AP Photo / Fernando Llano, file)

PA

A spike in violence has worsened hunger and poverty in Haiti while hampering aid organizations fighting these problems in a country whose government struggles to provide basic services.

Few aid workers are willing to speak publicly about the cuts – perhaps worried about drawing attention after the October kidnapping of 17 people from Ohio-based Christian Aid Ministries – 12 of whom remain hostages.

But several confirmed, without giving details, having sent personnel out of the country and having been forced to temporarily reduce aid operations.

Gang-related kidnappings and shootings have prevented aid groups from reaching parts of the capital, Port-au-Prince, and beyond where they had previously distributed food, water and equipment. ‘other commodities.

A severe fuel shortage also prevented agencies from operating at full capacity.

“It’s only getting worse in every way it can,” said Margarett Lubin, Haiti director for CORE, a US nonprofit organization.

“You see the situation deteriorating day by day, affecting life at all levels,” Lubin said, adding that aid organizations have gone into “survival mode”.

Few places in the world depend as much on aid groups as Haiti, a nation often referred to as “the republic of NGOs.” Billions of dollars in aid have flowed to hundreds – by some estimates several thousand – of aid groups even as government has become weaker and less efficient.

Shortly after the assassination of the president on July 7, Prime Minister Ariel Henry took charge of a country still struggling to regain political stability. Almost all seats in parliament are vacant and there is no specific date yet for a long-delayed election, although Henry has said he expects them early next year.

Less than ten elected representatives currently represent a country of more than 11 million inhabitants.

And in the streets, the gangs hold the power.

More than 460 kidnappings have been reported by the Haitian National Police so far this year, more than double what was reported last year, according to the United Nations Integrated Office in Haiti.

The agency said Haitians “live in hell under the yoke of armed gangs. Rapes, murders, thefts, armed robberies and kidnappings continue to be committed on a daily basis, on populations often left to their own devices in the disadvantaged and marginalized neighborhoods of Port-au-Prince and beyond.

The agency added: “Without being able to access these areas under gang control, we are far from knowing and measuring the extent of these abuses and what Haitians really experience on a daily basis …

“Humanitarian actors have also limited their interventions due to security risks for their staff and access problems,” he added.

Large organizations like the United Nations World Food Program have found other ways to help people, such as using barges rather than vulnerable trucks to transport goods from the capital to the southern region of Haiti. But small organizations do not always have such resources.

World Vision International, a California-based organization that helps children in Haiti, told The Associated Press it had moved at least 11 of the 320 employees due to the violence and was taking undisclosed safety measures for other members of the team. staff.

Water Mission, a South Carolina nonprofit, said it was considering moving to other parts of Haiti and said kidnappings and general violence had forced it to change its staffing plans. to ensure the safety of people.

“These issues sometimes cause a slowdown in progress in our ongoing work on the drinking water project,” the organization said. “However, we continue to work despite the temporary disruptions that occur.”

The difficulties arise at a time when calls for help multiply. A magnitude 7.2 earthquake in mid-August destroyed tens of thousands of homes and killed more than 2,200 people. The country is also struggling to cope with the recent arrival of more than 12,000 deported Haitians, the majority from the United States.

In addition, more than 20,000 people have fled their homes due to gang violence this year, according to UNICEF, many of whom are living in temporary shelters in extremely unsanitary conditions and the pandemic. The United Nations agency estimates it needs $ 97 million to help 1 million people in Haiti next year.

Among them, Martin Jean Junior, a fifty-something who sold scrap metal. He said his house was burnt down in mid-June amid fighting between police and gangs.

“I’ve been on the street ever since,” he said as he lay on a blue sheet he had spread out on the hard floor of a school in Port-au-Prince temporarily converted into a shelter.

Things could soon get worse: A prominent gang leader warned Haitians this week to avoid the besieged community of Martissant, as rival gangs will fight each other in the coming days.

“Even dogs and rats will not be saved. Anything that moves, trucks, motorcycles, people, will be considered an ally of Ti-Bois, ”the gang leader known as“ Izo ”said in a video, referring to a rival gang. “Martissant is declared a combat zone, and those who ignore this warning will pay with their lives.” “

Most are already avoiding the area for fear of being kidnapped, shot, or having their cargo looted. This largely cut off the southern peninsula from the country because the main road runs through the neighborhood.

Among those recently killed by crossfire in Martissant include a nurse, a 7-year-old girl and at least five passengers on a public bus. Violence forced aid group Médecins Sans Frontières in August to close an emergency clinic that had served the community for 15 years.

Liman Pierre, a 40-year-old mechanic, said he had recently had to drive through Martissant to get to work and saw four dead, including two elderly neighbors and the biker carrying them.

“Criminals kill with impunity and leave the dead to dogs,” he said. Those who are not devoured by dogs are set on fire, outright. It cannot be.

For the moment, Pierre is sleeping in the streets of Port-au-Prince because he fears having to cross Martissant to get home: “We don’t even have the opportunity to visit relatives and friends in difficulty.

“The state does not exist,” says Pierre. “Criminals have been in power for over six months. It is December and we do not see the light at the end of the tunnel.


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Live With This Herbal Recipe From Youth Health Advocate Haile Thomas – Food Tank


At each age, Haile Thomas’ life has revolved around nutritious food. Her Jamaican immigrant mother taught her how to cook when she was five, and three years later, when her father was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, her family turned their diet and lifestyle into a nurturing center and restorative food. When Thomas was 12, she founded The organization HAPPY, a non-profit organization that promotes the mental and physical well-being of young people by developing knowledge about diet and self-advocacy. At 17, she was the youngest certified integrative health coach in the United States. With her messages of healthy eating and youth empowerment, she has appeared in the White House, at Food tank tops, and in the national media.

And last year she published a cookbook-slash-empowerment-manifesto, Live alive, which was nominated for an NAACP Image Award. In addition to the more than 80 herbal recipes, his book opens with a series of essays on his upbringing, how we are shaped by what we consume and Thomas’s seven “Power Points”. From wellness and relationships, to education, creativity and community, and conversations with young women who embody these principles, Thomas breaks down the components of a lively life. And as one of the essays notes, the book is meant to be interactive – “a place where food stains and deep thoughts can coexist!” She writes – so there are journal pages and writing prompts to encourage thought and action.

“We really want [youth] see food and cooking as something that can really permeate their daily life and be something super fun and accessible ”, Thomas told Food Tank President Danielle Nierenberg at the Food Tank Summit 2018.

For our third monthly cookbook series, Food Tank is excited to share Thomas’ recipe for Red Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Chimichurri Sauce. If you missed the first few installments of our cookbook series, we’ve featured two recipes from Jubilee, Toni Tipton-Martin’s award-winning exploration of hundreds of years of black cuisine, and a selection of fall recipes from Beth Dooley’s local and seasonal cookbook The lively cuisine. Make sure to grab these recipes, but first, join us as we cook and live a busy life with Haile Thomas!

And one more thing: when you cook this recipe at home, let us know! Tag us on social media @FoodTank or #FoodTank so we can admire your meals and share your photos.

* * * * *

Red roasted cauliflower steaks with chimichurri sauce

Makes 4 servings

Knowing how to season and roast a good cauliflower steak is essential at home, so I pass this favorite recipe on to you! Due to the neutral flavor of cauliflower, it’s a great canvas for spices and sauces that really pop. Serve with your favorite vegetables and grains!

—Haile Thomas, Living Lively: 80 Herbal Recipes To Activate Your Power And Nurture Your Potential

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER

  • 1 tablespoon of garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon of paprika
  • 1 tablespoon of dried thyme
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 medium cauliflower, cut through the core into four slices about ½ inch thick
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil

CHIMICHURRI SAUCE

  • ½ cup of fresh cilantro, leaves and stems
  • ½ cup of fresh parsley, leaves and stems
  • ¼ cup fresh basil leaves
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • Kosher salt

1. To roast the cauliflower: Preheat the oven to 425 ° F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. In a medium bowl, combine garlic powder, paprika, thyme, cayenne pepper and salt to taste.

3. Arrange the cauliflower “steaks” on the prepared baking sheet and drizzle with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Sprinkle the herb and spice mixture evenly on both sides of each cauliflower steak. Drizzle the cauliflower steaks with the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil.

4. Roast for 20 to 25 minutes, until the cauliflower is golden and crisp on top.

5. Meanwhile, to make the chimichurri sauce: In a food processor, combine the cilantro, parsley, basil, garlic, olive oil, vinegar and salt to taste and mix until smooth consistency. Put aside.

6. Drizzle the steaks with the chimichurri sauce and serve.

From LIVING LIVELY by Haile Thomas Copyright © 2020 by Haile Thomas. Reprinted with permission from William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

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For the first time in decades, earnings grow faster for low-wage workers


Abramson pays his employees at ECI stores about $ 3 more per hour than they were two years ago, and now offers a pension plan. The bump doesn’t just keep its businesses on staff, it attracts better employees, including some who have been exhausted by stressful jobs in education and healthcare. “As a company that is surviving the pandemic,” he said, “we are more adaptable now. “

In the past year, the lowest-paid workers have seen their incomes rise by around 8%, according to a new To analyse by Arindrajit Dube, economist at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. While 5.5% of this gain was absorbed by inflation, those in the bottom third of the salary scale (taking into account occupation and worker demographics) saw their incomes rise in average, while in the top 70% they declined. .

Over the summer, for example, those earning $ 15 an hour saw their wages increase by about 1%, which explains inflation, while incomes fell by 0.2%. for those earning $ 30 an hour.

“It’s striking,” said Dube, “because it’s pretty much against the grain of the past 40 years where we’ve seen wage growth be the exact opposite.”

And it is particularly noteworthy that this is happening during a pandemic that has wreaked havoc on many employers who are raising wages, he said, including those in retail, hospitality and transportation. Workers are quitting their jobs at an all-time high, especially in lower-paying industries, as safety and childcare concerns persist. Early retirements are on the rise and the number of immigrant workers is falling. Some people are also rethinking their priorities.

“There’s a sense in which people who had particularly bad jobs, if you will, are less likely to want to stay there, and that creates that pressure,” he said.

Overall, real average hourly earnings, which represent inflation, have declined 1.2 percent over the past year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. But wage growth “has accelerated considerably” in the past six to eight months, according to a Conference Board poll released Wednesday. And it is expected to continue to climb.

Employers are expected to raise wages 3.9% next year, the highest rate in 14 years, the nonprofit business group reported. This jump is due to an increase in wages for new hires – especially for those under 25 and workers who have changed jobs – and inflation, which has increased at the highest rate in nearly 30 years. year. Persistent labor shortages will likely drive wage growth above 4% until next year, the board said.

Some of the increases at the bottom of the earnings scale are due to the increase in the minimum wage. In Massachusetts, the minimum of $ 13.50 will drop to $ 14.25 on Jan. 1 and to $ 15 in 2023. Yet about half of American workers earn less than $ 20 an hour, according to the organization in nonprofit Living Wage for US, but 80% of the population live in a place where the salary needed to pay for housing, health care, child care, and other expenses to support families is more than that .

In Massachusetts, 92% of the population resides in a county where a family of four needs an annual family income of at least $ 100,000 to live with a “basic level of decency,” according to Living Wage for US, which has just launched a certification program. for employers who pay a living wage. But less than 44% of the state’s households earn that much.

A higher salary for those who need it most could be a silver lining for the pandemic, which has wreaked havoc among many immigrants and people of color in lower-paying jobs – provided it increases enough, a said Zeynep Ton, professor at MIT Sloan School of Management and co-founder of the Good Jobs Institute.

“The wages are sticky,” she said. “Once you raise them it’s very difficult to go back. “

Raising wages can also improve job performance, forcing companies to view workers as more valuable and give them more responsibility – and treat them with more respect, Ton said. But planning more regular hours is also essential.

“I think the workers are finally fed up,” she said. “They are used like robots.

Several national employers have announced wage increases in recent months. Amazon offers a starting salary of $ 18 to $ 22.50 an hour – versus $ 15 – for warehouse and transportation workers, and Costco just moved up to $ 17 an hour, after rising to $ 16 in February. Starbucks, CVS, and Walgreens all increase base pay to $ 15 an hour.

At Bank of America, the entry-level salary was $ 15 an hour when Ajna Angjeliu started as a cashier in Boston in 2019. Since then it has increased several times and hit $ 21 in October.

“It created a trusting relationship between me and the company,” said Angjeliu, 22, who now assists clients with their accounts and studies part-time at Boston University, while helping his parents pay. the bills. “I know this organization is a business that will help me grow.”

Bank of America branch manager Tilan Perera has seen interest in jobs grow as entry-level salary increases.Pat Greenhouse / Globe Staff

Tilan Perera, the branch manager at 100 Federal St., where Angjeliu works, found that interest in jobs increased as wages rose. “There are more people applying,” he said.

The bank plans to hire 5,000 people this quarter and increase starting salaries to at least $ 25 an hour by 2025.

Small employers are also increasing wages. More than three-quarters of owners in a recent National Federation of Independent Business survey said they had already increased their pay or were planning to do so soon, the highest percentage in 48 years. David Weaver, chairman of Compensation & HR Group in Burlington, said wages are increasing mostly at the entry level, with quick service restaurants, grocery stores, retail stores and banks announcing higher hourly wages in the range from $ 17 to $ 21.

Yet soaring inflation means these increases may not mean much.

It’s sort of a vicious cycle, said Christopher Carlozzi, Massachusetts director of the National Federation of Independent Business. “A lot of the price increases that consumers are seeing are the result of wage increases due to labor shortages. “

At Whole Foods Market in the Boston area, starting wages went from $ 15 to $ 16 an hour this fall, and employees above received a 50-cent raise. Workers also get an extra $ 2 an hour until early January, and overtime and Sunday pay are doubled.

A local employee, who asked not to be identified because he was not authorized to speak to the media, said he made $ 19.20 an hour after the increase and $ 38.40 on Sunday . “It’s a teacher’s salary,” he said, noting that a client told him she could apply because the Sunday rate is higher than what she earns as a teacher. nurse.

The 50-cent increase doesn’t make a big difference to him, but the extra Sunday pay means he can work fewer days. That will likely change in January, however. “It’s a little depressing,” he said.

Fred Goff, managing director of Cambridge-based job platform Jobcase, said employers love to brag about pay increases, but when you consider how many of them are temporary, and how much the cost of the life has increased – and how high some corporate profits are. hovering – it sounds hollow.

“There are a lot of people who want to be applauded for raising wages from $ 13 to $ 15 an hour,” he said. “Don’t do me a favor if you’re just keeping up with inflation.”


Katie Johnston can be reached at [email protected] Follow her on twitter @ktkjohnston.



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An aging country shows others how to manage


ESINCE 1,495 residents of Gojome, a town in northern Japan, gathered for a morning market. One recent weekday, along a street with closed and almost empty shops, elderly vendors display their autumn wares: mushrooms and chestnuts, okra, eggplants and pears. It wasn’t always so empty, sighs Ogawa Kosei, who runs a bookstore on the street. He shows pictures taken by his father which show the scene filled with customers.

Gojome’s population has halved since 1990. More than half of its residents are over the age of 65, making it one of the oldest towns in Akita, the oldest prefecture in Japan, which is in its own right. tour the oldest country in the world. Still, Gojome is less of an outlier than an omen. According to UN, each country is experiencing growth in the size and proportion of its elderly population; by 2050, one in six people in the world will be over 65, up from one in eleven in 2019. UN also predicts that 55 countries, including China, will see their populations decline by 2050.

Demographic change has two drivers that are often grouped together: increasing longevity and a falling birth rate. Their convergence requires “a new map of life,” explains Akiyama Hiroko, founder of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Tokyo. The infrastructure created when the population was younger and the population pyramid more solid must be rethought, from health to housing to transport. The new reality demands a “completely different way of thinking,” says Kashiwa Kazuyori, head of Gojome’s planning department. When he started working in the 1970s, the focus was on growth. Now it is a matter of managing the decline.

Part of the challenge is that demographic change affects everyone differently. Two cities or regions may look alike from afar, but have distinct historical, cultural and environmental conditions; two people can be the same age, earn the same money, and live on the same street, but have different mental and physical health. “Context is often lacking,” says Kudo Shogo of Akita International University. He is one of dozens of young foreigners who have been welcomed to Gojome, which was a trade hub at the crossroads of agricultural districts. Comparable agriculture-focused neighbors have been less open to newcomers.

This makes it difficult to design a national policy. “There is no single model,” says Iio Jun, political scientist at HANDLES. While the national government is responsible for finances, including pensions, the new life map is best drawn from scratch. A lot of ideas come from listening to citizens, says Ms. Akiyama. “They know what the problems are and often they know how to solve them. “

One question is how aging is discussed: as a problem or a burden. “Older people feel that society doesn’t need them,” says Hatakeyama Junko, 70, head of Akita Partnership, a non-profit organization that runs a community center. Longevity in itself is not a problem, it should be celebrated. Problems arise when people lead long but unhealthy, lonely or dependent lives. The goal in Japan has shifted from increasing life expectancy to improving “healthy and independent life expectancy,” says Akiyama.

It means finding ways for older people to continue working. Almost half of the 65-69 age group and a third of the 70-74 age group are employed. The Japanese Gerontological Society has called for reclassifying people aged 65 to 74 as “pre-old.” Ms. Akiyama talks about creating “second life workplaces”. But the work of the second life will be different from that of the first; its contribution may not be easily captured in growth statistics. “We need to strive for well-being, not just economic productivity,” says Akiyama. Experiences abound, from municipalities that train retirees to become farmers, to businesses that encourage older employees to launch startups. The elderly “want dignity and respect,” says Matsuyama Daiko of Taizo-in temple in Kyoto, which has a “second life program” that offers courses for retirees to become priests.

The other key is to stay healthy, physically and mentally. Wiser municipalities focus on preventive care. At the stylish Kadokawa Care Center, a former school in Toyama, northwest Tokyo, 70s, 80s and 90s splash about in a pool and soar on exercise machines. “Without this place, I would be in a retirement home,” exclaims Kyoda Taketoshi, 82. Socialization is no less important. “It was expensive to build this place, but it was worth it,” says Saito Yoneaki, 80, before jumping to join friends in the sauna. Although healthy life expectancy in Japan is eight to 12 years less than overall life expectancy, the gap narrowed slightly between 2010 and 2016.

The birth rate is more difficult to change. It fell to 1.34 in 2020, well below the 2.1 needed to maintain a stable population. Even if Japan could increase it, rural areas would still struggle. One study estimates that more than half of Japan’s 1,700 municipalities could disappear by 2040, as young people, especially women, leave. Yet while a return to growth is unlikely in most regions, there is an alternative to outright disappearance: a critical core of newcomers. Even a handful of transplants can revitalize an aging city without fully replacing the population, notes Iio.

Gojome is a good example. Although the population is decreasing, “a new wind is blowing in the city”, explains Watanabe Hikobe, its mayor. Over the past decade, a small group of young foreigners have arrived, drawn by visions of a slow, bucolic life, and the chance to try out new models of loose work and community living. Yanagisawa Ryu, 34, a computer science graduate from Japan’s leading university, quit his job in Tokyo and became a “social entrepreneur”. He oversees Babame Base, a business center in an empty school in Gojome that is home to a graphic design studio, an ecotourism business, a local doctor, and a business that trains farmers in the use of drones, among others.

Such “urban migrants” are still a relative rarity. Mr. Yanagisawa admits his college friends find his lifestyle choices “weird.” But in many ways, they are the vanguard. “Rather than trying to recreate the past, we need to think about: what kind of community, what kind of city do we want now? Mr. Kudo said. They are not the only foreigners to settle. â– 

This article appeared in the Special Feature section of the print edition under the title “Le vieux pays”


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Houston NFL player Emmanuel Ellerbee launches Bee’s Believers nonprofit to help expose student-athletes to STEM careers


HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) – There comes a time when athletes need to hang up their cleats. A Houston native, in his fourth season in the NFL, started a nonprofit aimed at building young student-athletes for life after the game.

“The most important thing for you is your mind, and your mind is something that no one can take away from you,” said Atlanta Falcons linebacker Emmanuel Ellerbee.

Ellerbee’s nonprofit Bee’s Believers aims to bridge the gap between student-athletes and science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM.

“Our mission is to offer students opportunities through athletics and STE (A) M, so that they have the chance to discover new passions, on and off the field”, indicates the association on his website. “No child should be limited in what they seek to accomplish in this life, and we made it our mission to help them raise.”

Ellerbee, a product of Strake Jesuit College Preparatory, said it was his geometry teacher who told him that at the end of the day he must have more than just playing football.

“Bee’s Believers was an idea that really developed when I was at Strake Jesuit,” Ellerbee said. “Everyone at this school made sure that what I was doing on the football field was not a total synthesis of who I was. They always made sure I had it in class too.”

So that’s exactly what he did. Ellerbee had two dreams: playing in the NFL and getting a civil engineering degree.

“When I left school and during the recruiting process, a lot of people said to me, ‘Oh, you’re going to have to choose one or the other. be a great athlete. I was like ‘Why can’t I do both?’ ”

Ellerbee received her civil engineering degree from Rice University and is still living her NFL dream.

“I don’t think anyone’s dreams or what they want in life will ever be easy. You always have to go through trials and tribulations, hills and valleys, to be able to make sure it comes true. you have to kind of be stubborn with how you approach your dream, ”Ellerbee said.

He said he hopes his experiences will encourage all athletes, especially blacks and Latinos, to consider STEM as an option.

“There are a smaller number of African Americans in STEM careers, as well as Hispanic Americans,” Ellerbee said. “For us, it was about going to inner-city schools and just giving them the opportunity to have that exposure that they usually wouldn’t have.”

In March 2022, ninth grade students are invited to a seminar hosted by the nonprofit association, where students will be introduced to other like-minded student-athletes from other high schools in the region of Houston. In addition to meeting other students, they will also be able to meet and talk to former and current professional athletes who are now pursuing careers in STEM. Students will be able to experience and learn firsthand the many layers that STEM has to offer.

“We believe that when we welcome people of different beliefs, origins and socio-economic status, you would be able to create a better world because everyone understands the difficulties that others are going through,” said Ellerbee.

Copyright © 2021 KTRK-TV. All rights reserved.


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Confront the “myth of more money”


Part three in a series on the last eight years of my Seattle housing work.

From 2016 until the end of Washington State’s legislative session in 2019, I changed my approach to challenge the idea of ​​charging fees on new housing development and giving that money to organizations in non-profit. My argument was that the state’s largest city, Seattle, enforced the most rules, slowing production and thus creating higher prices as demand increased. As a result, most of the state’s available grants were consumed by Seattle, which was unfair to the rest of the state. Not only that, I argued, but building nonprofit housing in Seattle was very expensive and inefficient. Conventional wisdom was and still is that what is needed to solve housing problems is not more housing, but more and more money.

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to challenge big business and government allies to crush your critics, forget the idea that it’s like the movie Silkwood. There is no Cher or Kurt Russell and above all there is no journalist waiting somewhere to write about it. It’s more like the X Files, if you go up against the big guys you’ll be caught on and ignored. The prize will be an effort to make you irrelevant, mad, or part of some kind of unreasonable clique. I had no idea when I took over the industrial non-profit housing complex.

Here is my logic. Having been a nonprofit developer, I knew these developers had to face a steep climb to build their projects, arguably a steeper climb than for-profit developers. The number of contracts, commitments, and acres of paperwork were all stacked on the same demands as the for-profit sector: finding land, zoning, design review, utilities, and labor costs. But because they had political favors, they could ask for more money to solve these problems and the political structure would oblige them with interventions like Mandatory Housing Affordability, the program that would make it worse and not better for the poor because “affordable housing” would be paid for. for with higher rents (see my last post and many more).

