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Non profit living

FoundersForge and ETSU Offer Internship Opportunities to Talented Students | Sunday stories

JOHNSON CITY — FoundersForge, a local nonprofit dedicated to disadvantaged entrepreneurs, and East Tennessee State University are partnering to provide a unique opportunity for students looking to gain valuable experience at innovative regional startups without having to compete with big companies this spring.

The ETSU Startup Internship Fair, hosted by FoundersForge, will be held Thursday, April 7 from 6-8 p.m. at the Martha Street Culp Auditorium. The event is designed to ensure local talent and local businesses grow together, providing new opportunities for innovation and regional growth.

At the ETSU Startup Internship Fair, students will have access to a wealth of paid and unpaid opportunities for the summer in marketing, software development, accounting/finance, video production, and more.

This opportunity helps startups find amazing local talent to grow their business, and maybe even find the next (or first) full-time employee for their company.

Students gain experience. Gaining practical work experience can be more valuable to employers than degrees. Working with a startup can help students pursue work that really matters, gain real-life experience, explore areas of interest, and open doors to future job opportunities.

Startups are gaining momentum. Large job fairs are often a challenge for small businesses looking to hire great talent. Competing with bigger name companies means they sometimes miss out on the best candidates. But with the ETSU Startup Internship Fair, underdog entrepreneurs can share their mission with local students to find passionate, high-potential candidates and build their capacity to do more.

Learn more about FoundersForge at https://myfoundersforge.com.

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Non profit living

Loving your neighbors – one medical debt paid at a time

LINCOLN, Neb. (KMTV) – The leader of the Congregational Church of First-Plymouth wears sneakers and jeans for the 11:59 a.m. service – a laid-back, laid-back worship service.

A breeze blows through the open doors into the high-ceilinged sanctuary of the grand old church, surrounded by stately two-story houses, humble bungalows and box-like apartments in one of the most economically diverse neighborhoods of Lincoln.

Over the next 35 minutes, Senior Pastor Jim Keck will quote his mother, baptize a 3-year-old child, exalt moral courage, share a short version of the church’s long history, recite the Beatitudes, and move from the prayer of the Lord to the new initiative of the church.

“That moment when we say, ‘Forgive us our debts?’ You see here, during these months we are trying to help pay the medical debt in the center of Lincoln.

If you have five dollars in your pocket, he said. Ten. Everything you put on the plate, every penny, helps pay off our neighbours’ healthcare debts.

“I hope you have courage this week,” the pastor said. “I hope you cling to what is good.”

As the congregation enters the first sunny day of spring, a volunteer waits, shielding the collection plate from the wind to prevent his growing pile of money from flying out the door.

Even though that’s exactly where it’s destined to land.

***

It all started with Juan Carlos Huertas.

Keck had been surfing sermons on Facebook in the spring of 2020. Huertas lured him. Here is a man passionate about justice and community and the love of Jesus.

Here’s the guy who could help our church write its post-pandemic chapter, Keck thought.

A pastor’s son, like Keck. A church nerd, like Keck.

He invited the Methodist minister from Puerto Rico to preach in Lincoln, eventually luring him away from Louisiana, where he had served for 16 years.

“We brought him up to be a preacher and an innovator in social justice work,” Keck said.

Huertas was ready.

He and his family moved into a house four blocks from First-Plymouth last summer.

He started justNeighbors, a way to walk side by side with people in the neighborhood and show their love. They hung out at the local laundromat offering coffee and snacks, quarters for washers and dryers, help with folding and carrying laundry. They carpooled to volunteer at a medical clinic that helps sick Lincolnites without health insurance. They hope to find a way to fill the gas tanks.

But first, the two pastors floated bigger ideas. The pandemic has brought health care and inequality into the spotlight. They knew that churches across the country had redeemed large amounts of medical debt.

“But we didn’t want to do that in America as a whole,” Keck said. “We wanted to help our own neighbors in downtown Lincoln.”

Over the next few months, Huertas dug. He read as much as he could about medical debt, made phone calls and emails, learned all he could about this thorny American issue.

“I lost track of how many people I sat with,” Huertas said.

The more he learned, the more he realized, “It’s a problem with our neighbors.”

It’s easy for people to fall behind on medical bills, he said. Missing payments and ending up in collections. Your child falls ill. You get sick.

“You need the hospital and the pathologist and the respiratory therapist; people don’t understand the billing process.

Huertas learned as he went.

He learned that there are programs that already deal with medical debt here. The Lancaster County Medical Society is offering deeply discounted rates to patients overwhelmed with medical bills with the help of grants from the Community Health Endowment. Lincoln hospitals donate millions in charitable care; $42 million to Bryan Health alone in 2021.

He learned that some patients came to the Clinic with a heart run by Lincoln volunteers for care because they had debts they couldn’t pay at their own doctor’s offices.

He learned that people living in the cluster of neighborhoods in the heart of the city – near First-Plymouth – have a life expectancy nearly 10 years shorter than those living in outlying neighborhoods.

During his months of research, Huertas tracked down the three debt collection agencies responsible for collecting most of the medical debt near the church.

Only one called back.

They made a deal. The debt collector would be a silent partner, providing the church with a small balance discount and a list of indebted Lincoln central neighbors. No names. No addresses.

The church had its own rules. Beneficiaries had to be up to date with their payments and demonstrate good faith in repaying their debt.

Rule 2: The church would give without expectation. No strings attached. No acknowledgment required.

The project was launched in late February, cobbled together with money from fundraising plates and start-up funds from members who knew the rollout was coming.

A small committee sat down with $8,000 and a list.

A cancer patient unable to work who owed $1,500.

A retiree living on Social Security who owed $300.

A single parent without child support who needed $800 to pay off his debts.

Who could they help?

That night, they paid off the debt of 11 neighbors.

Stephanie Dinger is a committee member. She remembers how good it was.

“You can never move forward if you have medical bills. For me, it’s God, giving someone a hand.

A standard collection agency letter was sent to each recipient. It included a phone number and email for First-Plymouth’s justNeighbors project.

It also included the balance of each account: $0.

A few days later the phone rang in First-Plymouth. On the other end of the line was a woman who had racked up $3,000 in debt for years.

After her letter arrived, she had called the collection agency, sure they had made a mistake.

Keck recounts what she said next: “I don’t even have words to let you know how it feels. The only thing I can feel is thank you, Jesus.

***

Paul Rea has been a Lincoln bankruptcy attorney for nearly 30 years, long enough to know why his fellow Nebraskas are going bankrupt.

“When you look at the typical bankruptcy, the vast majority will have medical debt, and there’s a significant minority of cases where people have crippling medical debt.”

A Harvard study determined that six out of 10 bankruptcies cite medical debt as a contributing factor, said Scott Patton, director of development at RIP Medical Debt. “And that’s only for people who can afford to file. There are literally millions of people who cannot afford to file for bankruptcy and have medical debt.

Patton’s employer is a New York-based nonprofit that buys debt at pennies on the dollar and has paid off nearly $7 billion in medical debt across America since 2014.

One in five U.S. households report medical debt, Patton said. A quarter of credit card debt can be attributed to medical bills. Medical debt represents a staggering $88 billion on credit reports.

“It’s a huge problem,” he said. “It can happen to anyone who has a human body and lives in our country.”

Medical debt is a huge source of stress for those already struggling, said Lori Seibel, president of the Community Health Endowment.

“People are less likely to seek care,” she said. “They may just live with a problem or go to the emergency room because they know they will be seen there, which leads to more expensive care.”

Seibel sat down with Huertas last fall to give him some insight into the demographics around First-Plymouth and the church’s power as a neighborhood anchor.

But she was also skeptical of the grand church plan.

“My first thought was, ‘This is such a huge problem and what can one entity do? “Said Seibel.

Then she thought of attending the inauguration of a new Head Start that the endowment had helped fund, and of turning to the chairman of its board of directors: Sure, it will help 50 children; there are 800 on the waiting list.

The chairman of her board of directors replied: But Lori, it’s 50 children.

“Will they be able to resolve each person’s medical debt?” No. But for the people they do, it’s life changing.

***

No money blew through the doors of First-Plymouth on the first day of spring.

When church leaders emptied the collection plates from that morning’s service, they counted everything from pennies to $100 bills.

They added that to the collection plate money the first two weekends in March, as well as all checks and donations posted on its online medical debt portal. They arrived at a total: $45,000.

The committee met a second time on March 22. They looked at a new list.

A restaurant worker who owed $1,300.

A parent who owed $600.

A tenant working and living alone paying off a debt of $1,000.

A letter would soon be on its way to 35 households whose medical debt has been erased.

“There’s an energy around this thing,” Keck said. “There’s something about this initiative that’s gained a kind of traction that I’ve never seen before.”

Collectible plate offerings have doubled in the past month.

Trustees are willing to see money that might otherwise have gone into church coffers collected for this other purpose. Church members embraced the idea. A collection agent has voluntarily partnered with First-Plymouth.

“I think this is a great opportunity for the community to get the help they need,” Leah Kash-Brown, 25, said after the 11:59 a.m. service. “And a great opportunity to help the community.”

The church is just beginning.

The campaign will continue until Easter Sunday 2023. Who knows? Maybe they can wipe out Lincoln Center’s debt in the next year. Maybe they can expand their reach to new neighborhoods and help new people weighed down by the weight of medical debt, Huertas said.

“That would be great.”

The Free Flatwater Press is Nebraska’s first independent, nonprofit newsroom focused on the investigative and reporting that matters.

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Biden is on his way to Europe for a NATO summit. Here are the options the Pentagon gave him for more troops.

Chernobyl nuclear power plant seen from above on March 10 in Ukraine. (Maxar Technologies/Getty Imag

Russian forces looted and destroyed a laboratory near the abandoned Chernobyl nuclear power plant that was used to monitor radioactive waste, according to the Ukrainian government.

The site of the world’s worst nuclear disaster fell to the Russians in the first week of the Russian invasion, raising fears that safety standards inside the exclusion zone could be compromised.

According to a Ukrainian government agency, the lab was part of a European Union-funded attempt to improve radioactive waste management through on-site analysis of waste samples as well as packaging used to dispose of the waste.

The government agency also reported that samples of radionuclides – unstable atoms that can emit high levels of radiation – had been removed from the lab. He said he hoped Russia would use the samples to “harm itself, not the civilized world.”

This is the latest scare to emerge from the infamous Ukrainian site which sits near the border with Belarus.

More information about Chernobyl: Staff working there on the day he was captured in late February only recently had the chance to return home, three weeks after having to rotate with an incoming team.

Local Slavutych Mayor Yuriy Fomichev spoke to CNN after the workers were confined to the factory for 10 days, describing them as “exhausted, both mentally and emotionally, but mostly physically”.

Fomichev said more than 100 people were shift staff who should have been relieved after 12 p.m.

Earlier this month, the site was forced to be powered by emergency diesel generators for several days before being reconnected to the national power grid after damaged lines were repaired.

And on Tuesday, the Ukrainian government also warned of several fires near the factory, which it said were likely started by Russian artillery or arson.

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In Steamboat, some traveling nurses live where they work

Melissa Lahay, Sales and Marketing Manager of Casey’s Pond Senior Living, and Brad Boatright, Executive Director, show off a one-bedroom apartment similar to the accommodations where traveling employees are housed.
Suzie Romig / Steamboat Pilot and Today

Practical nurse Brenda Pittman’s commute to work at Casey’s Pond Senior Living is only a short elevator ride away.

The Louisiana mother of five adult children works as a traveling staff member on assignment at Casey’s Pond, and her temporary apartment is an unoccupied resident room inside the upscale resort.

“It’s super cool and I love it. It’s unique,” ​​said Pittman, who worked as a practical nurse for 28 years in all types of settings, from hospitals to hospices.



In nearly a year of traveling for work, this is Pittman’s first opportunity to live locally.

On a budget and in Colorado with one of his children on the autism spectrum, Pittman would commute to work by bus from a hotel in Craig. The trip took over an hour including transfer. Now Pittman isn’t worried about arriving on time for his shift with his one-minute commute.



“I can actually relax and do my job,” Pittman said.

Management at the nonprofit Casey’s Pond has used traveling staff hired by multiple third-party recruitment agencies for about three years due to nationwide nursing shortages, said Casey’s executive director Brad Boatright. Pond.

The company has offered temporary accommodation sporadically since 2020, but from October the senior community opened more apartments on-site to accommodate traveling staff. Visiting staff often cited difficulties finding affordable short-term rentals in Steamboat, said Melissa Lahay, director of sales and marketing for Casey’s Pond.

Currently, 18 traveling nurses live in vacant resident apartments, either on their own or sometimes with roommates. If staff prefer, they can also eat at community restaurants with an employee discount, Lahay said.

Another guest staff member, a licensed practical nurse who works evenings and lives in an on-site apartment, often returns from the ski resort with a snowboard under her arm, Lahay noted.

Providing on-site accommodation for up to 20 traveling nurses is another measure the local employer must now take to attract enough employees.

With similar staffing needs, UCHealth Yampa Valley Medical Center rents six condos as transitional housing for newly hired employees moving into the community and looking for their own homes. Condos are regularly full, said Lindsey Reznicek, communications strategist for YVMC.

“Hiring essential healthcare providers and staff at UCHealth Yampa Valley Medical Center has proven difficult due to the lack of affordable employee housing in Steamboat Springs,” Reznicek noted. “As one of Steamboat Springs’ largest employers, we are encouraged by the ongoing discussion, as well as the ongoing efforts to bring more employee housing to the area, and are delighted to partner with others in this important priority.”

Casey’s Pond offers a variety of levels of care ranging from independent living to memory support and skilled nursing, so the approximately 100 residents require the care of some 130 staff.

“One of the biggest challenges we face at Casey’s Pond is ensuring that our employees have access to affordable housing. People can’t work in a community if they can’t afford to live a quality life there,” Boatright said. “Like other businesses, we compete to recruit employees locally and nationally, and in order to provide traveling staff with affordable, high-quality housing, we have made the decision to provide on-site housing to these team members.”

Boatright said many traveling staff come from Georgia, Florida or Texas and typically stay on a 13-week contract, although some renew their contracts for up to a year.

Traveling nurses who take advantage of the housing arrangement are on a lower pay scale than traveling staff members who are responsible for their own housing, Boatright explained.

However, the use of traveling staff and employee housing can become another recruitment tool.

Sometimes traveling staff fall in love with the Yampa Valley and become permanent employees, including a couple who were recently hired as Food Services Manager and Chef at Casey’s Pond after starting as traveling staff in December.

Casey’s Pond Senior Living Executive Director Brad Boatright and Director of Sales and Marketing Melissa Lahay show an example of a one-bedroom apartment in the complex, similar to where traveling staff are housed.
Suzie Romig / Steamboat Pilot and Today
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Peter Buffett’s NoVo Foundation donates an additional $24 million in 2020 to Mid-Hudson groups, pledges to continue ‘significant investments’

KINGSTON, NY – In 2020, a charitable foundation controlled by Peter Buffett and his wife distributed more than $24 million to Ulster County and regional nonprofits, schools, activist groups, agricultural, pantry and college programs, according to tax records.

The majority of 2020 funding went to the Hudson Valley Farm Hub and Radio Kingston.

NoVo had previously donated at least $116 million to charities, activists and governments between 2017 and 2019, tax records show.

Buffett, who lives in Lomontville, is the youngest son of multi-billionaire investor Warren Buffett. Buffet and his wife, Jennifer, control the charity NoVo Foundation.

According to 2020 tax records, the foundation has donated a total of $24.7 million to community groups, nonprofits, activist organizations and others in the Mid-Hudson Valley.

Buffet bought the former Gill Farm in Hurley in 2013.

He posted a “Letter to the Kingston Community” on June 7, 2021 on blogging site Medium, outlining the mission of the NoVo Foundation and its philosophical underpinnings. The foundation was created 15 years ago with a $1 billion stock gift from Warren Buffett, whose net worth was recently estimated by Forbes magazine at $123 billion.

In a recent email, Buffett said continued donations from NoVo would bring about substantial change and provide needed programs.

“NoVo has made and will continue to make significant infrastructure investments in Kingston…as well as a wide variety of other capital projects, such as the new clinic being built by the Institute for Family Health on Pine St. ., the restoration of the Burger Matthews House by TRANSART on Henry St., and the redevelopment of the Broadway Bubble laundromat and community center with Kingston Midtown Rising on Broadway which will open later in the spring,” Buffett wrote, referring to donations. past and others that are not included in the tax records currently available.

Infrastructure, he said, “is by far the most expensive part of our job.

“However, we know that by investing the time, energy and funding to build physical infrastructure, we are collectively creating, in partnership with the community, new resources that will serve Kingston for generations to come.” , wrote Buffett. “While these capital projects often take years to complete, we believe that meaningful change is often slow, steady work that may very well benefit people we will never meet, as today’s children become the grandparents of tomorrow. »

The bulk of donations from 2017 to 2019 — more than $50 million — went to the Hudson Valley Farm Hub, which Buffett said NoVo helped establish on the Gill Farm property.

2020 records show an additional $15,011,471 donated to Farm Hub.

“NoVo has made very significant investments in the Farm Hub to help Kingston and surrounding areas prepare for what we anticipate will be difficult times ahead,” Buffett said. “We have all seen firsthand the impact of the pandemic on supply chains and there is no doubt that similar, if not more severe, shocks will occur.

“We envision the Farm Hub as part of a localized food system that creates a more direct relationship between the demand for food and its supply,” he added. “A reliable and healthy local food system is the cornerstone of a more resilient community. This means better nutrition in our major institutions, as well as in grocery stores, home kitchens, and ultimately the growing children of our community.

NoVo also donated $5 million to Radio Kingston in 2020. This is in addition to the nearly $20 million donated between 2017 and 2019.

“In the case of Radio Kingston, we support key infrastructure that elevates voices in our community and helps residents reconnect with each other through shared interests, storytelling, civil discourse or simply great music” , said Buffett, who is a musician. . “However, its ability as an emergency communications resource is equally important. On a practical level, last month’s ice storm exposed vulnerabilities in the current system when thousands of residents lost power, heat, internet and cell service.

“Radio Kingston’s infrastructure has remained intact,” Buffett said. “Now that the initial investment has been made, the station can serve as a resource for emergency communications, as well as a central, accessible hub for up-to-date information and assistance, now and in the future.”

2020 tax records show $1,175,000 went to the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies in Rhinebeck.

“Omega Institute, in a very different way, provides learning opportunities in a way that can be hard to come by,” Buffett said. “Omega’s leadership programs have benefited organizations in Kingston by providing access to innovative curricula, networking events and learning seminars in a thoughtful and supportive environment. Our support has enabled Omega to provide certain offerings at lower cost and has also helped them through a very difficult year.

Bard College, which received pledges of hundreds of millions from George Soros, has secured $70,898 in NoVo funding in 2020 and more in the past.

“Bard College, for example, provides educational opportunities for populations that are often overlooked or overlooked at all,” Buffett said. and the new “BardBac” full scholarship pathway for mature students. The Bard Prison Initiative, along with their work in high schools across the country, also stand out as outstanding programs that we believe are worth supporting.

Peter Buffett stands in front of a home purchased by NoVo which is adjacent to the Boys and Girls Club on Greenkill Avenue on March 7, 2022. The home will be converted into a community home for young adults who have left the Boys and Girls Club. The house is part of an infrastructure project. (Tania Barricklo/Daily Freeman)

Other groups or agencies receiving funding in 2020 include the Boys and Girls Club of Ulster County in Kingston, $650,000; Extension of the Cornell cooperative, $350,000; Mount Laurel Waldorf School in New Paltz, $200.00; People’s Square, $300.00; YMCA of Kingston and Ulster County, $250,000; Bardavon 1899 Opera House, operators of the Ulster Performing Arts Center, $250,000; Center for Creative Education, $288,000; Family of Woodstock, $325,000; and Kingston City Land Bank, $221,167.

Other groups or agencies receiving funding in 2020 include Mohonk Preserve, Clinton Avenue Methodist Church, Jewish Federation of Ulster County, the Good Work Institute, Farm to Table Community Inc., Citizens for Local Power and Nobody Leaves Mid-Hudson, now known as For the number.

Peter Buffett stands outside the Boys and Girls Club on Greenkill Avenue in Kingston, NY, one of the organizations that received money from the NoVo Foundation, the charitable organization that Peter Buffett and his wife Jennifer operate.

Buffett said 2021 records will show more donations to 60 organizations.

“Much of this money is going to long-cherished Midtown youth institutions like the Boys and Girls Club, Center for Creative Education, Everette Hodge Community Center and YMCA, all of which have opened their doors and stepped up to provide daytime educational services. , in partnership with the school district, at the height of the pandemic,” Buffett wrote. “We have also provided support to long-standing organizations, including Family of Woodstock, People’s Place and United Way, which have met the community’s most basic and critical needs – housing, food, health and welfare services. mental health, and other emergency support.

Buffett said NoVo was able to embark on its mission during the pandemic.

“We were also able to act quickly to support new collaborative initiatives that have sprung up during the pandemic, such as the Kingston Emergency Food Collaborative, which facilitated the distribution of thousands of prepared meals and groceries in the school district of the city ​​of Kingston.

Buffett said the funding was intentionally spread out.

“We fund in different ways because we live in complex times like no other,” Buffett said. “Jennifer and I have learned that the way philanthropy often works is to address the symptoms of much bigger problems, rather than their causes.”

“All of our work is grounded in the belief that challenges and solutions come from the same place, and that local residents are the best experts in the communities they call home,” Buffett said. “We center the lived experience and leadership of historically and persistently marginalized people and help them create their own solutions for a more just and balanced world.”

Editor Ivan Lajara contributed to this report.

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Medford launches effort to remove lead from homes – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News

Medford City Council and Habitat for Humanity will work together to reduce lead contamination

Children exposed to lead-contaminated homes will benefit from a $2.2 million Medford effort to eliminate the poison.

Medford City Council on Thursday evening approved the program, which will be managed by Habitat for Humanity.

“We’re going to be able to help a lot of people,” said Denise James, the nonprofit’s executive director.

According to the Centers for Disease Control.

While children can be contaminated with lead directly from paint chips, it is more common for lead chips to contaminate surrounding soil or the ground where children play.

The program aims to remove lead from 78 homes in Medford.

Most of the funding for the program comes from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development.

To provide the required matching funds, the council donated $200,000 to the program, with an additional $40,000 from Jackson Care Connect.

The agreement with HUD expires on April 30, 2025.

The cleanup effort is part of the city’s 2020-2024 plan to expand and improve affordable housing.

Habitat is still preparing for the three-year program and recently hired Joe Berggren as project manager.

To qualify for the program, a home must have been built before 1978 and must have children under the age of 6 living in it.

Grandparents or other caregivers can also benefit from the program.

Priority will be given to homes where children under 6 have high blood lead levels.

Any homeowner or homeowner interested in participating in the program can call Berggren at 541-779-1983, ext. 102, or [email protected]

To qualify, a homeowner must commit to living in the home for at least three years after repairs to avoid reimbursing the costs, James said.

The household must be considered low-income according to the standards established by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development.

James said Berggren, which begins next week, will conduct an analysis of the properties to determine the extent of the lead contamination and what steps need to be taken to clean up the property.

In addition to lead removal, the program provides an additional $5,000 to a particular home to address other health and safety issues, such as asbestos removal or heating and cooling systems. air conditioner.

James said Habitat will work with licensed contractors for lead removal.

Habitat for Humanity helped restore other homes in the valley and built homes for residents affected by the Almeda fire.

The organization anticipates that many residents will apply to be part of the program, but if it does not receive enough applicants, it will contact owners of older homes, which are common throughout the city.

“If we don’t hear from anyone, we’ll dig deeper into the data,” James said.

Contact freelance writer Damian Mann at [email protected]

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Woman jailed for stealing from nonprofit Molokai | News, Sports, Jobs

WAILUKU — A Molokai woman is serving a six-month prison sentence for stealing tens of thousands of dollars from a nonprofit that employed her.

Eliza-Kay Vendiola, 41, was doing bookkeeping for the Molokai Community Service Council when she wrote fraudulent checks to herself and others from June 30, 2017 to December 12, 2019, court records show.

“We want to reiterate that we were truly hurt by this flight, and it was an ongoing process,” Karen Holt, the organization’s executive director, said when Vendiola was sentenced on Thursday.

Holt, who appeared with three board members by videoconference for sentencing in 2nd Circuit Court, said the theft was discovered after Vendiola wrote the last fraudulent check for over $4,000. .

“We have been very concerned about the future of our community’s ability to benefit from our organization,” Holt said. “She did a lot of damage to our organization and she also took the money that we had saved so that we could serve our community for years to come.”

While the restitution amount was still being calculated, Vendiola had agreed to pay $70,000, deputy public defender Jeffrey Wolfenbarger said.

She had pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of second-degree computer fraud and first-degree larceny. Forty-two counts of second-degree forgery were dismissed in exchange for his pleas.

The permanent resident of Molokai “chose to take money from her community and spend it on herself and her family,” said Assistant District Attorney JW Hupp.

He said she created a fundraiser for the Class of 1998 which was used for parties for her family. “And the other money was just taken and spent”, Hupp said.

“She always lives high,” he said. “It’s Molokai. She’s going on a trip. She’s having a good time, and the community lost all that money.

Wolfenbarger said there was a class reunion. “It was not a false event” he said.

He said that Vendiola had accepted responsibility for this “started a little small and snowballed” until she is “too deep”.

She had raised $1,000 and thought she could raise an additional $3,000 to $4,000 to repay the nonprofit that sponsored community projects, Wolfenbarger said.

A plea agreement between defense and prosecution recommended probation and no jail time for Vendiola.

“But a prison sentence should be imposed when there is an admission and there is harm to the community,” said 2nd Circuit Judge Peter Cahill.

“The ripple effect is not just the theft of funds, but the suspicion that any loss like this causes nonprofits,” said Cahill. “Donors become very suspicious that you don’t monitor your funds properly. If the funds come from government sources, these funders can sanction nonprofit organizations.

“The smaller the community, the greater the loss of reputation, because everyone knows what is going on. Finding that confidence is hard.

As part of his sentence, Vendiola was placed on four years probation.

Cahill said the defense could ask that Vendiola’s prison sentence be reduced or suspended if his family can pay the restitution amount or have a payment plan.

A restitution hearing is set for April 21.

* Lila Fujimoto can be reached at [email protected]


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BN Indians: Young community servants show the future is in good hands

Aditi Sharma founded the Inclusive Education Coalition (IEC) when she was a senior at Normal Community High School. She is now a student at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana.

She said the history curriculum particularly caught her attention when she realized the peaceful side of the civil rights movement dominated the narrative.

“You don’t get the real truth that this movement wasn’t always just a peaceful movement,” Sharma said. “That a lot of the change that’s been brought about, has been brought about in a way that people don’t really like to hear.”

She also noticed that the health curriculum was exclusive to LGBTQ+ people and abstinence-based, and that the English class readings were mostly written by white men.

“I believe education is the first step to fostering empathy,” Sharma said. “So that’s what pushed me to create this group.”

Bloomington’s More is a senior at Normal Community High School. She also advocates for inclusion as co-chair of the NCHS Not in our School group. She also started the volunteer youth group Little Free Pantry. More said she heard about a similar pantry in Arkansas and started her own when she learned about 100 kids in McLean Country go to bed hungry every night.

“And it struck a chord with me,” More said. “I couldn’t imagine people in our town going to bed hungry. So, I ended up trying to do something about it.

More said because of her privilege, she assumed hunger was not an issue in McLean County.

“I couldn’t imagine people in our town going to bed hungry. So, I ended up trying to do something about it.”

Raji More, Normal Community High School student

“So to hear that they were concerned about that, and that it was a huge priority for them to get food for a day, was interesting to me and concerning to me,” More said.

Dhruv Rebba is also a senior at Normal Community High School. As WGLT reported in October, he won the National 4-H Council’s 2022 4-H Youth in Action Award for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) for creating several projects. that advance technological learning opportunities for children and the quality of life opportunities for citizens in crisis. This includes founding the nonprofit Universal Help, which digitized and provided textbooks, internet access and technology to schools in rural India.

Rebba also set up a robotics club at Grove Elementary School to increase STEM-based learning opportunities for young children. He told WGLT student reporter Jordan Mead that robotics can be expensive and the club is making it more accessible to younger students. “And a lot of the students I’ve taught are now on robotics teams competitively, and that’s pretty cool to see,” Rebba said.

Bloomington’s Isha Gollapudi is a sophomore at Normal Community. She is a firm believer in community service, with art as her favorite tool.

“Art is a universal language,” Gollapudi explained. “I may not be able to understand what everyone has to say, but when you see a job you understand the message behind it. And it’s extremely impactful.

Like More, Gollapudi is part of the Little Free Pantry, even ruling it for a year. Through the Bloomington-Normal Art Circle, she also participates in “Chairs 4 Change,” where community members paint chairs and other furniture to be auctioned off by Recycling Furniture for Families.

“Just having art around you really brightens people’s moods,” Gollapudi said. “So I like to paint more upbeat or happier things, especially when they go to places like charities. Because I think it’s going to brighten up the mood around everyone there.

Gollapudi is so committed to the power of art that she gave it a 10-minute run on the TED-X Normal stage last year.

“So even though I only look like I’m 14,” she said towards the end of her speech, “the journey that art has taken me and the knowledge that I acquired thanks to him, almost make me feel like I’m 743 years old. Thank you.”

Inspiration struck in sixth grade. His works were part of student selections chosen by local artist Julie Meulemans to be exhibited at her Normal gallery downtown. One piece sold for $20.

“And at the time, it was huge,” recalls Gollapudi. “I was like, ‘I can make money from this.’ Then I realized that I could help people with that too.That kind of started for me.

Sparkling plea

Aditi Sharma said the anti-immigration rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election was the initial fuel that sparked her advocacy for inclusion. But she added that her parents initially pushed for a low profile because they and she were immigrants.

“So maybe I should keep quiet, shut up, not make trouble, just do what my parents came here to do.” It was to help me get a better education and a better job,” Sharma said.

It didn’t last long.

“But I couldn’t sit while I watched all these things happen to people in my community and people in other communities,” said Sharma, who became a US citizen at 14.

Sharma made a point of thanking her parents for instilling in her the generosity and empathy towards the struggles of others that have become her core values. “Because we as immigrants moved here and we struggled a lot,” she said.

Sharma said unlike many South Asians who come to Bloomington-Normal for work, her family has no built-in class privilege. And seeing his parents struggle at first was an eye opener.

“I recognize that this is something that so many families in America go through. And so that has a lot to do with my desire to want to make this change,” Sharma said.

Dhruv Rebba said the founding of Universal Help was at least partly spurred by visiting the rural area where his father grew up in India.

“That’s when I was like, ‘OK, that’s a really big difference in living standards, and basic luxuries just aren’t available there. For example, reliable digital access for school supplies and things like that,” Rebba said.

His non-profit organization is helping to digitize these rural schools with computers, projectors, a digital curriculum, and “uninterruptible power supply to meet electricity needs. Because there are power cuts quite often in this part of India,” Rebba said.

He has also contributed to natural disaster relief in West Bengal after Cyclone Yaas of 2021, running a COVID-19 isolation center to combat the Delta Variant in India, and through grassroots projects such as recycling and composting in McLean County.

“Our mission is to improve the quality of life for people around the world in innovative ways,” said Rebba.

In addition to founding and directing the Little Free Pantry in Bloomington-Normal, Raji More is co-chair of the NCHS Not in our School Group and sits on the city’s Not in our School Steering Committee. Others said they were planning protests and vigils and fighting for inclusivity and equality.

Like Sharma, More credits her parents for being willing to serve Bloomington-Normal, teaching her to be kind to everyone and treat everyone the same.

“Part of that meant that I saw that some people weren’t able to have similar opportunities, and those opportunities included getting food. And I was like, ‘Let’s make sure they have access to food too,'” More said.

Plus was also moved to act as a witness for the division. Between people, between ideas. She touts the restorative circles she uses in Not in our School, where people can express ideas without being combative. And she strives to minimize the labeling of people.

“That’s part of why I do my projects…to really include people. Some people aren’t included and don’t have the same opportunities as me, and I strive to include people,” More said.

“Rooted in Who You Are”

Isha Gollapudi thinks his desire to serve is at least partly cultural, citing the Indian holiday Holi, a festival of colors, and Diwali – the five-day festival of lights.

“When you’re brought up with the idea that all these big parties are about giving back to others, it’s kind of ingrained in who you are,” Gollapudi said.

She said it was no different from Christmas in some ways.

“Because it’s fun to get presents, but seeing your brother’s face when he opens a present you gave him…I think it’s so much better,” Gollapudi said.

Gollapudi adds that she has equated community service with a way of life that will continue into adulthood, with climate change now on her service radar.

Dhruv Rebba said that not only would he serve until adulthood, but he was just beginning.

“Many of the projects we have started locally and in India are relatively long-term projects. So I will definitely keep doing this for a long time,” Rebba said.

Like many youngsters, Aditi Sharma is under some parental pressure to pursue a lucrative career. But she said her passion for social justice and activism comes first.

“Whatever I end up doing after my four years of undergrad, I know I’m always going to want to be part of any community, no matter where I live. This service is at the core of my being,” Sharma said.

Raji More said she loves Bloomington-Normal so much that she hopes to attend college in town, continue her community service and advocate for inclusivity. She cites Camille Taylor and Mary Aplington of Not in our Town as mentors.

“So many community members, I’m so grateful to be in their presence,” More said. “So it’s mostly the people of Bloomington-Normal that keep me wanting to be here.”

ABOUT THE SERIES

Why we did it

Bloomington-Normal has more East Indians than any other southern Illinois metropolitan community. First-generation Indian immigrants and their children shaped Bloomington-Normal in more or less significant ways, and it deserves our attention. The WGLT Newsroom aimed to measure this impact in an 8-part series of human-centered stories.

how we did it

The Bloomington-Normal Indian community is not a monolith – socio-economically, politically, culturally – and this series aims to reflect that. The WGLT newsroom interviewed over 30 people from a variety of backgrounds. We recognize that these sources do not represent all Indians in Bloomington-Normal. They represent themselves and we appreciate their willingness to share their story.

Feedback

We want to know what you think of the series and what future features we should consider. You can message our newsroom at WGLT.org/Contact.

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NC woman seeks to help Ukrainians

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina — Terrifying images of war in Ukraine continue to resonate with residents of the former Soviet republic living in North Carolina.


What do you want to know

  • Tatyana Thulien’s nonprofit United Communities helps create a humanitarian project called Road of Life
  • She collects basic necessities like clothes, medicine and money
  • To learn more about donating to his humanitarian project, visit the United Communities Association website

Music has always been part of Tatyana Thulien’s life. She grew up in Kiev under the Soviet Union.

Thulien says she finds playing the piano and singing in her Charlotte home an outlet for hope.

“I’m thinking about love and peace,” Thulien said. “And I think about how every country deserves to live in peace, just like my beloved Ukraine.”

As his hometown is attacked by the Russians, Thulien thinks of his parents, originally from Russia and Ukraine. Her mother survived the siege of Leningrad during World War II as a teenager.

“That’s why the sirens ringing all over Ukraine today ring in my heart,” Thulien said. “Because my mother spent an entire year in besieged Leningrad listening to those sirens.”

In her early twenties, Thulien, then a mother of two, watched the Soviet Union crumble in the 1990s. She lost her job in an engineering department and fell into the savage post-socialist environment of private enterprise.

She eventually received a scholarship to study in the United States at the University of Georgia and the University of Missouri.

She met her husband in Missouri. The two were married in Ukraine before getting her visa and moving to Minnesota in 1997. She has been involved in the Slavic community for many years as a public figure, journalist and Russian teacher.

“Our dear lord wanted me here,” Thulien said. “He wanted me to create the family here and be able to bring my legacy here as well.”

Thulien remains in constant contact with his friends still living in Ukraine. They continue to send him heartbreaking messages and videos of empty store shelves.

“I tell them to stay strong, don’t give up, don’t lose hope and stay alive,” Thulien said.

Thulien seeks to do more for Ukrainians. His nonprofit United Communities helps create a humanitarian project called Road of Life.

She collects basic necessities like clothes, medicine and money.

” People are scared. People are suffering. They are absolutely unsure of their future and we have to help them,” Thulien said.

Thulien says she’s praying for a better future, though she still doesn’t know how the war will end.

“I really don’t know today,” Thulien said. “I hope the whole world will stop and just focus on peace.”

Thulien is a candidate for the Mecklenburg County Commission seat. She also sits on the community relations committee to help raise awareness of county programs, services and initiatives.

To learn more about donating to her humanitarian project, visit the United Communities Association website.

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Community members and non-profit groups unite in support of Ukraine – Macomb Daily

As the world has learned in recent weeks, there are strong Ukrainians and then strong Ukrainians.

Ukrainians around the world have received an overwhelming response of support and solidarity from non-Ukrainians since Russia’s February 24 invasion.

The colors of blue and yellow are flying at rallies and demonstrations throughout Metro Detroit and beyond in overwhelming support and urges for help and relief for the people of Ukraine.

The Jewish Federation of Metro Detroit has allocated approximately $1.4 million in rescue and relief funds to Jewish Ukrainians.

“The Jewish community is extremely concerned about this,” said Rabbi Asher Lopatin, director of the Jewish Community Relations Council/AJC in Bloomfield Hills. “We are totally focused and praying for Ukraine and taking this very seriously.”

According to the Jewish Federation website, there are around 200,000 members of Ukraine’s Jewish population, including Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

Jewish Federation funds are intended for temporary housing and emergency kits for refugees, food and medical supplies, care for the elderly and more.

Many Ukrainians in the Detroit metropolitan area have direct ties to family members and friends abroad.

Warren resident Lesia Osypova is from Ternopil in western Ukraine and her husband is from Mykolaiv in southern Ukraine near the Black Sea.

On March 1, Osypova created an Amazon registry with medical supplies needed by the Ukrainian army. Within the first two hours of posting the link on social media, 1,000 items – out of 5,000 listed – were purchased.

“I reached out to other New Jersey volunteers and a nurse gave me some ideas of the most wanted items in the military,” she said. “I’m so surprised at how many people responded.”

Thinking that the link would only reach a few friends, Osypova did not expect the overwhelming amount of purchased items. By the next day, her porch was covered with Amazon boxes and packages of donated items.

Warren resident Lesia Osypova’s Amazon Registry donations for the Ukrainian military filled her porch after a day. (Photo courtesy of Lesia Osypova)

As more and more packages arrive at her house each day, Osypova works to organize and pack the supplies to be shipped. The logistics of shipping overseas to Poland can be tricky. Flights depart from Chicago and New Jersey weekly, so trucks must be driven to airports in time to be loaded onto the plane.

Staying in touch with her family in Ukraine, Osypova will be able to find out when items are being delivered and what is needed as soon as shipments start arriving. She plans to continue accepting donations on her Amazon page and will update with more or different items as needed.

The Ukrainian American Crisis Response Committee of Michigan, a grassroots coalition of community members and organizations formed about two months ago when Russian President Vladimir Putin began mustering troops on the Ukrainian border, also collects and ships military donations to Ukraine.

“The organization was formed to respond in case the worst happened, which it has now,” said Jordan Fylonenko, communications manager for the committee.

The committee is made up of representatives from most major Ukrainian organizations, including the Ukrainian Cultural Center, Ukrainian Immaculate Conception School, St. Mary’s Orthodox Church, Ukrainian Immaculate Conception Church, and Ukrainian Selfdependence Michigan Credit Union.

Since the initial Russian attack, the crisis committee has held several Pray for Ukraine rallies and events in the Detroit metro, which some local government officials have attended.

Their current focus is collecting and shipping military supplies, surgical aid, and home defense donations, under the direction of relief coordinator Anya Nona.

In conjunction with the Ukrainian American Crisis Response Committee of Michigan, the Ukrainian Children’s Aid and Relief Effort (UCare) will host a Humanitarian Aid Campaign for Ukrainian children from 1-7 p.m. March 21-26 at St. Mary’s. , 21931 Evergreen Road, in Southfield. Volunteers will collect new or lightly used clothing, shoes, diapers, formula, baby bottles, hygiene items, toys and first aid supplies throughout the campaign.

Troy resident Vera Petrusha founded UCare in 1997 to help children living in orphanages in Ukraine. Petrusha is a parishioner and board member of St. Mary’s Cathedral, which has opened its facilities for many events and collections over the years.

UCare will accept monetary donations in addition to collecting items, which will be used to cover shipping costs, such as fuel.

Supporters at the rally for Ukraine at Hart Plaza in Detroit. (Photo courtesy of Stephanie Preweda — For MediaNews Group)

The war has also struck close to home three Ukrainian-born dance teachers at Fred Astaire Dance Studios in Bloomfield Township, who each have immediate family members in Ukraine who are in desperate need of emergency assistance. , according to studio owner Evan Mountain. In support of instructors Viktor Tkachenko, Yuliya Lukina and Mykhailo Annıenkov, Mountain is hosting a month-long fundraiser, “Waltz for Ukraine”, to raise funds that will go directly to their families to provide food, a shelter and other basic needs they may have. The studio is also offering a free waltz dance class for individuals or couples (a $115 value) for anyone who donates to help the families of their teachers.

If you would like to participate in the “Waltz for Ukraine” event and receive a free dance lesson, call 248-454-1715 to schedule. Donations can be made at bit.ly/3I6jLzb.

For more information on local events and donation opportunities from the organizations listed above, visit:

• The Jewish Federation: jewishdetroit.org

• Ukrainian American Michigan Crisis Response Committee: uacrisisresponse.org

• Ukrainian Child Aid and Relief Effort: ucareinc.org

• Lesia Osypova Amazon Registry: amzn.to/3KoqINm

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Morehead State Music Ambassadors Prepare for Carter Fold | Living

HILTONS — The Music Ambassadors of Morehead State are ready to bring bluegrass and early music to The Carter Family Fold.

The group includes faculty members and students from Morehead State University’s Traditional Music Program, as well as Raymond McLain, who has his own Carter Fold story.

McLain is the director of the Kentucky Center for Traditional Music at Morehead State University, located in Rowan County, Kentucky. He also sits on the board of the Carter Music Center and is the artistic director of The Carter Family Fold.

He performed at the fold and many Carter family shows over the years, starting with his family, the McLain Family Band. According to a press release from the venue, he first began performing at Carter family shows when Janette Carter began performing concerts at the former AP Carter Grocery in 1974. Saturday night he will also be joined by his sister, Ruth McLain Smith. .

Throughout his 50+ year musical career, Raymond McLain has performed across the United States, in 62 foreign countries and has also toured as the Music Ambassador for the US State Department.

The Carter Family Memorial Music Center is a non-profit organization that offers old-school country and folk music weekly at Hiltons. The venue also pays homage to the legendary Carter family (AP Carter, Sara Carter and Maybelle Carter), whose first recordings in 1927 are credited with giving birth to the commercial country music industry.

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Carter Family Fold shows are on Saturday nights. Doors open at 6 p.m. and music begins at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults; $2 for children 6-11 and children 6 and under are free.

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Onward and Upward, the acclaimed military veteran nonprofit, has huge goals for 2022

Classes in session on January 8, 2018. Cabin workspaces

Group of new customers – the photo was taken with their permission

Suicides of active duty personnel and veterans are reaching new heights. This is an alarmingly growing statistic that Onward and Upward want to prevent this from increasing further.

– forward and upward

LOS ANGELES, CA, USA, March 9, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — What has a relatively unknown Wisconsin-based nonprofit been up to for the past 90 days? Onward and Upward, an acclaimed military veterans society, sought to understand why the rate of military suicides has risen from 22 to now more than 30 a day in the United States. According to a Washington Post article written by Peter Marks, dated January 1, 2022, suicides of active duty personnel and veterans are reaching new heights. This is an alarmingly growing statistic that Onward and Upward want to keep from increasing further.

Who is this non-profit organization? It is a veteran-owned and operated community-based online job center (“the Center”) designed to facilitate the employment of home-insecure and unemployed individuals seeking employment. an online or on-site job. Inside this facility is a laptop classroom on one side of the building and on the other side of the building is an area of ​​cubicle computer workstations. For people at the Center who want to work online as remote employees, this arrangement is fine. They have a workplace for their part-time or full-time online employer with mentorship, healthy food and drink, and a six-month program after which they graduate and take their computer home with them and continue to work for their online employer.

For people who are employed to work on-site, the Center mentors them and, if necessary, coordinates transportation to get them to their place of work safely and on time. In either online or on-site employment, the Center offers a six-month program that includes housing and soft skills training designed to provide what is needed to obtain, retain and progress in their employment. During the six months, the client works for their employer, saves up to three months in rent, utilities, and groceries, and attends all professional development training sessions covering topics such as interpersonal communication company, reliability/reliability, conflicts and negotiation, time management. , stress management, money/budget management and networking.

What’s really great about having the Center is to see all the people who once lived in tents, on sidewalks, benches and alleys now employed and safely housed, straighten up and staying up. It is also nice to witness the reunion of mothers with their daughters, brothers with brothers and couples who were once separated and can now be together thanks to a job and a safe place to live.

Onward and Upward helped 17 people in the first year of operation in 2017 (7 of whom were military veterans) to be employed and housed to never be homeless again. In 2018 there were 12 people (7 of which were military veterans) and the third year, 2019, there were 38 people (12 of which were military veterans) who once lived in tents and are now housed and employed and currently all living in their homes. them, working for their employers (online and/or onsite) to never be homeless again. “Our organization within the Center also teaches our clients and community members how to get, keep and grow in any job,” says Onward and Upward. “We enjoy witnessing the personal and professional growth of everyone we have the privilege of meeting and assisting with employment and advancement in employment. Our organization truly enjoys being the conduit and catalyst for new beginnings. for people who are homeless and unemployed, especially military veterans.”

That’s why, over the past 90 days, Onward and Upward is so thrilled to have been introduced to five other veteran service organizations who are equally passionate about ensuring people have the services they need to get back on their feet. foot and stay on their feet. sustainably. After meeting, they formed a coalition of veterans.

Onward and Upward continues, “Collectively and individually, we aim to make a difference in people’s lives, especially for our military brothers and sisters. The other five organizations are Project Diehard, Veterans Warriors One-Stop-Shop (VWOSS), Faith Hope Love for Veterans, Hope Advanced, and Veterans Ranch. Transitional Housing for Veterans and to provide a place for other nonprofit veterans to provide their services is with Project Diehard, more than 5,000 resources and sources for managing military transition issues and advocacy for veterans. VWOSS veterans, women’s issues are resolved and small home villages are established with Faith Hope Love for Veterans, credit issues, background issues and tax liens are resolved with Hope Advanced, and Veterans’ Ranch Veterans works with veterans and their families through horses (horse therapy) with a mission to get these great Americans to put down their heavy coats of burden and walk away as new and improved versions of themselves.