I knew the costs and difficulty of building non-profit housing, housing paid for by the MHA program, when exposed, could make people question the whole program itself. If nothing else, if I could find a way to show that more money was being spent on subsidized nonprofit housing in Seattle (where the MHA extortion program operated) than in the Washington countryside. , maybe we could force a conversation. The data supported my point; housing subsidies were consumed quickly by the state’s most blatant regulator of housing production, Seattle. If I could show that this was done to the detriment of the poorest immigrant farm workers, maybe we could get the press interested.

So I analyzed years of data from the state’s Housing Trust Fund and found that indeed, subsidies were piling up in Seattle while in rural areas, workers lived in their cars. I wrote an opinion piece on how access to water was choking the supply in rural areas and thus harming rural workers, primarily immigrants to Mexico. It infuriated House Speaker Frank Chopp as much as it pleased lawmakers in rural Washington, who were outraged by the rushed court decision by a left-wing Seattle advocacy organization. I had entered into a long-standing conflict on the side of the rural Republicans. Here I was a former Democrat from Seattle, working with Republicans.

My conversations with the President and with the Republican leaders were strange; I was making a valid argument, which went against everyone’s sensitivity. Democrats felt out of place, justifying more and more spending on expensive housing in Seattle (up to $ 500,000 per unit) while talking about how much they cared about rural immigrants, the people who did not benefit from housing subsidies because of rampant spending. in Seattle. Republicans were resistant to big spending schemes and more bureaucracy. So my proposal for a farm worker housing authority to take money out of Seattle and funnel it to farm worker housing fell on deaf ears there. I had managed to make valid points, but the policy was not in favor of the solution, of big changes in the subsidy system and of better management.

In a passive and aggressive Washington, my efforts have certainly been noticed. The President complimented me in an argument saying, “People are mad at you! ” Sure. But making people uncomfortable does not necessarily lead to policy change. Both left and right seem to have made peace with the inefficient way of subsidizing housing. I failed to convince Republicans in the Legislature to support the idea of ​​making the system fairer, and farmers and nonprofit real estate developers in rural Washington seemed intimidated by the task of taking over. the well-funded and politically connected non-profit organization. housing agencies in Seattle.

My campaign against the non-profit housing complex was a failure. He revealed, however, that there is an ongoing disparity in the way housing is subsidized in Washington. Recently, I showed how tax credits are pouring into Seattle, even though there is more poverty in rural Washington. Being white and awake means more money for housing. It was a deadly battle that exhausted many of my supporters, but I’m glad I made the effort. With all the money raised from the fees generated by the MHA fees and other largesse of recent federal legislation, I know the problem will not be solved with more money. It will get worse. The day may come when everyone can do the math and agree that fairness and efficiency are compassionate and that inflation is the greatest enemy of the poor.


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Saint-Louis high school students demonstrate against gun violence in honor of 19-year-old


ST. LOUIS – Hundreds of students from Cardinal Ritter College Prep High School marched against gun violence on Wednesday in honor of 19-year-old Isis Mahr.

Mahr was murdered in a quadruple shooting in St. Louis in October after returning from work at an elderly care facility. Her father said she had a heart of gold.

“My daughter was very dynamic. She gave a lot to the community during the 19 years that she lived on this land, that God gave her to me and to my family ”, declared her father Atif Mahr.

Mahr was a remarkable graduate of Cardinal Ritter College Prep in 2020. Her family said she was a part of the soccer team and naturally a person who loved and cared for everyone around her.

She volunteered in the community and was studying to be a nurse. Friends and family of Isis have said the march and the gathering mean the world.

“I am grateful for the support. It’s a beautiful day, ”said his father. “It took away the heartache and pain to have this march in her honor to stop the violence and stop the killings and put down the guns. I can say as a parent that the community has spoken about my daughter and said that it is is enough. “


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“It’s my super power now”: Utah residents living with HIV work to break down stigma surrounding the disease


SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – When Sequan Kolibas was diagnosed with HIV for eight years, the mother of one kept him to herself for years, largely fearing the reaction of others to her news.

Those fears were confirmed when she let out her secret one day while talking to a friend.

“We were just talking about HIV and, and I had kind of a seizure and I told him I had it and he was like, ‘Well, only hookers and junkies get HIV. So which one are you? ‘ “

Kolibas’ fear of the stigma surrounding the disease had proven to be justified. That had been her biggest concern when she learned she had contracted the virus from her five-year-old partner, a man.

“It was extremely scary, it changed my life,” she recalls. “To be honest. I had periods of suicidal thoughts, severe depression. I just thought my happiness was over and my life was over. I let HIV become who I am, instead of “to be a part of who I was. I let my diagnosis define me.

On Wednesday December 1, World AIDS Day will be celebrated, in memory of those who have lost their lives due to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, which is initially caused by a diagnosis of HIV. The occasion of 2021 is particularly poignant as it marks 40 years since the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) first reported the emergence of AIDS among gay communities in New York and California.

Originally dubbed “gay cancer,” the HIV and AIDS epidemic has been ravaged by misinformation, misunderstanding and, of course, stigma against those who contract the virus. Researchers ultimately reduced its primary means of transmission to sharing needles or injection equipment, exposure to blood in open wounds, and sexual intercourse. The shocking announcement of NBA star Magic Johnson’s infection in 1991 showed that HIV can affect people of any sexual orientation – gay or heterosexual – but many of the stigmas have always been hard to shake.

“I think this has persisted since the 1980s,” says Heather Bush, who manages the HIV program for the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) to ABC4.com. “In addition to facing a life-threatening disease, and all that it means, people with HIV worry about what people are going to think or how they are being paid. It’s just a huge additional burden that people have to face. And I think a lot of it is perception.

The truth is, living with HIV in 2021 is very different from what it was in 1981, as evidenced by testimonials and information from a new UDOH campaign, HIVandMe.com. While illness is still a part of life; the website says every three days a new Utah resident is diagnosed with HIV, no longer a death sentence.

Advances in prevention and treatment have made transmission nearly impossible for people with the disease who take appropriate measures, which can be as simple as a daily pill for antiretroviral therapy (ART) and extra precautions for antiretroviral therapy (ART). sexually active people. The new term in HIV medicine is “U = U”. The antiretroviral drug can reduce the amount of HIV in the blood to undetectable levels. If it is undetectable, it cannot be transmitted to others.

“We know it’s still there, we know they still have the virus, but it’s so weak that not only does it protect them and keep them from getting sick, but it also prevents them from passing it on to others. people, ”he added. Bush says, adding that those who have an HIV-positive partner who are not infected can also take preventative drugs. “We have a lot of tools that we didn’t even have 5-10 years ago.”

The biggest obstacle that remains is stigma, as both Bush and Kolibas agree. While medical advances have provided the means to make the spread of HIV and AIDS much more difficult if the right precautions are taken, opening the dialogue is still a work in progress.

Kolibas has since found purpose by sharing its story and founding a nonprofit that provides resources to those infected and information to those with outdated fears and misconceptions about HIV and AIDS.

“You don’t have to change who you are, it doesn’t define who you are,” she says, mentioning that her T-cell count, or the number of disease-fighting blood cells, is higher than before. diagnostic. “We are opening the conversation to educate people so that we can reduce this stigma for people. “

For years, many have thought that even routine, non-sexual or blood-related contact with someone living with HIV could be dangerous. Kolibas’ mission now is to shatter these misconceptions.

“It’s the misconception of ‘Well it’s just a gay disease’, or if somebody has it, you can’t share the same utensils, you can’t squeeze them in their arms you can’t drink out of the same cup as them It’s just about education now I’m kind of using HIV as my superpower now.


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Contra Costa Crisis Center helps parents share their grief and rediscover joy


WALNUT CREEK – Ann Khadalia and Steve Grimes interact with sometimes remarkable ease, sometimes finishing each other’s sentences or remembering another story to tell. They speak easily and think often.

They can always smile, and when the time is right, they can laugh too.

“Believe it or not,” Grimes said, “you can get away with this.”

Yet as they stand together outside the offices of the Contra Costa Crisis Center in Walnut Creek, holding a window to their soul – photos of Steve’s late son, Kevin, and Ann’s late daughter, Priya – the dark cloud of pain is never far beyond the horizon.

They are grateful that it is no longer raining sadness.

Grimes and Khadalia are close today as their respective paths connected and passed through the Contra Costa crisis center following the deaths of their children over 20 years ago. Kevin Grimes, who was almost 16, collapsed while on a scout outing with his father near Kirkwood Mountain Resort in March 1996 and never regained consciousness. Three years later, 5-year-old Priya Khadalia was struck and killed by an unlicensed driver of a car who turned on a red light at an intersection in Hayward.

WALNUT CREEK, CA – OCTOBER 12: Contra Costa Crisis Center volunteer Steve Grimes poses for a photo, with a photo of his 15-year-old son Kevin, whom he lost in a tragic event, in Walnut Creek, in California, Wednesday, October 12, 2021 (Anda Chu / Bay Area News Group)

Their parents are now volunteering on the same grief support teams that helped them survive the worst nightmare they have ever faced.

Grimes facilitates and sometimes leads bereavement groups. Khadalia does the same and was so inspired by the centre’s impact on her life that she obtained her Masters in Counseling at Cal State East Bay two years ago.

“We’re not trying to be therapists,” Grimes said. “We Listen. We are empathetic. We ask open ended questions. We have a conversation and we try to find a connection.

The Crisis Center has facilitated such conversations since 1963. The association is accredited by the American Association of Suicidology and provides 24/7 support and counseling to people in crisis, distress or suicidal, 365 days a year. . Its mission is to keep people in crisis alive until the storm passes.

WALNUT CREEK, CA – OCTOBER 12: Contra Costa Crisis Center volunteer Ann Khadalia poses for a photo, with a photo of her 8-year-old daughter Priya, whom she lost in a tragic event, in Walnut Creek, California, Wednesday October 12, 2021 (Anda Chu / Bay Area News Group)

The organization received funding this year from Share the Spirit, an annual vacation campaign that helps residents in need of East Bay. Donations will help support 56 nonprofit agencies in Contra Costa and Alameda counties. The center will use its grant for staff salaries and benefits; create the ability to return customers’ daily phone calls; train new volunteer animators; and coordinate weekly bereavement support groups.

Grimes and Khadalia said these services were essential for their ability to resume their lives after the loss of their children. Each participated in group sessions in small gatherings, meetings that turned strangers who started out into teammates united in grief.

“They helped me get through my grief, but to be more precise, they really allowed me to grieve,” Khadalia said. “I’m in this nightmare, but I was so wrapped up in the way other people were doing that I wasn’t dealing with my own feelings of loss and grief. I was just sort of surviving. The first few months were a total fog. I think for a year I cried every day. But the group helped me find a place to go with it all, and as you go through the process it starts to help you.

Grimes said the grieving groups at the center also provided a place where people were not afraid to talk with him about his loss, a key to his recovery. He said family and friends were initially reluctant to bring up Kevin for fear of opening a wound that was too painful.

Such fear is wrong, he said. The memory of Kevin is never far away, and neither is his father’s desire to talk about him.

“I’m always so happy when people ask me,” he said. “He was an adventurous young man. He had short trick type skis. He loved the Boy Scouts, he loved bungee jumping. We just did a lot, a lot of trips together during the summer. He was an explorer.

Khadalia similarly shines when the subject turns to Priya.

“She was a very lively and spirited little girl,” she said. “She was very determined, extremely curious. She loved to dance and took ballet lessons. She had a fearless personality.

In many ways, the same can be said of Priya’s mom and Kevin’s dad. They experienced the worst fear of parents. And while the scars are still there, so too are the inspiration they provide to countless others just by going forward and rediscovering the joy.

Both say the Crisis Center was an integral part of this process.

“As you get help, you come back to a place where you know you can help others,” Khadalia said. “And it seems helping others is what made that dark cloud not so close to me anymore. It’s there, but it’s very far now, and there is light now.

And the pain is less intense.

“The loss allows you to have a perspective,” Grimes said. “It teaches you what is important and what is not. We are here to show others that life can go on and on.


Share the spirit

The Share the Spirit vacation campaign, sponsored by the Bay Area News Group, provides relief, hope and opportunity to residents in need by funding nonprofit vacation and outreach programs in the counties of Alameda and Contra Costa. To make a tax-deductible contribution, cut the coupon accompanying this story or go to www.sharethespiriteastbay.org/donate. Readers with questions, as well as individuals or businesses interested in making grants or contributions, can contact the Share the Spirit program at 925-655-8355 or [email protected]


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New Mexico Legal Aid Makes a Difference for Highly Needed Clients | My opinion


New Mexico Legal Aid is a non-profit law firm that has provided free legal assistance to New Mexicans living in poverty for over 50 years. Inside our offices, the reception call center is fully loaded as soon as we open our doors.

It is very common for potential customers to start calling long before the opening, hoping to be the first when we start in the morning. Each month, over 1,000 New Mexicans living on the poverty line contact our lawyers and staff for help. In many cases, we are able to quickly resolve their issues within hours, but too often we have clients who are dealing with multiple issues at once such as evictions, unemployment, domestic violence and issues. income security.

These people are assigned to one of our advocates, who works in four specialized divisions: family, consumption, housing and economic security. They are stretched and process over 5,500 cases per year. But the high volume of cases is not as frustrating as when they are forced to turn down a viable case simply because we lack resources. For more than 100 New Mexicans per month, this is their reality.

Currently, nearly 400,000 New Mexicans live in poverty and qualify for our services, and we are already seeing that the demand continues to increase. In order to help more people, we need a stronger commitment from the legislature to increase funding for the Civil Legal Services Commission, which supports nonprofit civil legal providers in New Mexico.

We need to increase our staff and we need to be able to offer a competitive salary to a limited pool of available legal talent. A recent study by New Mexico Voices for Children looked specifically at New Mexico families and their income security. In its study, Voices for Children reported that 34 percent of children in New Mexico were food insecure in 2020, up from 24 percent in 2018. And nearly 30 percent of adults in households with children had little or no confidence in their ability to pay. their next rent or mortgage payment on time.

This study helps to put into perspective some of the reasons for the growing demand for help from our association.

Fortunately, we work alongside several other organizations that are equally focused and dedicated to the mission of helping people living in poverty by helping them with their legal issues. Each year, approximately 15,000 New Mexicans benefit from direct legal services offered by Legal Aid New Mexico, and thousands more benefit from our indirect services. When we are successful in helping a client, we keep a family at home, we improve the educational outcomes of their children, and we improve the health outcomes for the family.

We help these families to put down roots in the community, which in turn helps them to earn more income and ultimately to take root more deeply in our community.

Lewis G. Creekmore is Executive Director of New Mexico Legal Aid, headquartered in Albuquerque.


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After chronic illness, San José woman seeks help to become independent


Almost two decades after leaving the Philippines for San José, Nerissa Ramirez’s life finally started to get easier.

She had climbed the assembly line at an electronics company in Fremont and bought her first car. At night, she spent time with friends or attended local meetings of Jehovah’s Witnesses.

But then she was diagnosed with lupus – a chronic autoimmune disease in which the body attacks its own organs and tissues – as well as kidney disease.

“All of a sudden I’m fighting with my body,” recalls Ramirez, 52. “It was so hard.”

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Nerissa Ramirez cries as she shares the story of her struggles on October 12, 2021, at her new apartment in San Jose, Calif. (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group)

In the years since that 2012 diagnosis, that fight reduced Ramirez’s independence to a fraction of what it once was. After years of working and living alone, her illness forced her to spend most of the past year in a skilled nursing facility, receiving grueling dialysis treatment four times a week, and depending on others. for tasks such as eating, bathing and using the toilet.

It was around this time that she met Tita Das, a case manager at the Silicon Valley Independent Living Center, a non-profit organization that offers people with disabilities in Santa Clara County a range of free services, such as the advocacy, peer counseling and helping with the transition from hospital to independent living.

“I could see she was very sick,” Das said, “but she has that motivation, that aspiration.” Das began to think about a key question: “What can we take away from her so that her journey can end in at least one way?” “

To that end, the association hopes that donations collected through Wish Book can help make Ramirez’s life a little more comfortable.

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Tita Das, Case Manager at Silicon Valley Independent Living Center, speaks during an interview at Nerissa Ramirez’s apartment in San Jose, Calif. On October 12, 2021 (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group)

His journey so far has been marred by painful setbacks. Within months of being first diagnosed with lupus, Ramirez’s energy wore off. She was forced to reduce her working hours in the electronics business and was so exhausted that she could barely move her hands or get out of bed.

As she suffered from different flare-ups, she bounced back between treatments, even going through chemotherapy at one point. A bright spot came in January 2018, when Ramirez finally obtained U.S. citizenship and planned to return home to her home province in the Philippines to reunite with her mother for the first time in 25 years.

Shortly before his arrival, his mother passed away.

“I’ve never seen her, for how many years?” Ramirez said, covering his face with both hands as tears rolled down his cheeks. “I’m so sad – very, very sad.”

She has spent this winter in the Philippines, trying to follow the advice of her doctors to stay stress free and take advantage of the warm weather. The following fall, an unexpected glimmer of hope appeared: Thanks to church friends, she met a man and they started talking every day. After a few months of dating, they got married.

It was this sense of liveliness that Das and the rest of the SVILC team noticed when they first met Ramirez. FaceTiming her husband back in the Philippines before going to bed and eating with friends.

“Even though I’m in this kind of situation, I really, really want to live a normal life like everyone else,” Ramirez said.

Working together under the Section 811 Federal Disability Assistance Program, SVILC was able to secure Ramirez a two-bedroom apartment in San Jose and she left the nursing home in August. Since then, the cozy apartment she shares with a caretaker has been lovingly decorated, with a large portrait of a lush cascading island reminiscent of the Philippines.

But depending so much on others creates constant challenges: Sometimes the van that transports Ramirez to and from dialysis is late, forcing the center to cut his treatment short. Other times, he drops her off in front of his apartment building, too far away to walk the long hallway to the elevator unassisted.

“I am crying, but I have to be patient,” Ramirez said of these cases. ” I can not do anything. Just be patient and keep talking to the right person who can help me.

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Afternoon light shines on Nerissa Ramirez as she spends time in her new apartment in San Jose, Calif. On October 12, 2021 (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group )

Ramirez and Das seek help from Wish Book readers to secure his first motorized wheelchair, which would ensure Ramirez is never left stranded outside his apartment. And to make it easier to access and return to dialysis sessions, they are also looking for help buying a car to refurbish with manual controls.

There is one more thing: a plane ticket for her husband to emigrate from the Philippines. Ramirez – who has already been approved to be her godfather – took an affectionate look at the bench she placed in the kitchen so they could dine side by side.

Until she arrives, she said, she will remain “positive, positive, positive.”

“Whatever happened, it’s happened before,” Ramirez said. “We have to keep moving forward. “

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Nerissa Ramirez chats with her husband, who lives in the Philippines, at his new apartment in San Jose on October 12, 2021 (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group)

THE WISH BOOK SERIES
The Wish Book is an annual series of The Mercury News that invites readers to help their neighbors.

TO WISH
Donations will help Nerissa Ramirez Рa client of the Silicon Valley Independent Living Center Рpurchase a motorized bariatric wheelchair, power recliner, used vehicle with manual controls as well as a one-way trip from the Philippines to San Jos̩. Objective: $ 23,700.

HOW TO GIVE
Donate at wishbook.mercurynews.com or send the coupon by mail.

ONLINE SUPPLEMENT
Read more Wish Book stories, view photos and videos at wishbook.mercurynews.com.


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New Catawba College graduate Madison Kluge leads Salisbury towards sustainability goals – Salisbury Post


By Natalie Anderson
[email protected]

SALISBURY – Newly graduated Madison Kluge from Catawba College became the city’s first sustainability coordinator earlier this year, and she stepped up to help transform the goals of a more sustainable lifestyle into reality.

Kluge, 21, graduated from Catawba College earlier this year with a degree in environment and sustainability. She began an internship with the Salisbury Public Works Department in February before assuming a full-time role as Sustainability Coordinator in May. In 2020, she also completed an internship at Bread Riot, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting local farmers and providing access to locally produced food. Kluge said she was still a volunteer for Bread Riot.

Also during his stay in Catawba, Kluge did an internship at the school’s Environmental Center for over two years. She said her teachers helped guide her to the position she currently holds, which suits her well as she enjoys coordinating and collaborating with multiple groups.

Kluge, from Maryland, said she was living in Mocksville when her sister decided to attend Catawba College, which resulted in several trips to Salisbury with the option to explore while her sister was in class.

“I fell in love with the city, the culture it has here, the possibility of growth and the good people,” Kluge said.

Much of his work now requires him to strengthen relationships with city, county, and nonprofit organizations, in addition to strengthening environmental education and awareness of sustainable living.

Kluge is working with city staff to help draft the Forward 2040 plan, which aims to frame priorities and decisions over the next 20 years as Salisbury. In addition to this, Kluge is responsible for working on the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals of Salisbury City Council.

“I help steer the city towards a sustainable mindset,” Kluge said. “And put the goals they have in mind into perspective and make them come true.”

In March, board members adopted a set of goals for 2021 following a goal setting retreat in February. Among the priorities for the city’s infrastructure and human capital was the focus on reducing waste and promoting efficiency as well as improving infrastructure to promote foot and bicycle transport. In addition, council members have indicated that they want to support public transit for neighboring communities and explore alternative modes of transportation.

Also this year, the city used an amount of $ 818,000 Volkswagen Public transportation / facility shuttle program gdiatribe from the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality to purchase two electric buses for Salisbury Transit. Kluge said finding and applying for such grants is another part of his job. She is currently working to obtain a community subsidy for waste reduction from the NCDEQ.

Kluge told Salisbury that much of the thinking “towards sustainability” is already in place among residents and staff, which is part of what attracts him to the position. She said she is often pushed by older residents and colleagues who want to see Salisbury flourish with things such as increased use of electric vehicles and improved air quality.

“It is really my colleagues and community members who inspire me to help Salisbury follow this green vision,” she said.

Although her role falls under the Public Works Department, Kluge said she often works with communications and planning staff.

Current projects include a new Sustainability Salisbury newsletter, the first edition of which will be launched in January. This newsletter will provide more information and education for a sustainable lifestyle in Salisbury. She is also working to roll out more sustainability education through social media apps like TikTok and Instagram.

Other initiatives Kluge is working on include increasing awareness of waste, recycling, composting and waste prevention during the holiday season, promoting city and county parks, and working with neighboring schools to implement more sustainability-oriented programs. In 2022, the city will launch a nature city challenge in the spring on the occasion of Earth Day. City Nature Challenge is an event that takes place across the country, where local residents take photos and make observations of nature in their area and support the city’s naturalists.

Among its long-term goals is establishing a more robust internship program where students from Catawba, for example, can intern with the city to conduct research on sustainability, which is beneficial to the community. both for the city and students interested in careers related to sustainable development.

Eventually, Kluge said she would like to see the city’s composting program expanded to accept more types of waste. Creating a carbon inventory to assess how much carbon the city sees is another long-term goal that requires a lot of training that it is currently undergoing.

Additionally, another goal is to work with businesses to create a business alliance and neighborhood alliance with established sustainability goals, including increased recycling and waste reduction initiatives.

Kluge suggests that city residents take advantage of the free compost available at the Grants Creek Composting Facility, located at 1955 Grubb Ferry Road. Residents can pick up the compost generated from the previous year’s yard waste on Friday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, contact [email protected] or call 704-638-5260.

Contact reporter Natalie Anderson at 704-797-4246.