Collectively, the Five Veterans Service Organizations and Onward and Upward is a coalition of veterans whose mission is to prevent 22 military suicides from occurring a day. Onward and Upward have hosted a special day on 02/22/2022 titled “2-22 to Save 22” to bring attention to this crisis and announce that by working together, we can stop military suicide.

The event took place onsite at the Kalahari Resort, Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin, and via online conferencing platform, Whova. The introduction of a “home front forward operating base” was made on 02/22/2022. With the promise of introducing a possible solution to the military suicide crisis, over 200 LinkedIn sign-ups for the 2-22 to Save 22 hybrid event took place, and over 300 connections were made after the event for continue the conversation and start planning this event. concept to become a reality.

Working interdependently with each of the five Veteran Coalition organizations, Onward and Upward is confident that more and more military veterans will avoid going to a dark place and instead have a life worth living.

“We believe that if our brothers and sisters in arms have a life worth living, they will want to live it! We invite individuals and organizations who want to support us in the mission to stop military suicide to visit our website. in our collective and individual missions, we seek people to help us as volunteers, sponsors and/or donors of time, talent and/or treasure. We know that stopping military suicide ‘takes a village’ and we appreciate anyone who would support us in this fight to stop military suicide,” Onward and Upward conclude.

Aurora Of Rose
Media Unlimited Inc.
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H&M ANNOUNCES SECOND YEAR OF PARTNERSHIP WITH BUY FROM A BLACK WOMAN IN HONOR OF INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY 2022

Buy From a Black Woman is a non-profit organization founded in 2016 by Nikki Porcher that connects more than 600 black women-owned businesses across United States and provides a supportive community with the goal of helping their businesses thrive. Throughout 2021, H&M sponsored events such as the Buy From A Black Woman Inspire Tour and the BFABW Holiday Market which ran from November to December 2021 at the Times Square location of H&M. These events, which saw products from more than 50 black women-owned businesses sold in H&M stores across the country, exposed new customers to these Buy From a Black Woman member businesses.

“Over the past year, working with H&M, we have been able to shine a light on what it means when you believe in and support the communities that support you. The Black Woman Inspire Tour, The Business Accelerator, The Black Woman Holiday Market, these events have helped open the doors wider and we were able to show the world that black women are here,” said Nikki Porcher, Founder of Buy From a Black Woman. “I am thrilled to continue this partnership through 2022 and show why we believe black women are living examples of what is possible, not only when you believe in yourself, but also when you have the support of others. “a community that believes in you. When you support a black woman business owner, you support an entire community. H&M believes in supporting black women.”

Throughout 2022, H&M United States will continue to support Buy From a Black Woman through a variety of activities and support aimed at continued growth and success for business owners, beginning with a donation of $250,000. Starting this summer, H&M United States will once again sponsor the organization’s Buy From a Black Woman Inspire tour, building on H&M the United States brick-and-mortar channels and locations to highlight black women-owned businesses across the country. On the way to fall, H&M United States will continue to focus on sustainability in business by sponsoring the nonprofit’s Black Woman Business Accelerator program. This 10-week business training course includes a structured, expert-led online program to assist Black women business owners in the different ways they can grow, while providing an opportunity to access finance. Internally, H&M United States will sponsor both eligible colleagues who wish to join the Buy From a Black Woman directory and online network and will spotlight the nonprofit’s various ventures throughout the year.

“We are thrilled to enter the second year of our partnership with Buy From a Black Woman. Our relationship with Nikki Porcher and Buy From a Black Woman vendors have allowed us to witness the growth of these businesses in ways we could not have imagined. This partnership exemplifies the impact we want to have in empowering and building capacity in the communities where we live and work,” said Donna DozierGordonInclusion and Diversity Manager at H&M United States.

“After the success and impact we saw in our first year of partnership, we knew we had to continue and expand our support for Nikki Porcher and Buy from a Black Woman for 2022. Through our continued work together, we can further amplify their mission to uplift Black women, their businesses, and their communities,” said carlos duartePresident, H&M Americas.

To watch the trailer for “The Living Example” and see images from the announcement, click here.

For more information on Buying From A Black Woman, please contact:

Nikki PorcherFounder
E-mail: [email protected]
Customers can also donate here.
Support and learn about businesses owned and operated by black women here.

For more information about H&M, please contact:
H&M press relations
E-mail: [email protected]
*We hope you enjoyed reading the latest from H&M, but if not, just email [email protected] and request to be removed from our media list.

H & M Hennes & Mauritz AB (publ) was founded in Sweden in 1947 and is listed on Nasdaq Stockholm. The business idea of ​​H&M is to offer fashion and quality at the best price in a sustainable way. Besides H&M, the group includes the brands COS, Monki, Weekday, & Other Stories, H&M HOME and ARKET as well as Afound. H&M Group has 54 online marketplaces and approximately 4,800 stores in 75 markets, including franchise markets. In 2021, net sales were 199 billion Swedish crowns. The number of employees amounts to approximately 155,000. For more information, visit hmgroup.com.

SOURCEH&M

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San Antonio Ukrainians ask for help during meeting with Rep. Joaquin Castro

SAN ANTONIO — Ukrainians living in San Antonio hope to make their voices heard in Washington, DC A total of six women who represent local Ukrainian nonprofit San Antonio met directly with Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-San Antonio) on Friday.

They wanted to share their worries and frustrations about the war in their native country. They are looking for answers to help their loved ones back home.

“I keep in touch with my friends who are in hiding. They are scared and live in constant fear,” said Viktoriya Lundblade.

Lundblade said his hometown of Kharkiv was leveled by Russian shelling. It is one of many areas under constant Russian assault.

“You see a beautiful city, people dancing. Right now this city is bombed, destroyed,” Lundblade said.

Castro moderated the roundtable and wanted to reassure these women that their calls are being heard.

“I wanted to let them know that I’m listening and Congress is listening,” Castro said. “I know they speak in a very desperate voice because many of them still have family members there.”

A d

These women are calling for tougher sanctions against Russia.

“The United States is stepping up its military support, also imposing very tough sanctions on (President) Putin and Russia,” Castro said.

Castro said he was also working with Missouri Representative Ann Wagner (R-MO) to impose social and cultural sanctions in Russia, as well as a way to help refugees.

“I’m going to take this conversation and talk to other lawmakers in Washington. There has been talk of a humanitarian corridor so people fleeing the country have a safe route, so they don’t risk being hit by Russian fire,” Castro said.

These women just hope that they can one day return to the Ukraine they once called home.

“Please stop this war. I want to go back to my hometown, which is already bombed, and I want to see my people,” Lundblade said.

Copyright 2022 by KSAT – All rights reserved.

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There are 600 Holocaust survivors in Queens, nonprofit to get big money to help them

A non-profit group with a strong presence in Queens is set to receive millions of dollars to allocate to Holocaust survivors (Picture: Selfhelp website)

March 3, 2022 By Michael Dorgan

A nonprofit group with a strong presence in Queens is set to receive millions of dollars to allocate to Holocaust survivors.

Selfhelp, a Manhattan-based nonprofit that provides a range of services to seniors, will receive nearly $31 million through the German government to help the organization care for elderly New York-area residents who survived the horrors of the Holocaust.

A portion of those funds will be used to support Selfhelp’s Holocaust Survivor program in Queens, which it operates from an office at 70-20 Austin St. in Forest Hills.

The program offers home care, financial management services, community support and social programs. There are about 600 Holocaust survivors living in the borough, according to Aubrey Jacobs, the program’s executive director.

Of the approximately 600 Holocaust survivors living in Queens, 125 of them live in Forest Hills, Jacobs said.

The $30.7 million comes from a global nonprofit organization called Claims Conference, which is working with the German government to secure the funds.

The Claims Conference has secured reparations for Holocaust survivors living around the world since the early 1950s. The organization makes annual payments to hundreds of nonprofit organizations, including Selfhelp.

The payments, which come every year, are the primary source of funding for Selfhelp’s Holocaust Survivor program, Jacobs said.

Jacobs said funding is vitally important to helping Holocaust survivors live out their final years comfortably. Many Holocaust survivors are frail and in their 80s to 90s, she said.

“The support we receive from the Claims Conference is critically important as it enables us to…provide the services, support and care our clients deserve to help them live with dignity and independence,” said Jacobs.

Funding received by the Claims Conference last year, Jacobs said, was also used to cover the cost of medical care, food, utilities and other emergency needs that Holocaust survivors had. need during the pandemic.

Additionally, Selfhelp social workers provided virtual programs, phone calls and home visits to help address the increased isolation of survivors during the lockdowns.

Jacobs said it’s difficult to gauge how much of the funds received this year will go to support Holocaust survivors living in Queens, given that Selfhelp runs other Holocaust survivor programs in the area. from New York.

Selfhelp’s programs for Holocaust survivors support about 5,500 Jews outside of Queens, she said.

Since 1952, the German government has paid more than $90 billion in compensation to victims who were persecuted by the Nazis, mostly through negotiations with the Claims Conference.

This year, Claims Conference is receiving $720 million from the German government, which it will distribute to more than 300 nonprofit and social service organizations around the world.

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Myron Tarkanian Obituary (2022) – Pasadena, CA

May 13, 1940 – February 12, 2022 Myron George Tarkanian was born May 13, 1940 in Euclid Ohio to Armenian immigrants George and Rose Tarkanian, survivors of the Armenian Genocide. Myron was the third of three children, 10 years younger than his brother Jerry and 13 years younger than his sister Alice. George and Rose operated a small grocery store 7 blocks from Lake Erie during the middle of the Depression and the start of World War II. George, a generous and caring man, died of tuberculosis in 1940, six months after Myron was born. Rose remarried Vahan Derderian, whom Myron considered her father. Together, they all embarked on a cross-country road trip, intending to move to Fresno, California, but stopped in Pasadena to visit friends and relatives. Rose fell in love with the San Gabriel Mountains, often saying that Pasadena “reminds her of the old country”. With the exception of a few years early in his coaching career, Myron has never left the San Gabriel Valley. Pasadena was his home for the duration of his childhood and his workhouse for most of his life. A graduate of Longfellow Elementary, Wilson Middle School, and Pasadena High School, Myron grew up as a budding athlete and developed many lifelong friends, including his best friend, Harvey Hyde, whom he met in 3rd grade. Myron adored his mother Rose. She died in 1964. Vahan died in 1966. Myron’s brother Jerry, a Hall of Fame basketball coach and legendary sports personality, died on February 11, 2015. Myron’s sister Alice, known for his extraordinary loyalty to his older and younger brothers, died. on September 19, 2015. Myron attended the University of Redlands, where he earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree, and developed many close friendships that lasted a lifetime. He played football, earned a degree in education, and graduated as a teacher. Most importantly, Myron met the love of his life, Anna Fagerlin, who became his wife of 59 years. After graduating from the UofR, they got married. Together they had 4 children, Bill, the eldest, and Rose, Jane and Kendra. Myron was hired as head football coach at Moreno Valley High School right out of college, creating winning teams at the newly created school, and was named head football coach at Mt. San Jacinto College , launching their football program. In 1967, he left to become an assistant football coach at the University of Hawaii, where he and his family lived for a year. In 1968, Myron returned to Pasadena to become co-head football coach at Pasadena City College, along with his childhood friend, Harvey Hyde. Together they built a Junior College football dynasty that lasted nearly three decades, although Myron quit football to focus on his family, health and business 8 years later. He has the distinction of being the head coach of the last undefeated team (10-0-1) and the CCP National Championship in 1974. He continued to teach physical education and coach other sports ( men’s and women’s tennis and men’s and women’s football) for five years. decades, retiring in 2004 as the most winning coach in CPC track and field history, including conference titles in men’s tennis in 1992 and 1998, and men’s soccer in 1999, 2000 and 2001 He was inducted into the CCP Sports Hall of Fame in 2018, joining his famous brother, Jerry Tarkanian. During his five decades at the PCC, Myron developed many friendships with colleagues, players and students that have stood the test of time. Family was Myron’s highest priority and greatest source of pride. Her four children are all college graduates with graduate degrees. His daughters, Rose, Jane and Kendra, became accomplished educators like their father. Bill became a lawyer and is currently the director of a non-profit behavioral health organization, LA CADA. Myron and Anna were present for their 4 children at all their games, recitals and school activities. Rose, Jane and Kendra collectively had 8 grandchildren, and the children and grandchildren were the pride of Myron and Anna’s life. Summers included family reunions and long vacations. Anna Tarkanian, like her husband, was also a career educator. They lived in the same house in Arcadia, California for 50 years. They were the epitome of a happy, loving marriage and successful parenting. Myron was diagnosed with heart disease in his mid-thirties and survived a battle with cancer in his early sixties. In response, he hiked several miles a day, ran marathons, and became a vegetarian. He always saw himself as living on borrowed time, and in the last years of his life, Myron expressed a sense of deep gratitude for being husband, father, brother, uncle, grandfather, the coach and friend adored and respected by all who knew him. . He is survived by his beloved wife Anna, his children Bill, Rose, Jane and Kendra; sons-in-law, Clark Longhurst, Randy Wilson and Dave McGrath; and grandchildren, Randirose Wilson, Annalee Longhurst, Chris Wilson, Myron Longhurst, Kennan Wilson, Charlotte McGrath, Tark McGrath and Georgia Longhurst. A memorial service and celebration of life will be held Saturday, March 5 at 2:30 p.m. at the south end of the Rose Bowl in Pasadena. At the request of the family, a donation in lieu of flowers to LA CADA’s Myron Tarkanian Legacy Fund is appreciated. Go to LACADA.com.

Published by Pasadena Star-News on March 2, 2022.

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Non profit living

Nonprofit group home makes sacrifices to address staffing shortages: ‘I’ve never seen staffing difficulties like this’ – WCCO

MENDOTA HEIGHTS, MN (WCCO) – As group homes across the state struggle to find staff, some have been forced to close, leaving families to scramble. The facilities accommodate people with physical and developmental challenges.

To try to keep their homes open, a non-profit organization has made some changes. John Lauritsen shows us how these changes help.

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“In 35 years, I have never seen staffing difficulties like this,” said Rod Carlson of Living Well Disabilities Services.

For group homes across the state, the fight for staff has gotten so bad that there has been talk of bringing in the National Guard to help.

RELATED: Families scramble after group homes close due to lack of workers

“And certainly at some point the National Guard was suggested, the National Guard was early in COVID to help some nursing homes,” Carlson said.

It never came to this for Living Well in Mendota Heights. But sacrifices have been made to keep their nearly 40 homes in operation.

“We compete with restaurants and Costcos around the world. And all these other organizations that also need employees,” Carlson said.

To recruit more workers, Living Well raised their wages from $14.75 per hour to $16 per hour, for direct care workers. A modest increase that made a big difference.

Certified practical nurses also saw their wages increase to $17 an hour, which many group homes were unable to match. But that meant going into a budget shortfall to bring in nurses like Sunday Yengi.

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“I love it. I love working here,” Yengi said.

While the pay rise is attractive, Yengi said group homes need to recruit people who are passionate about helping others. She works in honor of her mentally handicapped brother who lives in South Sudan.

“When I work here with people who have mental disabilities, I feel like I’m helping my only brother,” Yengi said.

As part of its COVID plan, Living Well also lobbied for vaccination requirements before they were imposed.

“These are just rapid tests that we receive and are provided by the state,” said Annelies Stevens, director of health and welfare services.

They say it has made staff more comfortable working around residents with compromised immune systems.

“That’s what we were able to focus on and sustain, which I’m really happy with,” Stevens said.

Living Well said the changes have helped them hire more staff, but they are still missing a few nurses.

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As the nonprofit celebrates its 50th anniversary next week, it will lobby on Capitol Hill for higher wages for group home workers.

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Non profit living

Lexington Nonprofit Sends Funds to Ukraine: How You Can Help

LEXINGTON, Ky. (FOX 56) – Non-profit organization, Christian Mission Ebenezer (CME) joins the fight overseas by helping to send resources to their home country.

CME opened in 1999, and two years ago they opened their bookstore on Old Harrodsburg Rd where they buy books wholesale and give 100% of donations to missionaries around the world.

“That’s why we have this bookstore – we raise money by selling books,” said Alex Chubaruk, owner of CME. “The profits we take and give to different parts of the country.”

In Ukraine, CME is connected to about 30 mission stations, including their own family members, and their active search for monetary donations, so that locations can be supplied with funds to purchase mattresses, blankets, pillows, food baskets, etc.

“So we raised funds on our website and so on to give them funds to be able to buy blankets, food, firewood, food boxes for people in need,” said Chubaruk. “In addition, we are raising funds for people trying to escape, for people fleeing to western Ukraine and Poland.”

Chubaruk’s uncle is in eastern Ukraine and is a bishop in a church that opened as a refuge for refugees. Chubaruk spoke with his uncle earlier on Saturday.

“And so he’s like, ‘I’m not leaving my herd, I’m going to be there with him, stay with them, and so he’s trying to be that leader, and to be that support for the people who live in that area. Chubaruk said, “I asked them what you all need, and they asked us to pray that God might send redemption to the nation.”

When news of the war broke, the Chubaruks immediately took to their website and Instagram page to raise awareness.

Larisa Chubaruk, Alex’s wife, said: “The first thing we did was change everything on the homepage, set up the form, make sure people have a place to donate .”

Chubaruk said she tries to gather facts, not only for their website, but also for her children.

“So it was mostly about trying to figure out what was happening, why it was happening, we didn’t tell our kids about it on the first day,” Chubaruk said. “Mostly because we didn’t want to get emotional talking about it.”

They also wanted to be aware not to break the news to their children in a way that would make them resentful of the Russians.

“Because we know there are good people everywhere, and it’s not just Russians, we don’t try to categorize them and we don’t want them to have anything against Russians when someone mentions their name,” Churbaruk said.

Instead, they want to spread a message of love.

She said: “The one thing I think everyone can take away, Ukrainians, Americans, Russians, cherish what you have when it’s good.”


To connect with them on Instagram, click here: https://instagram.com/cm.ebenezer?utm_medium=copy_link

To donate to the Ukraine crisis through Christian Mission Ebenezer, click on the following link: Christian Mission EBENEZER – Christian Mission EBENEZER – Until now, the Lord has helped us. (cmebenezer.com)

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Non profit living

Elizabeth Hartman’s story continues in the lives of others | Bakersfield life

Elizabeth Hartman struggled with health issues for years. She died in Bakersfield in 2016, just a week before her 52nd birthday.

But the story of this beloved wife and mother did not end there. More than 300 people showed up for his funeral. She was covered in memories of his generosity and kindness. His latest generosity was to save and improve the lives of many people through the donation of his organs and tissues.

“They told me at the time that Liz had helped at least eight people,” her husband, Brian Hartman, told a KGET reporter. “I know someone had their kidneys, someone had their corneas, they couldn’t use their lungs because of scoliosis, but I think they used the heart and a bunch of other stuff. .”

But Elizabeth’s story didn’t end there either.

The Lake Isabella woman was featured in January on “Courage to Hope,” the 2022 Donate Life Rose parade float.

The float included four walkers, who were living donors, as well as organ and tissue recipients; 15 runners, who were organ and tissue recipients, as well as living donors; and 35 “florographs”, or floral portraits representing organ, eye and tissue donors.

Elizabeth was nominated to appear on the float by JJ’s Legacy, a Bakersfield nonprofit created in memory of 27-year-old Jeffrey “JJ” Johns, who suffered severe brain damage in a 2009 car accident.

“He loved life. And he had the most beautiful smile. He loved smiling. He loved people,” JJ’s mother, Lori Malkin, told The Californian.

Recognizing the extent of his son’s injuries, Malkin agreed to donate JJ’s organs.

“He saved five lives, which is a miracle,” Malkin recalled. One person received a liver and a kidney, and another received Jeff’s pancreas. His donated tissues have improved the lives of 50 people and he has also donated his corneas.

“These people who were blind can now see sunrises and sunsets,” she said.

To promote local organ donation, Malkin created JJ’s Legacy. The year JJ died, the young man from Bakersfield was featured in the Rose Parade in a floragraph prepared by his family and included on the Donate Life float.

Recalling how moving and empowering the Rose Parade experience was for her and JJ’s family, Malkin pledged to honor a family of local donors in the same way each year.

Elizabeth’s family encourages others in Kern County to register as organ donors and provide life to those in need. Register as a donor with the DMV when you apply for or renew a California driver’s license or ID card. Simply check the box marked “YES!” on the application form. You can also go to https://register.donatelifecalifornia.org/register

Using a black-and-white photo as a guide, Elizabeth’s family got together and worked for nearly eight hours on her floral portrait, before the iconic New Year’s Eve parade began rolling down Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena. . Brian admits the experience was very emotional.

Elizabeth’s Rose Parade fluorograph, decorated with natural seeds, flowers, cream of wheat, chocolate and coconut, will be on display April 30 at the JJ Legacy fundraising gala. Go to www.jjslegacy.org.

In 2021, OneLegacy worked with 591 organ donors and facilitated 1,688 organ transplants in a seven-county region that includes Kern. OneLegacy is one of 57 nonprofit organ procurement organizations nationwide. Each is assigned a federally designated region to serve. In just Kern, OneLegacy had 31 donors and 85 transplanted organs last year.

Many people pre-declare their intentions on state and national registries to donate their organs when they die. But where such a guideline does not exist, OneLegacy works with families to understand how the donation of an organ or tissue by their loved ones can save and improve lives.

Tom Mone, CEO of OneLegacy, said: “Fifty to 60% of families say yes to organ, eye and tissue donation because they understand that more lives can be saved and they have the hope of know that their loved ones live in others through donation and transplantation”.

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Non profit living

“It’s a sanctuary”: the magic of quiet, economical and anti-allergic “passive” houses | Living ethically and green

Jhe first night Stephanie Silva spent in her new Brooklyn apartment was exceptionally quiet. It was the same the next morning and the next day. The 32-year-old New Yorker had forgotten the last time she managed to mute the city of 8.2 million.

“It’s like a sanctuary,” Silva says, but as soon as she opens the windows facing the street, bustling outside noise fills her living room. Once she closed the windows, the difference was immediately noticeable. “Since moving here, my anxiety has gone away,” Silva says, referring to the affordable 10-story apartment in Ocean Hill, part of Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. But what sets this 67-unit building apart from the rest of the city’s housing is its “passive” element.

A passive building is designed to consume a minimum of energy. To be efficient in heating and cooling, the space is sealed with airtight insulation – like a vacuum bottle – so that it can retain heat during the winter while keeping it out during the summer. . Homes, schools, offices, and other buildings built to Passive House standards typically use thicker, higher-performance windows, such as triple-glazed models, which have three layers of glass. Another key step is to use the energy recovery process in the building’s heating, ventilation and air conditioning system. Known as the ERV, the ventilator, by means of two fans, acts as the lungs of the building, drawing in clean, fresh, filtered air and expelling stale air.

Resident Manager Rich Morris opens a window in the Harry T Nance Apartments laundry room. The windows meet passive house standards.

In New York and other cities, passive design is becoming a popular option for new apartment buildings and homes, and it’s easy to see why: people love living there.

“I didn’t suffer an allergy attack like I usually would,” said Silva, who suffers from dust and seasons allergies. “The building clears the air and I can sleep through the night.”

Continuous air exchange, coupled with super-insulated construction, means no more smell of what the downstairs neighbors are cooking, no more traffic noise in the living room, and no more click-clack from old radiators. Each room in Silva’s three-bedroom apartment has its own heating and cooling unit, allowing his family to heat one room at a time instead of the entire house. “My daughter hates the heat, while I like my bedroom to be nice and warm,” Silva says. “I love that each room has its own separate temperature.”

Solar panels are embedded in the roofs of many passive buildings, including two in the Bronx developed by Bronx Pro Group, which specializes in affordable housing.

“When you walk into a passive house, the average person probably doesn’t notice a difference,” said Justin Stein, senior vice president of the Bronx Pro Group.

“Other than being quieter, it looks like any other apartment,” Stein said.

Large blue-gray ventilation systems are installed on a roof, with the city skyline in the background.
Energy-efficient heating, cooling and ventilation systems benefit residents’ well-being, but also their wallets, say passive building advocates.

The invisible health effects of cleaner air will help tenants in the long run, but the benefit of lower electric bills will be felt immediately. The annual energy demand of passive houses is estimated to be more than 70% lower than that of traditionally insulated buildings with the same parameters. Silva, who lives with her three-year-old son and her fiancé, paid her first utility bill in December, which came to $57. In his old two-bedroom apartment, charges averaged $135 a month: $60 for gas and $75 for electricity.

“I’m not that grumpy,” Silva says as she reflects on the impact lower housing costs have had on her personality. “I was living paycheck to paycheck in my last apartment and now I can buy something nice because I can afford it. Before, all the money I had left had to be used for expenses for the following month.

It took eight months from the day Silva applied for the city’s affordable housing lottery to the day she was able to move into her new home developed by RiseBoro, a Brooklyn-based nonprofit. In 2014, RiseBoro developed New York State’s first-ever affordable multi-family apartment building certified to Passive House standards. Today there are more than 30 affordable apartment buildings in New York City built to passive standards, including this first RiseBoro project in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

A trio of images shows a blue vertical pipe, a close-up image of an air vent grille, and a copper-colored air vent cap.
Passive building air ventilation systems are designed to efficiently supply fresh air while exhausting stale air.

“When you move from an older affordable home to a more efficient one, there’s a huge shift in attitude,” said Satpal Kaur, an architect who has been designing efficient buildings for more than 15 years. Kaur helped deliver the Bushwick Building while in the office of Chris Benedict, one of the leading architects in the field of sustainable design. From keeping your feet cold while working from home, to sitting by a window and not feeling the cold peeking through the glass, to reducing noise pollution and energy costs – for Kaur, the benefits of living in an affordable Passive House are conveniences that every person deserves.

“If we made it standard practice, comfort would be for everyone,” Kaur says.

Dozens of affordable passive developments are currently under construction in the five boroughs. Building a passive house usually costs about 5-10% more than a conventional house. The construction of a multi-family passive building can be approximately 3% more than a comparable non-passive building. Renovating an older building to passive standards is one of the most effective ways to reduce heat concentration and emissions from the existing housing stock.

These renovations and new construction projects can contribute to the city’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from buildings by 40% by 2030. Energy-efficient design decisions – such as moving away from gas for electricity – will also help reduce residents’ bills, Kaur said. When developers adopt passive design standards, “not only are you changing the life of the building,” Kaur said, “you’re changing the lives of the people in it.”

Close-up image of a white multi-story building facade with angular rectangular panels around its windows.
Knickerbocker Commons in Bushwick, Brooklyn is the first all-affordable-unit apartment building to be built and certified to Passive House standards in New York State. The building’s facade optimizes light and shade, contributing to energy costs that are only 20% of the average size of a New York building.

In New York, as in many places across the country, summer temperatures are highest in densely built-up areas. Adequate and efficient cooling is a priority.

New York City buildings are good at providing – and retaining – heat to keep residents warm during the winter. The challenge for homeowners is how to keep residents cool when temperatures rise and buildings heat up, says Ryan Cassidy, director of sustainability and construction at RiseBoro. He thinks that like tenants’ current right to heat, in the next 5 to 10 years New York City will likely develop a cooling policy for buildings.

Currently, the city’s building stock is responsible for 71% of New York’s greenhouse carbon emissions. The recent decision to ban gas heaters, cookers and water heaters in all new buildings may push traditional developers to follow Passive House standards.

Aramis Rosa, a slender dark-haired, bespectacled man in light gray jeans and a long-sleeved black t-shirt, sits for a portrait in his renovated attic, with three narrow windows behind him.
Aramis Rosa poses for a portrait in the attic master bedroom. An air circulation tube is visible on the wall below the windows. Photographed January 8. 2022, Staten Island, NY.

Aramis Rosa is one of the owners who does just that. In March 2020, he purchased a five-bedroom, two-story home in Staten Island with an attic and basement. An electrician, he was fixing sockets at Kaur when they started talking about architecture and how Kaur designs buildings.

“I remember he said, ‘Hey, would you mind sending me the cut sheets?'” Kaur recalled. She emailed the information and a few months later, when he returned to fix her doorbell: “He told me he had done everything, and I was completely blown away.”

Rosa applied what Kaur taught her to remodel her new family home. The boiler, the first to leave, was replaced by an ERV. Then he installed energy efficient windows, separate units in each room and solar panels on the roof, who was eligible for state tax refunds.

When it comes to insulation, working with spray foam was a turning point for Rosa. “That has got to be the best thing I’ve done, to go with spray foam insulation,” Rosa said. “Because of the amount of heat it is able to retain, now in winter, you can feel the difference as soon as you walk into the house.”

A triptych image shows Aramis Rose's two-story house, a detailed close-up of the white foam insulation sprayed into the walls, and a close-up image of Rosa's hands.
Left: Aramis Rosa used passive design elements to renovate his family’s new home. In the middle: spray foam insulation in the walls of the house reduces heating and cooling costs. Right: Rosa did most of the renovations herself.

A chemical compound that expands in seconds when applied, spray foam leaves virtually no air gaps, unlike traditional fiberglass insulation. Rosa is the fifth owner of the 1938 house and the first to do such a spectacular renovation on his own.

“I feel like when you hire someone, they’re there to do the job and then go home. They might not consider the person living there long-term,” Rosa said. “Even though it took us a little longer to be home, the fact that I’m doing it for my family means I’m not skipping any corners because I’ll be the one living here.”

In a city known for its sensory overload — whether it’s the roar of new construction, the funk of curbside trash, or the howls of the century-old subway system — being able to tune out can be a luxury. But the promise of passive architecture is that it doesn’t have to be – it can be as easy as coming home.

Non profit living

Italian town raises funds to pay pensioners’ rising energy bills

FLORENCE, Italy (AP) — Florence is famous for its contributions to Italian art, architecture and cuisine. But these days, local leaders in the city considered the birthplace of the Renaissance are preoccupied with more mundane matters: paying the bills.

Amid soaring energy costs across Europe, officials at Palazzo Vecchio – the building that serves as both city hall and museum in Florence – have teamed up with a nonprofit local charity to help fixed-income retirees retain their power through an “Adopt-a-Bill” fundraising campaign.

“Florence is a city where you live well, and for this reason too, people live very long,” said Mayor Dario Nardella.

However, a significant number of retirees in Florence live on less than 9,000 euros ($10,205) a year and cannot afford to make ends meet with an expected 55% increase in home electricity costs and a 42% rise in residential gas bills, he mentioned.

The widower Luigi Boni, 96, confirms this. He says that by the end of February he will have emptied his bank account and spent his monthly pension check of less than 600 euros ($680) before covering the charges.

“Either I eat or I pay the rent,” Boni said as he sat on his sofa, a daily newspaper in his hand.

To help him and others of Florence’s approximately 30,000 residents over the age of 65 who live alone, the city administration launched the fundraising campaign with the non-profit Montedomini Foundation, which runs projects aimed at helping the city’s retirees.

The campaign raised 33,000 euros (over $37,000) in its first days. Private citizens, including Florentines living abroad, made more than 200 donations, according to city social councilor Sara Funaro.

“Our goal is to raise funds to ensure that every elderly person who comes to us for help can receive help to cover the increase in bills due to the increase (in energy costs),” Funaro said.

Soaring energy prices are pushing up utility bills – and driving inflation to a record high – from Poland to the UK. In response, governments across Europe are rushing to provide aid to residents and businesses as utility companies pass the costs on to consumers.

In Turkey, where economic pressure is extreme and has fueled protests, Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir are among opposition-run municipalities with similar Pass a Bill initiatives. The Istanbul municipal website says nearly 49 million Turkish liras (around $3.6 million) have been donated since 2020, covering 320,000 utility bills.

Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi’s government has passed measures valued at more than 8 billion euros ($9 billion) to help mitigate the impact of soaring energy prices for businesses and individuals.

The latest government decree, published on Friday, also had a forward-looking component: it aimed to accelerate Italy’s transition to more renewable energy sources, particularly solar power, to make the country less dependent on imported supplies. .

Italy currently imports 90% of its gas, much of it from Russia, and Draghi insisted that any European Union sanctions aimed at punishing Russia for recognizing two separatist-held areas in the east of Ukraine must exempt the energy sector.

The association of Italian mayors has said the government’s response has so far been insufficient to help cities cope with hundreds of millions of euros in additional energy costs, forcing them to choose between balancing budgets or cutting costs. services.

Florence, Rome and other cities kept their civic monuments and local government buildings dark on February 10 to draw attention to the situation.

Florence’s Adopt-a-Bill campaign has popular support. As well as being a top tourist destination, the capital of the Italian region of Tuscany has a long history of success in providing social services to poor and vulnerable residents.

“It’s a great initiative because you can help people who can’t come to pay a bill that has shamelessly reached unsustainable costs,” said Luca Menoni, owner of a butcher shop in the food market. covered with Sant’Ambrogio in Florence.

“I’m paying a (electricity) bill myself that’s double what I used to pay,” Menoni said.

Boni may be getting help with her energy bills to get her through the winter and avoid a planned move to a retirement home. But he’s still on a tight budget that doesn’t allow for a lot of luxury.

“Steaks? Me at? Let’s not even talk about it. I eat (cheap) packaged food,” he said. After the death of his wife, he said: “I became an expert in economical cooking.

___

Nicole Winfield in Rome and Zeynep Bilginsoy in Istanbul contributed to this report.

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Non profit living

Prosecutor says racism drove men to hunt and kill Ahmaud Arbery: live updates

Credit…Nicole Craine for The New York Times

Three white men were convicted in November of the murder of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old black man, after suspecting him of carrying out a series of break-ins in their South Georgia neighborhood. The men were sentenced to life in prison in January and now face federal hate crime charges.

Here’s what we know about the circumstances of Mr. Arbery’s death.

Ahmaud Arbery, a former high school football player, lived with his mother outside of the small town of Brunswick, Georgia. He had spent some time in college but seemed to be on a drift in his twenties, testing various careers, working on his rapping skills and living with his mother. He also suffered from a mental illness that caused him auditory hallucinations.

On Sunday, February 23, 2020, shortly before 1 p.m., Mr. Arbery was running in a suburban neighborhood called Satilla Shores, when a man standing in his front yard saw him pass, according to a police report. The man, Gregory McMichael, said he thought Mr Arbery looked like a man suspected of several burglaries in the area and called Travis McMichael, his son.

According to the police report, the men grabbed a .357 Magnum handgun and a shotgun, got into a pickup truck and chased Mr. Arbery, trying unsuccessfully to cut him. A third man, William Bryan, also joined the chase in a second truck, according to the report and other documents.

In a recording of a 911 call, which appears to have been made moments before the chase began, a neighbor told a dispatcher that a black man was inside a house under construction on the block of the McMichaels.

During the chase, the McMichaels shouted, “Stop, stop, we want to talk to you,” according to Gregory McMichael’s account in the police report. They then pulled up to Mr. Arbery and Travis McMichael got out of the truck with the shotgun.

Gregory McMichael “said the unidentified man began violently attacking Travis and the two men then began fighting over the shotgun, at which point Travis fired a shot, then a second later , there was a second shot,” the report said.

Mr. Arbery was unarmed.

Shortly after the shooting, Brunswick Circuit Court Attorney Jackie Johnson recused herself because Gregory McMichael had worked in her office.

The case was sent to George E. Barnhill, the district attorney for Waycross, Georgia, who later recused himself after Mr Arbery’s mother argued he had a conflict because her son was working also for the District Attorney of Brunswick.

But before dropping the case, Mr Barnhill wrote a letter to the Glynn County Police Department. In the letter, he argued there was not sufficient probable cause to arrest Mr Arbery’s pursuers.

Mr. Barnhill noted that the McMichaels were legally carrying their firearms under Georgia’s open carry law. He said they were within their rights to pursue what he called “a burglary suspect” and cited a state law that says, “A private person may arrest a violator if the offense is committed in his presence or to his immediate knowledge”. This so-called Citizens’ Arrest Act was largely dismantled in response to the Arbery case.

Mr Barnhill also argued that if Mr Arbery attacked Travis McMichael, Mr McMichael was “authorized to use deadly force to protect himself” under Georgia law.

Anger over the murder and the lack of consequences for the McMichaels grew when a graphic video surfaced showing the shooting on a suburban road.

The cellphone video, shot by Mr Bryan, is about half a minute long. It shows Mr. Arbery running along a shaded two-lane residential road when he comes across a white truck, with Travis McMichael standing next to the open driver’s side door with a shotgun. Gregory McMichael is in the bed of the pickup with a handgun.

Mr. Arbery runs around the truck and briefly disappears from view. Muffled screams can be heard before Mr. Arbery emerges, fighting with Travis McMichael outside the truck as three shotgun blasts ring out.

Mr. Arbery tries to run but staggers and falls to the sidewalk after a few steps.

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Non profit living

The next affordable city is already too expensive

Mr. Silbar, the real estate agent, has sold it twice in the past three years. The first time, in November 2019, he represented a buyer who offered $168,000 and got it with no drama. This year it came back on the market and Mr. Silbar listed it for $250,000. Fourteen bids and a bidding war later, it closed at $300,000.

When Mr. Silbar got into the business, he said, his clients were “nurses and teachers,” and now they are business managers, engineers and other professionals. “What you can afford in Spokane has completely changed,” he said.

The typical Spokane-area home is worth $411,000, according to Zillow. That’s still significantly cheaper than markets like the San Francisco Bay Area ($1.4 million), Los Angeles ($878,000), Seattle ($734,000), and Portland ($550,000). But it’s dizzying (and infuriating) for longtime residents.

Five years ago, just over half of Spokane-area homes sold for less than $200,000 and about 70% of its working population could afford to buy a home, according to a recent report commissioned by the Spokane Association of Realtors. Today, less than 5% of homes – a few dozen a month – sell for less than $200,000, and less than 15% of the area’s working population can afford a home. A recent survey by Redfin, the real estate brokerage firm, showed that homebuyers moving to Spokane in 2021 had a 23% higher budget than residents.

One of Mr. Silbar’s clients, Lindsey Simler, a 38-year-old nurse who grew up in Spokane, wants to buy a house for around $300,000 but keeps losing because she doesn’t have enough money to compete. Spokane isn’t so competitive that it’s flooded with all-cash offers, like some higher-priced markets are. But prices have risen so quickly that many homes are being priced below their selling price, forcing buyers to pay higher down payments to cover the difference.

A dozen failed deals later, Ms Simler has decided to sit out the market for a while as the constant loss is so demoralizing. If the prices don’t calm down, she says, she’s considering becoming a travel nurse. With the healthcare workforce so depleted by Covid-19, traveling nursing pays much better and will hopefully save more for a down payment.

“I’m not at the point where I want to give up living in Spokane because I have family here and it feels like home,” she said. “But traveling nursing will be my next step if I haven’t been able to find a home.”

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Non profit living

Hometown Alaska: Teens talk coping with COVID


Young people trying to stay connected during the Covid pandemic. Wikimedia Commons image by SGerbic,

In this week’s Hometown Alaska, teenagers in Anchorage describe how they suffered, endured and even grew while living under the Covid pandemic. We’ll hear from teens from Alaska Teen Media Institute (ATMI), Covenant House, and MHATS, which stands for Mental Health Advocacy Through Storytelling, a nonprofit organization founded and run by students in Anchorage.

ATMI students have started creating a series called “Podcast in Place, Youth Stories from Quarantine” recorded at home due to COVID constraints. Topics include individual student reactions to school closures and uncertainty, interviews with Alaska’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Anne Zink, and a multi-generational family interview (grandparents, their daughter and their grandchildren) on immunization information and engagement management.

Two Covenant House students talk about the emotional impact of isolation and job loss due to restaurant closures during the pandemic.

The MHATS teens describe their commitment to better mental health education for young people in school, and their own ups and downs throughout the pandemic.

Either way, these students were changed by the experience of living through Covid. They also represent an age group, according to the CDC, that has the lowest rate of vaccination and booster compliance.

This program has been pre-recorded for scheduling purposes, so hosts will not take your calls during the program. However, we still want to hear from you. Please call our 24/7 registered line (550-8480) and tell us about your own experience. Have you hesitated to get vaccinated or to be vaccinated? What helped you overcome this hesitation?

This program is part of Alaska Public Media’s “Talk to Your Neighbor” project, providing trusted voices and accurate information to listeners about Covid vaccination. APM has partnered with 20 community groups to help overcome vaccine hesitancy.

HOSTS: Kathleen McCoy and ATMI’s Daisy Carter

GUESTS:

  • Caelan Vossa.k.a PeanutAlliance House
  • Grace MargesonAlliance House
  • Abby LauferMHATS
  • Marshall ivyMHATS
  • Tara SkidmoreMHATS
  • daisy carterATMI and Alaska Public Media, co-host and guest

CONNECTIONS:

TO PARTICIPATE:

  • Today’s program has been pre-recorded so hosts cannot take live calls. However, we still want to hear from you. Dial 550-8480 and leave a recorded message, 24/7.
  • Send E-mail to [email protected] before, during or after the live broadcast.
  • post your comment or question below (comments can be read on-air).
  • The pre-recorded show air: Monday February 21, 2022 at 10 a.m.
  • RE-AIR: Monday February 21, 2022 at 8 p.m.
  • PODCAST: Available on this page after the program.
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Non profit living

‘Worthy to take up space’: Jennifer Lee ’23 founds nonprofit to support disabled Asian Americans

In June 2020, after months of doctor’s appointments and medical tests, Jennifer Lee ’23 was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease. Although she had many typical symptoms of the disease, Lee said her doctors were initially hesitant to consider Crohn’s disease because of its rarity in Asian Americans.

“From the beginning of my journey with a chronic illness,” said Lee, “I began to see how my Asian American identity influenced not only the way I perceived my illness and my body, but also the way which even medical professionals perceived the disability and diagnostic processes. ”

After his diagnosis, Lee sought out communities like the Crohn’s and Colitis Young Adults Network and the National Council of College Leaders of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation. But even in groups with other young adults with disabilities, Lee felt her Asian American identity set her apart from her peers.

“I soon discovered that I didn’t see people who looked like me, and so for a very long time I thought that I was the only person who felt that way, that I had no one else to talk to. of the specificity of the cultural stigmas around disability, what it was like to be of two marginalized identities — to be both Asian American and disabled,” she said.

Although Lee may have felt lonely, she is one of more than 1.3 million Americans who identify as both Asian American and disabled. After meeting others who shared his identity during the American Association of Persons with Disabilities (AAPD) internship program in the summer of 2021, Lee decided to form a group dedicated to this intersection.

In July 2021, along with a coalition of Asian Americans with disabilities and non-disabled allies from across the country, Lee founded the Asian Americans with Disabilities Initiative (AADI), a nonprofit organization run by and for people like her who identify as both Asian American and disabled. Lee is now Executive Director of AADI and manages a leadership team of approximately 20-25 people at any one time.

“AADI’s overriding mission is to amplify the voices of Asian Americans with disabilities and provide the next generation of Asian Americans with disabilities with the tools, resources, and infrastructure necessary to thrive in a world which hasn’t always welcomed them,” Lee said.

In its short existence, AADI has already made great strides toward fulfilling its mission to increase the visibility of the disabled and Asian American community and provide resources on how to live in a world that is not not built to accommodate either group.

AADI started with what Lee calls a “three-pronged vision.” She hoped to publish a resource guide for Asian Americans with disabilities, host speaker panels and events with people involved in Asian American and disability advocacy, and build a community of peers. disabled and Asian Americans.

On all three fronts, AADI has made tangible progress.

On January 10, after months of preparation, AADI launched its Resource Guide, an 80-page document described on AADI’s website as a guide “to combat ableism within the Asian American community. disability through first-person accounts, extensive peer-reviewed research, and AADI event summaries.

The AADI Research Committee has compiled collections of academic research, alliance lessons, and profiles of Asian American and disabled activists for inclusion in the guide. AADI received support from the TigerWell Initiative and Service Focus in developing the guide.

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“We had recognized that in the academic field there is very little research that has been done on the intersection of disability and Asian American identity, and the reason it is so important is that this type of research directly informs and feeds into what policy looks like,” Lee said of the importance of the academic research section.

The audience for the research guide, and AADI as a whole, encompasses a wide range of stakeholders, according to Megan Liang, program manager at San Diego State University and AADI’s director of external relations. As an Asian American amputee, Liang got involved with AADI after seeing them highlighted on social media.

“Whether you are an Asian American with a disability, an ally, a social worker, or only identify as disabled or identify only as an Asian American, you can take away a fresh perspective on how this community is dealing with things and issues that they might face,” Liang said. “And even though it’s a small impact of change, I’m just glad we’re able to do that.”

AADI has held two speaker events so far. The first panel of speakers took place on August 13, 2021, featuring Lydia XZ Brown, Miso Kwak and Mia Ives-Rublee, three Asian American activists with disabilities. The event was virtual and included American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters and captioning services. More than 50 people attended the event, according to Lee.

“That panel kind of served as a starting point,” Lee said. “[The panelists talked] about the intersection of these two identities themselves, the difficulties our speakers might have encountered while navigating through space, as well as any advice they had for other younger Asian Americans and disabled watching.

Most recently, on January 29, AADI hosted another virtual panel focusing on the intersection of art, disability, and being Asian American. Comedian Steve Lee, poet Topaz Winters ’23 and dancer Marisa Hamamoto spoke at the event.

“I was on the panel with several other Asian American and disabled artists, so we talked a lot about how our Asian American identities fit into our disability rights work, as well as ‘to our artistic work,” Winters said.

“The three streams of my identity – being an artist, being disabled, and being Asian – aren’t really streams that intersect very often in my advocacy work or in my artistic work,” they added. “It was really special for me to be among a group of people who understood very well what it was and the unique challenges, but also the unique joys of existing in these three beautiful spaces, and simply expanding the definitions of what these spaces can be.”

The ultimate goal of forming a community of disabled Asian American peers has been achieved, so far, in a largely virtual setting. Most people involved with AADI have never met in person.

“It’s just about showcasing the community, and for me, part of what AADI does is show that Asian Americans with disabilities and our experiences deserve to take up space,” Lee said.

“I knew the second I found AADI, I had found a specific kind of community that I wouldn’t have been able to find if I hadn’t looked for it otherwise,” Liang said. “I hope we can do more community events in the future, because I understand how empowering it is to be among people who have shared life experiences.”

In the coming months, AADI plans to continue its outreach efforts and spread its mission of accessibility and inclusion for the Asian American and disabled community.

Jiyoun Roh ’24 is AADI’s Director of Outreach and is responsible for managing the organization’s social media. Roh’s brother has cerebral palsy and she became interested in disability justice after noticing how her disability had led to a lack of inclusion in the Asian American community.

“We want accessibility to be more than just a disability community,” Roh said. “We want it in other AAPI organizations.”

“We get a lot of collaborations with many other organizations and together with them, we want to build our own community because a community is made better by the people in it,” she continued.

Lee hopes the conversations started during the COVID-19 pandemic about racial justice and chronic disease will continue in the future.

“I think in this era of the COVID-19 pandemic, we face an extraordinary opportunity to redefine how we understand the experience of people with disabilities and how we understand the Asian American experience,” Lee said.