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Morning Pointe ‘Seniors Got Talent’ events raise over $ 60,000 for the Morning Pointe Foundation


Morning Pointe’s “Seniors Got Talent” presentation events across Tennessee and Kentucky raised more than $ 60,000 for the Morning Pointe Foundation among four events in 2021, after a one-year hiatus in the series. annual fundraiser at the height of the coronavirus pandemic. Over 100 seniors danced, sang and performed their way onto the big stage this year to raise funds for the philanthropic arm of Morning Pointe Senior Living founded by Greg A. Vital and J. Franklin Farrow, healthcare entrepreneurs for seniors of Tennessee.

The 501 (c) 3 nonprofit public service organization was established in 2014 to deliver caregiver support programs, sponsor education awareness events, and fund clinical scholarships to advance caregivers. care for the elderly in the South East.

“Morning Pointe’s ‘Seniors Got Talent’ events are flagship events in our four main markets, and we knew this year was going to be very special because we couldn’t have it last year,” said Mr. Vital, President of Morning Pointe. Life of the elderly. “So many of Morning Pointe’s sponsors and friends have stepped up in 2021 to help seniors showcase their talents on the theater stage. ”

Building on a 10-year tradition that began at Morning Pointe of Hixson, Seniors Got Talent events are the Morning Pointe Foundation’s primary fundraising activity as they seek to help develop the workforce. workforce and fill the pipeline of future senior nursing associates.

In total, the four events in Lexington (Ky.), Chattanooga, Franklin and Knoxville raised over $ 60,000 to support the mission of the Morning Pointe Foundation. The main sponsors include the East
Tennessee Pharmacy Services, Middle Tennessee Pharmacy Services, Propel Insurance, First Horizon Bank, CHI Health at Home, and RBA Employee Benefits Advisors.

Many others have helped make performing live on a theater stage a reality for these seniors, many of whom have only dreamed of something like this. The talent spectrum included artists such as a ventriloquist, a couple of tap dancers, a dance troupe, a choir and several bands, singers and musicians, all aged 62 and over.

“What can I say, it was an amazing experience. It was wonderful and made me want to cry, ”said Jan Douglas, 78-year-old singer-songwriter and one of the big winners.

Morning Pointe Senior Living, headquartered in Chattanooga, develops, owns and manages
35 Morning Pointe Assisting Life, Self-Care and The Lantern in Morning Pointe Alzheimer’s Center of Excellence communities in five southeastern states.

“This is what it is about: presenting an abundance of talented seniors on the biggest stage of their lives. while proving that age is really just a number. You can still dance, sing and show off your talent until retirement, ”said Mr. Vital. “We thank all of our sponsors for so generously allowing the Morning Pointe Foundation to provide much needed opportunities for nursing students. while providing support to caregivers and drawing attention to important health issues for older people. “


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Bay Area Nonprofit seeks 300 volunteers to participate in study on sla


Bay Area nonprofit dedicated to advancing research into an incurable – and deadly – disease of the nervous system is looking for an additional 300 people by the end of this month to participate in the largest research project ever carried out on the disease.

EverythingALS has already recruited nearly 700 people this year in a national speech study that aims to collect quantifiable data on some of the early symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Gehrig was a New York Yankees player who was diagnosed with a rare degenerative disease at age 36 and died in 1941 just before his 38th birthday.


An estimated 30,000 Americans are living with ALS, which results in a widespread loss of muscle control as nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are destroyed.

The first symptoms range from twitching, cramps, and weakness to difficulty chewing and slurred speech. Patients usually do not live more than five years after the first signs of the disease appear.

“With 1,000 participants, which is the largest group ever recruited to perform a neurological assessment of people with ALS, we are reinventing the research platform by using a patient-centered citizen science approach to get things done 1 000 times faster. EverythingALS co-founder Indu Navar said in a press release.

A smaller study on speech earlier this year collected data that only recently led to the identification of breathing patterns and mouth movements that differ significantly between healthy individuals and patients with ALS, including including those which are pre-symptomatic.

Now, EverythingALS wants to have at least 1,000 participants on board by Thanksgiving in its so-called “Speech Bucket Challenge†in the hopes that the larger trial will validate the link between ALS and speech abnormalities.

As the muscles of the face lose their flexibility, it becomes more and more difficult to open the mouth wide enough and to use the tongue to form certain sounds. The throat muscles also contract, limiting the amount of air that must pass over the vocal cords for someone to speak.

The study is carried out remotely through web-based computer software that records and analyzes the speed and depth of participants’ breathing as well as the volume of their voice when speaking into a microphone.

Anyone with an Internet connection, webcam, and microphone can participate in the project, which is open to people with or suspected of having SLA as well as healthy people who can serve as witnesses.

Volunteers converse with an avatar – a virtual assistant called Tina – while a webcam and microphone record their speech and facial gestures for the Modality.ai software to analyze.

Supporters of the study note that so far the number of ALS patients involved in the research has been low as they often have difficulty getting to the facilities where the work is being performed.

But most have smartphones and computers, making remote data collection a viable option.

For more information or to join the study, email [email protected] or call (650) 833-9100. To learn more about the organization, visit Everythingals.org.

Copyright © 2021 Bay City News, Inc. All rights reserved. Republication, redistribution, or redistribution without the express written consent of Bay City News, Inc. is prohibited. Bay City News is a 24/7 news service covering the Greater Bay Area.

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Non-profit organization plans to build village of 50 small houses for homeless veterans at OKC


A Kansas City-based nonprofit focused on ending veteran homelessness plans to expand to Oklahoma City.

The Veterans Community Project announced last week that it will build 50 small homes, each under 300 square feet, on a property on North Phillips Avenue, between Northeast 26th and 28th Streets.

The property will also house a community center and an awareness center.

“What we are doing is we are really restarting the transition from military to civilian from day one,” said VCP Chairman Jason Kander. “No matter how long you’ve been homeless, no matter how long you’ve been fighting, let’s do this again. ”

In recent years, Oklahoma City’s homeless population has increased, according to a 2020 city survey. Veterans make up about 10% of the city’s homeless population.

“10% means 150, 160, 170 homeless vets on our streets or in our shelters every night,” said The Homeless Alliance executive director Dan Straughan.

The nonprofit model includes on-site services and transitional housing for homeless veterans. After receiving treatment and help, Kander said residents of the mini-houses were transitioning to permanent housing.

In Kansas City, Kander said 85% of their residents have moved into a permanent living situation.

Social, legal and other services help with their transition, which are provided by local groups and volunteers.

“A big part of the reason we come to Oklahoma City is because we have identified Oklahoma City as a place that has the capacity to provide this level of service and this level of passion to veterans,” Kander said.

A spokesperson for VCP said the nonprofit did not yet have a construction schedule.


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Avondale’s new workforce housing symbolizes hope and success for black residents


CINCINNATI – A workforce housing development is coming to Avondale, and residents have said they are thrilled with the hope and wealth the project is supposed to bring to the community.

The Avondale Development Corporation inaugurated the first phase of the Hale Avenue Townhomes project on Thursday. Seven new townhouses with two and three bedroom units will be built on land on Hale Avenue between Harvey Avenue and Hallwood Place. The units will cost between $ 230,000 and $ 260,000, prices suited to families earning 120% of the region’s median income.

“It gives families the opportunity to own property here in the community instead of just relying on apartment living,” said Terresa Adams, Treasurer of the Avondale Community Council.

Vince Terry, vice president of ADC, said the development is in Cincinnati’s second highest employment area, “so having the property here within walking distance of a lot of jobs is going to be amazing.”

The subdivision means many achievements for its leaders, almost all from disadvantaged backgrounds. The Townhouses are the first development led by black women in Avondale, with Maria Collins of ADC and architect Bridget Harris, president of BTH Construction Delivery, at the helm. The project is also notable for being primarily supported by entities owned and operated by people of color – Kaiker Development & Construction, owned by Kai Lewars, is the general contractor for the project.

“It has been wonderful working with the other companies and organizations who have all contributed professionally to this project,” Lewars said.

Lewars noted how rare it is for black businesses to have the opportunity to collaborate and make developments like townhouses a reality. The fact that this was a black-led development helped allay fears from onlookers who thought townhouses would lead to gentrification.

“From the community itself to the black professionals who have been under contract, whether under contract or volunteering, it took a bit of everyone to bring it to fruition – and I know the community has it. appreciates, ”Lewars said. .

“Being a minority woman leading this charge and being our first project as a non-profit organization, many people have questioned whether we would have the ability or the capacity to make it happen,” said Maria Collins. . , ADC’s director of real estate and community development. “I think that’s what’s really important in this whole process and why we encountered so many obstacles. We did not yet have a proven track record.

Still, Collins said a small group of people believed in the effort and helped move his team forward.

“These people have worked with us to make sure we can innovate on this project and I appreciate their support and partnership to date,” Collins said.

This is ADC’s first stand-alone project. There will ultimately be two dozen townhouses built on Hale and Hallwood avenues in three phases. The houses are particularly marketed to blacks and first time buyers. Organizers say they want to foster opportunities for aspiring black homeowners and provide them with equity in the neighborhood.

CDA officials note that only about 27% of Avondale residents are homeowners, while the remaining vast majority of residents are in rental properties. They hope projects like the Hale Avenue townhouses will continue to introduce more affordable housing to Avondale and surrounding areas.

“There just isn’t enough of that stock in Cincinnati and we’re excited to be able to provide it,” said Harris. “This is something that hasn’t happened in the past, and it makes it even more special that we are really here, that we are innovating and that this project is going to move and build. “

“We want to make a sizable difference in what it means to own a home here in Avondale so that when you think of this community as an owner, you think of it as a place where you want your kids to be, your grand- parents be. You want to be able to contribute to the community and make it a great place, ”said Royce Sutton, CDA Chairman of the Board.

These townhouses are part of a dramatic increase in major neighborhood improvements and investments in what was once a struggling neighborhood. Last month, Fifth Third Bank announced it was investing $ 20 million in Avondale as part of an effort to revitalize predominantly black neighborhoods across the country.

Nearby, the expansion of the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and the development of the Uptown Innovation Corridor on Martin Luther King Boulevard are further signs of Avondale’s transformation in real time. Despite all the changes, leaders say they want all residents, new and old, to feel like they have a place in the community.

“Avondale is one of the most sought after communities in town right now,” said Tony Moore, chair of the Avondale Community Council. “What concerns us is: how do we get the current residents to stay who want to stay and get them to mingle with the new residents? It is our job: to keep what we have and to grow with what we will have.

Like Moore, Russell Hairston, the executive director of the Avondale Development Corporation, acknowledges the concerns of longtime residents who fear eviction due to the new development coming to the neighborhood. It supports affordable housing projects like the Hale Avenue Townhouses as a solution for the most vulnerable people to always find stability and a better quality of life in Avondale. He is also optimistic about the positive message this development sends to the community.

“When you’ve faced intergenerational poverty, when you’ve faced crime, when you’ve faced all the hardships that a distressed community has to go through, it’s uplifting to see the development. It’s uplifting to see homeownership. It’s edifying for kids to see that if they want to be an architect, developer, banker, or association manager, look: you can do it.

Monique John covers gentrification for WCPO 9. She is part of our donor-supported journalism program Report For America. Learn more about RFA here.

If there are any stories about gentrification in the Greater Cincinnati area that you think we should cover, let us know. Send us your tips at [email protected]


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Bezos Day One Fund Provides $ 2.5 Million to Family Life Center in Kahului, Maui


Family life center, Kahului. File photo by Wendy Osher.

Family Life Center, Inc., a non-profit organization serving the homeless on the islands of Maui, Moloka’i and Kaua’i, has been selected to receive a $ 2.5 million grant from Bezos Day One Families Fund, the largest grant in the history of the Family Life Center. .

This is the second year in a row that the organization has received a donation from the Bezos Day One Families Fund. In 2020, the association received $ 1.25 million from the same fund. The Family Life Center is one of 32 organizations in 21 states, and the only one in Hawaii to be included in funding allocations this year.

Launched in 2018 by Amazon Founder and Executive Chairman Jeff Bezos, the Day One Families Fund presents annual leadership awards to organizations and civic groups doing compassionate and needle-moving work to provide shelter and support. against hunger in order to meet the immediate needs of young families.

“The Family Life Center is incredibly grateful to the Day 1 Families Fund, which has so generously supported our organization for the second year in a row,” said Maude Cumming, Executive Director of the Family Life Center. “Our Day One Families Fund 2020 grant allowed us to expand our reach beyond Maui and Kaua’i to reach Moloka’i as well. This year’s donation will allow us to improve and expand the services we offer on the three islands.

This one-time grant will allow the Family Life Center to continue expanding its services on the islands of Kaua’i and Moloka’i, where the homeless population is “very underserved,” according to Cumming. The organization also plans to develop a suitable shelter model for families, replicating a pioneering approach during the COVID-19 pandemic in Maui.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW THE AD

Family Life Center was selected as a Day One Families Fund grant recipient by an independent advisory board of homeless experts with experience in politics, advocacy, racial equity, protection child and housing and service delivery, as well as direct experience of homelessness.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW THE AD

This year, the Day One Families Fund awarded a total of $ 96.2 million in grants to dozens of organizations across the country.

“Without the support of the Family Life Center, my family and I may still be living in our car,” said a former client of the Family Life Center. “I am so grateful to have a home for our son. We will never be homeless again.

The Bezos Day One Fund has pledged $ 2 billion to focus on creating meaningful and lasting impacts in two areas: funding existing nonprofits that help homeless families and the creation of a network of new non-profit first-level preschools in low-income communities. .

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

The Day One Families Fund presents annual leadership awards to organizations and civic groups that do compassionate and needle-moving work to provide shelter and support from hunger to meet the immediate needs of young families.

Since 2018, the Day One Families Fund has awarded 130 grants totaling more than $ 398 million to organizations across the country that fight homelessness and help families gain housing and stability. The vision statement comes from Mary’s Place in Seattle: No child sleeps outside.

Founded in 1982, the Family Life Center serves the homeless in Maui County. The organization has grown to employ over 40 employees. As a primary resource for homelessness services in Maui County and a growing key resource in Kaua’i and Moloka’i, the organization has assisted over 1,271 families over the past three years.

The Family Life Center offers a holistic approach to meeting the needs of the homeless through a wide range of services, including outreach, shelter, shelter and prevention services.

Bezos recently purchased a 14 acre Maui beachfront estate at Keoneʻōʻio “La Perouse” in the Mākena area of ​​South Maui.

The Family Life donation is the latest in a list of contributions Bezos made to Maui this year. Other donations were made to:


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Non profit living

ExpressionMed Celebrates Diabetes Awareness Month with NFT


MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. 11, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – What do dragons, NFTs, and medical gangs have in common? They all work together to improve the lives of people with diabetes.

ExpressionMed, which has been making designed medical tapes for over six years, is launching its largest awareness campaign to date. they launch Diadragon NFT to raise money for life-saving diabetes supplies, create educational content from YouTube to TikTok, and donate 10% of profits from diabetes-themed tapes to the College Diabetes Network.

Diadragons is an NFT collection project started by ExpressionMed CEO Meghan Sharkus that features art, built in collaboration with Emma from Type One Toucan.

The two commercial competitors have come together to create collectible art, which is available for purchase at www.diadragons.com. This art features one-of-a-kind dragons that represent pieces of the diabetes community. The owners of Diadragon not only support an amazing cause, but also have access to a health-focused community and weekly prizes.

The main objective of the project is to raise funds for “Life Drops”, a donation of funds to pay for one year of insulin and CGM supplies. Anyone who owns a Diadragon is eligible to win, and they can donate the funds to themselves (if they are insulin dependent), a friend or family member, or donate them to Insulin For Life USA. , where it will be used to transport insulin to developing countries and disaster relief areas.

It is one of the first NFT projects to disburse funds directly to individuals.

“We aim to change the way charitable giving works in diabetes,” said Meghan Sharkus, CEO of ExpressionMed. “Right now there is a significant flow of funds for advocacy and research. While these are important, they do not address the current insulin affordability crisis. “

“On average, people with diabetes pay a third of their income for the supplies they need to stay alive. We hope that by donating directly to these families, we can inspire other projects to do the same, creating a better balance between solving the issues at hand and donating to longer term initiatives. ”

This unique approach to NFT is focused on supporting the diabetic community in a new form of giving back that is currently inaccessible to government and other nonprofit support programs.

You can join the Diadragon community on Discord or follow @Diadragons on Twitter to participate and learn more about the project.

ExpressionMed will distribute Diadragon stickers to raise awareness among local businesses and through collaborations with College Diabetes Network, NickiChicki, Senita Athletics, The Petite Nurse NP and more. Each sticker features an insulin dependent dragon and a QR code indicating how people can learn, support and take action on behalf of Diabetes Awareness Month. Digital versions of the sticker are also available for distribution at www.diadragons.com/cause.

In addition, ExpressionMed has added three new diabetes awareness templates to its collection of ribbons and stickers. These can be worn by both diabetics and non-diabetics to spark conversation around the disease, and they make great gifts to show support for loved ones with diabetes.

Finally, 10% of November revenue from ExpressionMed’s diabetes-related bands will be donated to the College Diabetes Network (CDN). CDN helps young adults with type 1 diabetes find the peer relationships and resources they need as they transition to college and beyond. Donations will be distributed to the young adults they serve.

ExpressionMed manufactures pre-cut device tapes from the most durable and comfortable materials, allowing users to achieve peak performance with their portable chronic care devices. They currently sell over 200 models for several types of devices, including diabetic supplies available worldwide. The constant addition of dynamic and diverse design offerings allows the devices to represent the people who wear them, not the disease they are living with. Their products are made and packaged in the USA and are waterproof, fray resistant, and easy to apply and wear. You will find additional products and information at www.expressionmed.com.

###

Media contact:

Brittany Stevens
ExpressionMed Marketing Manager
952-270-9462
[email protected]

Related images

Image 1: Diadragon

Diadragon with Libre CGM

This content was posted through the press release distribution service at Newswire.com.


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Non profit living

Equitable Giving Circle stimulates communities of color, giving without strings attached: Sharing Season 2021


The pandemic has put the life of most countries around the world on hold. But for Equitable Giving Circle, it was the catalyst that started it all.

Since its inception in the spring of 2020, the black women-led organization has collected weekly food boxes for thousands of families, distributed plants, and provided housing assistance and school supplies to families in the Portland area.

Driven by a philosophy of “give without conditions”, the organization’s mission is to economically stimulate communities of color and address inequalities created by institutional biases and discriminatory systems.

“We know the most ignored people are often the hardest to reach,” said AJ McCreary, executive director and one of the founders. “We wanted to take care of black and brunette people, women and women. “

McCreary said the group had evolved from pre-pandemic discussions about ways to support black and brunette women in professional settings. At an event called Black Growers Gathering, McCreary said, she met people who inspired her. The pandemic has prompted the organization to regroup more quickly.

“Farm-to-table produce has always been in fashion here,” she said. “And as business owners, moms, aunts, community caregivers, we were all worried about what was going on. So I said let’s buy CSAs from farmers in BIPOC and give them to black families. “

AJ McCreary is the Managing Director of Equitable Giving Circle.Randy L. Rasmussen / For The Oregonian / OregonLive

She and several others started fundraising and started delivering food in June 2020. The organization now delivers boxes of food to 325 households or families every week.

The nonprofit, beneficiary of the Oregonian / OregonLive’s 2021 Season of Sharing fundraising campaign, has an annual budget of around $ 1.2 million, with four and more employees of 50 volunteers.

> Donate to Fair Giving Circle or the General Fund of the Season of Sharing

The organization aims to provide three main services to BIPOC families: food, accommodation and welfare.

Every week, Equitable Giving Circle hosts a pop-up pantry where black and brunette individuals and families can pick up produce and packaged items. “We see an average of 75 families or households per week,” McCreary said.

The food comes from local farms and businesses. CSA director DeeDee Hopkins said she tries to get unique products every week.

“Bob’s Red Mill, Dave’s Killer Bread, Stumptown Coffee,” Hopkins said, “I got a lot more yeas than nays about what we do in the community.”

A sign reading "Fair Giving Circle"

The majority of Equitable Giving Circle’s funding in its first year was spent on food programs. But the organization is also helping families find stable housing and has provided backpacks and new clothes to more than 500 children.Randy L. Rasmussen / For The Oregonian / OregonLive

Although the organization has a social media presence, Director of Outreach Dyvisha Gordon said much of its work is spread through word of mouth and the connections it is already forming.

“I’m in the community, so we know what our community members need,” Gordon said. “It’s a very small BIPOC community, so we all work together and collaborate. “

Several founding members said that although they did not know each other before, they had heard about each other because they had all been active in helping their communities.

“We may be a new organization, but we’re not new to serving the Portland metro area,” said Housing Manager Lillian Green.

Leigh Bohannon of the Black Parent Initiative, a Portland-based organization that connects black families with community-specific resources and education, said that during the 2020 holiday season, Equitable Giving Circle has provided more than 150 gift baskets and boxes of food, including culturally specific foods, to families with whom his organization works.

“It tends to be a pantry problem that ‘you get what you get and you don’t complain’,” Bohannon said. “But you should feel valued. You shouldn’t feel like you are a burden or less than deserving of nice things because you need a little help. They made our families really feel special. “

The majority of Equitable Giving Circle’s funding in its first year was spent on food programs. But the organization also helps families find stable housing.

Over the past year, it has distributed emergency rents and three-month mortgage grants, which have helped prevent dozens of families from being evicted.

The organization hopes to expand the housing program.

“We really want a radical model of wealth and equity redistribution,” Green said. “We really want to buy an apartment complex and have cohorts of families – especially black and brown single parents – live there for a few years without rent, so they can live, heal, save and, in the end, have a competitive down payment. . “

Equitable Giving Circle has provided backpacks and new clothing to over 500 children. He also hosts a “Plant Jam,” distributing houseplants to community members by working with local stores like Birds and Bees Nursery and EcoVibe Style.

When buying food, the organization looks for companies belonging to BIPOC.

A man stacks crates of produce.

Pablo Muñoz, of Pablo Muñoz Farms in Dayton, delivers product for distribution by the nonprofit Portland Equitable Giving Circle on October 21, 2021 in Portland.Randy L. Rasmussen / For The Oregonian / OregonLive

Japhety Ngabireyimana, whose family owns Happiness Family Farm, said McCreary contacted last year and asked if they were willing to provide boxes of community supported agriculture. The experience prompted the farm to start its own CSA program and to seek partnerships with others as well.

“I think they do a good job supporting us as farmers and highlighting what we do,” he said.

Dr. Allen, co-owner of EcoVibe Style, said she appreciates the group’s commitment to BIPOC-owned businesses. His company has a “matching donation” program: every time a customer purchases a plant to donate to Equitable Giving Circle, EcoVibe Style matches that donation.

As the founders of Equitable Giving Circle seek to increase their impact, they are excited about the work they have done so far.

“I’m really proud of our intentionality in everything we do,” said McCreary. “I’m proud that we’re continually stretching organizations to be better and making those little pivots that really have a profound impact. “

What your donation can do

$ 55: Provides a box of local food to a food insecure family.

$ 250: Provides one month of local food (one box per week for four weeks) to a food insecure family.

$ 500: Provides two weeks of rent / mortgage support.

> Donate to Fair Giving Circle or the General Fund of the Season of Sharing

Read more Season of Sharing stories at oregonlive.com/sharing


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Non profit living

Vivalon ends the challenge of Marin’s paratransit contract


A VIvalon paratransit bus descends Bridgeway in Sausalito on Saturday, September 25, 2021 (Alan Dep / Marin Independent Journal)

A long-standing provider of transport services for disabled and elderly residents of Le Marin has decided not to challenge plans to transfer the service to a French company from next year.

Vivalon, formerly known as Whistlestop, has been providing paratransit service in Marin for over 50 years and has had a contract with the local transit agency, Marin Transit, for 48 years. More than 10,000 passengers used the service each month before the pandemic.