She looks forward to expanding the advocacy work AADI has done in the six months since its inception.

“The more we work in the disability, Asian American, and nonprofit space, the more our team realizes that there are many definitions of success in terms of what our mission can accomplish,” Lee said.

Naomi Hess is an emeritus editor who focuses on university politics and alumni affairs. She can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter at @NaomiHess17.

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Covid updates: Supreme Court rejects teachers’ proposal to block New York City’s vaccination mandate

Credit…Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters

A new study on underreported coronavirus variants is a reminder that early detection and frequent genomic sequencing are among the most effective arrows in the quiver of public health officials.

But that is precisely what is not happening in many countries, putting their own populations – as well as the rest of the world – at risk.

Researchers in the United States and Nigeria examined a variant of interest, Eta, which circulated in Nigeria in early 2021, as well as a regionally rare Delta sublineage that was different from the Delta variant that circulated around the world.

Eta might have warranted the “variant of concern” designation if its growth potential had been recognized earlier, the researchers from the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University and the University of Ibadan in Nigeria wrote. Their research was published this month in Nature Communications.

“We were just lucky that this variant didn’t spread globally,” said Dr Oyewale Tomori, a virologist who heads a Nigerian government committee on Covid-19.

Judd Hultquist, co-author of the report and associate director of Northwestern’s Center for Pathogen Genomics and Microbial Evolution, said variant tracking was “incredibly uneven” across the world.

“Less than 1% of footage is from the African continent and less than 3% is from South America,” he said in an interview.

On Thursday, the World Health Organization’s Africa director, Dr Matshidiso Moeti, urged wider use of genomic sequencing technology in Africa to help speed up the detection of new variants. The technology is only available in a few middle-income countries in the region, such as South Africa and Botswana.

Researchers around the world use GISAID, the global online repository of coronavirus sequences, to share new genomes and search for mutations in its hundreds of thousands of viral genetic sequences.

Nigeria, with a population of 220 million, is the seventh most populous country in the world and the largest majority black country. It is also one of the least vaccinated: less than 3% of its population is fully inoculated, according to the Our World in Data project at the University of Oxford.

The World Health Organization has labeled Eta a variant of concern, which means it was worth studying but not as dangerous as a variant of concern. But after Eta moved the Alpha variant to Nigeria and the surrounding region early last year, researchers found it went largely unnoticed while Alpha remained at the center of much of the world. .

“Eta had all the hallmarks of a variant of concern and was able to outmatch the Alpha variant in the region before Delta arrived,” Dr Hultquist said.

And after the rise and fall of Eta, a rare Delta sub-lineage (AY.36) appeared in the region that was different from the Delta variant that circulated most of the world.

The study underscores the critical need for improved surveillance and tracking of coronavirus infections to ensure early detection of new variants in Nigeria and the West African region, said Dr Moses Adewumi of the ‘University of Ibadan, one of the collaborators.

Even now, the researchers said, there are just over 1,400 Nigerian coronavirus sequences available in public repositories. The United States, by comparison, sequences tens of thousands of specimens each week.

The variants that have been examined by researchers are no longer a threat. But at the time, the Alpha and Eta variants produced the highest spike in new infections; and the rare Delta lineage caused the second spike, according to Northwestern’s Dr. Ramon Lorenzo-Redondo, one of the study’s authors. The spikes resulted in the highest death rates of the pandemic, he said.

Africa is not fully utilizing available laboratory resources, Dr Tomori said. He said mainland labs had sequenced 70,000 viral genomes by the end of 2021.

“Sequencing is inadequate in Africa because many African governments have not appreciated the usefulness of such facilities to provide data for better epidemic control,” he said. “Furthermore, there is a lack of collaboration among African scholars, some of whom prefer to work with their former ‘colonial’ colleagues.”

One lesson is clear: it’s never too early to try to say what the impact of a variation might be. Researchers are already keeping a close eye on a new Omicron sub-variant, BA.2.

Alex Sigal, a virologist at the Africa Health Research Institute in Durban, South Africa, who helped identify Beta and Omicron variants, said: “The most important message here is that we don’t see everything, and that some of these places may not have Covid-19 control.

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Nonprofit Riverside helps those who were homeless or incarcerated regain their independence – Press Enterprise

Starting Over Inc. provides transition and reintegration services to people who have come into contact with the criminal justice system. The organization provides housing, employment, family reunification, recovery and mental health services.

Start Over housing services are available for those in need, including clients who are homeless, recently released from prison, or struggling with substance abuse. The organization has eight halfway houses in Los Angeles and Riverside counties. Transition houses provide sober living and harm reduction options. David’s House, located in Eastvale, is available for single women with children.

“We tap into the potential of people who may not have had the opportunity to succeed or give back,” said co-founder and executive director Vonya Quarles. “We offer people opportunities to give themselves, to learn and to grow.”

The organization believes that everyone is of equal value and helps clients who need help dealing with the immediate effects and root causes of homelessness. Case management specialists who have direct experience on the journey provide referrals and support to those in need. This includes immediate basic needs, obtaining health benefits, essential documents, employment, advocacy and family reunification.

By investing in prevention and addressing trauma, Starting Over believes the community will not need to invest in eliminating re-entry into the criminal justice system. Clients of the organization’s programs have gone on to form their own organizations, become advocates, work in health, and are present in the lives of their children.

Bobbie Butts, Associate Director of Family Reunification of Starting Over Inc, speaks at the Family Reunification, Equity and Empowerment (FREE) program rally in the state capitol to transform protective services in childhood. (Courtesy of Start Over, Inc.)

Community organizing and civic engagement are also a big part of Starting Over’s work. The organization has worked to elevate the voices of leaders affected by the system and build the pipeline of leaders who organize and build grassroots in the community. The organization’s Family Reunification, Equity and Empowerment (FREE) program supports families who are dealing with dependent child courts and the child welfare system. The program offers legal support, strategies for advocating for family reunification, and free resources.

On January 18, 2022, FREE held a rally in Sacramento at the State Capitol to Transform Child Protective Services. Working with CPS and other partners, Start Over helped pass SB 354 and is working to publicize the revisions it puts in place. The bill relaxes restrictions on placing children with relatives. There are 60,000 children languishing in foster care because parents are deemed ineligible for placement, Quarles said.

“I’ve met many parents who weren’t able to have the kids because of old, unrelated convictions,” Quarles said. “SB 354 opens the door to an individualized assessment to make a decision. Data shows that children placed with family members are much better off.

Recently, Starting Over received a grant from the IE Black Equity Fund through the Inland Empire Community Foundation. Start Over has grown from an all-volunteer organization to 21 staff members and welcomes contributions to support its work.

Currently, the organization relies on the help of 40 volunteers and is always looking for more. Those interested in volunteering can contact Ashley Williams, internship program manager and housing program manager for the organization.

Start Over tries to match volunteers with work that builds on their strengths. Opportunities include policy and advocacy work, writing grant applications and working with housing guests. There is also a need for fresh grocery donations for the bi-monthly Starting Over food drives. Donations of gently used clothing and accessories are also welcome and provided free of charge to accommodation hosts and the community.

“Opportunity is what we offer,” Quarles said. “Yes, we help provide direct services, but more broadly, we give people the time and space to reset and rethink their future.”

More information: https://www.startingoverinc.org or 951-898-0862

Inland Empire Community Foundation strives to strengthen the Southern California interior through philanthropy.

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Recognizing Local Charities for Nonprofit Appreciation Week | bloginfo(‘name’); ?>

February 10, 2022 0 comments

By Paula Brown, Local Journalism Initiative reporter

A small group of Dufferin County organizations will recognize the work of local nonprofits next week as part of a campaign for the first-ever Nonprofit Appreciation Week (February 14-February 20) .

In December 2021, the province passed Bill 9 to create Nonprofit Appreciation Week, a motion that received unanimous support from all parties. Beginning February 14 and continuing through February 20, the week is focused on recognizing those in the nonprofit sector whose work changes the lives of individuals, families, and communities.

Michele Fisher, executive director of the Dufferin Community Foundation, said the week of appreciation had been “a long time coming.”

“Most of the other helping professions are recognized for their impact. During the pandemic, for example, healthcare workers have been rightly praised for their efforts. But frontline workers in the nonprofit sector — many of whom were also deemed essential — have flown under the radar. That’s why we like to call them ‘invisible champions’,” Fisher said. “Nonprofit Appreciation Week is an opportunity for us as a community to say ‘Thank You.’ It makes visible all they do to help some of our most vulnerable and to strengthen our communities. I hope this will allow our nonprofit professionals to feel truly recognized for all that they do. »

In Dufferin County alone, there are over 150 non-profit organizations working within the community, ranging from social services, environmental/conservation organizations, arts and culture, recreation, health, mental health, community development, housing and homelessness, food security and much more. .

The Citizen spoke with some of the local nonprofits in Dufferin County ahead of Nonprofit Appreciation Week.

Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County

For people with dementia, a consistent routine can help them thrive. As a non-profit organization focused on support, programming and education, the Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County has taken on the challenge of maintaining this routine for more than two years.

“Over the past two years we have seen a significant drop in the availability of things like day programs, community support, personal support worker support. Basically anything that would allow a person with dementia and their family to maintain a consistent routine,” said Lindsay Gregory, Outreach and Education Coordinator. “Without this structure, we are seeing an increase in complex cases, an increase in behaviors and the burnout of caregivers.

To help address the lack of structure for clients brought about by the pandemic, the Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County has begun offering online training and education sessions as well as social programs, activities and social sessions. exercises.

One program, which Gregory points to as a proud moment in the face of the pandemic, is their Bring Back Box program.

The Bring Back Box program is a Montessori approach to dementia care where clients receive personalized activity kits based on their hobbies, interests, and memories that provide meaningful stimulation and engagement.

“We see a lot of people with dementia who are bored,” Gregory said. “It’s a really nice way to connect with people in an otherwise virtual world.”

The Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County has approximately 400 people on their active caseload and while their caseload has not increased since the pandemic, they have seen more admissions seeking access to education and support .

“We talk more often with people who are now at home with loved ones and who may be noticing this cognitive decline that they wouldn’t otherwise notice,” Gregory said.

Coming out of the pandemic, Gregory said after seeing how people have connected with them, the Alzheimer Society of Dufferin County will likely continue to use their virtual opportunities in a “hybrid model.”

Community Living Dufferin for over 60 years has been providing support to adults in Dufferin County who have developmental disabilities and when COVID-19 hit, rather than accepting a hiatus from all programs, Community Living Dufferin staff shows creativity.

“It could have been very easy for us to say ‘sorry, the building is closed and the programs are over, we’re just going to get by,’ but our staff didn’t,” Karen Murphy-Fitz explained, executive assistant. . “We changed our programs from those we operated in the main building to programs we offered in each of our homes.”

One of the ways they transformed, Murphy-Fitz added, was by distributing craft boxes in their homes, which contained games, science projects and art supplies.

“Residents had something different to fill their days,” Murphy-Fitz said.

Operating 14 homes that provide housing for more than 60 adults supported by the nonprofit, Community Living Dufferin was challenged early on by isolation as family visits were cut short.

Community Living Dufferin applied for and became the recipient of a number of grants allowing them to purchase smart TVs, iPads and Google Home units so they can continue to connect with families.

“It was huge for helping the people we support stay connected with their families, giving them the opportunity to see each other face to face,” Murphy-Fitz said.

Although Community Living Dufferin has learned, like many organizations, to balance the setbacks caused by the pandemic, it is the emotional impacts that continue to be felt.

While speaking with the Citizen, Murphy-Fitz held back tears as she spoke about their adaptation as hallways and rooms remain empty.

“It’s been hard not seeing people, and it’s going to be nice to have everyone together again.”

As the saying goes, the show must go on.

As a relatively young organization that began with seasonal programming, Streams Community Hub faced the challenge of bringing the arts, a naturally collaborative and in-person discipline, into the virtual space.

“We really spent several months, like anyone working in a space that deals with a lot of in-person programming, trying to figure out what to do,” explained Juli-Anne James, co-founder of Streams Hub. “It’s hard to put on a play without a stage.”

Although not fully equipped with the technology and staff to deliver virtual programs, Juli-Anne and Andrew James have found a way to bring the arts into children’s homes – through a stand-up competition.

The Word of Mouth Monologue competition launched in March 2021 and saw local young people aged 8-17 submit online performances of various monologues and compete in a live final.

“The monologue competition was a really great opportunity that we did after it turned out to be really awesome,” Andrew said. “It made us realize it’s a good outlet and now we need to keep doing it even when things get back to ‘normal’. We recognized the importance of helping young people have another way to express themselves .

Although restricted for a year to offering arts programs to young people, the James duo note that internal work was underway to deepen their roots in the community.

“We were able to see some of the needs in our community and see how we could better meet those needs,” Andrew said.

Streams Community Hub is preparing to open its first permanent location, tentatively scheduled for early March.

“We know the importance of connection, of being together in a space and that we can never escape that need or that want,” Andrew said. “Our show must go on, to move forward creating a bigger space not only for young people, but for the artist who also needs a place to express themselves in their art, while earning a living and teaching the next generation.”

Organizations that have worked to develop local activities in recognition of Nonprofit Appreciation Week include the Dufferin Community Foundation, United Way Guelph Wellington Dufferin, Headwaters Communities in Action, DC MOVES, the Chamber of commerce of Dufferin and Dufferin County.

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Vancouver awards contract for 2nd Safe Stay Community to Living Hope Church

Vancouver City Council voted unanimously on Monday to contract with Living Hope Church to operate the city’s second Safe Stay community.

Brian Norris, associate pastor of Living Hope, said the organization has built relationships with the homeless population which will be an asset to the church while running the Safe Stay Community.

“They know where we come from; we know where they are (and) what their struggles are,” he said. “We want to see the best in people and we want them to see the best in themselves.”

The additional initiative from city staff came shortly after setting up its first site at 11400 NE 51st Circle, which operated for more than a month. Residents of the cul-de-sac in Vancouver’s North Image neighborhood have achieved many goals, said Jamie Spinelli, Vancouver Homeless Intervention Coordinator.

Three residents got jobs while others decided to seek treatment. A person has found his family; several residents have obtained their driver’s license; and some received essential medical care.

Outsiders Inn, a Vancouver-based nonprofit, operates the city’s first Safe Stay community. Adam Kravitz, executive director of Outsiders Inn, said community residents have already achieved milestones after more than a month of operation.

“Most of the time, success comes from people stabilizing,” he said.

Outsiders Inn is working on some issues, such as maintaining a continuous flow of essential supplies, including paper products, garbage bags and cooking utensils, Kravitz said. Some challenges require patience as the pieces fall into place, such as waiting for WiFi to be installed, he added. The organization’s staff shares their acquired knowledge and other general advice with Living Hope Church to ease their transition.

“We’re working very closely with them (to) help them get off the ground as smooth and easy as possible,” Kravitz said.

Spinelli said the added location will operate around the clock, connect residents to outside resources and provide peer support, just like the first site.

Living Hope Church operated a relief site early in the COVID-19 pandemic and operates the county’s only walk-in severe weather shelter. Volunteers also provide meals, a food and clothing bank, mobile sanitation facilities and other outreach services on a weekly basis.

Mayor Pro Tem Ty Stober said the community may question the role of a religious organization in running a municipal program and stressed that the church will abide by the Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity Act. employment opportunities, which is described in the contract.

The city will pay Living Hope Church $552,212 per year to operate the site. Location and shelter options have not been determined.

Vancouver’s first Safe Stay community was included in its 2021-2022 budget, and additional communities will be funded with the first supplementary budget in 2022. The proposed second site and additional support sites may be funded through the Fund for the affordable housing, a sales tax on affordable housing. , and community development grants.

In the same motion, council members approved an updated administrative plan for the Affordable Housing Fund. The proposed changes allocate funds to meet changing community needs, such as the growing demand for temporary shelters during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Affordable Housing Fund initially allocated $300,000 per year for temporary shelters. The proposed update increased the amount to $1.66 million per year, which would support Safe Stay Community operations and the creation of additional sites.

The increase comes as the $3.96 million allocation for housing production and preservation has been reduced to $2.6 million, said Samantha Whitley, community development manager. City staff found that their goals had been met and that more investment was needed to help people in need find shelter.

“We’re nimble in responding (and) to the needs of our community, and this is a great way to do that,” Councilor Bart Hansen said.

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Why is the demolition of a Marcel Breuer house important?

LAWRENCE, NY – “Are people going to care about a tiny house?” asked Elizabeth Waytkus, who had been alerted a few weeks ago to the possibility of a once-famous house by architect Marcel Breuer being demolished. She is the executive director of Docomomo US, a nonprofit organization that promotes the preservation of modern structures.

People cared, it turns out. She received an outpouring of dismay and grief upon learning that the 1945 Bertram and Phyllis Geller home in Lawrence, on the southwest edge of Nassau County, had been torn down without warning on January 26 by current owners, Shimon and Judy Eckstein, who Waytkus said had assured him just three weeks earlier that they had admired him and had no plans to take him down.

It was a beautiful composition of three single-storey, cedar-framed wings, which zigzagged among the trees and shrubs of a spacious site, each wing topped by a low-pitched roof which gave the house an undulating silhouette. . The house had been significantly, but not irreversibly, altered, according to images on a real estate website.

His question, however, raises a larger point. The Geller house was rapturously covered by the press in its early days because it appealed to an America obsessed with a better life after enduring the sacrifices of World War II and the gloom of the Great Depression. It was “one of the most famous houses of the time,” said Barry Bergdoll, an expert on Breuer, who teaches architectural history at Columbia University and was the chief curator of architecture at the Museum of Modern Art. However, he had fallen into a kind of obscurity, well known especially to aficionados.

Preserving single-family homes is difficult and expensive, Waytkus explains, primarily because they are private. Docomomo’s modest resources are primarily focused on preserving commercial, cultural, and civic buildings as they are generally accessible to the public. In large-lot suburbs like Lawrence, the loss of a single home is less shocking because it isn’t seen as part of a whole, as a row of Manhattan mansions or towering brownstones might be. .

Suburbs often resist local preservation ordinances, especially those aimed at mid-century modern or later buildings. The taste for modernism is not universal, and suburban officials often shy away from enacting historic ordinances that compel property owners to become unwitting stewards of an important cultural resource.

“There aren’t a lot of tools to help preserve these houses,” Waytkus explained. The best activists can do, she says, is promote the value of post-war architecture to the community, as well as vendors. Then try to find buyers willing to keep them.

The Geller House received a lot of attention during its construction because it confidently embodied the new values ​​of the suburbs: technological progress and an informal and discreet way of life around children, with easy access to games. and relaxation in the open air. It’s the emblem of an era that has completely disappeared: when post-war suburbs, at their best, were places of possibility, innovation and new ideas. The architecture of single-family homes expresses these aspirations and embodies this emerging way of life.

The Geller House has been described as binuclear, a rather significant way of emphasizing the primacy of childrearing which inspired the design. The visitor entered a closed covered passage which separated the wings reserved for family activities from a bedroom wing. Two of the children’s bedrooms faced a playroom that ran the full width of this wing, which opened directly onto a lawn for outdoor recreation.

On the other side of the breezeway, the kitchen, dining room and living areas came together in a relaxed way – emblematic of the greater informality sought by families. The owners didn’t treat the house like a showpiece. Joe Geller, one of the Gellers’ four boys, told Caroline Rob Zaleski, author of “Long Island Modernism: 1930-1980,” that his mother “didn’t bother us as young kids running inside out, and from room to room”. with all our

friends.”

The upward-sloping roofs in both wings lent a generosity to the modest dimensions of the rooms, as did the vast floor-to-ceiling glazed walls that projected sunlight onto the flagstone floors and opened onto the greenery outside. outside.

Marcel Breuer, born in 1902, left Hungary to study in Vienna, then entered the Bauhaus school in Dessau, Germany, where he would later lead the furniture workshop. He designed two famous chairs, the Cesca and the Wassily, both framed in chromed tubular steel and succinctly capturing the Bauhaus synthesis of abstract geometries and industrial techniques.

With the rise of the Nazis, Breuer, who was Jewish, moved several times, finally settling in Cambridge, Mass., in 1937, where he practiced and taught with Bauhaus colleague Walter Gropius at Harvard. Gregarious and charming, “Lajko” befriended many clients, including the Gellers, who hired him to design another house in Lawrence, in 1967. (That’s why the original Geller house is now known to curators as Geller I.) The house has been extended but remains largely as it was built.

In a series of houses with Gropius, Breuer would soften the sharp cubic forms, white plaster or metallic surfaces, and dramatic overhangs of his Bauhaus work. Geller was conceived as Breuer separated from Gropius and moved to New York.

In this house, Breuer merged his stylistic tendencies more completely with American building techniques. Conventional wood construction was clad in vertical cedar sheathing that gave a flat, sleek feel. Inside, he used thin panels of varnished plywood and contrasted them with expanses of saturated paint colors in the fashion of modern artists. Jackson Pollock made one of his first drip paintings – sold a long time ago – for the home.

Breuer anchored this light architecture to the earth with a living room wall and a massive fieldstone fireplace. Stone walls projected into the landscape to delimit play and relaxation areas. You could say the old-fashioned brickwork is reminiscent of the traditions Americans cling to – or the stone is simply a sultry counterpoint to the sleek planes of the rest of the design.

Many of the ideas Breuer had honed at Geller would appear in a house he had designed that was built in the garden of MoMA in 1949, spreading his ideas to an international audience. “The Geller and MoMA houses were meant to be replicable,” Bergdoll said, “a house that a local contractor could build.”

While many other architects, including émigrés like Gropius, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Richard Neutra, as well as the architects of the California Case Study Houses, brought new ideas to the rapidly expanding suburbs at this time, certain aspects of Breuer’s—and, by extension, Geller’s—MoMA design appeared nationwide, massaged to suit local conditions by talented so-called regionalists, in the Carolinas and Texas, California, and the North -western Pacific. A clean break from the past, homes celebrated the modesty and thrift people took away from the Depression.

I would argue that Geller House is more important today than it was when it was built, precisely because the qualities that made the era unique have largely disappeared. As the government endorsed suburban highways, towns emptied out, some returning later, largely by luring people to underappreciated neighborhoods, held together by those who didn’t leave, with stunning architecture but neglected. Ideas and optimism have started to come from the cities again.

The suburbs are now struggling to control traffic. Some have become impoverished. Thrift and modesty now seem antiquated. Land in desirable locations has become unaffordable and demolitions epidemic – in what were once middle-class suburbs as well as enclaves of innovative homes commissioned by adventurous clients – as the home as an investment vehicle triumph of the house as shelter. (In Lawrence, homes that appear to be three to four times larger than the longstanding mix of modest ranch homes and substantial summer “cottages” of the early 1900s rise along the coastal salt marshes and fairways of golf courses.) Zaleski, the author, estimates that more than two-thirds of the homes she showed in her 2012 book have been demolished or drastically altered.

As working from home frees people from commuting, the indoor-outdoor orientation and innate flexibility of House Geller and its ilk seem ideal, a reprieve for people glued to screens in dark rooms all day. Unfortunately, the lessons these houses teach are being lost as they become fewer and fewer.

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Letter to the Editor: Residents Avoid Using Manning Avenue Bridge Due to Possible Collapse

Dear Mr. Merchant, Mr. Mixon, Ms. Dennis and Members of Sumter City Council and Sumter County Council:

The decrepit and deteriorating condition of the Manning Avenue Bridge in Sumter, South Carolina presents a significant disadvantage to many voters who reside in South Sumter, South Carolina and want to vote by mail early and in person. The primary site for conducting this type of voting is the Sumter County Voter Registration and Elections Office, located at 141 N. Main St., Sumter, SC.