Vivalon’s contract will expire next year. Marin Transit has issued a tender for the three-year, $ 24 million contract. In September, the agency’s board of directors voted to award the contract to Transdev from February.

After two unsuccessful attempts to protest the decision, Anne Gray, Managing Director of Vivalon, announced that she would no longer continue to challenge the decision and would instead work to ensure a “smooth transition” with Transdev.

“After carefully considering our options for ensuring paratransit users the same safe and reliable service that they have enjoyed with Vivalon over the past 50 years, we are confident that Vivalon has done everything possible, other than hiring legal counsel. costly, to continue to provide the Marin Access paratransit services in Marin County, ”said Gray.

Gray previously said the contract could have been appealed to the Federal Transit Administration, but Vivalon spokeswoman Jennifer Golbus said the research needed would be too costly for the association.

“After careful deliberation and consultation with trusted advisors, we have concluded that the right decision for Vivalon and for those we serve is to focus on a smooth transition of paratransit services to Transdev,” said Golbus.

The paratransit contract is Vivalon’s largest, representing approximately $ 5 million of its $ 11 million operating budget. Most of the revenue is used to operate the paratransit service, but about $ 500,000 is used for other programs, which will force the nonprofit to find a new source of funding, Gray said.

Marin Transit staff and board members justified the decision to award the contract to Transdev based on federal restrictions on tendering. The Federal Transit Administration demands “fair and open competition” and prohibits agencies from favoring or excluding non-local bidders, said Nancy Whelan, executive director of Marin Transit.

A selection panel made up of Marin Transit employees and consultants rated Vivalon and Transdev in different categories, Transdev having finally obtained the best rating. Categories included project understanding, experience and qualifications; work plan and approach; innovation; and the granting of bonuses for bilingual staff.

Vivalon obtained a score lower than that of Transdev in terms of understanding, qualification and experience of the project; work plan and approach; and innovation. Gray said the categories were the most subjective.

Transdev said it would offer all Vivalon drivers a job with the company. Golbus said Vivalon hopes many of its drivers will stay with the nonprofit to work in its Vivalon Rides service, which will provide medical rides, specialized transportation, shuttles and other services.

“In addition to transportation, we have enormous opportunities to continue to serve our community with the many programs at Vivalon that impact the health and vitality of seniors and people with disabilities,” Golbus said. “We are particularly excited about the opening of our Healthy Aging Campus at the end of 2023. Vivalon has a very bright future as Marin’s hub for healthy aging. “

Whelan said Vivalon and Transdev have been “very cooperative” in the transition.

“There has been a lot of talk about this change,” Whelan said. “We all want everything to go well. We want to continue working with Vivalon. They are a highly respected partner in our community. We will continue to serve the same people and we want to partner with them in the future. It’s an important part of that relationship here.


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Non profit living

St. Charles family touched by Ida donated caravan after months of sleeping in tents


PARADIS, Louisiana (WVUE) – A family of five in St. Charles Parish is sleeping warmer this weekend, after spending 77 days without a solid roof over their heads.

Hypolite Nazio’s family home in Paradis was destroyed by Hurricane Ida.

After weeks of back and forth with FEMA and the state, Nazio said he was understandably skeptical when he got a call offering him a free trailer.

“I got a call from someone who said, ‘Hey, we’ve got a trailer that we want to give you,’” Nazio said. “And my first reaction was, ‘No, it’s not real.’

“I spoke to my wife and she said, ‘OK, did you ask how long we can keep him? Or when they need it in return? “

Their benefactor Matt Rookard said he noticed a tweet from Fox 8 containing photos of the living conditions of the Nazios last week. He reached out to find out more.

“It started and ended with the tweet for me,” Rookard said. “I knew it was your tweet and I think it was three photos of some sort of tent city they had created.”

Rookard works with the Terrebonne Economic Development Authority, which also has a non-profit parent organization designed to help those who need it most.

Nazio, his wife and three children fit this description.

“Simpler is better, isn’t it?” Rookard said. “Go buy a used trailer, use our links with community organizations to identify needs and drop it off. “

Nazio said on Sunday that he still struggles to deal with the kindness his family has shown. But he said he remained true to his faith in God and in mankind.

“I sort of had doubts about any faith in humanity,” Nazio said. “It restored all of my faith in humanity.

“The Bible says worry about nothing. The Bible says, “God will provide. And in this case, God has definitely provided.

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Non profit living

Music in the Mountains live choral concert on November 7 – YubaNet


Nevada County’s Music in the Mountains (MIM) will present its fall choral concert this Sunday, November 7 at 3 p.m. at the Center for the Arts in Grass Valley, California.

Under the direction of artistic director and conductor Ryan Murray, the MIM 60-Voice Choir and select musicians from the orchestra will be joined by renowned organist Dr. Ryan Enright; and the haunting soprano soloist, Liisa Davila.

Organist Dr. Ryan Enright holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees and an artist’s diploma in organ performance from McGill University. He participated in international competitions; its awards include first prizes in the Canadian Music Competition and the National Organ Performing Competition of the Royal Canadian College of Organists. Dr. Enright is known regionally for his performances in the San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento and for accompanying the Sacramento Choral Society and Orchestra (SCSO) on their tour of Italy.

Soprano Liisa Davila is recognized for her vocal clarity and dazzling coloratura, combined with a richness and depth that enables her to possess a highly desired level of versatility in her work. Its repertoire includes both traditional and contemporary works. She has appeared in Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, Mendelssohn’s Christmas Oratorio, Mozart’s Mass in C minor as well as Handel’s Messiah,

The highlight of the program will be Dan Forrest’s Requiem for the Living, composed in 2013, which garners widespread acclaim as it is discovered around the world. Conductor Murray describes this work as “neo-romantic”, with rich melodies and harmonies. The ethereal movement of Sanctus in this piece was inspired by photos from the Hubble Space Telescope.

“For anyone interested in vocal music this is a must see gig,” said Murray. “” Forrest’s Requiem is one of the choir’s favorite pieces and is packed with beautiful melodies, incredible solos, and some of the greatest choral moments in the repertoire. It will truly be an unforgettable concert!

Under Murray’s direction, the MIM Chorus is an auditioned group of experienced singers from Nevada County and surrounding communities with roots dating back to the 1960s. With weekly rehearsals and individual studies and practices, the MIM Chorus is dedicated to presenting superior performance and to maintain professional standards of excellence. The group presents an ambitious summer music festival, performs with the MIM Orchestra and wows audiences with two performances of their popular holiday concert in December.

Murray will give a 30-minute talk before the concert at 2 p.m. before the concert, for those who want to know more about the compositions on the program and their composers, as well as the pleasure of singing.

In addition to his work with Music in the Mountains, Ryan Murray is also the Associate Conductor of the Modesto Symphony Orchestra. He is also Director of the Symphony Orchestra and Opera at California State University, Sacramento, and Conductor of the First Orchestra of the Sacramento Youth Symphony. Award-winning opera conductor, Murray is currently Music Director of Opera Modesto.

Music in the Mountains is a Nevada County-based non-profit organization that celebrates 40 years of delivering classical music live to the Sierra Foothills, Metro Sacramento and surrounding communities. Tickets for the MIM Holiday choral concerts are available online at musicinthemountains.org, at the box office at 131 S. Auburn Street, Grass Valley, or by calling 530-265-6124.


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Non profit living

Find it early and live Public service and social media campaign during Lung Cancer Awareness Month


WASHINGTON, Nov. 4, 2021 / PRNewswire / – LUNGevity, the nation’s leading lung cancer nonprofit, launches Lung Cancer Awareness Month with the launch of its Inspire for life: find it early and live public service campaign. This powerful campaign features the stories of lung cancer survivors diagnosed with stage I cancer, when it is most treatable, dramatically increasing their chances of survival. In fact, these survivors are leading normal lives.

Check out the interactive multi-channel press release here: https://www.multivu.com/players/English/8883051-lungevity-inhale-for-life-find-it-early-and-live-lung-cancer-psa/

Inspire for life: find it early and live is tLUNGevity’s fifth annual campaign Inspire for life educational videos and series focused on social media. This article aims to educate people with a long history of smoking about whether they are eligible for low dose CT screening, which can detect their lung cancer at its earliest stage, when it is most treatable. and even curable. Patients who may have had surgery to remove their lung cancer when it was caught early due to screening share their stories and current active lifestyles.

The videos also explain why it is crucial to support research into new, non-invasive and universal early detection tests that will help discover all lung cancer in both smokers and non-smokers. Survivors shown who have been diagnosed due to unrelated circumstances help to convey that lung cancer should not be discovered by accident.

“Detecting lung cancer at an early stage, when it’s easiest to treat, can save lives,” says Andrea Ferris, President and CEO of the LUNGevity Foundation. “Today, only 18% of lung cancers are diagnosed at an early stage, and many patients are diagnosed when they have symptoms, when the cancer is most likely at a more advanced stage. Our goal with Inspire for life: find it early and live is to screen eligible patients and lobby to support new ways of early detection so that more lung cancer patients have a chance of a cure. “

The Inspire for life: find it early and live videos feature six lung cancer survivors who have been screened for lung cancer or whose cancer was discovered during screening for unrelated medical conditions. Also featured are two renowned medical experts who talk about the importance of early detection of lung cancer: Robert Winn, MD, director of the VCU Massey Cancer Center and member of the board of directors of LUNGevity, and Avrum Spira, MD, MSCI , Global Head of the Johnson & Johnson Lung Cancer Initiative, Professor of Medicine at Boston University, and Member of the Scientific Advisory Board of LUNGevity.

The Inspire for life: find it early and live The campaign is funded in part by grants from AstraZeneca, Genentech, Bristol Myers Squibb, Regeneron and Sanofi Genzyme.

The campaign can be viewed at lungevity.org/inhale-for-life-early-detection.

About the LUNGevity Foundation

The LUNGevity Foundation is the leading national lung cancer organization focused on improving outcomes for people with lung cancer through research, education, policy initiatives and advocacy. support and engagement of patients, survivors and caregivers. LUNGevity seeks to have an immediate impact on the quality of life and survival of all those affected by the disease, while promoting health equity by addressing disparities across the continuum of care. LUNGevity works tirelessly to advance research into early detection and more effective treatments, provide information and educational tools to empower patients and their caregivers, promote impactful public policy initiatives and amplify patient voices through advocacy. research and engagement. The organization provides an active community for patients and survivors, as well as those who help them live longer and better lives.

Comprehensive resources include a medically-controlled, patient-centric website, a toll-free support hotline, the International Lung Cancer Survival Conference, and an easy-to-use guide. Search for clinical trials, among other tools. All of these programs aim to achieve our vision: a world where no one dies of lung cancer. The LUNGevity Foundation is proud to be a four star Charity Navigator organization.

Please visit lungevity.org to learn more.

About lung cancer in the United States

  • About 1 in 16 Americans will be diagnosed with lung cancer in their lifetime.
  • More than 235,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year.
  • About 60-65% of all new lung cancer diagnoses are in people who have never smoked or who are former smokers.
  • Lung cancer takes more lives than the following three major cancers (colorectal, breast and prostate) combined.
  • Only 22% of all people diagnosed with lung cancer will survive 5 years or more, BUT if it is caught before it spreads, the chances of survival at 5 years improve dramatically.


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Non profit living

Lake Chamber presents awards to community leaders at fall dinner


It was a great evening for the Lake District Chamber of Commerce.

The chamber last week held its annual fall dinner and awards ceremony in Camden on the Lake.

Among the awards during the evening, the Boy Scouts Great Rivers Council was named Nonprofit of the Year.

“The scouts have been going well here at the Lake of the Ozarks. The Cubs, the BSA scouts all survived 2020 and I think we’re doing pretty well ” says BSA executive director Chris Harper on behalf of the Boy Scouts.

Other accolades include: Mike Smith of Precision Auto with the President’s Award, Morgan Crainshaw with Arrowhead Senior Living and Luke Hagedorn with Dog Days (and, of course, KRMS / 93.5 Rocks the Lake) sharing the honor of being a member of the Board of Directors of the Year, Sandy Waggett as Distinguished Citizen of the Year, Sam Beck as Young Professional of the Year, the Barrett Restaurant Group as Big Business of the Year and Ball Parks National as the small business of the year.

There were also 10 business members known to have been with the chamber for 25 years.

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Lake District Chamber of Commerce hosts annual fall dinner and awards ceremony

LAKE OZARK, Mo. – Over 200 members of the Lake business community gathered for the Lake Area Chamber of Commerce Annual Fall Dinner and Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, October 27, 2021 at Camden on the Lake Resort and Conference Center .

Seven prestigious prizes were awarded throughout the evening in the following categories:
Non-Profit Organization of the Year, Small Business of the Year, Large Business of the Year, Young Professional of the Year, Board Member of the Year, Emeritus Citizen of the Year and Awards Of the president.

The winners of the LACC Annual Awards 2021 are:

  • Nonprofit of the Year: Great Rivers Council – Boy Scouts of America
  • Small Business of the Year: BallParks National
  • Great Business of the Year: Barrett Restaurant Group
  • Young Professional of the Year: Sam Beck – Edward Jones – Financial Advisor
  • Distinguished Citizen of the Year: Sandy Waggett – MSW Interactive

Lake Area Chamber staff presented the Board Member of the Year award to Morgan Crainshaw with Arrowhead Senior Living and Luke Hagedorn with Dog Days Bar and Grill for their exceptional service to the Lake Area Chamber and the countless hours spent serving. Mike Smith of Precision Auto & Tire Services received the President’s Award in recognition of his outstanding service to the Lake Area Chamber and the Lake community.

Members of the Lake District Chamber of Commerce celebrating 25 years of membership were also recognized. These members include:

  • Central Bank – Lake of the Ozarks
  • Old kindergarten crochet
  • Instant signs and banners
  • S. Station management
  • Town of Linn Creek
  • Windows and more
  • Holiday Inn Express
  • StoneBridge retirement home
  • Miller companies
  • Lutheran Church of Christ the King

The Lake District Chamber of Commerce is a non-profit membership organization with over 590 members ranging from home businesses to large corporations. The House’s mission is to enhance economic and community prosperity in the Lake of the Ozarks region by providing services and advocating for businesses. To learn more about the Chamber, including membership, please contact Casey Alexander, Director of Membership, at (573) 964-1008 or [email protected]


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Non profit living

VIDEO | The Bend welcomes Kat Perkins from The Voice


West Bend, WI – The theater of curvature, 125 N. Main Street, hosts Kat Perkins, finalist for The Voice, for two performances on its historic stage.

Under coach Adam Levine, Perkins advanced to the final in the 2014 season of The Voice.

Perkins and guitarist Dave Burkart will perform at the non-profit theater’s first Bend Ball on Friday, November 19, with all proceeds going to The Bend’s operating budget as well as Perkins’ own charitable foundation, which supports the initiatives. music education.

On Saturday, November 20, the entire Kat Perkins Band will take the stage with free admission for all students.

Kat Perkins

Tickets for both evenings are on sale now at thebendwi.org

Her bold voice and passion for music have not only led to commercial success, but she is a rock star who enjoys giving back to the community.

Perkins averages two military tours a year to perform for troops overseas, sells venues across America with a variety of shows and themed tours, and visits schools to talk to students about the fulfillment of their dreams, of life without fear and of achieving a positive impact on the world.

kat

The success of these presentations led Perkins to create a nonprofit, The Rising Star Foundation, providing scholarships and opportunities for aspiring musicians while giving back to the local community.

Part of how The Bend gives back is giving students FREE tickets to Kat’s concert on Saturday, November 20. come discover Turn, live music and all that music can do for our community.

The Bend is proud to present original music in a unique setting. Operated by the non-profit Historic West Bend Theater Inc., The Bend, is a 1929 vaudeville theater building fully restored in early 2020. It is listed on both the National and National Records of Historic Places.

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit thebendwi.org or by email [email protected]

Learn more about Kat’s music and founding at katperkinsmusic.com

Kat Perkins
Kat Perkins


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Non profit living

Amid climate talk, an actor’s call to action unfolds on stage


Actor Fehinti Balogun knows that theater can mobilize people towards climate action, because that’s what he has done for him.

In 2017, while preparing for a role in “Myth,” a climate parable, he started reading books about climate change and became alarmed at the unusually hot summer he was experiencing in England. The play itself called on him and the other actors to repeat the same mundane lines over and over, to the point of absurdity, as their surroundings terrifically fractured around them – the ridged walls of oil, the stove on fire, the freezer oozing water.

The whole experience changed her life, Balogun said. Suddenly, nothing seemed more important than tackling the global crisis. Not even land the head of a West End production (a long coveted dream) of “The Importance of Being Serious”. His growing anxiety made him feel like he was experiencing a real version of the “Myth” in which society repeated the same old scenario even as the planet fell into chaos.

“Knowing everything I’ve done made me angry with the world for doing nothing,” Balogun, 26, (“Dune”, “I can destroy you”) said in a telephone interview. “I didn’t understand how we weren’t upset.”

That sense of urgency is what he said he hopes to convey to audiences on “Can I Live?” », A new play he wrote, performed and created with the Complicité theater company. A filmed version of the play, which also features supporting actors and musicians and was originally intended as a live performance, was screened on Monday as part of COP26, the United Nations climate meeting. in Glasgow. The resulting artwork is as innovative as any play to emerge during the Covid-19 era: initially it seems like just an intimate Zoom session with Balogun, but evolves into an explosive mix. spoken word, animation, hip-hop and dialogue.

The hour-long production, which the Barbican Center has made available to stream on its website until November 12, combines scientific facts about how the greenhouse effect works with the story of Balogun’s own journey into the climate movement. He also emphasizes the gap between the predominantly white environmental groups he has joined and the experiences of his predominantly black friends and family.

Throughout the show, Balogun answers phone calls from family members about issues seemingly unrelated to the centerpiece of the room, asking when he is getting married or why he left a bag in the hallway. at home. Although at first it seems like they interrupt Balogun’s main narrative of ‘shows, shows, shows’ as he sings at one point, their interjections hammer home one of his central ideas: if the movement is unwilling to prioritize someone like his Nigerian grandmother, he misses the point. Climate action, in other words, is for ordinary people with everyday concerns.

“The aim is to make popular activism accessible and to represent people of color and people of the working class,” he said. To that end, he interweaves his own story with that of Nigerian writer and activist Ken Saro-Wiwa, who campaigned against destructive oil extraction on behalf of his Ogoni people. “Very often we don’t talk about the Global South,” Balogun said. “We are not talking about the communities that have been fighting this fight for years.

Although Balogun is the only theater artist on the official COP26 program, he is certainly not the first playwright to tackle climate themes. Climate Change Theater Action, an initiative of the nonprofit Arctic Cycle, was created to encourage theatrical creation that could draw more attention to COP21, the United Nations climate meeting in 2015 that culminated in to the historic Paris Agreement. (The theater group has never been officially affiliated with any of the annual COP meetings.)

Since its creation, the group has produced 200 works which have been performed in front of 40,000 people in 30 countries, said its co-founder, Chantal Bilodeau. The organization commissions plays on environmental themes, remunerates the authors and then provides the scripts free of charge to theater companies, schools or any other group that wishes to stage readings or productions.

The first year, Bilodeau said, they ended up with “a lot of depressing parts.” Now they’re trying to steer playwrights away from dystopia and toward visions of a liveable future, and encourage those who direct the works to pair them with programming that helps audiences better understand the issues.

Lanxing Fu, co-director of the nonprofit Superhero Clubhouse in New York City, devotes some of her time to those who will be most affected by a warmer planet: the next generation. Through Superhero Clubhouse’s Big Green Theater after-school program, run in conjunction with the Bushwick Starr and the Astoria Performing Arts Center, students at Brooklyn and Queens public elementary schools are learning about climate issues and writing plays in response to what ‘they learn.

More than a decade after the program began, Fu said that what is most striking about the student’s plays is how young writers instinctively understand a fundamental truth about the climate that escapes many. adults: to find long term solutions, we will need to work together.

“A huge element of climate resilience is in the community we build and the way we come together,” she said. “It is always very present in their stories; it’s often part of how something resolves.

Queens-based TV playwright and screenwriter Dorothy Fortenberry also spends a lot of time reflecting on children’s roles in the movement. His play “The Lotus Paradox,” which premieres in January at the Warehouse Theater in Greenville, SC, asks: What happens when children are constantly being told that it is their job to? save the world ? Like much of Fortenberry’s work on television (she is a writer on “The Handmaid’s Tale”), “The Lotus Paradox ”includes the subject of climate change without making it the singular center of the story.

“If you make a story about anything, anywhere, and you not having climate change in it is a science fiction story, ”she said. “You made the choice to make the story less realistic than it otherwise would have been.”

It is a feeling also shared by Anaïs Mitchell, musician and author of the musical “Hadestown, ” which reopened on Broadway in September. In his account of Greek mythology, Hades is portrayed in the song as a greedy “oil and coal king” who fuels his industrialized underworld hell with the “fossils of the dead”. Above the ground, the main characters, Orpheus and Eurydice, suffer from food shortages and brutal weather that is “either scorching heat or freezing cold”, a framing inspired by the headlines on climate refugees.

It’s worth fighting intentionally with climate narratives in theater, not only because they make plays more believable, Mitchell said, but also because theater might just be one of the best tools for dealing with such themes. . Like Orpheus trying to put things right with a song that shows “how the world could be, despite what it is”, Mitchell sees theater as a powerful tool to help us imagine our path to a better future.

“The theater is able to open our hearts and our eyes to an alternative reality to the one we live in,” she said.

This is why Balogun – although he notices it more than once in “Can I Live? “ that he is “not a scientist” – said he believed he had an equally crucial role to play as any climatologist. “Scientists are begging artists and theater makers to help get this message across,” he said. “And there is a need for it more than ever. “


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Urban transplants threaten to cost Southern California desert dwellers dearly


MORONGO BASIN, Calif .– Along a dusty highway that winds through the Southern California desert, Eric Wilson makes a list of fruits and vegetables available at his nearby farm.

He’s been selling kale, lettuce, tomatoes and other locally grown produce since April at Morongo Valley Fruit Market, a small grocery store he and his wife took over earlier this year.

Despite being located in what Wilson calls a “food desert” – the nearest grocery store is 15 minutes away in the nearby Yucca Valley – Wilson was initially dismissed as another outsider seeking to gentrify the community. calm.

Eric Wilson and his wife Garden Ramirez at their farmer’s market.Michael Rubenstein for NBC News

“People thought I was from LA,” said Wilson, who grew up in Cathedral City, about 30 minutes away. “I was called a yuppie because of the prices of organic products.”

Once a hamlet for cowboys and homesteaders, the Morongo Basin is undergoing rapid change amid an influx of city dwellers seeking to escape city life during the pandemic. They come to the sun-drenched desert hoping to find fresh air, cheap homes, and Instagram-worthy settings.

But what’s considered affordable for residents of Los Angeles, Silicon Valley, or New York is out of reach for many longtime residents, who say transplants are costing locals and disrupting the fragile ecosystem.

“It’s culture shock,” said Sarah Kennington, of the Morongo Basin Conservation Association. “Everybody Loves [Joshua Tree National Park], everyone loves the desert, and if you were gentle, that was fine. But that’s not where it was decades ago.

Located more than 160 km from Los Angeles, the Morongo Basin is nestled in the great Mojave Desert. It borders Joshua Tree National Park and includes the communities of Morongo and Yucca, Joshua Tree, Twentynine Palms, Pioneertown, and others.