A number of residents of South Sumter, South Carolina avoid crossing the Manning Avenue Bridge due to the hazardous conditions that exist there and the risk of danger and loss of life that can occur at this site in the event of an accident. collapse of said bridge.

Residents of South Sumter, South Carolina are predominantly African American and have low to moderate incomes. These people suffer disproportionately from diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, chronic lung disease, prostate cancer, high maternal morbidity and mortality, and the coronavirus pandemic.

Residents of South Sumter, South Carolina are, in effect, economically and racially separated from the more affluent and economically secure segments of the City of Sumter and Sumter County, South Carolina, by the presence of the railroad system CSX which divides these entities demographically into two. and by the presence of a faulty, decaying and deteriorating Manning Avenue Bridge which, due to its unsafe condition, forces residents of South Sumter to use detour routes around this bridge for safety reasons and for fear of an imminent bridge collapse and the resulting devastation. results.



In fact, inequality powerfully depresses the vote of low-income people.

Even without the impact of the global pandemic, economic deprivation is a case of double jeopardy when it comes to voting: if you’re poor, you’re more likely to have poor health – and if you’re unhealthy , you are less likely to vote.

The Family Unit Inc. is continually consulted by low-to-moderate income residents of South Sumter, South Carolina on issues regarding their health, homelessness, substandard living conditions and their right to vote .

Voting rights are often the last item on the agenda for low-to-moderate income residents of South Sumter, South Carolina, due to their focus on survival and basic sustenance. However, surprisingly and incredibly, despite their countless hardships in daily life, the right to vote is sought and revered by some of the poorest people The Family Unit Inc. has come into contact with and advocates for.

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 prohibits any obstruction or restriction, caused by a state government, that adversely affects a voter’s right to have unrestricted and easy access to the ballot box.

The Sumter Urban Area Transportation Study (SUATS), which is a metropolitan planning organization (www.transit.dot.gov/regulations-and-guidance/transportation-planning/metropolitan-planning-organization-mpo) consisting of Members of the City of Sumter Government, Sumter County Government, South Carolina Department of Transportation, Sumter County Legislative Delegation, City of Sumter Planning Commission, and County Development Board of Sumter, made the decision as a group to place the replacement for the Manning Avenue Bridge. following the implementation of other “connectivity” projects that have been undertaken over the past decade in Sumter County, South Carolina.

The Family Unit Inc. argues that the decision to delay the replacement of the Manning Avenue Bridge while ignoring and ignoring the unsafe, dilapidated and deteriorated condition of this structure impedes and violates the voting rights of South Sumter residents, South Carolina, many of whom are members of our 501(c)(3), nonprofit charitable organization, and are beneficiaries of services provided by our organization that relate to the health, housing, and education of voters, voter registration and promoting voter engagement in the electoral process.

The Family Unit, Inc. recommends that the South Carolina Department of Transportation perform a full and thorough assessment and inspection of the Manning Avenue Bridge as soon as possible and, simultaneously, close access to this decaying bridge and deteriorating, setting up alternative routes for motorists and pedestrians who would normally cross this bridge. It is recommended that SCDOT configure alternate detour routes for motorists as well as pedestrians traveling over the Manning Avenue Bridge.



Further, The Family Unit, Inc. recommends that the South Carolina Department of Transportation and SUATS communicate with the CSX Railroad Corporation regarding the relationship between the Manning Avenue Bridge and the CSX rail system which is an integral part of the city of Sumter and the county of Sumter. , Caroline from the south.

Importantly, the CSX Railroad Corporation has already begun to improve transportation in the City of Sumter and Sumter County, South Carolina, by extensively replacing the old, deteriorated railroad tracks and surrounding equipment with new materials. and safe, secure and durable equipment.

A joint effort between SUATS and the CSX Railroad Corporation would benefit residents of the City of Sumter and Sumter County, South Carolina, especially low to moderate income people who live, own and operate businesses and love in South Sumter, South Carolina.

In addition to this, proactive actions in reference to the replacement of the Manning Avenue Bridge will help protect and preserve the voting rights of low-to-moderate income residents of South Sumter, South Carolina, by helping to ensure these voters unlimited and unhindered access. access to the Sumter County Voter and Election Registration Office, located at 141 North Main Street, Sumter, SC…the site where the majority of in-person mail-in voting takes place.

A significant number of low to moderate income residents who live in South Sumter, SC live within one (1) mile of the Sumter County Registration and Elections Office and use the Manning Avenue Bridge to reach this destination.

A collapse or failure of the Manning Avenue Bridge would result in these aforementioned voters incurring significant charges to access the Sumter County Voter Registration and Elections Office, the location where they routinely voted using by-pass voting. correspondence in person.

Immediate strategic planning by the South Carolina Department of Transportation for the implementation of alternate routes around the Manning Avenue Bridge would indicate that voters would prepare and inform voters of the altered route to the registration office and Sumter County Elections where they could cast their Mail-In Votes in person.

The Family Unit, Inc. routinely and regularly engages with low to moderate income individuals who are registered voters in the State of South Carolina and who are potential voters. It is common for many of these voters to be carried by me, representing my non-profit charity. Preparing to vote is fundamental and essential to participation in the electoral process. Having advance notice of transportation routes before the election overall helps get voters to and from the Sumter County Voter and Elections Registration Office and to and from the various polling places.



BRENDA C. WILLIAMS, MD

The Family Unit Inc., a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization

Summer

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US evacuated 10 civilians in raid, Pentagon says

Video

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transcription

Islamic State leader kills himself with bomb in US raid in Syria

President Biden says the Islamic State leader died in a raid by US special operations forces. All US troops returned safely from the operation, he said.

Knowing that this terrorist had chosen to surround himself with families, including children, we made the choice to pursue a special forces raid at a much greater risk than for our own people, rather than targeting him with a air strike. We made this choice to minimize civilian casualties. This operation is a testament to the reach and ability of the United States to eliminate terrorist threats no matter where they try to hide anywhere in the world.

President Biden says the Islamic State leader died in a raid by US special operations forces. All US troops returned safely from the operation, he said.CreditCredit…Yahya Nemah/EPA, via Shutterstock

President Biden said on Thursday that the Islamic State leader died in a raid by US special operations commandos in a risky pre-dawn attack in northwestern Syria. Rescue workers said women and children were among at least 13 people killed in the raid.

In brief remarks at the White House, Biden said the choice to use special forces to target ISIS leader Abu Ibrahim al-Hashimi al-Qurayshi was made to minimize civilian casualties , despite the greater risk to US troops.

Speaking in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Mr Biden was understated when he described the story of the Islamic State leader, saying he ordered a series of atrocities, including against the Yazidi people. “Thanks to the bravery of our troops, this horrible terrorist leader is no more,” he said.

Mr Biden said Mr al-Qurayshi died when he detonated a bomb, killing himself and members of his family.

Mr Biden said the raid served as a warning to terror groups.

“This operation is a testament to America’s reach and ability to eliminate terrorist threats no matter where they try to hide anywhere in the world,” he said.

Ahead of his White House remarks, Mr Biden said in a statement: “All Americans returned safely from the operation.”

John F. Kirby, the Pentagon’s chief spokesman, addressed victims associated with the raid at a press conference Thursday afternoon. “To the extent that there is loss of innocent life, it is caused by Abdullah and his lieutenants,” he said, using a nickname for Mr al-Quaryshi. He said US forces were able to evacuate 10 civilians from the building, including several children.

Asked about the timing of the raid, which officials said had gone months into the planning, Mr Kirby said several factors played a role: intelligence levels, certainty about the location of the leader of the ‘EI, weather and operational conditions (it was a nearly moonless night, ideal for night operations).

“A lot of factors had to line up to be perfect,” Kirby said. “It was the best window to execute the mission.”

The helicopter assault was carried out by about two dozen American commandos, supported by helicopter gunships, armed Reaper drones and attack aircraft. The operation resembled the October 2019 raid in which Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the former Islamic State leader, died when he detonated a suicide vest as US forces raided a hiding place not far from where Thursday’s operation took place.

The operation came days after the end of the biggest US fight against the Islamic State since the end of the jihadists’ so-called caliphate three years ago. US forces backed a Kurdish-led militia in northeast Syria as it fought for more than a week to drive Islamic State fighters out of a prison they had occupied in the city of Hasaka.

Little is known about Mr. al-Qurayshi, who succeeded Mr. al-Baghdadi, or the top command structure of ISIS. But analysts said the death of the Islamic State leader was a blow to the terror group.

US helicopters ferried the commandos into position after midnight, surrounding a house in Atmeh, a town near the border with Turkey in the rebel-held province of Idlib, according to eyewitnesses, social media and the Observatory Syrian Human Rights, a Britain-based conflict monitor.





A tense standoff ensued, with loudspeakers blaring warnings in Arabic for everyone in the house to turn themselves in, neighbors said. Then an explosion shook the building. After that, some of the occupants of the house had not come out and a major battle broke out, with heavy machine gun fire and, apparently, missile strikes.

During the operation, one of the American helicopters suffered a mechanical problem, was forced to land and was later destroyed by American attack aircraft. After about three hours, the American commandos and their remaining helicopters took off, witnesses said.

Given the fluid nature of early reports of a complex raid like Thursday’s operation, the Army’s initial version may be incomplete. Accounts of other events have sometimes turned out to be contradictory or sometimes completely wrong.

The report was provided by Falih HassanMuhammad Najdat Hij Kadour, Asmaa al-Omar, Hwaida Saad and Evan Hill. Jean Ismay

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Alice Cooper doesn’t think politics and rock ‘n’ roll go together

Alice Cooper doesn’t ask for much, but when it comes to politics, he wants to be left alone. The legendary shock rocker doesn’t think politics and rock ‘n’ roll go hand in hand – more specifically, that they “don’t belong in the same bed together”.

Though he’s spoken about his dismay for political topics in the past, the topic came up in a new interview with Tampa Bay’s Creative Loafing, where the icon was asked about his relationship with outspoken Ted Nugent at the light of all the political and social unrest that has occurred in recent years.

“Ted and I grew up together in Detroit, and he’s always been the mouth that roared. When he gets into it, no one can stick with him. I sort of consider him his own entity. I never talk of politics…I hate politics,” Cooper said.

“I don’t think rock and roll and politics are in the same bed, but a lot of people think they are – because we have a voice and we should use our voice. But again, rock and roll should be anti-politics, I think. When my parents started talking about politics, I was turning on the [Rolling] Stones as hard as possible. I don’t want to hear politics, and I still feel that.”

Cooper ultimately wants his music and live performances to be a “vacation from CNN.” And while he’s not trying to insult anyone who uses his platform to share his own opinions, he said he would never take the stage and tell his fans who to vote for in an election.

“If I did something like ‘Elected,’ which we always would do in elections, and I brought Trump and Hillary in to fight, and they’d both be wiped out! That’s what who was funny about it. If you’re into political theater, you better be able to take a joke.”

Although the rocker is not into politics, he is still a humanitarian. At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, he set aside money for his team so they wouldn’t struggle financially during the tour stoppage. In early 2021, he wrote a song just for Harry Nilsson’s son, Zak, who was battling terminal colon cancer. Last December, a photo went viral of the musician serving food to children at some sort of food bank event – and these are just examples of his selflessness that has happened over the past two years .

The “School’s Out” singer is currently embarking on a winter tour of North America, which will wrap up Feb. 14 after the 2022 Monsters of Rock cruise. He’ll be heading back in March, though, with Buckcherry. See all dates here.

14 Rock + Metal Artists Giving Back

These artists do so much to give back to a wide variety of communities and causes.

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We are evolving so you can thrive at Oak Hills Living Center | News, Sports, Jobs

Oak Hills Living Center exists to support our family, friends and neighbors who can no longer take care of themselves. The community established Highland Manor in 1958 when long term care was needed in New Ulm. In 1995 the community saw that the building needed major repairs and came together to rename and build our current home and in 2003 when the community needed income based housing you again supported this mission .

More than 20 years have passed since our last request for a major community contribution. Our community of seniors is growing and it is our duty to meet the increased demand. For some of you, you may not know that Oak Hills Living Center is a community-owned, not-for-profit, independent, long-term care and assisted living facility. Oak Hills is ownerless, community owned, and governed by a board of directors made up of community members. Our current Board of Directors includes Chris Jensen, Jay Vancura, Dr. Joan Krikava, Barb Dietz, Betsy Pieser, Danielle Marti, Michelle Markgraf, Judi Nelson and James Unke.

For the past six years, Oak Hills Assisted Living has tracked referrals, admissions, and discharges. We had noticed that the studios were no longer desirable for the community. Shortly before 2015 our apartments were always full with a waiting list. The needs of the community were changing and we had more and more requests for larger living spaces and memory care. Unfortunately, our paid private apartments were all studio apartments and we did not have a secure area to care for residents with memory loss. A market study confirmed our observations; however, we did not anticipate how much the need for care would increase. By 2050, people aged 80 to 84 in Brown County would increase by 48% and people aged 85 and over by 34%.

In 2019, the state informed our industry of upcoming assisted living licensing changes that will take effect August 1, 2021. Strategic planning was in the process of developing a plan for how we would respond to the needs of our growing senior population, as well as planning and preparing to meet the new licensing change for assisted living. Then came the pandemic and we were forced to redirect our efforts. We were hoping that the state would push back the deadline because of the pandemic; however, the state has held firm to licensing changes which have required us to continue to explore options to renovate and/or expand our assisted living facility. We have planned different scenarios, renovate, expand or do nothing. Doing nothing meant the future of Oak Hills Living Center was not guaranteed. Where would our friends and neighbors go when they could no longer care for themselves if Oak Hills Living Center ceased to exist?

We need to renovate our existing assisted living facility so people in our community have more options than a 425 square foot apartment. We need to offer additional services with these larger spaces so that we can reserve our qualified nursing home beds for those who need them most. Residents requiring memory care should be in a safe and secure environment where they are free to roam.

Concerns about staffing are valid. There isn’t an organization that isn’t looking for employees. When fully staffed, we have approximately 275 employees in Oak Hills. Currently we have a handful of positions open, however, we do not have temporary contract staff working in our building. How did we do this? Our Board and management have developed a plan to increase the salaries of our direct care staff in October.

The expansion will require 20 to 25 additional employees. We understand this is worrying given the number of vacancies in so many places. We are confident that by investing in our organization and our community, we will be able to fill these additional positions. Generating interest in healthcare and supporting those who want to enter the field is a priority for Oak Hills. Our scholarship program pays tuition fees for individuals pursuing a variety of healthcare careers. The person brings us the tuition statement and we pay it directly to the college or university. We also have a program, OnTrack, which trains practical nurses and many may not be aware that care homes are required to pay tuition for those being trained for their first CNA role. We are committed to developing and supporting our people.

At Oak Hills, we care about people and believe that every life has value. The expansion will cost $13 million and we need to raise at least $2.5 million from the community. While staff and board members may change, the one constant is you. You will always own Oak Hills, it is the home of the community. We need your support.

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More and more small houses are coming to the YK Delta thanks to pandemic relief funds. But are they a good idea?

This story was originally posted by KYUK Public Media at Bethel and is reprinted with permission.

BETHEL — A wave of new housing is coming to the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta. Most of these new units should be of the fashionable tiny house variety. But with households in the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta generally much larger than the national average, some tribes are wondering if smaller houses are right for their communities.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) recently announced nearly $7 million in funding for Aniak, Atmautluak, Napaimute, Newtok, Quinhagak, Toksook Bay, and Tununak to begin construction of 25 new homes this year. The funding comes from federal coronavirus relief funding, which has brought a huge influx of money to Alaska for tribes to build homes.

“Blast is a good term for how much it’s increased,” said Greg Stuckey, administrator of HUD’s Alaska Native American Programs Office.

Since these grants are tied to coronavirus relief funding, tribes must use homes as isolation or quarantine units, at least initially.

“And then, you know, later when COVID is finally over, you can use them to reduce overcrowding in your communities, because that’s a major problem in rural Alaska,” Stuckey said.

About 40% of homes in the Yukon Delta are either overcrowded or severely overcrowded. According to a statewide housing assessment, more than 2,400 homes need to be built to address this issue.

Almost all of the homes that will be built in the YK Delta with these HUD grants will be small homes. They will be smaller than 500 square feet, with the kitchen, bed, and living space in the same room. There will be a separate bathroom, but no separate bedrooms.

Tiny houses have been all the rage in recent years, often touted as an answer to affordable housing. But are they well suited to a region where households are, on average, 50 to 80% larger than the national average?

The Yukon-Kuskokwim delta has already experimented with small houses. The non-profit organization, Coastal Villages Region Fund, built one in Eek in 2018. The organization says it will no longer do so.

“We’ve found that people need more space than a small house with the number of people in the family,” said Oscar Evon, regional business manager at CVRF.

Evon said there were other problems with tiny homes, such as banks not funding mortgages for them. CVRF originally planned for homeowners to buy small houses through mortgages, which would have opened up another route to home ownership in the villages of the YK Delta. Most are currently built and paid for by the regional housing authority or by grants. After moving away from smaller homes, CVRF is now building more traditional three- to four-bedroom homes, which Evon says banks fund mortgages and better meet the needs of families.

“A bigger house gives a family more space to raise their family and sometimes even their extended family,” Evon said.

Some of the tribes that have recently received a HUD grant to build tiny homes have come to the same conclusion. Toksook Bay received $1,035,000 to build five small houses, but Tribal Administrator Robert Pitka Sr. said Toksook Bay would prefer to build larger houses.

“We would choose a two-bedroom house instead of a small house,” said Pitka Sr.

However, Toksook Bay applied for a grant and received funds to build small houses. Pitka Sr. said he believed the grant was specifically for small homes.

“The ICDBG (Indian Community Development Block) grant already had wording in there where it’s for small houses,” Pitka Sr said.

HUD’s ICDBG grant requirements suggest building tiny houses as a way to use grant funds, which may have been enough to convince tribes to include tiny houses in their grant application. Tununak, who also received a grant to build small houses, also said he would prefer to build houses with bedrooms.

Stuckey said HUD did not require applicants to build tiny houses or any particular type of housing, and did not favor applications that included tiny houses. For example, Newtok received the same grant to build three three-bedroom houses.

“It’s self-determination. The tribes decide, the tribes are going to tell me what they’re going to build,” Stuckey said.

If tribes like Toksook Bay decide they prefer to build bigger houses, they will be able to do so. HUD spokeswoman Vanessa Krueger said tribes can submit an amendment to their grant application.

In Toksook Bay, Pitka Sr. said new homes, whether tiny or not, will make a big difference to families currently living in old, unsuitable homes.

“They are moldy. They are cold. They are rotten. They have no water and sewage system. Some are even smaller than tiny houses. And at least a brand new little house would make it 100% better,” Pitka Sr. said.

Pitka Sr. said those families could move into their new homes later this year.

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Sevastopol neighborhood group sues to stop safe parking program for homeless in motorhomes

A Sevastopol neighborhood group has sued the city to end a controversial safe parking scheme planned for the city’s north end for local homeless people living out of their RVs.

On January 21, Friends of Northwestern Sevastopol filed a petition in Sonoma County Superior Court seeking to force the Sevastopol City Council to reverse its decision approving the year-long pilot program on private land. at 845 Gravenstein Highway North.

“Friends recognizes the importance of safe shelter for homeless people. … Friends object to the entire burden of these encampments being concentrated on one neighborhood,” the petition reads.

The legal filing describes the group as representing the interests of “local landlords and tenants, parents of schoolchildren, business owners and operators, and landowners”. It was incorporated as a nonprofit on Jan. 5, according to filings by the California companies.

Sevastopol City Prosecutor and Director Lawrence McLaughlin said the city has hired outside attorneys and will “vigorously oppose” any attempt to block or close the parking lot.

Petition of Friends of Northwest Sevastopol.pdf

The hourly program that would provide support services and space for 22 vehicles is expected to be fully operational by February 15. A delay of more than a week could jeopardize the $368,000 federal stimulus grant package that will fund most of the pilot program, according to Sonoma Applied Village Services, the nonprofit selected to run the site.

“Any delay risks killing the project,” said SAVS president Adrienne Lauby.

SAVS, which is named in the petition with the city, plans to lease the land at a former AmeriGas propane store in the nonprofit St. Vincent de Paul Sonoma County.

Saint Vincent is also named in the petition. Jack Tibbetts, the nonprofit’s executive director and former Santa Rosa city councilman, said the charity had “every intention of moving forward” with the lease.

The secure parking scheme, approved by city council in November, came largely in response to health and safety concerns from neighbors and business owners about a long-running encampment with more than a dozen campsites -buses on Morris Street. The hope is to move as many people as possible from the unauthorized camp, where police have warned campers, to the new ‘RV village’.

The city is also considering an ordinance that would effectively ban RV parking on city streets during the day, alarming some homeless advocates. Council was scheduled to vote on the ordinance on Tuesday, but the item was moved to its next meeting on Feb. 15, city officials said.

Tony Francois, a San Francisco lawyer representing Friends of Northwestern Sevastopol, told The Press Democrat the group considers the secure parking scheme illegal due to a local ordinance prohibiting people from living in campsites. -cars.

Additionally, he said the city council failed to follow the proper permitting process, conduct an environmental review, and give residents enough notice to comment on the scheme.

“The way they proceeded deprived many of the project’s neighbors from exercising their right to comment on the project before it was approved,” Francois said.

City Council approved the RV Village in about a month to meet a deadline that would ensure SAVS received federal funding. Despite the quick turnaround, council members at the time said they aimed to do everything possible to hear residents’ concerns.

McLaughlin, the city attorney, said the program was exempt from the normal permitting process and environmental review because it is a homeless shelter.

But Francis argues that under state law, such a project is only exempt if it is on city-owned property or if the city itself leases the property.

McLaughlin disputes this interpretation. And regarding the local ordinance prohibiting living in vehicles, he said a secure parking program is exempt.

“All of the factual and legal allegations in the lawsuit are incorrect,” McLaughlin said.

Francois said the neighborhood group wants the city to reconsider the secure parking program through the normal permitting process and potentially create smaller RV villages throughout the city so vehicles aren’t concentrated on a single site.

The group plans to ask the court for a stay to immediately suspend the project while hearings are underway. But as of Thursday, Francis had yet to get confirmation that the petition had been officially received due to a lack of court personnel, he said, meaning it’s unclear when a first hearing could be held. be fixed.

You can reach editor Ethan Varian at [email protected] or 707-521-5412. On Twitter @ethanvarian

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Harvard Hillel Hosts Holocaust Remembrance Day Memorial | News

Harvard Hillel held a memorial service on the steps of the Widener Library on Thursday in observance of International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Holocaust Remembrance Day marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp in 1945 and honors the lives of the millions of Jews and civilians who were killed. In his service, Hillel commemorated the life of Ita Warmund, a victim whose name was chosen from the database of Yad Vashem – Israel’s official memorial to the victims of the Holocaust.

College Dean Rakesh Khurana, Dean of Students Katherine G. O’Dair, Associate Dean of Students Lauren E. Brandt ’01, Reverend Matthew Ichihashi Potts, Rabbis Jonah C. Steinberg and Hirschy Zarchi each lit a candle in honor of the victims.

In his speech, Steinberg, executive director of Hillel, stressed the importance of remembering those whose lives were lost in the Holocaust.

“There is hardly a family represented here that has not been touched in some way by the Sho’ah – by the Holocaust – who does not have a wound, which is often a gaping hole, an absence,” Steinberg said.

Despite the loss and tragedy of the Holocaust, Steinberg said it was still important to work toward a “world of unity.”