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See Danny Pintauro from “Who’s the Boss?” Now – Better life


Danny Pintauro literally grew up on TV. For eight years he starred in Who is the boss as Jonathan Bower, the son of single mother Angela (Judith Lumiere), whose world changes when a new governess (Tony Danza) and her daughter (Alyssa Milano) move in. The multi-camera sitcom was a smash hit and aired on ABC from 1984 to 1992. By the time it ended, 16-year-old Pintauro was a true teenage idol, appearing regularly on the covers of Bop and teen beat alongside people like Kirk cameron and Michael j fox. Then he moved away from Hollywood and a full-time acting career. To find out why Pintauro left the company and what he does today, read on.

RELATED: 13 Child Actors From The 90s Who Left Hollywood And Why.

Ron Galella, Ltd./Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images

Before Who is the boss, Pintauro got his first credit on the soap opera As the world turns, followed by his film debut in the 1983s Cujo. And during the course of the sitcom, he held a few other jobs, including two TV movies.

When Who is the boss passed away, Pintauro took a break from his acting career to finish high school, then study theater at Stanford University. After graduating he tried to get back into the game and performed on stage in a few productions. However, he didn’t find the screen success he once had, and a tabloid story complicated matters further.

Danny Pintauro in 1997
Ron Galella, Ltd./Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images

In 1997, the National investigator called the young actor to tell him they would air an article publicly denouncing him as gay. Pintauro said Weekly metro two years later, it wasn’t as traumatic as some might assume since he was already open about his sexuality in his personal life.

“Most people think it was a terrible, terrible experience,” he told the outlet. “It wasn’t. It might have been if I wasn’t expecting it. If they hadn’t been nice enough to call me and ask me if I wanted to be a part of it. But as a actor, I have to say I totally expected it sooner or later because I wasn’t hiding it. I wasn’t in the closet. I knew it was going to happen.

Pintauro said he called his former co-star and close friend Judith Light for advice. “And his advice was, ‘If they write a story about you whether you like it or not, as much as they quote you correctly,” “the actor explained. “So I cooperated with the Applicant. And the article was really great. It was sincere. It was interesting. It was smart. What people don’t realize about these magazines is that if you cooperate, they’ll make a good story. They will do it well. If you don’t cooperate, they’ll come after you. “

And Pintauro certainly has no regrets today. On this year’s Spirit Day, a celebration of the LGBTQ + community, he posted a TikTok that begins: “You know, it always makes me smile when someone tells me I inspired them to come out of the closet. It’s something I can be proud of for the rest of my life. “

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Danny Pintauro in 2019
Bobby Bank / Getty Images

In a 2015 appearance on Oprah winfrey‘s Oprah: Where are they now, Pintauro has revealed his HIV status. He was diagnosed in 2003.

“I went for a regular check-up,” he said. “You know, as a responsible gay man, you get tested for HIV every six months… And you kind of waited two weeks with pins and needles, or at least I did, because that I was just terrified of contracting HIV. “

He said he believed he contracted it because he had used drugs and therefore was less concerned about safe sex.

“On meth, you have no limits, you feel invincible,” he told Winfrey. “You feel incredibly elated when it comes to your sexuality, and everything looks and feels arousing to you.”

Daniel Pintauro in 2016
Gregg Felsen / Getty Images for the Desert AIDS project

Although he felt compelled to back down right before Winfrey’s interview, Pintauro said that ultimately being upfront about his status made his life better.

“Before, it was difficult to walk in the street without someone recognizing me, and it was initially because I was on Who is the boss?. Then it was, ‘He was on Who is the boss? and he’s gay. Now it was going to be, ‘He was on Who is the boss?, he’s gay, and he’s another one of those HIV-positive guys, “” the 45-year-old said. People in 2021. “It was a little terrifying, but it didn’t really make me guess because I’m much happier as a person with no secrets.”

And Pintauro didn’t just tell the world he’s HIV positive. After the interview aired, he collaborated on the HIV Equal social media campaign for the “Beacon of Light” tour, which aimed to reduce the stigma associated with the disease, as reported. People. The campaign involved in-depth discussions between Pintauro and HIV and AIDS experts about living with the disease.

In 2016, Pintauro received the Arts and Activism Award from the Steve Chase Humanitarian Awards, which raises funds for the Desert Aids Project charity based in Palm Springs, California.

“I am proud to say tonight, in front of this welcoming, passionate and alluring crowd, that this award, in many ways, completes a huge circle of life and reinforces the fact that I made the right decisions,” he said. he declared when he accepted, the Desert sun reported.

Pintauro touched on a few areas after graduating from college, including the entertainment industry in a behind-the-camera capacity. In addition to working as a casting assistant, production coordinator and agent assistant, according to his LinkedIn, he managed a restaurant and worked at Whole Foods.

He is now a veterinary technician and pharmacy technician at the Texas nonprofit shelter, Austin Pets Alive.

“There is something of a wonder around animals,” Katera Berent, the shelter’s communications and events manager, told Austin360 in 2019. “You can feel the love he feels for every cat and dog he takes care of.”

The Who is the boss? The star told the outlet that he believes his job at the clinic is his true calling.

“As a very young child, that’s literally what I wanted to do when I grew up. Even though I was on TV, every summer I worked at this vet practice near my home in Los Angeles and cleaned the kennels or whatever they left is me doing it, ”he said. “I liked it.”

Pintauro did not lose the acting virus, however. He posts videos of himself performing monologues on TikTok and last year collaborated with several other former child stars for a web series called The quarantine group. And he has a sense of humor about his sitcom past; In a live musical parody titled Who is Da Boss?, Pintauro played a version of himself at the age of six.

He has shared his life in Austin with her husband for seven years, Wil tabares.

RELATED: Former Star Children Who Are Actually Geniuses.



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Do you think giving attracts wealth? A lot of millionaires do. Here’s how to make it work for you


You are reading Entrepreneur United States, an international Entrepreneur Media franchise. This story originally appeared on MarketBeat

To some people, the idea that giving money attracts wealth seems like a lot of hokum, but others strongly believe that living a life of abundance can make you a millionaire.

Contributor Depositphotos.com/Depositphotos.com – MarketBeat

When you give back, the argument is that this type of abundant act is flowing back to you. Not only do you feel great, but you also earn money with your freebies. In fact, wealth givers often say that before you can receive wealth in the first place, you must first learn how to sow goodness by giving.

It’s a hot topic ahead of Giving Tuesday on November 30. According to Giving Tuesday, Inc., the nonprofit behind the famous hashtag #GivingTuesday, 34.8 million Americans donated $ 2.47 billion to Giving Tuesday on December 1.

Let’s go over this seemingly incongruous concept: how to give your money away make you more money? We will find out.

Reasons Why Giving Your Money Attracts Wealth

Let’s take a look at the (admittedly unscientific) reasons why giving away money increases your prospects for wealth.

Reason 1: You adopt the principle of abundance against the principle of scarcity.

Scarcity vs. abundance means you stop seeing the world as a kid hoarding their Halloween candy. Instead of stuffing Halloween candy in every nook and cranny of your closet or believing that you’ll only get so much money before your allowance runs out (a la Mr. Scrooge), an abundance mindset takes on an abundance mentality. different approach – that there is a lot for Everyone.

Holding on to your money emphasizes the scarcity mentality, and wealth experts say it will hamper your ability to attract money.

Reason 2: It focuses your attention on what you want.

When you focus on attracting wealth, it can happen to you because you are creating momentum behind those thoughts. A negative mindset (like focusing on not having enough) can become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Instead of focusing on the fact that you weren’t able to purchase the “extra” things you want, figure out how you will donate to charity once you have the money.

How to give and attract wealth

Now what? Easy – you pick a charity, figure out how much you will give, figure out how you plan to give, and increase your percentage each year.

Step 1: Choose a charity.

Do you want to increase the tithe in your church? Give to your alma mater? Allocate funds to eradicate childhood cancer? Whichever recipient you choose, identify them and make a commitment to them – or multiple charities, if you prefer.

You can use Charity Navigator to help you determine the right organizations. The site assigns trust metrics to nonprofits so you know which charities are accountable and transparent. Charity Navigator does not charge the organizations it evaluates so that it can keep its marks objective.

Step 2: Determine how much you will give.

You may want to choose a small amount to start with so you can donate larger amounts later. (Many wealth experts suggest working up to 10% of your income.)

Let’s say you earn $ 100,000 per year. You may want to start giving 1% of your salary, or $ 1,000 per year – just $ 20 per week.

You may find it easier to get into the habit of giving early in your career (or before you earn millions) and keep giving a higher percentage as you earn more.

Of course, the mindset is that the more you give the more you will receive, but that doesn’t mean that you are pushing your limits or giving so much that you have to leave your home.

Step 3: Determine how you plan to donate.

Next, determine how you plan to give – through regular donations or a lump sum throughout the year. Some organizations run campaigns throughout the year and some companies often offer a matching donation option.

You can also save all your effort for Giving Tuesday, donate through a donor advised fund, start a private or family foundation, join a donor circle, or donate items you own, like a car or clothes. Let’s take a look at some of these definitions:

  • Fund advised by donors: Donor-advised funds, also known as charitable giving accounts, offer less expensive and more easily accessible options than using a private foundation. The sponsoring institution manages your money once you have invested it.
  • Private or family foundation: Private or family foundations look like what they are: foundations that allow you to donate money based on your goals and preferences. The IRS imposes rules on private foundations, including how much you must donate each year. It is important to involve an attorney and an accountant in order to achieve the foundation’s goals and meet all IRS requirements.
  • Donation circle: Giving circles can involve community gatherings that come together to offer donations to specific charities or groups. Giving circles don’t just exist in your local community – you can find them state or nationwide.

Step 4: Increase your donation percentage each year.

Last year’s Giving Tuesday donations were 29% higher than in 2019, despite the pandemic, according to Giving Tuesday.

Just like increasing your retirement savings percentage, why not do the same for your philanthropic efforts? Increase your donations to the percentage that suits you best.

Step 5: What now? Watch my bank account grow?

Winston Churchill said (roughly paraphrased): “We earn our living with what we earn, but we earn our living with what we give.” (He also said, “If you’re going through hell, keep going,” also great advice.)

If this seems like the least “safe” way to embrace wealth, you are right. It’s not like putting X amount on the market and expecting a 10% return after 30 years of compounding. However, experiments have shown that people often take higher (read: higher paid) leadership positions after their known charitable acts.

Giving Attracts Wealth – Try it!

If someone else needs your money more, don’t hang on to it, give it away. Give and you will receive: just a month before #Giving Tuesday is a great reminder.
Don’t be surprised if you find yourself richer because of it – in more ways than one.


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Merck to share its Covid pill formula with poor countries


Merck has granted a royalty-free license for its promising Covid-19 pill to a United Nations-backed nonprofit in a deal that would allow the drug to be manufactured and sold cheaply in countries the poorest, where coronavirus vaccines are extremely short. supply.

The deal with the Medicines Patent Pool, an organization that works to make medical treatments and technologies accessible globally, will allow companies in 105 countries, mostly in Africa and Asia, to sublicense the formulation of the antiviral pill, called molnupiravir, and start making it. .

Merck reported this month that the drug had halved the rate of hospitalizations and deaths among patients at high risk of Covid in a large clinical trial. Rich countries, including the United States, have rushed to negotiate deals to buy the drug, locking up much of the supply even before it was approved by regulators and raising concerns that countries poor people are deprived of access to medicine, much as they have been to vaccines.

Treatment access advocates hailed the new deal, which was announced Wednesday morning, calling it an unusual step for a major Western pharmaceutical company.

“The Merck license is very good and meaningful protection for people living in countries where more than half of the world’s population lives,” said James Love, who heads Knowledge Ecology International, a non-profit research organization. “It will make a difference. “

Charles Gore, Director of the Medicines Patent Pool, said: “This is the first transparent public health license for a Covid drug, and very important, it is for something that could be used outside of hospitals, and which is potentially going to be very cheap. “

“This will hopefully make things a lot easier by preventing people from going to hospitals and preventing people from dying in low- and middle-income countries,” he said.

Mr Gore said more than 50 companies, from all parts of the developing world, have already approached the organization for a sublicense.

The deal with Merck, Gore said, is also a critically important precedent. “Hopefully this will trigger a landslide of people coming into the Medicines Patent Pool, wanting to license, because there is no doubt that access has been the problem,” he said. “From a scientific standpoint, the industry has done a really brilliant job – first providing the vaccines, and now providing the treatments. But the access side dropped everything. “

Pfizer also has a Covid antiviral pill in late stage trials, and Mr Gore said the company is in talks with the patent pool as well.

Molnupiravir was developed by Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics of Miami, based on a molecule first studied at Emory University in Atlanta. All three organizations are parties to this agreement, which will not require any fees from any sublicensing company.

Merck has submitted its clinical trial data to the Food and Drug Administration to apply for emergency use authorization; a decision could be made in early December. Regulators in other countries that produce a version of molnupiravir will need to evaluate it. Some drugmakers will likely seek World Health Organization prequalification for their versions, so they can bypass regulatory steps country by country.

Stephen Saad, managing director of Aspen Pharmacare in South Africa, said his company plans to apply for a license to make molnupiravir and distribute it across Africa. He said he believed Aspen could make the drug for around $ 20 per course. The US government has an agreement to purchase 1.7 million courses of the drug, pending FDA clearance, an agreement that fixes the price at $ 712 per course.

Mr Gore said some in the field told him that a generic version of molnupiravir could be produced cost-effectively for as little as $ 8 per course.

As part of the licensing deal, Merck would continue to produce and sell the drug in wealthy countries and many middle-income countries at significantly higher prices.

Merck had already taken the initiative to allow eight major Indian drugmakers to produce generic versions of molnupiravir, pending clearance. But the company feared that production in a single region would not be sufficient to ensure rapid access to the drug in developing countries, said Jenelle Krishnamoorthy, Merck’s vice president for global policy.

The company has therefore also entered into talks with the patent pool, which has extensive experience working with a global network of drug manufacturers capable of meeting high quality standards, including those required for WHO prequalification. , she said.

“We knew we had to work faster, we had to do things that we had never done before, we had to be more efficient,” said Ms Krishnamoorthy.

The licenses Merck has issued to Indian generics manufacturers restrict sales to developing countries and exclude most middle-income countries, including China and Russia – the site of a current raging Covid epidemic – raising the possibility that the citizens of these countries, which often have weak health systems, will not have access to the drug.

The molnupiravir patent pool deal also excludes middle-income countries and most Latin American countries, Love said.

“What are you going to do for countries like Chile or Colombia, Thailand or Mexico? ” He asked. “They are not in the license.”


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Guys with Ties offers life classes in Massillon in CM2


MASSILLON – Jason Hamilton Jr. doesn’t want to take off his crisp white shirt and black clip-on tie.

He looks and feels great.

This is exactly what a Guys with Ties participant is.

Following: Guys with Ties Expands to Gibbs Elementary in Canton

“We’re dressed for success,” Massillon alumnus and Tiger football star Devin Jordan told more than a dozen students from Franklin Elementary School who have joined the volunteer leadership program.

On Monday, Jordan, president of his nonprofit Beyond the Game foundation, welcomed 87 elementary students in Franklin, Whittier and Gorrell to the brotherhood.

The leadership program for third graders aims to develop good leaders, good manners and good citizens.

Dressed in matching ties and shirts, the boys meet regularly to learn about different skills, including social etiquette, community service, job skills and respect.

Guest speakers will travel in person and virtually to discuss their personal experiences.

Following: Girls with Pearls Prepares Fairless Third Grade Students for the Future

Following: TE Harrison Bryant of Cleveland Browns shares frozen treats with area students

Boys are expected to live up to the program’s motto “Be good. Look good. Do good.”

“Wear this shirt and tie with pride,” he told the third graders.

The first lesson was about making a good first impression, which happens within two to three seconds of meeting someone.

They learned the five ways to make a good first impression – the 5 S’s: stand up when you meet someone for the first time, smile, say your name loud and clear, shake firmly, and say something nice to you. about the person.

Jordan challenged the boys to practice the techniques, promising them that those who follow the rules, do their “homework” and emulate the leaders will be awarded prizes and participate in special events.

As a former Tiger, Jordan wanted to bring the Guys with Ties program to Massillon. They were close last year but COVID has hampered efforts.

“There is a lot of enthusiasm around this program,” he said. “Superintendent (Paul) Salvino really insisted on that.”

The Massillon Guys with Ties program reaches Middlebranch and Avondale schools in Plain Local, Fairless Elementary School and Alliance City schools.

New programs are expected to start in Carrollton and Tusky Valley in the coming weeks, he said.

Girls with Pearls comes to Massillon

The girls also have a chic new group.

The Girls with Pearls is similar to Guys with Ties. The program promotes healthy relationships and values ​​to equip young people with the skills to prepare for femininity.

It was introduced to about 80 grade three girls in the city’s school district last week.

Throwing on organza scarves and satin gloves in a rainbow of matching colors, a beaded bracelet and necklace, the girls regularly meet volunteer coaches.

After just one meeting, Jordan said. there were several girls who asked to join after hearing about the effort from their classmates.

“This is what we want,” he said. “We want to build the program to include all the girls.”

Local Fairless schools hosted the program last year and more are expected to launch a program this year, Jordan said.

The Guys with Ties and Girls With Pearls programs both require volunteers to run the program with help from Jordan.

A positive program

Anytime the district can put a positive male figure in front of the kids to teach good manners, respect and being a good citizen is positive, said Franklin principal Mike Medure.

Hamilton’s mother Ashley Smith is hoping her son’s participation will give him the boost he needs.

“My son has a lot of self-confidence issues and what (this program) does is build confidence. I hope this can help him be more of a leader than a follower,” she said. declared.

As she picked up her son from school on Monday, the youngster couldn’t contain his excitement.

“Look at my shirt,” he told those waiting in the car.

“He likes to look good,” Smith said of his son. “I haven’t seen his face light up like this in a while.”

Contact Amy at 330-775-1135 or [email protected]

On Twitter: @aknappINDE


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Here is an overview of the business news from the Mahoning Valley


Also among today’s business updates: Regional chamber says it’s time to be scary and Real Living Ministries is donating to first responders.

YOUNGSTOWN – Mahoning County Commissioners have awarded Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corp. $ 500,000 in ARP funding to provide emergency home repairs to low-income homeowners.

The Emergency Home Repair Program can provide the following repairs at no cost to owners of a home equal to or less than 50% of the region’s median income who occupy their home:

  • Replacement of leaky roofs on the house;
  • Repair or replacement of furnaces that are not functioning properly;
  • Repair of plumbing leaks or other major plumping issues (i.e. replacement of hot water tank).

Those who qualify should contact YNDC at 330-480-0423 to request an application.

Coleman Health receives grant to help underinsured

YOUNGSTOWN – The Thomases Family Endowment of the Youngstown Area Jewish Federation has awarded a $ 2,000 grant to Coleman Health Services to help the nonprofit serve clients at the Belmont Avenue site in Youngstown who are not uninsured or underinsured to receive necessary mental health services.

Coleman serves nearly 7,000 people a year in the Mahoning Valley, treating everyone by helping clients not only with counseling and case management, but also by helping remove barriers to recovery by helping get cards social security, employment and affordable housing so that they can live independent lives.

“Coleman is grateful for the support of the Thomases family as the need for these services has increased dramatically due to the pandemic,” said Tammy Weaver, vice president of clinical services for Coleman in a press release.

Martha Thomases said, “My father would be proud to be part of Coleman Health Services’ mission. He would have appreciated anything Coleman does to improve life in the Mahoning Valley. “

Real Living Ministries donates to first responders

LIMA NORD – Real Living Ministries will honor Beaver Township first responders with a $ 1,000 donation to the Beaver Township Police and Fire Fund. The check will be delivered at 1 p.m. today at the Beaver Township Safety Building.

The $ 1,000 donation was recently raised during Real Living Ministries’ opening weekend (September 24-26). Local businesses and devotees have designed themed donation baskets filled with everything from art and other desirable items to canine care.

The September 25 Family Fun Day attendees purchased tickets to win the baskets.

Perry and Joy Chickonoski, co-founders of Real Living Ministries, said in a press release that they plan to make Family Fun Day an annual event and fundraiser for the community.

Further information is available online at www.RLMWOW.com or at https://www.facebook.com/reallivingministries.

Power After Hours Costume Party Set

FOWLER – Youngstown-Warren Regional Chamber of Commerce says it’s time to be scared!

The organization is sponsoring a casual networking event and Halloween costume party on Tuesday at Hartford Hill Winery. Powers After Hours runs from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. and costs $ 15.

Power After Hours, like Chamber Power Lunches, allow attendees to connect with other Chamber members.

Participants can enjoy appetizers and a cash bar with Hartford wine. The winner for the best costume will receive a spooky Halloween prize.

To register, click.

Youngstown Police take an oath

YOUNGSTOWN – Youngstown Police Chief Carl Davis will be sworn in to a new officer on Tuesday.

Dylan Bell will be sworn in at 10 a.m. Tuesday in the community room of the Covelli Center.

– Do you have an ad about your business or organization that you would like to share? Send an email to [email protected]


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-profit celebrates 10 years of healing with horses | Online features


Silver Lining Riding, a non-profit organization providing adaptive riding and horse-assisted therapy, celebrates 10 years of helping others heal through horses.

The organization, located at 7220 N. 185th Avenue in Waddell, offers therapeutic and educational horseback riding and horseback riding programs for people with physical, mental and cognitive disabilities. It caters to a wide range of special needs, aimed at challenging its students physically, cognitively and socially.

Founded in 2011, Silver Lining Riding is a member of the Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA) and celebrates a decade since achieving non-profit status, according to Silver Lining Riding Board Chairman Gregg Brown.

“We work with special needs, but it’s a pretty big topic and we’re trying to be a little vague,” Brown said. “Our mission is to help people overcome the obstacles in life, whatever those obstacles, whatever.

Silver Lining typically serves 35-40 clients per week, ages 4-90. Classes can be delivered as semi-private or group lessons in six-week blocks. They are also adapted, with the help of parents and guardians, to the needs of each student.

According to Cori Morris-Sweetalla, instructor and manager of the Silver Lining Riding program, horse-assisted experiences help improve balance, strength, range of motion, coordination, motor skills, reflexes, breathing, circulation and sensory integration, to name a few.

“We adapt it to the needs of each student. Our main goal is to make sure that all students end up riding independently, ”she explained. “With that in mind, we know this may not always happen. We do admissions so our students know what their goals are, and from there we build. “

Because horseback riding moves the body rhythmically in much the same way as a human gait, the act can be therapeutic, said Morris-Sweetalla, who has seen students with physical disabilities improve their flexibility, balance and strength. muscular.

“When you are on horseback, after you finish your first lesson, you get off and it hurts – so it’s the same with these kids when they are out and riding them (the horses) for 30 minutes of lessons” , she said.

“We’re looking for that automatic reaction where, when you see them start sliding to one side, their body automatically adjusts, regains their balance and readjusts themselves,” he said.

Physical benefits aside, horses have gained a reputation within the mental health community as quality companions for relieving stress, anxiety, and depression.

Equines can “mirror and respond” to human behavior, says the Anxiety Treatment Center. With similar social and responsive behaviors, it’s easy for clients to bond with the animal in the herd.

The benefits of Silver Lining can also be educational, Brown said.

“We have a riding program where we teach the different parts of the horses, how to saddle them and how to groom them,” he explained.

Riding students work with their equine partners in the field, building a stronger relationship. Brown suggests pairing the adaptive riding lessons with the riding feature to get the maximum benefit.

Silver Lining Riding is scheduled to host its 10th Anniversary Student Showcase in February of next year. Originally scheduled for May 2021, the two-day event has been postponed due to security measures related to COVID-19.

The student recital gives the nonprofit organization’s students a chance to show off their riding skills through a series of locally judged events, Brown explained. They will also have the opportunity to qualify to compete in the Silver Lining Riding Special Olympics Track and Field Games.

“We’re just starting to plan for it, but I don’t think it will differ from previous years,” Brown revealed. “We have different classes and they follow a pattern. We have judges, and it’s very much like a horse competition – just for special needs. We make trophies and have a trophy party – for everyone to receive a trophy. “

Morris-Sweetalla added that the Special Olympics portion of the recital is the highlight of his career each year.

“This is literally why I come to work every day, especially the Olympics,” she said. “When you see the kids, it’s really worth it to see how their faces light up. Some of these kids will never get the chance to do a horse show, and it’s their day. “

To be eligible, students must complete a full six-week session. Riding lessons suitable for groups of four are $ 35 each, or $ 55 with the riding program.

Semi-private two-rider lessons cost $ 45 each and $ 65 to include horseback riding. Private lessons are available for $ 60.

Although most of the funds go towards operating expenses, Morris-Sweetalla said Silver Lining Riding is always open to volunteers.

Brown echoed his partner’s sentiments, adding that he was eager to get Silver Lining Riding up to standard with his students in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I have seen real breakthroughs,” he shared. “But the great thing I take in – and I’ve heard this from a lot of parents – is that they become a normal family, at least one day a week.”

To complete a student registration form, go to silverliningriding.org/student-

registration. For more information visit

silverliningriding.org or contact Morris-Sweetalla at [email protected]


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Non profit living

Berghoff is passionate about supporting seniors |


FORT WAYNE —Sherri Berghoff is clear when she shares her philosophy of life.

“Be better today than yesterday and better tomorrow than today,” said Berghoff.

Berghoff is currently focused on growing his three businesses and a nonprofit organization from scratch: One Purpose Senior Healthcare; Single-use services for the elderly; Single objective marketing; and One Purpose Senior Adventures nonprofit.

“I’ve been working in the healthcare industry for about 18 years now,” Berghoff said.

“I was looking to redefine who I was and what I wanted to be and I started working in the healthcare industry and fell in love with long term care. “

When setting up his three new businesses and his non-profit organization, Berghoff said, “An opportunity presented itself and I just had a few ideas on how I might turn those opportunities into certain businesses. So I took the leap of faith the first part of June and I jumped and started three for-profit businesses and one non-profit organization.

“My goal with these three for-profit companies is to end up getting them to where they operate successfully and make money so that I can really focus on the nonprofits, because that’s where my heart is really in, ”she added.

Berghoff’s nonprofit, One Purpose Senior Adventures, works to make the wishes of seniors in need come true. The seed that led to the creation of the organization was sown about five years ago.

“My mom lives in southern Tennessee. She was 78 at the time … At least once a year, I made a point of spending time with my mother. And normally when I went to visit, we would go shopping, go out to eat, that sort of thing. But on that visit, I asked her, “Mom, what would you like to do while I’m here this time?” And she said, “Well, we don’t have to do it this time, but I saw pictures you posted, taking your kids’ zipline and I would love to try that.”

Berghoff said she told her mother there would be no wait until next time and, thanks to Google, was able to find a place nearby and the mother-daughter duo went to do of the zip line the next day.

It started an annual tradition, and subsequent adventures included whitewater rafting, attending Dollywood’s opening day, and a hot air balloon ride.

Bergoff also took his father zipline after seeing photos posted on social media that showed Berghoff and his mother on their adventures.

“So at 82 I took my dad’s zipline for the very first time,” she said.

Checking things off his mother’s to-do list, Berghoff figured there were other seniors who had things on their to-do list that they had never been able to do due to calendar or finances.

“Through our non-profit agency, our focus will be on fulfilling some of the bucket list wishes for individuals – primarily focused on low-income people living in a long-term care facility. And he doesn’t have to be adventurous. It doesn’t have to be ziplining and whitewater rafting. But whatever it is, it’s on their bucket list, ”Berghoff said.

Berghoff went on to describe his three businesses.

One Purpose Senior Healthcare aims to provide personalized healthcare coordination for the elderly.

“Basically, this is an attempt to improve communication between all providers involved in the care of an individual,” Berghoff explained.

Berghoff said that while working in healthcare, she found there was a lot of disconnection between providers and her business attempts to involve everyone involved in the care of an elderly person in communication. of what was going on with that person.

One Purpose Senior Services provides consulting services to healthcare organizations.

One Purpose Marketing offers services such as sales coaching, sales training, website design, logo design, branding, and social media management.

Berghoff said her passion for serving the elderly likely stemmed from the relationship she had with her grandmother.

“It was such a special relationship… It was such a positive experience in my life… It was like a way of honoring him,” she said.

“I feel like if I’m living my own mission, which, I say, is to be better today than I was yesterday and better tomorrow than I am today, my only hope is that people are not afraid to step out of their comfort zone and really go for the things they want. I think if there is anything I could say to anyone, it’s not to be afraid. And I think that is holding us back. So often in our lives the fear of what other people will think or the fear of failure or, I think, fear in general just holds us back and I’m inspired by the women who have been in my life and I don’t. can only hope that I can be half of what these women have done for me for someone else.


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Non profit living

Zena empowers women living in poverty in Uganda


OXFORD, UK – Zena, a non-profit organization with a deep and lasting impact on women living in poverty in Uganda, works in several parts of Uganda, including Kamuli, one of the most poor people of the country.

Women in Uganda

Due to pervasive gender inequality in Uganda, women are treated like second-class citizens. Women are marginalized in many ways, whether due to lack of access to education, political under-representation or the violation of harmful cultural practices such as female genital mutilation and marriage. of children. Although overall poverty has declined over the years, the poverty rate is still high in Uganda, rising to 21.4% in 2016. Notably, high poverty rates have a disproportionate impact on women.

In an interview with The Borgen Project, Loren Thomas and Caragh Bennet, co-founders of Zena, point out that the women they work with “are not beneficiaries but benefactors”. Entrepreneurship women are enrolled in The Zena Launchpad program, where they gain confidence, education and community, while simultaneously gaining a learning / employment opportunity to create jewelry for the community. Zena brand. This work allows women to save to start their own business and escape poverty.

Origin story

Thomas and Bennet met in Uganda while volunteering on a gap year after high school. After active discussions on best practices in aid, Thomas’ experience in developing a social enterprise program for women, and Bennet’s research thesis in Uganda, they agreed that “women entrepreneurs needed debt-free capital ”. From there was born the idea of ​​Zena.

Zena has two bodies that go together. One is the Zena Launchpad where the focus is on social impact. The other is the product line, The Zena Brand, which focuses on creating unique jewelry. The quality and style of Zena’s products make the brand popular, featured in Vogue Italia, Marie Claire and Harper’s Bazaar.

Hybrid model

What makes Zena unique is that it is not a traditional charity. Zena is partly nonprofit because she works with donors who invest in women, wishing to have an impact rather than getting a capital reward. At the same time, Zena is a social enterprise as women gain access to stable employment and acquire skills and earned capital for their business ideas.

Thomas explains: “The hybrid model Zena Launchpad allows women to access start-up capital without loans and without handouts. This is extremely important in fostering a sense of agency, as it “allows them to start businesses from a real place of strength and trust, knowing that they have fully earned this opportunity themselves”.

The model in practice

The selection process is simple: the participants / potential members of the program are women living in poverty in Uganda with viable business ideas. Women are an eclectic mix of backgrounds, all “from a variety of religions, tribes and even different countries,” says Thomas. Some were once refugees, others were abused, but all women come into Zena and find not only a new livelihood, but a new community of support. Women end up becoming clients of each other and looking after each other’s children.

Once selected for the jewelry apprenticeship program, women receive education and training in business and literacy. Each member is assigned a unique contract based on their business idea and the amount they need to save to start the business. Zena supports achievable goals so that women graduate and the next cohort can then be enrolled.

But, Zena doesn’t stop there. Bennet and Thomas intentionally decided to use only recycled and locally sourced waste to make their products, believing in the power of the fashion industry to do good not only for workers but also for the environment.

Education

Education in Zena is extremely important. The program takes a holistic approach through three areas of learning: classroom instruction, work experience, and personal development through mentoring. Zena sees literacy as crucial in changing the lives of women living in poverty in Uganda alongside formal business education and leadership training. Women gain “project management experience and communication skills” while working and discussing important topics, such as violence, family planning and mental health in a supportive environment.

Bennet and Thomas are continually looking for a way to improve their program. They are now planning a course on social media and smartphones after noticing during the COVID-19 pandemic that a lack of computer literacy can be a barrier to success.

Combat gender inequalities

In Uganda, there is a significant gender disparity in human capital wealth, with women accounting for only 39%, while men accounting for 61%. What is more, girls and women of lower socioeconomic status are the most affected by gender inequality. Therefore, the Zena Launchpad program, active since 2016, deliberately focuses on creating future women entrepreneurs by empowering women living in poverty.

The Zena team believes that these women will then also become leaders in their communities, defending and supporting other women. Some of Zena’s graduates now only hire women at their startups, and a graduate called Susan is going one step further, focusing on hiring single mothers. Thomas says that another graduate, Eva, “is currently working to run for local government to better advocate for women in her community.”

The empowerment and social awareness gained through the model has a clear impact on the community, not just the women in the official program. This belief in solidarity is something Bennet and Thomas stand for, with weekly team bonding sessions mandatory for all Zena members, regardless of the role of the participant, from security personnel to board members. .

An exemplary model

In her first five years, Zena supported the development of 31 women entrepreneurs, with 19 graduating from her program. This impact means that 200 people are lifted out of poverty, 90 children receive an education and 17 women are literate.

Zena’s founders are now looking to expand their program to help more women living in poverty in Uganda, believing the success of their model is proof of its potential for replication around the world. Zena, a community power-driven nonprofit, is one to watch for the future and be inspired by today.

– Hope Browne
Photo: Courtesy of Zena


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Non profit living

Initially, surgeons attached a pig kidney to a human – and it worked


Surgeons in New York have successfully attached a kidney grown on a genetically engineered pig to a human patient and found the organ to be functioning normally, a scientific breakthrough that could one day produce a vast new supply of organs for them. critically ill patients.

Although many questions remain unanswered about the long-term consequences of the transplant, which involved a brain-dead patient followed for only 54 hours, experts in the field have said the procedure represents a milestone.

“We need to know more about organ longevity,” said Dr Dorry Segev, professor of transplant surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine who was not involved in the research. Nonetheless, he said: “It’s a huge breakthrough. This is a big, big problem.

Researchers have long sought to grow organs in pigs suitable for transplantation into humans. A constant flow of organs – which could eventually include hearts, lungs and livers – would offer a lifeline to the more than 100,000 Americans currently on transplant waiting lists, including the 90,240 who need of a kidney. Twelve people on waiting lists die every day.

An even greater number of Americans with kidney failure – more than half a million – depend on grueling dialysis treatments to survive. Largely because of the scarcity of human organs, the vast majority of dialysis patients are not eligible for transplants, which are reserved for people most likely to thrive after the procedure.

The operation, performed at NYU Langone Health, was first reported by USA Today on Tuesday. The research has not yet been peer reviewed or published in a medical journal.

The transplanted kidney was obtained from a pig genetically engineered to grow an organ unlikely to be rejected by the human body. In a close approximation of an actual transplant procedure, the kidney was attached to a person who had suffered brain death and was kept on a ventilator.

The kidney, attached to the blood vessels in the upper leg outside the abdomen, began to function normally, producing urine and creatinine waste “almost immediately,” according to Dr. Robert Montgomery, director of the NYU Langone Transplant Institute, which performed the procedure in September.

Although the organ has not been implanted in the body, problems with so-called xenotransplants – from animals like primates and pigs – usually occur at the interface of the human blood supply and organ, where human blood circulates through porcine vessels, the experts said.

The fact that the organ is working outside the body is a strong indication that it will work in the body, said Dr Montgomery.

“It was better than we expected, I think,” he said. “It looked like any transplant I have ever done from a living donor. Many kidneys of people who have died do not work right away and take days or weeks to start. It worked immediately.

Last year, 39,717 residents of the United States received organ transplants, the majority of them – 23,401 – receiving kidneys, according to the United Network for Organ Sharing, a nonprofit that coordinates the country’s organ procurement efforts.

Genetically modified pigs “could potentially be a sustainable and renewable source of organs – the sun and the wind of organ availability,” said Dr Montgomery.

Reactions to the news among transplant experts ranged from cautious optimism to wild outpouring, though all agreed that the procedure represented a sea change. The prospect of raising pigs to harvest their organs for humans is sure to raise questions about animal welfare and exploitation, although around 100 million pigs are already killed in the United States each. year to feed.

While some surgeons have speculated that it may be a few months before kidneys from genetically modified pigs are transplanted into living humans, others have said there is still a lot of work to be done. .

“This is truly a leading edge translational surgery and transplant that is on the verge of being able to be done in living humans,” said Dr Amy Friedman, former transplant surgeon and chief medical officer of LiveOnNY, the organ procurement organization for the greater New York City area.

The group was involved in the selection and identification of the brain dead patient receiving the experimental procedure. The patient was a registered organ donor, and because the organs were not suitable for transplantation, the patient’s family agreed to allow research to test the experimental transplant procedure.

Dr Friedman said she is also considering using hearts, livers and other organs grown in pigs. “It’s really mind-boggling to think of how many transplants we could offer,” she said, adding: “You have to raise the pigs, of course.”

Other experts were more reserved, saying they wanted to see if the results were reproducible and review the data collected by NYU Langone.

“There is no doubt that this is a feat, in that it is difficult to do and you have to overcome a lot of obstacles,” said Dr. Jay A. Fishman, Associate Director from the Massachusetts General Hospital Transplant Center.

“Whether this particular study advances the field will depend on what data they’ve collected and shared, or whether it’s a step just to show they can do it,” said Dr. Fishman. He urged humility “about what we know”.

There are still many hurdles to overcome before organs from genetically modified pigs can be used on living humans, said Dr David Klassen, chief medical officer of the United Network for Organ Sharing.

While he called the surgery a “watershed moment,” he warned that long-term organ rejection occurs even when the donor’s kidney is well adapted and “even when you are not trying to cross the barriers of the organs. species “.

The kidney has functions in addition to removing toxins from the blood. And there are concerns about pig viruses infecting recipients, said Dr Klassen: “It’s a complicated area, and to imagine that we know all the things that are going to happen and all the problems that are going to arise is naive.

Xenotransplantation, the process of grafting or transplanting organs or tissues between different species, has a long history. Efforts to use animal blood and skin in humans date back hundreds of years.

In the 1960s, kidneys from chimpanzees were transplanted into a small number of human patients. Most died soon after; the longest lifespan of a patient was nine months. In 1983, a baboon heart was transplanted into a baby girl known as Baby Faye. She died 20 days later.

Pigs offered advantages over primates for organ harvesting: they are easier to rear, mature faster, and reach adult human size in six months. Pig heart valves are commonly transplanted into humans and some diabetic patients have received pig pancreas cells. Pig skin has also been used as a temporary graft for burn patients.

The combination of two new technologies – gene editing and cloning – has produced genetically modified pork organs. Pig hearts and kidneys have been successfully transplanted into monkeys and baboons, but safety concerns have prevented their use in humans.

“So far, the field has been stuck at the preclinical primate stage, as moving from a primate to a living human is seen as a big leap,” Dr. Montgomery said.

The kidney used in the new procedure was obtained by removing a pig gene that encodes a sugar molecule that elicits an aggressive human rejection response. Pork has been genetically modified by Revivicor and approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use as a source of human therapy.

Dr Montgomery and his team also transplanted the pig’s thymus, a gland involved in the immune system, in an attempt to prevent immune reactions to the kidney.

After attaching the kidney to the blood vessels in the upper leg, surgeons covered it with a protective shield so that they could observe it and take tissue samples during the 54-hour study period. . Urine and creatinine levels were normal, Dr Montgomery and colleagues found, and no sign of rejection was detected for more than two days of observation.

“There did not appear to be any incompatibility between the pig kidney and the human that would render it inoperative,” said Dr Montgomery. “There was no immediate rejection of the kidney.”

Long-term prospects are still unknown, he admitted. But “it allowed us to answer a very important question: is there something going to happen when we go from a primate to a human that is going to be disastrous? “


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Non profit living

Nonprofit Organization Denies Jamie Lynn Spears’ Donation From Book Proceeds | Culture & Leisure


This Is My Brave declined Jamie Lynn Spears’ offer for a donation from the proceeds of his upcoming book.

The nonprofit – which aims to raise awareness about mental health issues – reacted to the backlash against the 30-year-old star’s memoir and confirmed it would not accept “proceeds from the book sale. “.

Speaking to Instagram, This Is My Brave said, “We hear you.

“This Is My Brave was recently recommended as a benefit organization for Jamie Lynn Spears’ upcoming book.

“We have made the decision to decline the offer to receive the proceeds from the book sale.”

This was shared with another statement, which read, “We have heard you. We are taking action. We are deeply sorry for all whom we have offended.

“We are refusing the donation of Jamie Lynn Spears’ next book.”

The ‘Zoey 101’ actress sparked a backlash in July when it was announced that she was planning to release an autobiography titled ‘I Must Confess’ – which is a word from her older sister, Britney Spears’ single. … Baby One More Time ‘- but she later revealed it’s titled’ Things I Should Have Said ‘.

The book’s original subtitle, “Family, Fame and Figuring It Out,” also appeared to have been deleted.

And she recently revealed her intention to donate to This Is My Brave by praising the organization’s “amazing work”.

She said: “I know I still have a LOT to learn, but I feel like finishing this book has brought this chapter of my ’30 year’ life to a close and hopefully. , to help anyone who has forgotten their worth, lost their voice or is trying to break an unhealthy cycle in their life.

“That’s why, I’m so happy to announce that a portion of the proceeds from my book will go to @thisismybrave, because I know how scary it can be to share personal struggles, especially if you don’t feel like you have the support or a safe space to do it, and they do an amazing job of supporting and encouraging people as they courageously share their experiences. (sic) “


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Non profit living

I am a fashion editor and am blown away by these eco-friendly heels


This fancy shoe brand is committed to saving the planet and our feet from the throbbing pain

Rachel richardson

As for the heels, we have a lot options, but it’s actually very rare to find a fancy shoe brand that boldly makes lots of promises up front – and actually delivers. Well, that’s precisely what Ma’am Shoes did, and I’m so here for it. The new Los Angeles-based brand made its debut by declaring that women no longer have to choose between style and comfort, and went one step further by using sustainable materials to source locally and produce their very cute and colorful line of quality sandals, heels and ankle boots (coming soon).

Jennifer chan

Jennifer chan

Courtesy

madam shoes

madam shoes

Courtesy

Buy now: $ 300; maamshoes.com

My interest immediately piqued when I browsed the site for more details and I was pleasantly surprised to find that Ma’am was more than just cute suede shoes. The eco-conscious line makes it known that they are created by women for women, and their mission is to make the world a better place. Understandably, there are strong feelings of empowerment and equality for women on their minimalist packaging, and upon closer inspection, I found that Ma’am even partnered with nonprofits. like United States of Women and I Am a Voter to give back and make an impact where it matters. If there was a shoe election in the fashion world, I would definitely vote for Ma’am Shoes.

So when the brand offered to send me a pair of their cute Ruth heels, I took them out for a walk to see how they performed. I wore them for brunch followed by a walk around town afterwards, and I felt cool, confident, and totally at ease. The (very) manageable heel height made for an enjoyable day without any complaints, and it turned out that the Ma’am team tested different heel heights, widths, insoles, outsoles and fabrications for finding the perfect equation to keep consumers comfortable on their feet to “walk the walk”. I like this.

Jennifer chan

Jennifer chan

Courtesy

“At Ma’am, we reject the idea that the bigger the better and that women need throbbing feet to be powerful,” the website proclaims. Music to my ears. The older I get, the more I realize that more reasonable heel heights are better for my joints (did I really just say that?) On your precious feet.

Jennifer chan

Jennifer chan

Courtesy

This particular style comes in four fun colors, and the soft petal pink hue I chose was a good start from the typical beige and neutral hues I usually gravitate towards in the fall. At $ 300, these shoes don’t come cheap, but the quality and brand history are well worth it, if you ask me.

madam shoes

madam shoes

Courtesy

Buy now: $ 300; maamshoes.com

And later this month, Ma’am is expanding its line to offer ankle boots in a rich ink indigo hue with a cool cylindrical heel. As if they weren’t tempting enough, for every pair of Shirley Boots sold, $ 10 will be donated to Baby2Baby, a non-profit organization that provides diapers, clothing and more to children living in poverty.

madam shoes

madam shoes

Courtesy

Buy now: $ 350; maamshoes.com

In short, Ma’am Shoes makes the difference in more than one way.


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Non profit living

Spokane teenager helps found refugee outreach program Youth Brining Immigrants Together


When immigrants and refugees arrive in Spokane, they often struggle to make connections in their new community. This can be especially true for young people, who find themselves in a school system that they do not understand, speaking a language that is foreign to them.

Neharika Sharma, junior at Gonzaga Prep, and a group of teens around the world hope to ease this struggle by connecting recent immigrants with local residents through a new nonprofit they have founded called Youth Bringing Immigrants Together (YBIT).

Students from the United States and Ukraine have been invited to participate in a training camp organized by Global Youth Entrepreneurs. There, Sharma teamed up with Larry Huang, a Taiwanese immigrant living in Vancouver, Washington, Daria Malevka from France and Barbara Potochevska from Ukraine.

Soon they realized that they all had something in common: a family experience with immigration. This inspired them to create a non-profit organization dedicated to connecting local residents with immigrants and refugees to ease their transition.

YBIT has been selected as the winner of the non-profit Global Youth Entrepreneur competition. This competition attracts hundreds of applicants from all over the world.

Students in the United States and Ukraine were matched in groups of four to compete for a $ 1,000 grant and the opportunity to receive financial advice from Nike CFO Mehran Nikko and former Microsoft vice president Dan’l Lewin.

This is how Sharma, Huang, Malevka and Potochevska connected. Using their shared family experience with immigration, they introduced a non-profit organization that matches locals with immigrants and refugees to ease their transition.

“We had to create business presentations, financial and business plans within a week, and it was overwhelming with the jet lag,” because two of the founders lived in Ukraine, Sharma said.

“Some of us didn’t have enough time to sleep because the competition was going on,” Potochevska added.

Sharma said the group didn’t know the financial side of doing business, so when they got $ 1,000 they didn’t know how to use it. As a result, Nike’s CFO and Microsoft’s vice president told YBIT how to set up a non-profit organization, register it with the government, and distribute the funds properly.

Shortly after YBIT won the grant, COVID-19 took the world by storm. However, this roadblock benefited the building of their non-profit organization. This saved the group a lot of money as they have built a positive reputation through social media.

Sharma’s parents immigrated from India to Spokane. She is a junior at Gonzaga Prep and enjoys participating in musical theater and Indian classical dance. She said the process took her family about 13 years to immigrate to the United States. Understanding how difficult and trying this process is for so many people, Sharma sought to make this transition easier, especially for families.

When she first started working with YBIT, Sharma was surprised to find that unlike her, most immigrants quickly abandon their culture to assimilate into American life.

“If I had left my culture behind,” she said, “half of my life would have been gone.

She said she tries to prevent this assimilation by posting topics on Instagram that mentees can discuss with their mentors. One week, she asked mentees to share a recipe from their culture with their mentors. With this program, Sharma hopes to encourage teens to embrace their uniqueness.

Huang immigrated to Vancouver from Taiwan at the age of 3. Huang said that because his family spoke Mandarin Chinese, he struggled to overcome the language barrier. His school enrolled him in ESL, which made it difficult for him to adapt to an unfamiliar environment.