“That doesn’t mean we go through life traumatized and scared,” Steinberg said. “But that means we go through life wearing that and figuring out how to live forward.”

Harvard Chabad Rabbi Zarchi said in his remarks that revealed knowledge of the Holocaust alone does not guarantee moral choices.

“Today we light a candle for souls with a candle of truth,” Zarchi said. “And perhaps that is what veritas teaches us – that there must be truth in our knowledge and in our wisdom to ensure that this knowledge leads to morality, to ethical living and to ethical choices. “

Addressing the crowd, Khurana said ‘remembering’ is one of the ‘most important human acts’ and stressed the importance of sharing the stories of Holocaust victims, especially with younger generations. .

“Their stories are an essential part of our common humanity, and those who are one, two or three generations apart are committed to understanding these horrific events and telling the stories to the next generation,” he said. . “The Holocaust not only altered the contours of world history, it also shattered the lives of countless families around the world.”

Khurana condemned anti-Semitism, citing the Texas synagogue hostage crisis and the harms of remaining silent in the face of oppression.

“We must not forget the lessons of the Holocaust and the dehumanization it depended on,” Khurana said. “And we must not forget that it is up to each of us, as humans, to decide whether to perpetuate good or evil in the world or remain indifferent.”

Hillel’s memorial was also intended to raise funds for The Blue Card, a non-profit organization that provides financial, emotional and physical support to Holocaust survivors in the United States.

The service ended with a reading from “El Male Rachamim” – a Jewish memorial prayer – by Noa D. Kligfeld ’24.

“May their memory endure, inspiring truth and loyalty in our lives. May their souls be bound by the bond of life. May they rest in peace. And let’s say “Amen,” Kligfeld recited.

—Editor Leah J. Teichholtz can be reached at [email protected] Follow her on Twitter @LeahTeichholtz.

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Non profit living

Local non-profit petitions for a minimum wage increase

“Often LGBTQ people tend to be underemployed simply because of the conditions in our state, but we also believe in equality and fairness for all. We want everyone in Nebraska to have the ability to blossom fully,” Aryn said. Okay.

LINCOLN, Neb. (KLKN) — Local nonprofit OutNebraska has begun petitioning to raise the minimum wage in Nebraska.

OutNebraska, a nonprofit organization that empowers the LGBTQ community, has joined the statewide “Raise the Wage” petition.

“Often LGBTQ people tend to be underemployed simply because of the conditions in our state, but we also believe in equality and fairness for all. We want everyone in Nebraska to have the ability to s ‘fulfillment. Part of that is making sure they can afford food, bills, rent,’ said Aryn Huck, community organizer at OutNebraska.

Each week, OutNebraska will dedicate an hour to collecting signatures at its office. The time and places to sign the petition “Raise the salary” can be found here.

The petition says the minimum wage would increase by $1.50 per year for the next three years until it reaches $15 per hour. Petitioners will need to collect signatures from approximately 20% of Nebraska workers, including a percentage in each Nebraska county.

Currently, the minimum wage is $9 per hour in Nebraska.

“Keep it adjusted to the cost of living in the state. So if the cost of living doesn’t go up, it won’t go up, but there will always be an annual review just so we don’t have to start over,” Huck said. “We don’t need to go out and collect signatures every 5, 6, 7 years, instead we can have an annual review that says okay, are we competitive, are we tracking the cost of the life?”

People wishing to sign the petition must be registered to vote in Nebraska for the signature to count. People can register either at OutNebraska during their weekly petition hour or online at the Secretary of State’s website.

If petitioners have received all required signatures by July 7, this will appear on the November ballot.

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Non profit living

ADDF and AFTD Partner to Support Wave Life Sciences’ FTD and ALS Clinical Program

NEW YORK, January 25, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) and the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD) today announced their partnership to support the FOCUS-C9 phase of Wave Life Sciences 1b/2a clinical trial investigating WVE-004 as a potential treatment for C9orf72– associated frontotemporal degeneration (C9-FTD), as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (C9-ALS). The partnership provides an investment from the ADDF and AFTD that will support the assessment of fluid biomarkers, functional assessments and digital biomarkers in FOCUS-C9, potentially leading to clinically meaningful results to inform the development of treatments for DFT.

The ADDF and AFTD made the decision to support the FOCUS-C9 trial following a review of Wave’s clinical research application for the Treat FTD Fund, which supports the development of new drugs to treat FTD. Specifically, members of the Treat FTD Fund Joint Steering Committee, an expert panel convened by the ADDF in conjunction with the AFTD, and the ADDF Scientific Review Committee reviewed and commented on the phase 1b/2a study design, preclinical data supporting the program, and study team references.

“This investment exemplifies many of our priorities: collaboration, innovative science and the development of more rigorous methods for conducting clinical trials,” said Howard Fillit, MD, Co-Founder and Scientific Director of ADDF. “We must work together – as the ADDF and AFTD have done for years – to expand our scientific knowledge of all neurodegenerative diseases so that we can help provide meaningful treatments for people with FTD, Alzheimer’s and other related dementias.”

“The AFTD is proud to support, through the Treat FTD Fund, this innovative and potentially important clinical trial,” said Susan LJ Dickinson, CEO of AFTD. “For so many people living with FTD, this trial represents hope for effective treatments and to ease the journey of the next family facing this disease. Our ongoing collaborations with ADDF and Wave Life Sciences portend a future without this disease, and we are grateful to all clinical investigators and those diagnosed with FTD who will participate in this important research.”

The FOCUS-C9 trial is original in that it is a “basket” type study designed to evaluate the effects of genetically targeted treatment in patients with different disease phenotypes (FTD, FTD with ALS or ALS) that share a common molecular etiology, as has been used in oncology trials but has not yet been applied in neurology and C9orf72 population specifically. Wave’s focus on C9-FTD makes it a unique program in the C9orf72 clinical research landscape. It is also unique in the use of novel oligonucleotide chemistry which has shown enhanced cellular and nuclear uptake.

“We are grateful to the ADDF and AFTD panel of experts for their support and recognition of the innovative approach we have taken to rapidly advancing our clinical program,” said Michael Panzara, MD, MPH, Chief Medical Officer and Head of Therapeutic Discovery and Development at Wave Life Sciences. “In addition to advancing WVE-004 as a new genetically targeted treatment for FTD and ALS, we look forward to sharing the many learnings that will emerge from this trial with the wider medical and scientific communities.”

WVE-004 is a stereopure antisense oligonucleotide designed to selectively target transcriptional variants containing a hexanucleotide repeat expansion (G4VS2) associated with the C9orf72 gene, thus sparing C9orf72 protein. g4VS2 extensions in C9orf72 are one of the most common genetic causes of sporadic and hereditary forms of ALS and FTD.

ABOUT THE ALZHEIMER’S DRUG DISCOVERY FOUNDATION
Founded in 1998 by Leonard A. and Ronald S. Lauder, the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation is dedicated to rapidly accelerating drug discovery to prevent, treat and cure Alzheimer’s disease. The ADDF is the only public charity focused exclusively on funding drug development for Alzheimer’s disease, employing a venture philanthropy model to support research in universities and the biotech industry.

Thanks to the generosity of its donors, the ADDF has awarded over $209 million to fund more than 690 Alzheimer’s disease drug discovery programs, biomarker programs and clinical trials in 19 countries. To learn more, please visit: http://www.alzdiscovery.org/.

ABOUT THE ASSOCIATION FOR FRONTO-TEMPORAL DEGENERATION
Founded in 2002, the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD) is the leading US nonprofit organization working to improve the lives of people with FTD, their care partners, and loved ones. The AFTD promotes and funds research into the diagnosis, treatment and cure of FTD; stimulates greater public awareness; provides information and support to those directly affected; promotes the education of health professionals; and advocates for appropriate and affordable services. To learn more, visit www.theaftd.org.

ABOUT WAVES LIFE SCIENCES
Wave Life Sciences (Nasdaq: WVE) is a clinical-stage genetic medicine company committed to providing life-changing treatments for people struggling with devastating diseases. Wave aspires to develop best-in-class drugs across multiple therapeutic modalities using PRISM, the company’s proprietary drug discovery and development platform that enables the precise design, optimization and production of oligonucleotides stereopure. Driven by a resolute sense of urgency, the Wave team targets a wide range of genetically defined diseases so that patients and families can achieve a better future. To learn more, visit www.wavelifesciences.com and follow Wave on Twitter @WaveLifeSci.

SOURCE Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation

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Non profit living

‘We all have a little PTSD’: Monterey County residents deal with Colorado fire

MONTEREY COUNTY, Calif. (KRON) – “We all have a little bit of PTSD,” Audrey Cray said with a local charity called “All In Monterey.” “When we live in an area that tends to have fires every time we hear about anything, we all get very nervous, very scared.”

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As firefighters continue to battle the Colorado blaze, many people are still displaced from their homes.
The fire is now 35% contained and affects 700 acres.

Many people have had to leave their homes without notice and situations like this can be very scary.

“They don’t know if they’re going to have a home to come to, if they’re going to lose all of their belongings and we’re just a little bit there’s a big, warm hug,” Cray said.

As the Colorado Fire continues to burn, people living west of 3800 Palo Colorado Road toward Highway 1 and south of Bixby Creek in Monterey County are still being evacuated.

“When you’re told to evacuate, you leave with the clothes on your back and there’s so much that you don’t even think about that you don’t grasp,” Cray said.

Cray says they are doing what they can to help.

The non-profit organization provides support to its neighbors in Monterey.

They are currently working with the Red Cross at the Carmel Middle School Shelter.

“We worked with the evacuation center to make sure they had wash clothes, everything they would need at the evacuation centre.”

Meanwhile, firefighters are working around the clock to put out the fire.

U.S. Representative for the Central Coast, Jimmy Panetta, said he met with Cal Fire about their efforts.

“They feel confident, but the terrain is really steep there,” Panetta said. “If you’ve been along Highway 1, which many of your viewers have, you understand how steep and rugged it is.”

Panetta was happy to report that only one structure was damaged and there were no injuries or fatalities.

“The people of this area, the people of Big Sur are hardy, they’re warm, they’re used to these kinds of natural disasters.”

Panetta says he’s calling on everyone to help prevent fires – like this one – from happening in the future.

Although we don’t yet know what caused this fire, he says most of these fires are caused by human activity.

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Non profit living

MU Extension Leads Double Up Food Bucks | Community life

This year, more low-income families in Missouri and Kansas will be able to double their spending power when shopping for fruits and vegetables.

New USDA funding will allow the Mid-America Regional Council to expand the Double Up Food Bucks program in Kansas and Missouri from 80 to 140 locations. The program offers eligible consumers dollar-for-dollar consideration – up to $25 a day – for goods at participating grocery stores and farmers’ markets.

Consumers are eligible if they are enrolled in the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance program, said Londa Nwadike, food safety specialist for the University of Missouri and Kansas State University.

Last summer, MARC – a nonprofit association of cities and counties in the Kansas City area – received a three-year, $4.6 million grant from the National Institute of Food and USDA Agriculture to bring Double Up Food Bucks to more places.

The program has redeemed nearly $3 million in incentives for SNAP recipients since 2015, said Donna Martin of MARC, head of Double Up Food Bucks.

MARC partners with local and regional organizations to implement the program. Through a $757,622 contract, MU Extension will work with farmers’ markets outside of the Kansas City metro area and west-central Missouri.

“This program is a huge benefit for SNAP recipients because they can afford to buy more fruits and vegetables,” said Jollyn Tyryfter, MU Extension’s nutrition and health education specialist, who is working with Nwadike on the project.

“It’s also a great benefit for vendors at local farmers’ markets who are able to sell more fruits and vegetables,” added Jennifer Elms, the newly hired coordinator of MU Extension’s Double Up Food Bucks program.

Nwadike encourages farmers’ market managers and interested vendors to join an informational webinar at noon on Tuesday, February 8. February 11th. For more information, visit extension.missouri.edu/events/2022-selling-at-the-farmer-s-market.

CultivateKC and the West Central Missouri Community Action Agency will continue to serve markets implementing Double Up Food Bucks in Metro Kansas City and West Central Missouri, respectively. For more information, visit www.DoubleUpHeartland.org.

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Non profit living

Leadership Development for Racial Equity

After working 26 years in the for-profit capital sector of our economy and nine years working with the poor, forgotten and demonized people in our society, I see life much differently. I feel like I’ve awakened to a new understanding of the rules of how we interact for the good of society. The Homeboy Way is the “how” of mutuality, compassion and relatedness for a better society.

Homeboy Industries is the largest and most successful gang reintegration program in the world. It was founded and is run by Father Greg Boyle, a Jesuit priest, who dedicates his life to helping men and women get out of the gang lifestyle. By transforming their lives, these men and women show us why people shouldn’t be defined by the worst thing they’ve done. Homeboy has helped thousands of people heal from complex traumas and become contributing members of our society, even when it seems everyone in society has let them down. In many ways, this effort can be seen as a fight against racial and economic inequality – because the population we serve is made up of poor people of color who have never had a fair chance in our society.

As a human services nonprofit, Homeboy has always struggled to secure the financial resources to stay afloat. I came to Homeboy exactly when they needed someone like me with the skills to lead successful organizations. I also came at a time when I needed to know more about myself and my spiritual journey. Working with Homeboy Industries has given me knowledge and insight into my own spirituality and the plight of the people Homeboy Industries serves.

I have made friendships and relationships that are remarkable. I have experienced more heartbreak and more joy in recent years than in my entire life before that. Along the way, almost by providence, I have been able to see how business can be run with a different set of priorities so that everyone benefits: owners, management and those who have never been able to maintain a job but are doing so now. I learned how to help the “unemployable” to become employable. I participated in the development of business models that provide not only economic impact but social impact. Doing business the Homeboy Way is the direction in which we must lead our collective efforts and a roadmap to revamp capital markets.

In today’s environment, we have massive tidal currents around the issues and causes of social injustice and racial inequality. What I didn’t know then, but what I know now, is that I was lucky enough to be on the front line with those involved. I became not only a non-profit CEO of a social service agency, but more importantly, a participant in the fight to bring resources and help to those on the margins of our society.

I learned a lot about leadership development for racial equity. Every organization, be it a non-profit or government agency and especially a for-profit business, must address this issue and strive to improve the lives of everyone around us.

The struggle for any organization is to develop the next generation of leaders from within, and at Homeboy, that’s not just vitally important to the mission, but an order of magnitude more difficult. Our ex-gang population needs to see people like them in leadership roles so that the actions we take are genuine and have the best interest of the client in mind.

Outside organizations have the luxury of hiring mid- to high-level executives into their organization and can groom them to be the best leaders. For Homeboy, to have leaders who share the lived experiences and stories of those we serve – gang life, incarceration and trauma – we must prepare our people from the bottom up. They start as customers to transform their lives and, when ready, become frontline workers, followed by a series of supervisory jobs before moving into middle management. Once in middle management, they acquired a combination of positive leadership and some functional skills. However, going beyond middle management at Homeboy or any organization is about knowing how many other functional skills one can pick up along the way. When one becomes a senior leader, they function like a general manager. This is where the task becomes the greatest challenge, as it is partly about the motivation of the individual and the ability of the organization to provide such learning experiences.

Motivating our clients can be complicated. One of the ideas of our founders is that young people, who are stuck in the gang lifestyle, don’t see themselves living past 30. (That’s one of the reasons tougher sentencing laws don’t deter crime, because they don’t feel like their lives are going to last long anyway.) When they come to Homeboy to change their life, this is the first time they start dreaming and planning a long life. Once they complete our 18-month program, they rightly feel like they’ve accomplished something magical: “What’s next and how can I move up the corporate ladder?” is no longer so far from their thoughts. However, many just want to revel in the life they now have, “the good life”. I’ve had many conversations with interns taking that first step into management and they’re ecstatic and don’t even want to think about the next step. They are now a success for their children, their families, their friends and themselves.

Another aspect of developing a career is that you need to be aware of your “work flaws”. When our homies reach “the good life”, it’s after so much deep introspection to transform their lives, they avoid considering another level of introspection concerning life at work. This period of calm can last a few years. Then, for some, they start wanting more and developing more. When that time comes, we can start discussions about further developing business and managerial skills.

We have to keep in mind that the only organizational structure our peeps have known is the gang hierarchy, which is a very different structure from the grassroots-based nonprofit world and the corporate world of matrix organizations. In the world of gangs, the leader must make a call and everyone must follow and listen. When our insiders first become managers at Homeboy, they expect absolute authority, which rarely happens, and so a clash occurs. This can cause them to question their own worth or even stir up a desire to fire everyone. For them, realizing this issue and changing their own mindset usually takes time to overcome.

The final area of ​​challenge is organizational mundane things like emails, phone calls, and report writing. This is where Homeboy’s insiders struggle the most: they don’t see it as a priority, and some see it as “women’s work” and think it’s a waste of their talent. If they refuse to do so, it often becomes their biggest obstacle to career advancement. However, after a lot of “straight talk” type coaching, they come back and eventually come to a point of reconciling these issues.

Even with these challenges, we have wonderful managers who have overcome their obstacles and reached high leadership positions. The effort to develop the leadership team that is partly made up of leaders with family backgrounds requires time, money and, most importantly, a mindset that the entire organization must adopt.

From a broader societal perspective, I believe one of the key drivers will be how to lift more people out of poverty and into quality jobs that ensure growth on the economic ladder. It’s not enough to provide entry-level positions (usually at minimum wage), but work that leads to something more substantial. This would mean an over-investment in terms of developing people’s job skills while they work. A proactive approach for people of color with the same type of lived experience is to provide counseling, mentoring and coaching. I suspect that the same factors that present challenges for Homeboy will be the same factors that other organizations face when trying to really push people up the economic ladder. Our hard-won lessons should be a model for other organizations wishing to follow a similar path and work towards racial equity.


Written by Thomas Vozzo.

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Follow the latest news live on CEOWORLD magazine and get news updates from the United States and around the world. The opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of CEOWORLD magazine. Follow CEOWORLD magazine on Twitter and Facebook. For media inquiries, please contact: [email protected]

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Non profit living

Accountant who embezzled over $1 million from adoption agency sentenced to 4.5 years in prison

A former international adoption agency accountant who stole more than $1.6 million from her employer and her own family was sentenced to four and a half years in federal prison on Wednesday.

U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernandez said he believed the fraud lasted about eight years and involved multiple victims. He said he also considered the COVID-19 pandemic as a mitigating factor when determining his sentence.

Melodie Ann Eckland, 56, of Hillsboro, pleaded guilty to wire fraud, aggravated identity theft, filing a false tax return and willfully failing to collect or pay payroll taxes.

She was also ordered to pay more than $1.6 million in restitution.

The illegal scheme was uncovered in March 2018, when one of the owners of Journeys of the Heart adoption and surrogacy agency received a call from a Premier Community Bank representative requesting information on several company checks that had been presented for payment with a signature of the owner. which appeared to have been tampered with, prosecutors said.

Eckland stole funds directly from the adoption agency’s business account at the bank by using the Journeys of the Heart computer to make unauthorized wire transfers to his personal bank account in the United States and writing checks unauthorized to herself, according to prosecutors.

She also transferred unauthorized funds by computer as a “bonus” from the adoption agency’s bank account to her own bank account.

To hide his fraud, Eckland kept two separate QuickBooks files on the adoption agency’s computer.

To cover the money she had stolen, Eckland applied for loans from at least five loan agencies in the adoption agency’s name, using the agency owners’ names without their permission. Eckland altered the agency’s financial records to give the impression that she owned the agency and was authorized to enter into the loan agreements. As of 2016, Eckland stopped making the agency’s quarterly employment tax payments to the IRS and stopped filing employment tax returns. As a result, the agency owed more than $94,000 in overdue employment taxes.

In yet another cover-up, she transferred $123,900 she had stolen from an account belonging to her deceased brother-in-law’s estate to the adoption agency’s bank account by forging her husband’s signature , according to prosecutors.

Eckland, who worked as an accountant for the adoption agency from 2011 to April 2018, spent her flight money on gifts and living expenses for her adult children, trips to Hawaii, Mexico and Disney World, event tickets, groceries, household items and living expenses, prosecutors said.

As part of the plea agreement, Eckland admitted that the amount of loss she caused to the adoption agency, the owners of the agency, and the estate of her brother-in-law and IRS was over $1,565,000.

“The crimes committed by Melodie Eckland reveal an astonishing level of greed, deceit and callousness towards her victims. Eckland repeatedly victimized the adoption agency and its owners over seven long years, bleeding the organization nonprofit over $1 million,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Claire M. Fay wrote in a sentencing memo.

“The owners of the adoption agency are devastated by the accused’s embezzlement and identity theft. They have worked hard for 26 years to fulfill an important mission: to help children around the world find caring and loving families,” Fay wrote. “However, due to the theft, selfishness and greed of the defendant, the owners feel they can no longer continue financially with the adoption agency.”

Eckland, a mother of two and grandmother of three, began stealing from her employer because she was heavily in debt and felt pressured to support her children and grandchildren, the company’s attorney said. defense Jamie Kilberg. She used the stolen money for household expenses, retail expenses, family support, debts, some travel and repayment of stolen funds, Kilberg said.

Kilberg argued for a maximum sentence of three years, noting that Eckland has no criminal record, is unlikely to commit future crimes, is remorseful and is working hard to repay her victims.

“In my quest to take the financial burdens of my family on my shoulders, I have wronged others,” Eckland wrote to the judge. “It’s just not okay and it’s not the person I want to be. … I want to right my wrong, and I don’t feel like I have the opportunity to do that if I’m incarcerated… I promise to work every day to become a more honest and trustworthy person.

Appearing via video for her remote sentencing hearing, she apologized to her former employers, saying she felt regret and shame for betraying their trust and stealing from them.

“I know better and I should have done better,” she said.

–Maxine Bernstein

Email to [email protected]; 503-221-8212

Follow on Twitter @maxoregonian

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Non profit living

Volunteers wanted for the local nonprofit’s “Dinner Club” to feed terminally ill patients

Welcome Home of Chattanooga provides a community of hope, healing and compassion for those facing serious illness or death with a comfortable living space and family-like care.

Individuals, families and groups are currently providing dinner for residents of Welcome Home of Chattanooga. The love and compassion of the volunteers who provide the meals saves Welcome Home over $10,000 a year and helps residents feel welcome and someone cares.

As Welcome Home expands its reach and services in the Chattanooga area to help more residents, more volunteers will be needed. Volunteers can join the lunch club by contacting welcometochattanooga.org.

The organization’s dinner club allows families, churches and restaurants to bring a meal to residents one evening a month. As a result, almost every night of the month, Welcome Home hosts a Community Dinner which allows residents, staff and volunteers to eat together.

Due to the pandemic, adjustments have been made with the club dinner; many volunteers now drop off dinner or have dinner delivered. General manager Sherry Campbell says the dinner club started organically with a few volunteers providing meals a few nights a week. She says it has now become an essential part of their daily routine.

“We have all experienced loneliness and loss of connection, and it is important to know that we are part of a community larger than ourselves. There are people who care about us and love us. is what our dinner club is all about. We sit around the table, tell life stories, talk about our favorite bands and music, and tease each other. It’s about creating a camaraderie,” Campbell said.

Camaraderie is why volunteer Christie Petty got involved with Welcome Home of Chattanooga four years ago. “My whole family is in Ohio and my kids aren’t home. I’m a very outgoing person and love having the company of the residents,” Petty said.

She heard about the association through a resident who stopped by her work. “I believe God sent him to me. He told me he was staying at Welcome Home and told me everything the staff do for him. Then he told me he was terminally ill. I immediately went to the nonprofit to find a way to help. I don’t know who benefits more from this club, the residents or me.