“Coping with the language barrier was difficult for me. So I signed up for this innovation boot camp (Global Youth Enterprises) and met the YBIT team and from there I discovered this common story in this field, ”said Huang.

The team decided that the nonprofit would target teens desperate to find a home in the community.

“With the stress and responsibilities that adults have to take on, it’s easy for teens to feel lost in the equation,” Huang said.

Afghan families who fled their homes continue to arrive in Spokane as the Taliban gain traction following the US withdrawal. Sharma said YBIT is “absolutely” looking for opportunities to help Afghan refugees.

When an immigrant family files their documents, they learn about resources designed to facilitate their transition. YBIT presents documents from immigration agencies as a resource for young people. This advertisement is the reason YBIT hosts operations in over 55 countries.

“The language barrier is the most difficult barrier facing immigrants and refugees,” said Jackson Lino, director of youth programs at World Relief.

The four co-founders echoed Lino’s statement, saying easing the language barrier is YBIT’s top priority. Meeting a mentor each week allows mentees to learn the language of their new home and provides teens with a unique opportunity to experience phrases, slang and nuances of the language they are learning.

Ahmed Hassan participated in the YBIT Refugee Mentor / Mentor Program. Hassan recently moved from Saudi Arabia to Ukraine to study at university and is no stranger to moving countries. He was born in Germany and has also lived in Canada and the United Arab Emirates.

He said the YBIT team had it set up with a friend and they instantly hooked up.

“We shared a lot of cultural knowledge and acquired a good amount of new things,” Hassan said. “We both knew different languages ​​as well, so we also practiced this together. “

In this mentorship, Hassan said he found a place to share his experience and realized that the YBIT participants “were one family with the same goals.”

After completing his mentorship, Hassan was invited to remain a volunteer.

“We do our best to give young people all the support they need and to help them get involved in any new environment they find themselves in,” he said.

In order to facilitate communication, mentors must be at least bilingual. Huang is the leader of the Chinese language, Sharma the Hindi leader, Malevka the French and Potochevska the Ukrainian.

In addition to language proficiency, YBIT is looking for likeable, kind and enthusiastic teens about learning about another culture.

Potochevska lives in central Ukraine and plans to study at Taras Shevchenko National University in Kyiv in the fall. She understands the challenges of immigration because she saw her brother immigrate to Australia. She said the process was “really stressful” for everyone involved.

“For migrants, it’s a big cultural difference,” she said. “For me alone, communicating with Americans is sometimes difficult for me, and sometimes I just don’t understand (their) mentality.

YBIT is delighted to welcome a new group of mentees and mentors for the 2021-22 school year. Their mentee application form is open to refugee and immigrant youth. Applications to become a mentor are closed, but teens are encouraged to contact YBIT to find out how they can be of assistance. Visit YBIT online at ybitinternational.wixsite.com/ybit.


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La Palma volcano, live updates today: eruption, tsunami warning and breaking news | the Canary Islands


A group of celebrity chefs feed the hungry people of La Palma

Working near the glowing lava flowing from a volcano on the Spanish island of La Palma, rescuers eagerly await their lunch break – and while any food will do, it tastes better when it comes from a famous chef’s kitchen.

Chef Jose Andres ‘nonprofit World Central Kitchen (WCK) has delivered hot meals, sandwiches and water to thousands of evacuees as well as rescue workers overseeing residents’ safety .

“Although there are so many of us, it seems there is a lack of staff… including those who come down to give us a sandwich! It sounds silly but after eight hours on the ground it’s fundamental, ”said Guardia Civil police captain Diego Ortiz.

Arriving in one of the emptied neighborhoods in a van, WCK volunteer Pablo Pais told Reuters: “The lava is very close. Until the day before yesterday, there were still people in these houses.”

The association started preparing 200 meals a day at the start of the eruption – which began on September 19 – and now has 1,400, with a daily increase, said Olivier de Belleroche, a 45-year-old chef from Madrid who works for WCK.

After the manager of a local hotel suggested using all of the hotel’s food stocks as creeping lava threatening to cut power lines, WCK and its partners organized a large convoy of food for the military, rescue workers and evacuees, he said.

“It’s very moving, this feeling of being constantly on the alert, so many people lose their homes,” said Belleroche to himself after taking out of the oven a tray filled with dozens of hot dishes sealed in a lively kitchen. sold by a supermarket chain.

You get more and more involved with people – I’ve been doing this for four weeks now,“he added, explaining that initially he had only come for a few days.

WCK chef Andres is known for his innovative cuisine and credited with popularizing tapas in America in the 1990s.

He recently partnered with the Archewell charity of British Prince Harry and his wife Meghan Markle to set up a series of community relief centers in disaster areas around the world.


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KFOR INQUIRY: Oklahoma DHS abruptly ends relationship with nonprofit providing free service to place children


OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – At this time, 7,200 Oklahoma children are in state care.

These children cannot live with their biological parents.

Some may possibly be reunited with a biological parent. Hundreds are available for worship.

Some will grow old because of a system that has failed to find them a forever home.

An Oklahoma-based nonprofit founded to find homes for these children has been told their help is unwanted.

The Oklahoma Heart Gallery is a network of child advocates who maintain a database of photos and videos of children available for adoption.

Several times a year for the past 19 years, photographers have donated their time and resources to take beautiful images of children held by DHS.

According to Oklahoma Heart Gallery (OHG) board chair, Mary Beth Ede, this is a $ 20,000 to $ 30,000 a year business.

Their mission is to connect potential adoptive families with an available child.

“For me, it’s really humanizing for these kids who are in the care of DHS,” Ede said.

Deangelo Coberly, 18, was first presented by the Oklahoma Heart Gallery at the age of 13.

“A lot of these kids. they can’t wait to be on this website for some hope, ”Deangelo recalls.

He had been detained by DHS most of his life.

In 2018, Deangelo was living at the Tulsa Boys Group Home; its 27th foster home.

That same year, the Coberly family found Deangelo on the Oklahoma Heart Gallery website.

“She found his picture and said, ‘Look at him. Look at this kid! ‘ She kept talking about her dimples. Deangelo’s adoptive father, John Coberly, said. “Honestly, without the Heart Gallery, we wouldn’t have found Deangelo. We have gone through so many DHS profiles.

The Heart Gallery has provided this service to DHS for 19 years.

Almost two decades of photos, videos, website maintenance, and daily phone calls from potential adoptive parents.

The founder, Gay Larsen, adopted two teenagers from DHS years ago.

The children of Oklahoma need a home.

Larsen and members of the Oklahoma Heart Gallery board of directors received a letter from DHS earlier this year, informing them that DHS would not “renew” the relationship.

“After all this time and money and all this work that we have done, it was mind blowing,” said Larsen.

The notification from DHS Child Protection Services provided little explanation.

According to the letter, Director Deborah Shropshire wrote: “Over the past few years our understanding and approach to fostering foster care has evolved… Our work with the Oklahoma Heart Gallery just doesn’t align as well as it does. the past. , and for this reason, I want to inform you that we will not be renewing the Memorandum of Understanding between the Oklahoma Human Services and the Oklahoma Heart Gallery. Additionally, the effort to develop a system for photographing children in need of foster care will not be a strategy that we are going to advance further.

“The tone was a bit rude and contemptuous,” Ede said. “Just for someone to say, ‘Oh. Thank you. We don’t need you. It really is. It was a punch in the guts.

Keep in mind that this was a free service for finding homes for children.

Every expense was paid for by the Oklahoma Heart Gallery, including a brand new custom website portal created by the Oklahoma Heart Gallery at the request of DHS.

Today, the Heart Gallery and DHS are embroiled in a legal battle over who owns the rights to the images and videos produced by OHG volunteers.

The database is made up of thousands of images produced over 19 years of effort to help.

“We would have appreciated at least a minimum of respect for the time, effort, energy and money we have put into it over the years. It’s no small effort, ”Ede said.

KFOR has requested an interview with DHS. We asked for a legitimate reason why the state would refuse free assistance in finding homes for the children.

The agency offered this vague statement:

“We are eternally grateful to the organizations and volunteers who use their time and talent to reach out to people who improve the lives of children and families. OK-DHS aims to reduce or eliminate the amount of trauma suffered by children and youth, to heal and strengthen families and communities and to create alternative supports for the safety and well-being of children. . We continue to refine and evolve our strategies, approach and partnerships to achieve this goal based on evidence-based best practices. “

News 4 also requested twelve months of internal communications between DHS administrators and adoption services in Oklahoma. We were hoping to find out more about what was wrong with DHS and the Oklahoma Heart Gallery.

Ali Meyer of KFOR made the request in July, and we have been waiting three months for DHS to comply with the Open Records Act and release these public documents.

Regarding the request, a DHS spokesperson emailed this update in September:

“We are processing your request under the Open Records Act. Due to the volume of your request, we anticipate that the response will likely take months, as to date it has returned over 50,000 pages for review. We expect there will be even more records at the end of our search. As many of our records are confidential under state law, we will need to review all of these records for possible drafting before sharing them with your station. We intend to respond in a reasonable manner and appreciate your patience.


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Green Sudan: the crossroads of well-being


It’s a Friday morning in September and Sudan Green is driving one of his three younger brothers to school.

“See you, man,” he says as his brother gets out of the car. “Be careful.”

Be careful? I ask. Is this your farewell note to everyone? Just him? For some special reason?

He stops ; on the phone, I hear him turn on his flashing light. “When people close to you have been taken away,” he said, the signal fading, “you have some caution about those you hold nearby. “

Seeing Green, like most of the people he has known his entire life growing up in Philly, is no stranger to loss. One of his earliest memories as a toddler? See someone shot in West Philly, near 47th and Kingsessing, where his family lived at the time.

“Having mentors around me and people who change my life is probably the reason I didn’t go looking for a gun or drugs,” says Green.

It would be years later, at the end of 2018, when he would experience one of the most painful tragedies of his life: the murder of his best friend, Nantambu, in Germantown, where Green had grown up.

But Green is no stranger to the role of Big Brother, either. It is a badge of honor that he has worn for as long as he can remember. Older son of poet / musician / goddess Ursula Rucker – he also has an older half-brother – Green grew up leading his pack of siblings. Tayyib Smith, who produced two of Rucker’s albums, remembers Green as a little boy hanging out at Larry Gold’s music studio while mom worked.

“Sudan has always been placed in a leadership position, like it or not,” says Smith. “I remember he and his brother had the code for a particular door in the studio, and it was like an adult honor for them, because they could move around the studio without the help of an adult. And I remember seeing that they were taking Pride in there.

A loss, then a different path

Moving through the artistic and creative circles forged by his mother, Green was exposed early on to the power of community, the glitz of entertainment, the sheer force of music, language and words. He attended the private progressive school in Philadelphia for a while, which he says was life changing, breaking out of the toxic masculinity that often permeated his neighborhood.

He didn’t realize it yet, but these worlds showed him the full gamut of masculinity, of humanity.

“The fact that I had mentors around me and people who changed my life was probably the reason why I didn’t go looking for a gun or drugs and didn’t have unhealthy relationships with these people. things, ”he said. “Because I’ve seen a lot of these things in front of me, like most people of all races, but it’s about what you do with it.” “

Of course, he was also a kid who wanted the same things that so many Philly kids did: work at Ubiq on Walnut Street, with his cool sneakers and streetwear. To hang out with his friends, even when it meant getting involved in the shadows, violence, or “jumping people,” immature activities that Green says he grew up on.

I just believe in being strong in your morals and going back to your standards on a daily basis, ”Green said. “You wonder who are you presenting yourself for and why? “

He grew up and started making his own music; he lived in New York for a few years, tapping into the yoga community through the now defunct, paid studio Yoga For The People; he further broadened his view of the world. He attended Smith’s Institute of Hip Hop Entrepreneurship.

Then, in 2018, Nantambu was assassinated.

“I fell into a depression. I lost 15 pounds in two weeks. It was crazy, ”he said, his voice starting to break. To cope, he turned to music, writing a song called “Spirits Up!”

The earth continued to revolve around the sun and, lo and behold, it was 2020, with all its turmoil, the tensions that had always been part of Green’s Philadelphia rising to the surface of the nation. The Whites – not enough, but more – have started to pay attention.

Green leaned into the protests, of course, but he also listened intently to what they were revealing about the pain, a pain he recognized in his bones; he decided to do something about it.

This something? It encompasses the influences that have shaped Green his entire life: music, community, love. He organized Spirits Up !, a nonprofit movement that invites blacks and brunettes to come together through free community yoga, mindfulness and wellness events.

RELATED: Free Yoga Series for Black Philadelphians After George Floyd Protests

During the past 18 months, Spirits Up! organized nearly 50 events that touched the lives of over a thousand people. At one point on June 17, 2020, over 400 people, mostly people of color, were doing yoga at Malcolm X Park.

“Having the foresight, wisdom and maturity to bring people together in a space that is centered, welcoming and safe for black people, it’s revolutionary, ”says Smith. “I think Sudan is a brilliant man with enormous potential. And I think the Spirits Up! addresses are a priority for everyone who talks about the health and well-being of the city.

Because let’s be honest: seeing a group of white women or suburban children doing yoga, talking about wellness or sharing the names of their therapists? It’s important, but it’s not revolutionary. But among black and brown men, the stigma surrounding mental health issues and barriers to seeking care persists: just 26.4% of black and Hispanic men aged 18 to 44 who experienced daily feelings of loss. anxiety or depression were likely to have used mental health services, compared with 45.4 percent of non-Hispanic white men having the same feelings. What when black men ask for help and would prefer a provider of the same race? Well, they only make up about 4% (albeit rising) of the psychology workforce at the doctoral level.

“You go to white wellness areas, and they’re super nice. They have a lot of support, and that’s my goal. I don’t wanna do it if it’s not gonna be really nice. We have to take people out of the ordinary. You can’t just do the recreation center all the time, ”says Green.

And so bring well-being to light and bring people of color to to kiss this? It’s revolutionary. This is what makes Green the natural fit for Generation Change Philly, The Citizen’s new series in partnership with Keepers of the Commons to shine a light on and support the next generation of Philly change agents.

Since the launch of Spirits Up !, Green has also achieved her certification as a yoga teacher and the group has received fiscal sponsorship from BlackStar, the non-profit organization that produces the BlackStar Film Festival and serves as a platform for them. artists and designers of color. He was approached by sneaker brand Allbirds and LuLuLemon as a brand ambassador, worked with Ars Nova and artist Hank Willis Thomas on events.

Look ahead

Despite everything he has accomplished in the past 18 months, Green’s work has only just begun: he is committed to opening up a physical space, a cool recreation area for yoga, mindfulness, meditation. and workshops, ideally in Germantown and West Philly. But he doesn’t want to rush; he wants it to be nice. Truly attractive.

“You go to white wellness areas, and they’re super nice. They have a lot of support, and that’s my goal. I don’t wanna do it if it’s not gonna be really nice. We have to take people out of the ordinary. You can’t just do the recreation center all the time. It is also moving forward with its plan to offer a virtual platform. “I want to be able to reach everyone. “

Smith admires the path Green has taken and recognizes the pitfalls that abound.

“A lot of times the people most connected to the community are supposed to do everything from a sweat equity space and then jump through a blank stare to qualify for a nonprofit system that isn’t really about invest in you, but the tax benefits make it see like they’ve invested in you, ”he says. “I think this is the fight that Sudan and its advisers must wage. And that’s a challenge. I mean, as far as I read on Build Back Better money… I don’t see a lot of capital, energy or empathy flowing to organizations like the one in Sudan, or a host of people who bring innovation and passion to space. “

Sudan Green | By Sabina Louise Pierce

Green knows this, is not naive. And he’s mature enough to understand the difference between being exploited and being supported on his journey: Oh he Fortunately working with Penn, with IBX, with Comcast, doing the work to bring his work to more people.

He wants to do the job in an inclusive way, for black men (and all people), including those who want to embrace wellness while being part of pop culture, if they so choose; in other words, you can practice yoga and healing while still loving beautiful things. You don’t have to be, say, a bearded ascetic: it doesn’t have to be a choice, because wellness runs deeper than the clothes or sneakers you wear.

Morale! home page, there is a text that describes the mission of the group as “To work collectively to heal the black community through yoga and meditation.” By any means necessary. “

just reread The autobiography of Malcolm X, I ask Green about this last sentence, famous adaptation of Fanon and Sartre. Green says that as much as this quote inspires him, he is even more motivated by another quote widely attributed to the revolutionary leader.

“A man who represents nothing will fall in love with everything. “

“I just believe in being strong in your morale and going back to your standards on a daily basis,” Green said. “You wonder who are you presenting yourself for and why? “

To show up. Perhaps this is what Green does most significantly: he presents himself on behalf of the community that raised him; the brothers who admire him; the best friend he lost; and the city that needs him more than ever.

This is the logo of Generation Change Philly, a joint project between The Philadelphia Citizen and Keepers of the Commons that shines a light on the change makers in Philadelphia.

The Philadelphia Citizen partners with the nonprofit Guardians of the commons on the “Generation Change Philly” series to provide educational and networking opportunities for the city’s most dynamic change makers.

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African penguins at Denver Zoo live their best lives as they get a major habitat upgrade


Seventeen African penguins trembled and twisted, as if they were part of a single organism, out of the 65-degree water of their new enclosure at the Denver Zoo and on the hot deck above the week last.

Impressively, they never lost their tight training, squeezed shoulder to shoulder as they were like an elevator full of commuters with stiff arms and tuxedo clad (albeit incredibly cute).

“They will start to expand and make more use of the main area as they acclimatize,” said John Azua, curator of birds at the Denver Zoo, watching the zoo’s tiny human visitors crush their cheeks against a clear acrylic divider to catch the eye. -eye with the compact creatures. “For now, they are still grouped.”

You can’t blame them: At the time of this visit, the African penguins had barely been in the public eye for 24 hours, after zoo workers removed the wall separating their exhibit from the rest of the 84-acre campus , just north of City Park, home to around 3,000 other animals.

Located in the former Benson Predator Ridge, the $ 1.75 million African Penguin Habitat, which opened on September 30, draws visitors right inside the main entrance. The zoo painted and repaired the fake brown (now gray) rocks of the Ridge instead of tearing them down, while closing their perimeter to create this state-of-the-art 2,400-square-foot home for its endangered penguins, which are native to the area. ‘South Africa.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Children visit the new African penguin habitat at the Denver Zoo on Thursday, September 30, 2021.

“Their new pool is about four to five times the size of their swimming area at Bird World,” said Jake Kubié, communications director for the Denver Zoological Foundation, which operates the nonprofit Denver Zoo.

“The long, linear nature of it also allows them to display natural behaviors, such as porpoising (i.e. what dolphins do), which they weren’t able to do before. Azua added of the 40 foot long pool. “Their old exhibit was what we call in the industry a ‘dump and fill’, so no filtration, no circulation and a lot of wasted water.”

Pinnacle African Penguin Point, as it is officially called, solves these problems through technology. The new 10,000 square foot water tank is temperature controlled and filtered every 15 minutes, allowing caretakers to reuse the water instead of emptying it once or twice a week to prevent algae blooms summer events that hit the Bird World exhibit.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

A group of African penguins gather in their new habitat at the Denver Zoo on Thursday, September 30, 2021.

There are also heaters under parts of the deck that will allow the penguins to easily access the water, even in freezing weather, although once it hits 20 degrees or below they are still gathered at inside. The multiple burrows and nesting boxes, as well as various natural and landscaped substrates, effectively mimic their origins in the Cape of Good Hope, Kubié said.

It is specifically inspired by Boulder Beach in South Africa, where experts at the Denver Zoo have brought their Colorado knowledge to help rehabilitate and save African penguins for much of the past two decades. Animal care experts are also returning from these overseas trips with new practices that improve the care of captive animals at the Denver Zoo, Azua said.

Vertix Builders, the company behind the exhibit, has a lot of adaptation experience, having recently completed a major update for the ever-popular Space Odyssey at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science.

“Unlike a traditional commercial building, the exhibits are uniquely unique and the designers, contractors and zoo staff had to work closely together to develop a vision and then execute it to bring it to life,” said Ted Laszlo, vice-president of Vertix, in a press statement.

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

Left to right, Holly Samson, 2, and her sister Juniper, 3, of Denver have their photos taken in the new African penguin habitat at the Denver Zoo on opening day, Thursday, September 30, 2021.

Vertix had to balance the water and sand areas (the latter, where the keepers’ discussions and daily meals will soon begin), with spaces in which the penguins could both exercise and cool off, including including 600 feet of interior space. They also installed a rope and pulley system that zoo visitors can use to create “their own playful waves that the penguins can splash in”.

Of course, that would require these still-acclimatized penguins to loosen ranks, and luckily – for visitors and penguins alike – they’re on the right track.

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San Francisco housing complex gives victims of domestic violence a fresh start


Tucked away on her Chesterfield sofa, her power wheelchair close at hand, Rosemary Dyer examined the glittering peacock figures she had purchased on her first solo trip to San Francisco’s Chinatown after her release from prison, and admired the bright tablecloth with silk flowers in her new living room.

Dyer, an effervescent woman with a mischievous sense of humor, brought these and other prized possessions to Home Free, a new transitional apartment complex in San Francisco. It was designed for women who have been jailed for killing their abusive partner or being at a crime scene coerced by an abusive spouse or boyfriend. Dyer was convicted of murder and sentenced to life without parole in 1988 for the shooting death in 1985 of her eight-year-old husband, who abused and tortured her, at a time when expert testimony related to domestic violence and its effects were not permitted. in court in most states.

The insidious villainy that defined her life included being repeatedly beaten and sodomized with a loaded handgun. Her husband had dug a grave in the backyard, saying he intended to bury her alive.

Home Free – where Governor Gavin Newsom’s 2020 Dyer’s Switch is proudly hung on the wall – was created by Five Keys Schools and Programs, a statewide nonprofit that provides education, training professional, therapeutic programs and housing for inmates and new releases. The five-bedroom, two-bedroom apartment complex is the result of years of advocacy by survivors of intimate partner violence and the organizations that work with them. Their efforts have enabled women like Dyer to secure their release by pardon or by retroactively presenting evidence of their abuse to the state parole board or the courts.

“The fact that women who have suffered unspeakable violence against them have not been allowed to provide evidence of the abuse is the epitome of injustice,” said Sunny Schwartz, founder of Five Keys. “We are committed to creating a vibrant, dignified and safe home, a place that says ‘you are worth it.’ “

Previous transitional housing options for women were largely limited to those dealing with substance abuse. Home Free, on Treasure Island, a former naval base in the San Francisco Bay area, was forged during the pandemic last year with a tight start-up budget of $ 750,000, including staff. The once grimy apartments have been renovated with the help of nearly 100 volunteers – architects and landscapers, flooring and cabinet installers, plumbers, transporters, electricians and urban construction apprentices. They all gathered on this somewhat bizarre island originally built for the 1939 Golden Gate International Exhibition.

Interior design students at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco dedicated a semester to the project, joining mini-charettes on Zoom with Irving A. Gonzales of G7 Architects. They also reflected with the women, whose desires included full-length mirrors (they had been denied in prison to monitor their form for years).

“We wanted color! said Dyer, who visited the construction site while still in temporary accommodation. She and others had a particular aversion to gray, a shade associated with bunks and metal prison lockers.

A 69-year-old cancer survivor with congestive heart failure, Dyer has been using a wheelchair since she injured her hip in prison. A huge pirate flag – a nod to the Treasure Island theme – greets visitors as they arrive. Her accessible apartment adjoins a patio where she grows pots of tomatoes and radishes.

The landscape itself was designed by Hyunch Sung of the Mithun firm, who chose 10 different tree species. (Because the soil on Treasure Island is contaminated with industrial chemicals, the trees are planted in brightly colored containers.) Sung said she approached her work there as if designing for high-end clients. . “The idea of ​​beauty is underestimated for disadvantaged communities,” she said.

Nilda Palacios, 38, who lives upstairs, said it was “emotionally moving” to join the resort. She grew up with a history of abuse: she was assaulted as a child by an uncle and a stepfather, then raped at the age of 15 by a high school teacher. The teacher’s stressful ordeal made her dependent on drugs and alcohol (“I was trying to sleep my life,” she says). Palacios became distraught and suicidal. When a beggar cornered her one day, she said, she thought he was planning to attack her and “went on a rampage”, strangling her. She was convicted of second degree murder. Incarcerated for 17 years, she benefited from therapists in prison who helped her understand “how the depth of my crime relates to my story,” she said. “I confused someone who was not a threat for someone who was.”

Palacios was paroled. She benefited from a broader vision for Home Free, which now welcomes women like her, whose crimes were directly linked to their abuse.

Upon moving in, she was “shocked” at the prospect of a private room after years of sharing an 8 x 10 foot cell and cramming all her things into a six cubic foot box, with, as one inmate put it, current. , “your panties against noodles and peanut butter.”

“No way, is this my room?” Palacios recalled. “It felt like a real house to me.”

The idea for Home Free arose during a conversation between Schwartz, its founder, and the state treasurer of California, Fiona Ma, then the deputy of the state. Ma’s legislation, signed by Gov. Jerry Brown in 2012, allowed women who had experienced domestic violence and been convicted of violent crimes related to their abuse the opportunity to have their cases heard again using Women’s Syndrome. beaten (as it was called then) as a defense. The law also gave them the right to present evidence of abuse by intimate partners during the parole process. It applied to persons convicted before August 1996.

The number of Rosemary Dyers still behind bars is unknown. About 12,000 women are currently incarcerated for homicide nationwide, said Debbie Mukamal, executive director of the Stanford Criminal Justice Center at Stanford Law School and director of the Regilla Project, a three-year effort to study the frequency with which women in the United States are jailed for killing their attackers. Small studies, including one in Canada, suggest that 65% of women serving a life sentence for the murder of their intimate partner had been assaulted by them before the offense. The link between abuse and violent crime was highlighted by grim statistics in a 1999 US Department of Justice report showing that a quarter to a third of incarcerated women had been abused as minors and only a quarter to almost a half in adulthood.

Despite increased public awareness, “there are still a large number of criminal lawyers who do not understand how intimate partner violence creates the context for a crime,” said Leigh Goodmark, director of the gender-based violence clinic at the University of Maryland School of Law.

In New York State, the Domestic Violence Survivors Justice Act, enacted in 2019, was put to the test in the high-profile case of Nicole Addimando, a young mother of two in Poughkeepsie who shot and killed her baby friend and his father. children in 2017 after years of heartbreaking abuse (the case is dramatically captured in the documentary film “And So I Stayed.”)

Sentenced to 19 years in life for second degree murder, Addimando was entitled to a subsequent hearing under the law, where her allegations of abuse could be factored into a reduced sentence. The county court judge dismissed the allegations, saying she “had been given the opportunity to leave her attacker safely.” In July, the appeals division of the state Supreme Court overturned the decision, reducing the length of Ms. Addimando’s detention to 7.5 years.

For Kate Mogulescu, associate professor at Brooklyn Law School and director of its Survivors Justice Project, the case illustrates “the impossible burdens we place on survivors to prove their victimization.” Women are scrutinized by the courts in a very different way than men, she added. “With women, they are a bad mother, or promiscuous. The tropes are trotted on women and the punishments reflect this. However, so far 16 women have been punished in New York.

By far the most common reason that women who have been abused by intimate partners end up in prison are accomplice laws, in which a victim is forced to be at the scene of an abuser’s violence, like driving the getaway car, said Colby Lenz, co-founder of Survived and Punished, a national rights organization.

This was the case with Tammy Cooper Garvin, a victim of sex trafficking at the age of 14 and jailed for 28 years for being in the car while her pimp murdered a client. Her sentence was commuted and she was hired by Home Free as a residential coordinator.

Another advocate – and a guiding force behind the founding of Home Free – is another survivor named Brenda Clubine, who started a weekly support group at the California Institution for Women. Some 72 women quickly joined. Dyer was one of the original members, but until Clubine encouraged her, she was so terrified of life that she could barely speak.

Clubine herself had suffered years of abuse, including broken bones and stab wounds, by her husband, a former police detective. She hit her head with a bottle of wine and he died of blunt trauma. She served 26 years of a 16 life sentence. Her fierce retelling of the stories of the women in the prison group – which she sent to state lawmakers and governors – led to public hearings and the 2009 documentary “Sin by Silence,” which in turn inspired California laws.

Clubine’s close friendship with Dyer continued and is essential to Dyer’s rebounding confidence. At Home Free, Dyer now delights in making homemade noodles with chicken from his grandmother’s recipe. Clubine, his BFF, found that a safe and strengthening place for his “sisters” was long overdue. “I can’t say how full my heart feels that he’s available to them now,” she said.


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“It’s like having another job” – poverty relief programs hard to navigate during pandemic


Rain Chamberlain, who identifies with the pronoun they / them, lives in a small stucco house in Fresno with their child and a roommate. Chamberlain’s workspace is tucked away in a corner of the living room.

“This is my office here,” they say as they sit down at the desk and begin a regular routine, logging into one of the many government websites they use to access assistance programs. .

“So if I were to go to ‘My Benefits, Calwin’,” they say, waiting for the page to load.

“Oh hey, guess what. The internet decided it wasn’t there, ”Chamberlain laughs.

It takes at least a minute to reconnect the laptop to Wi-Fi.

“That’s a lot,” Chamberlain said, concentrating on the screen.

It takes another 30 seconds for the website to load.

“And a lot of times, I’ll be multitasking. I’ll be working in other tabs while I wait for these items to load, ”Chamberlain says.

Chamberlain writes grants for nonprofit organizations, including one they just started on their own.

“You know, it’s not there yet, but it’s getting closer. I get to the point where I work pretty much full time, ”they say.

Chamberlain, who is a single parent, has also recently started taking online classes. But Chamberlain says one of the most time-consuming and stressful parts of their routine is keeping up with government assistance programs that are helping them get by.

“The housing authority, social assistance, the rehabilitation department, the telephone and the Internet are benefiting,” says Chamberlain, finally referring to the California LifeLine program.

Right now, they have four assistance programs and have applied for a fifth – utility assistance from the Fresno Emergency Rental Assistance Program.

Chamberlain is disabled and sometimes uses a wheelchair. And once COVID hit, their household lost jobs and income.

“Living in poverty usually means going through eight different crises simultaneously,” explains Chamberlain.

It’s like having another job to maintain program benefits.

“So there’s this expectation that from 7:00 am to at least 6:00 pm, you have to be available for any random phone calls, any random text, any random email,” Chamberlain explains.

They say they spend 10 to 60 hours a month keeping up to date with all the programs. They say a lot of the skills needed are financial.

“Bank statements and paypal records and everything to show all my itemized income,” Chamberlain says.

Chamberlain goes through a stack of papers in a trash can. There are 12 bins for each month of the past year. Chamberlain says it helped them sort through the paperwork to re-apply for the housing authority voucher, which is key to lowering the cost of their monthly rent.

“I have to be the one to sit there and professionally make sure it all adds up,” Chamberlain said, flipping through the papers.

Chamberlain says it took about 60 hours over a three month period to complete this app. Before COVID, recipients could schedule appointments to help fill out forms. But everything changed very suddenly.

“Even the desks that they are still there, even though the workers themselves will still go to work every day, that doesn’t mean beneficiaries can enter,” Chamberlain says.

They say browsing can be overwhelming for some of the most vulnerable populations, especially when reliable internet access and often a printer or scanner are needed.

“People who have been disenfranchised, who have multiple marginalizations, all these different things absolutely need to be part of these programs. And the punishment, the pretty literal punishment if you don’t, is homelessness and often death, ”Chamberlain says.

That’s why Chamberlain created a non-profit organization. It’s called Navigating Structures and now has 501c3 status.

“This is by and for people who fit into both the crossroads of disability and chronic homelessness or at chronic risk of homelessness,” Chamberlain said.

It was designed from Chamberlain’s own experiences in and out of homelessness. The goal is to build a stronger community by paying homeless people to work on their own passions, whether it’s fixing bikes or cooking. At present, Chamberlain is still seeking grants to fund the organization.

“We can have the time and the energy to really invest in our community, without having to worry about where that next paycheck comes from,” Chamberlain said.

Although Chamberlain is not yet making any money in this phase of the nonprofit organization, they are hopeful that this effort will pay off in the future.


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Non profit living

LiveXLive, a subsidiary of LiveOne, will exclusively broadcast its 62nd event; United lighting of over 225 landmarks in all 50 states and musical performances for metastatic breast cancer on October 13


To agree October 13e To 8:30 p.m. EDT for #LightUpMBC Live broadcast on LiveXLive.com, Youtube and Facebook @METAvivor, and metavivor.org for a virtual benefit with special guests Rob Thomas, Kristin chenoweth and Tom morello

LOS ANGELES, October 8, 2021 / PRNewswire / – LiveOne (NASDAQ: LVO), a global platform for live streaming and live and on-demand audio, video and podcast / vodcast content in the fields of music, comedy and entertainment pop culture, and owner of LiveXLive, PodcastOne, Lazy radio, React present and Custom Customization Solutions, today announced a collaboration with METAvivor research and support to broadcast live the third annual global benchmark campaign, #LightUpMBC, to highlight the importance of raising awareness and funding metastatic breast cancer research. Each year, more than 685,000 of people worldwide die from metastatic breast cancer (CMB), also known as stage IV or advanced breast cancer, for which there is no cure. It happens when the cancer spreads beyond the breast to other parts of the body.

At October 13, 2021, National Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day, LiveOne will live stream lighting from over 225 Landmarks in all 50 US states as well as Porto Rico, Canada, Sweden and Ireland, in the MBC outreach colors of green, teal and pink, as part of the #LightUpMBC campaign. In the age of inclusiveness, people might not realize that pink doesn’t resonate with the MBC community. Designed and deposited by METAvivor volunteers, the teal, green and pink tricolor ribbon symbolizes hope, immortality, healing and spirituality. Iconic participating locations include: One World Trade Center, Niagara Falls, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, BMW Zentrum and Kilkenny Castle in Ireland. This year, many iconic sporting destinations are participating, including FTX Arena, Caesars Superdome, US Bank Stadium, Citizens Bank Park, Lincoln Financial Field, Wells Fargo Center and BC Place.

#LightUpMBC Live, a virtual benefit co-hosted by a TV personality Katie McGee and MBC Advocate Tami Eagle Bowling, will start to 8:30 p.m. EDT to October 13. Viewers can watch the live stream on LiveXLive, Youtube and Facebook @METAvivor and METAvivor.org. The event will feature inspiring MBC stories from illuminated landmarks around the world and musical guests such as Kristin chenoweth, Tom morello, Rob thomas and JD Eicher.

“#LightUpMBC Live aims to garner critical attention around the lack of funding for stage IV breast cancer research. Fundraising is imperative to support scientists looking for new treatments,” said Tami Eagle Bowling, MBC patient advocate and creator of #LightUpMBC Live. “Research is the only thing that will give me and so many others living with MBC more time with our families.”

“LiveOne is proud to partner with #LightUpMBC to bring the livestream to our global audience and our subscribers. This virtual benefit connecting music, artists and a visual performance will increase awareness and much-needed funding for metastatic breast cancer “, said Jackie Pierre, Marketing Director of LiveOne. “On a personal note, I have known Tami Eagle Bowling For over 20 years, I have continued to be impressed by his drive, dedication and spirit to this important cause. “

“It saddens me to see how many people I have met have not exceeded the life expectancy of 2-3 years for metastatic breast cancer,” said the president of METAvivor. Jamil Rivers. “100% of every donation to METAvivor funds stage IV MBC research. It is simply the only way to prolong the life of people with this terminal illness. “

National sponsors for the event include Seagen, Pfizer, Hulu, BMW and The Eagle Method.

For more information, at make a donation and see the list of participating landmarks, please go to www.metavivor.org/LightUpMBC and follow Facebook on @METAvivor and Instagram @metavivor.

153 participating cities include: Albuquerque, Allen Park, Mooring, Anderson, Annapolis, Antioch, Arlington Heights, Asbury Park, Atlanta, Atlantic City, Baltimore, Barrington, beaver lodge, Billing, Biloxi, Binghamton, Birmingham, Bloomington, Wooded, Boston, Bothell, Bradley Beach, Branson, Ox, Burlington, Calgary, Camden, Charlotte, Charlottesville, Chicago, Crystal Lake, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Colombia, Columbus, Davenport, DC, Denver, Detroit, Detroit, Dover, Duluth, Eagan, Edine, Edmonton, Elisabeth, Evansville, Fan wood, Fort Wayne, Garwood, Gilbert, Large fork, Grand Rapids, Great Prairie, Big falls, Greenville, Greer, Halifax, Harrisburg, Hartford, Hartland, Hermosa Beach, Hershey, Hinsdale, Property (Pittsburgh), Honolulu, Houston, Hummelstown, Huntsville, Jacksonville, Jamestown, Kansas City, Kilkenny, Kittery, Forest Lake, Laramie, Las Vegas, Lethbridge, Lexington, Libertyville, Small stone, Los Angeles, Louisville, Manhattan, Marseilles, McLean, Miami, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Mobile, Mokena, Montgomery, Morristown, Myrtle Beach, Nashville, New Orleans, New York City, Niagara Falls, Northbrook, Oklahoma City, Okoboji, Omaha, Orlando, Panama City, Paris, Pascagoula, Pawtucket, Peoria, Philadelphia cream, Phoenix, Pigeon Forge, Pittsburgh, Pointe Pleasant Beach, Portland, Portsmouth, Poughkeepsie, Fast city, Red bank, Rehoboth Beach, Rochester, Roselle, Rosemont, Saint Louis, Salem, Salt lake city, San Antonio, San Diego, San Juan, Saint Clare, Schaumburg, Scottish plains, Seattle, south bend, south gate, Saint-Charles, Stockholm, Sussex County, Syracuse, Toledo, Tonawanda, Toronto, Trenton, Canton of Union, Vancouver, Virginia Beach, Waterbury, Wausau, Western Orange, Westfield, Wheaton, To roll, Wilmington and Yonkers.

About LiveOne, Inc.
Based at Los Angeles, California, LiveOne, Inc. (NASDAQ: LVO) (the “Company”) is a global interactive music, sports and entertainment subscription platform, offering premium content and live broadcasts from the world’s best artists. The Company has broadcast more than 1,800 artists since January 2020, a library of nearly 30 million songs, 500 expert curated radio stations, 235 podcasts / vodcasts, hundreds of pay-per-views, personalized products, an NFT business and has created a valuable link between brands , fans and bands. The other major wholly owned subsidiaries of the company are LiveXLive, Slacker Radio, React Presents, Custom Customized Solutions and PodcastOne, which generates over 2.27 billion downloads per year and over 300 episodes distributed per week over a stable of hundreds. of leading podcasts. The combination of acquisitions and the expansion of products and franchises have made LiveOne a premier music, entertainment and media services company. LiveXLive is available on iOS, Android, Roku, Apple TV, and Amazon Fire, and through OTT, STIRR, Sling, and XUMO, in addition to its app, online website, and social channels. For more information visit www.livexlive.com and follow us on Facebook, Instagram, TIC Tac, and Twitter to @livexlive.

About METAvivor and the Origin of Breast Cancer Ribbon (MBC):
METAvivor Research and Support is dedicated to the specific fight of men and women living with stage IV metastatic breast cancer. It is a volunteer-run 501c3 nonprofit organization that exclusively funds stage IV MBC research to move the disease from terminal to chronic with a good quality of life for MBC patients. METAvivor dedicates 100% of every donation to research into metastatic stage IV breast cancer.

The pink ribbon is well known to represent the fight against breast cancer, but many patients with stage 4 breast cancer feel that the pink does not sum up their experience. Metastatic breast cancer can start in the breast, but its spread to vital organs makes the disease fatal. To emphasize the uniqueness of the disease and show its similarity to other stage 4 cancers, METAvivor designed a green and teal base ribbon to represent metastases. Green represents the triumph of spring over winter, life over death and symbolizes renewal, hope and immortality while teal symbolizes healing and spirituality. The thin pink ribbon overlay signifies metastatic cancer originating in the breast.

For more information on METAvivor and for make a donation, visit www.metavivor.org/lightupmbc and follow us on Facebook @METAvivor and Instagram @metavivor.

About #LIghtUpMBC:
#LightUpMBC is a campaign produced by Moore Fight Moore Strong (MFMS) in memory of Jessica moore to increase awareness and funding of metastatic breast cancer. by pairing with landmarks to illuminate MBC’s symbolic colors of teal, green and pink. All proceeds collected through #LightUpMBC benefit METAvivor’s research and support.

For more information on the #LightUpMBC campaign, follow on Facebook @LightUpMBC and Instagram @lightupmbc.

Press contact:
Lindsey von Busch, director of public relations
The social status company.
[email protected]
732.284.9089

For LiveOne
917.842.9653
[email protected]

LiveOne IR Contact:
[email protected]
310.601.2505

SOURCE LiveOne, Inc.

Related links

http://livexlive.com



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Non profit living

Satellite Healthcare – Industry Leader in Home Dialysis – Appoints Chief Physician to Lead Home Therapies


SAN JOSE, Calif .– (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Satellite Healthcare, a leading non-profit provider of renal dialysis and related patient services, today announced that it has appointed Dr. Graham Abra to the newly created position of Chief Medical Officer, Home Therapies. Dr Abra will assume the role effective November 1, 2021, having served as the organization’s vice president of medical affairs and home therapy.

Dr Abra brings to the position extensive experience as a practicing nephrologist and success in innovating and operationalizing clinical programs within Satellite Healthcare. This includes playing a critical role in developing and implementing initiatives to identify and prevent diabetic foot disease, prevent hospitalizations by managing fluid overload, and reduce rates of diabetic foot disease. infection in dialysis centers and home dialysis centers.

As Chief Medical Officer, Home Therapies, Dr Abra will aim to bring the benefits of peritoneal and home hemodialysis to more people, introduce new technologies and cultivate partnerships to continuously improve the clinical outcomes and the overall experience of the Company’s patients who choose to have dialysis at home.

“People at all levels of our organization, as well as academic health centers, nephrology practices, and innovators in kidney-focused technology, each make a significant contribution to improving the lives of people on home dialysis.” , said Dr Abra. “This new role gives me the opportunity to combine our thinking and our collective skills for the benefit of the patients we serve in home dialysis. ”

Satellite Healthcare has achieved the country’s highest rate of home dialysis use among end stage renal disease patients, with around 20 percent of its patients receiving home dialysis, compared to a national average of industry about 12 percent. Home dialysis is associated with patient longevity, high quality of life, short recovery times after dialysis, and convenience for people whose health and home environment can accommodate it.

The company pioneered the concept of providing dedicated home dialysis centers, under the WellBound brand. His long history of treating hundreds of thousands of patients in need of dialysis treatment, his home-first philosophy and his increased focus on home therapies reflect his commitment to this modality, as well as to health and wellness. of the people who use it.

“From the day Satellite Healthcare opened its doors nearly 50 years ago, its founder, Dr. Norman Coplon, has insisted that collaboration, ingenuity and access were essential to the success of the company that serves patients, ”said Jeff Goffman, CEO of Satellite Healthcare. “Graham has built his career on these principles. His vision of the continued growth and impact of our home dialysis program will allow us to bring individualized therapy and its clinical and lifestyle benefits to more patients who may benefit from it.

“Satellite Healthcare always strives to determine the best possible care for people with kidney disease, and making it easier for patients to access the benefits of home therapies is at the heart of this commitment,” said Dr. Brigitte Schiller, Chief Medical Officer of Satellite Healthcare. Officer. “Graham’s expertise and in-depth thinking have contributed significantly to the growth and clinical excellence of our home dialysis program, and his new role will allow him to build on that success.

Dr Abra joined Satellite Healthcare in 2012, after obtaining a Fellowship in Nephrology at Stanford University with a focus on population health in people with chronic kidney disease. He currently holds the position of Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Nephology at Stanford University, a position he will retain. He will report to the CEO of Satellite Healthcare, working closely and in tandem with its Medical Director, Brigitte Schiller, MD, and President and COO, Bernadette Vincent.

About Satellite Healthcare

Satellite Healthcare, Inc., has been a leading non-profit provider of kidney dialysis and related services in the country since 1974. Through its affiliated services, Satellite WellBound, Satellite Dialysis and Satellite Research, Satellite Healthcare provides early education unmatched patient well-being, personalized clinical services and a full range of dialysis therapy choices. Additionally, Satellite Healthcare has a well-known mission to “improve the lives of people with kidney disease,” a lasting commitment to philanthropy and community service, ranging from funding millions of dollars in research grants to sponsorship of nationwide renal programs. Satellite Healthcare is committed to advancing the standards of care for chronic kidney disease through innovation and research so that patients can enjoy better health and lead better lives. For more information, visit satellitehealthcare.com.


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Non profit living

Two men strengthen friendship at Boston Marathon – and homeless families benefit – CBS Boston


BOSTON (CBS) – The Boston Marathon is more than just a race. It brings people together to test their endurance on the course and a community’s commitment to helping others in need.

Trainer Rob Vasquez runs the marathon for FamilyAid Boston, a non-profit organization that provides solutions to homeless families in Greater Boston.

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“You are running for a cause; you’re running into a goal, ”said Rob. “You are running for someone. You are running for a community.

Rob was introduced to the association through his trainer client, Jim Partridge of Newton. The pair got close as Rob continued to push Jim to go harder, faster, and harder in his workouts. And Jim did just that.

Jim Partridge and Rob Vasquez have developed a friendship that includes Rob who ran the Boston Marathon this year in place of Jim. (WBZ-TV)

“He was one of the most energetic and motivating in the gym. As well as in life, ”Jim told WBZ.

Rob says their relationship means a lot to him. “It has become a great friendship. It turned out that I would do anything for him.

Jim had already run the Boston Marathon for FamilyAid Boston in 2013 and wanted to do it again. However, a cancer diagnosis put that goal on the back burner. Instead, Rob will run for Jim.

“It really is,” Jim paused and bit back tears. “Sorry. It’s very emotional. It’s special to see someone who is so dear to me experiencing the joy that I may have felt.

And Jim says he’ll be at mile 17 to give his friend a big hug and give him the motivation to keep going.

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“I’m not a big crier, but that will be the point,” Rob said.

Khanisha Felder and her daughter Serenity slept in a car most nights before FamilyAid Boston’s help. (WBZ-TV)

And their efforts in the marathon benefit families who really need the help, like Khanisha Felder and her daughter Serenity of Dorchester. Khanisha says she and Serenity slept in a car most nights before FamilyAid Boston’s help.

“I remember having to go to Dunkin Donuts to wash myself. Wash her and change her clothes in a Dunkin Donuts.

This despite Khanisha’s work. She still had difficulty finding accommodation.

“When we were sleeping in the car it was very scary. And just be alone. It was very scary.

But, things have improved dramatically over the past year for this mom and daughter, thanks to FamilyAid Boston.

“I am able to cook my own meals. I can take a shower. I’m just able to feel comfortable, happy, and secure.

And November will be a happy month for Khanisha and Serenity as they mark the first anniversary of their lives in their own apartment.

NO MORE NEWS: Crews paint Boston Marathon start line in preparation for race day

You can donate to FamilyAid Boston through the Boston Marathon donation site, https://www.givengain.com/cc/familyaidboston/.


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