She provides two meals a month.

Learn more about Welcome Home of Chattanooga:

Welcome Home of Chattanooga is expanding to eventually accommodate ten residents on Quiet Creek Trail. The second phase of the construction project will begin at the end of January. The project will cost around $500,000. If you would like to donate or volunteer to help with the expansion, you can do so online at welcometochattanooga.org.

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Non profit living

Rising adoption of DAO and NFT for just causes is a positive indicator: Raj Chowdhury

Blockchain, like every other technological innovation in history, was designed to improve the quality of life. Decentralization and peer-to-peer networking foster a spirit of collaboration and commitment to changing things for the better.

Raj Chowdhury, blockchain pioneer and founder of HashCash Consultants, foresees increased use of blockchain-based digital transformations for humanitarian, philanthropic and social purposes. Throughout 2021, decentralization has been key to the growth of DAOs, NFTs, the Metaverse, and the future Web 3.0.

Decentralized Autonomous Organizations, or DAOs, take full advantage of the lack of hierarchy by operating on coded smart contracts. Notable global examples involving the use of digital tokens and crowdfunding to make social and economic contributions include streaming projects, independent platforms, charities, and many more. A recent DAO project raised more than $40 million to acquire an early copy of the US Constitution at auction, despite being outbid by a private collector.

Chowdhury has a positive outlook on current market trends and the upcoming future. “Blockchain, like every other technological innovation in history, was designed to improve the quality of life. Decentralization and peer-to-peer networking foster a spirit of collaboration and commitment to changing things for the better,” he says in reference to the growing adoption of blockchain applications for non-profit purposes.

A global consciousness to make the world a better place brings together collectors and crypto enthusiasts. Projects have been launched to help fund cancer research, save the environment and fight poverty. Organizations like UNICEF and the American Red Cross accept donations of crypto assets.

“The growth of technological progress as well as the losses associated with the pandemic direct a collective force towards the social and economic betterment of people

Worldwide,” Chowdhury said.

American HashCash consultants led by Chowdhury have been involved in medicine and space research. Over the years, the company has been actively involved in projects boosting financial inclusion, low-cost remittances and COVID-19 vaccine distribution, as well as child labor prevention and business support/ African nonprofits with blockchain funding channels.

Blockchain innovations such as DAOs, Metaverse, and NFTs, touted as the next global game changers, already hold great promise for social, environmental, and financial betterment. The future can expect more philanthropic efforts and collaborations through charitable blockchain projects.

Raj Chowdhury is the Managing Director of HashCash Consultants and a Blockchain pioneer. Raj pioneered the first interbank implementation of blockchain technology trade finance and remittance transfers between two of the world’s largest banks. Raj is a prominent voice in the Blockchain and Cryptocurrency space and actively engages with policy makers in this area. He is a contributor to Economic Times, Business World, CNNMoney and advises industry leaders on Blockchain adoption. Raj had been a research associate at MIT’s Microsystems Technology Lab. He is a member of Asha Silicon Valley, a non-profit association committed to the education of children in emerging countries. Author of the book “The Dark Secret of the Silicon Valley”, Raj is an investor in blockchain and cryptocurrency companies and an active member of the philanthropic community.

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Holiness of Life Sunday: Practical Pro-Life Resources for Kentucky Baptists | Baptist life

Kentucky Baptist Convention churches across the Commonwealth will join other Southern Baptist churches across the country on Sunday in celebrating and affirming the sanctity of human life – that every person is made in the image of God. .

As you consider how your church can actively uphold the sanctity of life, explore these practical resources:

Q: I would like to partner with a local pregnancy center. How can I locate the closest one?

A: There are nearly 50 Pregnancy Support Centers located throughout Kentucky, and each depends on the financial, volunteer, and prayerful support of local churches. Visit kybaptist.org/pregnancy-resource-centers/ for a list.

Q: Members of my church are interested in sidewalk counseling at the nearest abortion clinic. Where can we train?

A: Speak For the Unborn equips local churches for holistic, gospel-centered pro-life ministry driven by love and seduction. They provide training to congregations interested in counseling women preparing to enter abortion clinics. Learn more at speakfortheunborn.com.

Q: I am unable to adopt or foster and my funds are limited. How can I serve orphans and foster families?

A: Orphan Care Alliance, a Louisville-based ministry that equips and connects Christians with opportunities to serve children in need, recruits believers to serve as life coaches for teens in Kentucky’s foster care system.

After completing orientation training, life coaches are paired with a teen and are expected to spend at least one hour with them once a week for a calendar year, sharing the love of Christ, setting goals, and offering encouragement. . Life coaches are the only unpaid adult in a foster child’s life, a role the Orphan Care Alliance describes as “integral.” Visit orphancarealliance.org for more information on their various ministries.

Q: Our church wants to support foster care and orphan care ministries. What organizations exist in the state?

A: The Baptist Convention of Kentucky is a longtime partner of Sunrise Children’s Services, a Christ-centered nonprofit organization that provides therapeutic foster care, therapeutic treatment, and community services to children in Kentucky. For more information on how you can partner with Sunrise, visit sunrise.org.

All God’s Children in Nicholasville also works with foster children in Kentucky. The Christian ministry offers counselling, daycare, independent living program and training for foster parents. Find out how to volunteer, pray and give on kyagc.org.

Q: There are women in our church who have had abortions, and we want to support them as they heal. Are there Bible studies or small group materials for post-abortion women?

A: Letting go of the secret is a study offering biblical healing to post-abortion women and is frequently used by pregnancy centers and local churches. Visit abandoningthesecret.com for more information.

SaveOne is a ministry offering help and healing to men, women and family members who have been affected by a past abortion. They offer training, small group studies, and resources for churches. Learn more at saveone.org/churches.

And Embrace Grace offers a program and training for churches to create support groups for women who have chosen life for an unplanned pregnancy. A KBC church has already successfully started an Embrace Grace group. Visit kissgrace.com for more details.

Q: What is KBC doing to equip churches for pro-life ministry?

A: The Kentucky Baptist Convention launched the Friends of Life Kentucky initiative to mobilize Kentucky Baptists to support pregnant women and advocate for unborn children.

While the initiative is still in development, churches can expect regional conferences, active support of a proposed pro-life constitutional amendment in Kentucky, and a survey of attitudes and perspectives that will shape the strategy. across the convention. Follow the ongoing initiative at friendsoflifeky.org.

Q: Where can I find updates on pro-life issues in Kentucky?

A: Subscribe to our newsletter, The Morning Briefing, for weekly articles on the most relevant pro-life issues here in the state.

From updates on pro-life legislation to monthly reports on the number of abortions to personal stories of families impacted by unplanned pregnancies, Kentucky Today is committed to providing coverage on abortion, the adoption, foster care and other pro-life topics.

Tessa Redmond reports on pro-life issues for Kentucky Today. She is a member of First Baptist Church in Taylorsville, Kentucky, where her husband serves as minister of music and youth.

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Non profit living

New CEO of Lawndale Christian Health Center tackles health inequities in the neighborhood where he grew up

NORTH LAWNDALE – The Lawndale Christian Health Center has appointed Pastor James Brooks as CEO of the community clinic.

Brooks was previously the chief administrator of the community health center ministry. Brooks was born and raised in Lawndale and is also senior pastor at Harmony Community Church, where his father previously served as senior pastor.

Her experiences growing up in North Lawndale and coping with challenges on the West Side “give me great perspective” on the health needs of the community, Brooks said.

“This experience has informed how I will lead going forward,” Brooks said.

Since the health center grew out of the Lawndale Christian Community Church in 1984, it has always been driven by a mission to uplift the West Side. Church members initially sought to establish the health center with the goal of improving long-standing health inequalities faced by people living on the West Side by making high-quality care affordable and accessible. to residents.

“It had very humble beginnings,” Brooks said. “We are integrated into the community. This means that our residents have access to us. Our mission is to share the love of Jesus by promoting wellness in Lawndale and our neighboring communities.

What began as a small clinic and basketball court for residents to exercise has grown into one of North Lawndale’s major flagship institutions. Lawndale Christian Health Center is a safety-net hospital that accepts sliding scale payments, and 40% of patients are uninsured. 75,000 people in the area rely on Lawndale Christian Health Center for primary care, Brooks said.

The nonprofit organization operates a state-of-the-art fitness center that residents can join for just $15, as well as multiple event spaces, a seniors’ center, pharmacy, eye clinic, and several satellite clinics in the West Side. The Lawndale Christian Health Center also runs a neighborhood’s only cafe, the Green Tomato Café, “where the community can gather and have a great meal,” Brook said.

Despite major advances in improving access to health care, people in the region still face huge health disparities. According to a 2015 report from Virginia Commonwealth University, residents of parts of the West Side have an average life expectancy 16 years lower than that of inner-city residents. This gap isn’t just due to shortcomings in clinical care, the study showed: it’s also due to social conditions, including disinvestment, segregation and a lack of grocery stores.

One of Brooks’ management priorities is to build community partnerships to improve the social conditions that lead to chronic health problems. Lawndale Christian Health Center is already engaged in such initiatives, such as its medication-assisted treatment programs to support recovery from opioid addiction and its partnerships with more than 20 shelters to serve homeless people, it said. he declares.

“We want to be a better collaborator and partner with organizations that are on the ground, trying to make a difference in the social determinants of health. When we look at violence, when we look at homelessness, transportation, we want to partner with those who have that role and come in as a health care provider,” Brooks said.

Brooks also intends to follow the mantra of Lawndale Christian Community Church founder, coach Wayne Gordon, who often said, “We are better together. The health center has worked with local churches on a campaign called One Lawndale which aims to unite the black community of North Lawndale with the Latino community of Little Village as part of the common social challenges facing each neighborhood.

“Our main campus borders both communities. As an anchor institution, we have a great opportunity to bring people together and break down the walls that divide us,” said Brooks.

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Non profit living

Haymarket sues Itasca over village rejection of drug rehab center

The Haymarket Center on Tuesday filed a federal discrimination complaint against the village of Itasca, claiming elected officials violated civil rights laws by denying the association’s request to open a center for the treatment and recovery of blood drug addiction in the county town of DuPage.

The lawsuit opens a new legal front in a two-and-a-half-year controversy over the project. After more than 35 public hearings, Itasca administrators unanimously rejected Haymarket’s proposal in November to turn a closed Holiday Inn into a 240-bed rehabilitation center.

The complaint describes the board’s decision as “intentionally discriminatory, arbitrary, capricious, baseless and unreasonable”. The lawsuit also names Mayor Jeffrey Pruyn, the Itasca Planning Commission, Itasca Fire Protection District, Itasca Elementary School District 10 and Superintendent Craig Benes as defendants.

The complaint alleges that officials violated the Fair Housing Act and other laws that give people with substance use disorders the same rights as people with disabilities.

Federal prosecutors have also launched a separate investigation to determine whether the village is in violation of anti-discrimination laws.

Village officials did not immediately return requests for comment.

From the start, Haymarket faced an uphill battle in his second attempt to deliver treatment services within DuPage to help fight the scourge of opioid addiction. In 2020, 112 people died from opioid overdoses at DuPage, a dismal record and a 17% increase from the 96 reported in 2019.

Almost four years ago, Haymarket, a Chicago-based supplier, was turned down an offer to start a 16-bed satellite program at Wheaton.

But Haymarket met strong resistance in Itasca.

Resident opposition group argued the facility would put a strain on police and fire emergency services, despite assurances from Haymarket that it would contract with a private ambulance supplier to manage, at a minimum, the basic resuscitation calls generated by the establishment. Haymarket has also committed to contract with an additional private ambulance company if required.

“The biggest barrier we face in tackling substance use disorders is stigma – it prevents those in need from getting treatment and hinders the availability of more life-saving treatment.” Haymarket President and CEO Dan Lustig said in a statement announcing the lawsuit. “Expanding immediate access to care for people with substance use disorders, regardless of their ability to pay, has been the mission of the Haymarket Center for over 46 years. We are committed to creating a full new treatment center in an area that faces a significant shortage of treatment beds and programs as the need for these services continues to increase.

Access Living, a disability rights organization, represents Haymarket in court. The group raised the issue of ADA compliance in a June 2020 letter to village prosecutors. Two attorneys for Access Living said Haymarket should have been allowed to apply for a special use permit to operate as a healthcare facility.

Instead, Itasca officials saw the project as a request for planned development, arguing that the proposed use of the property represented mixed residential and medical use.

“The intentional and orchestrated discriminatory conduct in key government entities in Itasca is designed to interfere with the rights of the Haymarket Center, the people with disabilities it serves and their families,” said Senior Counsel for Access Living, Mary Rosenberg, in a statement. “The concerted actions to delay and deny the functioning of the Haymarket Center healthcare facility have had and will continue to have devastating consequences for those in need of treatment for substance use disorders.”

The mayor of Itasca made his first detailed comments on Haymarket’s plans by reading a statement prepared before the board of directors voted against the project.

“At first it was clear that the potential financial burden from Haymarket would be heavy on Itasca,” said Pruyn.

There was also talk of soliciting state subsidies to ease the potential financial burden on the village. But the mayor said Itasca could not count on “unknown dollars”.

“It was clear to elected officials, county officials and local officials,” said Pruyn, “that one of the smaller communities was going to have to absorb 100% of the costs, risks, and burden of maintaining d ‘a facility that would accept residents beyond Itasca. “

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Non profit living

The Bronx fire is New York City’s deadliest blaze in decades


Credit…David Dee Delgado for The New York Times

Wesley Patterson was in the bathroom just before 11 a.m. on Sunday when his girlfriend knocked on the door to say she saw flames coming out of another unit.

It only took a few moments for the apartment to fill with smoke, said Mr Patterson, who has lived in the building for 20 years.

“We were just trying to breathe,” said Mr. Patterson, 28. He rushed with his girlfriend and brother, who lives with the couple, to a back window.

He tried to open it but the frame was so hot he burned his hands. When he opened the window he started yelling at the firefighters who were helping a family in the 3M apartment. Firefighters couldn’t reach them yet, he said.

Mr Patterson said he had to keep opening and closing the window to prevent smoke from entering as he called for help.

“I was screaming, ‘Please help me! Please come and get us! ‘ “, he said.

The family tried to open the door, but the apartment was flooded with more smoke.

“I was thinking about my son and wondering if I was ever going to see him again,” Mr. Patterson said.

It was around 11:20 a.m. Mr Patterson said he and his family were taken out of the window by the fire department.

“I’m glad we made it out safe and sound, but I still can’t believe that happened,” he said.

Dana Nicole Campbell, 47, was in a nearby park, working as a gardener for the city, when one of her four teenage children called to say smoke was entering their third-floor apartment. Ms Campbell said she told them to put wet towels at the foot of the door to prevent more smoke from entering the apartment and barricading itself inside the apartment.

Then she rushed to the building and arrived in time to see her children jump out of the third floor window. They landed on a mattress and garbage bags that people had put there as a makeshift landing pad. Ms Campbell later said she was grateful her children were unharmed.

“You can be here tomorrow with broken legs,” she said. “You can’t be here tomorrow with the smoke inhaling.”

Firefighters helped Cristal Diaz escape with his two aunts, aged 49 and 65, and three cousins, from their smoky apartment on the 15th floor. Ms Diaz, who left the Dominican Republic two years ago, only took her phone and ID with her when she left. “We don’t know what to do right now, and tomorrow I’m supposed to be working,” said Ms. Diaz, who works as a cashier. The family is currently staying with friends.

Ms Diaz said she was drinking coffee, as she does every morning when disaster struck.

“I thought, will this be the last time I have coffee with my family?” Ms. Diaz, 27, recalled, still in shock.

Members of the Wague family stood at the corner of Avenue Tiebout and Rue Folin, huddled together, some under blankets, after escaping from their third-floor apartment.

Mamadou Wague was awakened by one of his children. “I get up and there is smoke in the children’s rooms,” said Mr Wague, 47.

As the family rushed out of the apartment, one of Mr Wague’s children cried that their sister, Nafisha, 8, was missing. Mr Wague rushed to her bedroom and found her sitting on her bed screaming, he said. Mr. Wague grabbed her and ran out.

Ahouss Balima, 20, lived on the ninth floor of the building, with his three younger sisters and his parents. He and his family had fallen asleep on Sunday morning when he was awakened by the sound of someone crying for help.

Mr Balima went to wake his family and they rushed downstairs, only to be told by the firefighters on the 6th floor that they couldn’t come down any further because it was too dangerous.

After finally being rescued by firefighters, one of her sisters was rushed to hospital, and she was still in critical condition on Sunday evening.

By 3:30 p.m., the fire was under control and a slight odor of smoke persisted in the air. Several residents were standing nearby. Some wore sneakers, others wore winter coats, and a few had blankets wrapped around their shoulders. A few people huddled under nearby scaffolding to escape the biting wind. Several held their phones close to their faces to assure affected family members that they were alive.


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Non profit living

Susan Ann Lacy Obituary | Star Tribune


Lacy, Susan Ann December 3, 1945 January 3, 2022 Sweet and loving Susan, younger daughter of Isabel and Eugene Lacy, sister of Patrick, (Marilyn), Jean Ryberg, (Bernie), Jack, (Diane), Michael, Mary Cohea, (Kent), several nieces, nephews and cousins, passed away peacefully from complications from Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Susan loved going to church and was a member of St. Thomas the Apostle for over 70 years, attended Opportunity Partners for many years and her zest for life was working at JUUT Solon in downtown Minneapolis for 27 years. where she was much loved by all. and received awards and recognition for his service to the company. The employees there were all “Day Makers” and made Susan’s morning job so special. Living independently from the age of 50 and later receiving help from his REM care team. Susan moved to live at the Roseberry House group home, where she was once again loved and cared for. Special thanks to all the staff at Roseberry for their unwavering support to Susan and the wonderful team at the Guardian Angels Hospice who helped send Susan into the arms of her mother and father. Susan has had many Guardian Angels along the way helping her navigate life. Susan’s family is grateful to everyone we knew and those we didn’t know who took her under their wings and kept her safe. – Memorials can be sent to the Guardian Angels Hospice, Elk River, Minnesota, or any local non-profit charity of your choice. The memorial service will be announced in early spring.

Posted on January 9, 2022


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Non profit living

Live news: Rising staff absences in England over Christmas add pressure to NHS


Britain’s richest 10% own nearly half of all the country’s wealth, according to pre-pandemic data, even as inequality has remained stable for the 14 years leading up to March 2020.

A tenth of households held 43% between April 2018 and March 2020, data from the Office for National Statistics showed today, which revealed huge differences between income groups, ages and regions.

In contrast, the bottom half of the population held 9 percent. Wealth inequality as measured by the Gini coefficient, however, remained stable over the 14-year period, the ONS said.

The numbers are the most comprehensive set of data on the distribution of wealth, but exclude the period of the pandemic, when the total increased, separate data from the ONS showed.

The richest 1% of households hold more than £ 3.6million, compared to £ 15,400 or less for the bottom 10%.

There were striking differences in age, with the median wealth of those aged 55 below the statutory retirement age being around 25 times that of those aged 16 to 24.

The upper region was the South East, which has seen one of the fastest increases in average wealth since 2006. Its median wealth of £ 503,400 was about three times that of the North East, at £ 168,500. , the region with the lowest wealth. .

London has an average of £ 340,300, reflecting the lowest home ownership rate in the country, low participation in private pensions and declining median wealth in the last period. Still, he owns 15 percent of the wealth, possibly due to his higher real estate values.

The Gini coefficients, which measure inequalities, showed that London was the region with the most unequal distribution.


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Non profit living

Community hero: saving animals, a long-standing ambition for a resident of Ramona


Jeanne Cannon says she doesn’t feel like a hero, but she’s saved and trained enough animals over the years to deserve praise.

Now around 70, the longtime Ramona resident has spent 30 years saving animals, primarily for the non-profit Help for the Homeless Pets.

Cannon, a mother of three grown children, said she got involved with the organization after meeting its founder Bea Hoskins. Cannon was working at Ramona Animal Hospital when Hoskins brought a dog from Newfoundland for an exam.

“I loved him and adopted him,” said Cannon, who discovered she had a lot in common with Hoskins and formed a friendship that spanned 30 years. “Bea invests a lot of money and effort in the animals she takes in and she mainly welcomes dogs with special needs, small ones.”

Hoskins said the dog was one of two Newfoundlanders who were thrown from a van in front of her as she picked pomegranates on a property near Highland Valley Road.

“She is a true compassionate and caring friend who has never let me down,” Hoskins said of Cannon. “He’s someone you can count on in the worst of times. We have always leaned on each other’s shoulders. He’s someone you don’t meet every day.

In addition to saving animals in Ramona and neighboring communities, Hoskins has rescued dogs and cats as far as Siberia. Cannon has helped save stray animals in Mexico. Sometimes dogs with special needs that have been injured or abused are brought to the United States.

But these days, Cannon mostly gathers supplies due to health concerns.

Hoskins said Cannon was rewarded, along with the other volunteers, for working tirelessly and without pay.

“Every little money we have goes to animals,” said Hoskins, who founded Help for the Homeless Pets in Ramona in 1993. “We never hired any employees.”

Cannon said she always had an affinity for animals, even though her parents never had more than one small dog. As a girl, she played with a farm set instead of dolls.

“It’s always been in my blood from the start, even though I wasn’t raised that way,” she said.

By the time Cannon met Hoskins, she had already been living in Ramona for a decade with her husband, Jerry. While the couple were building their home in Ramona, they acquired a number of animals, including horses, pigs, sheep and chickens. By the time their house was built two years later, they had set up a whole farm.

“The animals just kept on multiplying and when we moved here to four acres we ended up taking things that people didn’t want anymore,” Cannon said. “My husband called them drive-bys. People were dropping off animals.

“We had pets and we did wildlife rescues for a while and had some exotics. Our barn was always full and we had a variety of things. I had lots of interesting wildlife including skunks and raccoons. These are animals that have improved and have for the most part been released. “

As their menagerie grew, local school children visited his home to take lessons on his animals. Cannon would teach them vocabulary words, such as the difference between nocturnal and daytime, and also how to care for animals and be responsible pet owners.

Hoskins said she felt blessed to have met Cannon and a few others who genuinely care about animals and can be counted on to help them. Even if it means getting up in the middle of the night to set a living trap for a lost or abandoned animal.

“The rewards are when these animals recover and trust people again,” Hoskins said. “Not all of them do. If we can find loving homes for them, that’s the rewarding part. These are the highlights. “

For a decade, Cannon also helped the San Diego Humane Society bring animals to nursing homes. Cannon told the elderly how she acquired the animals and how she took care of them.

When her daughter, Lisa, was 11 and involved in a 4-H club, she wanted to learn how to breed guide dog puppies. As Cannon learned more about training guide dogs, she became a leader. Thanks to Guide Dogs for the Blind, Inc. in San Rafael, Cannon took dog owners to stores and other places to teach them how to get dogs to behave in public.

She volunteered with guide dogs for the blind for 18 years. Lisa also continued to breed dogs with her husband after her marriage, and together the family has raised over 20 guide dogs.

In addition to his work with animals, Cannon has also contributed to other causes. One provided respite care to caregivers of terminally ill patients through the Elizabeth Hospice. Cannon said her 14 years volunteering with Elizabeth Hospice has been a rewarding experience.

One day, she met a woman at the checkout of a grocery store who told her about the Heart to Heart organization and its mission to help people in Romania who had lost their homes and jobs and were without food or clothes.

Cannon organized a clothes drive, recruiting local schools who held contests to see who could make the most clothes.

“The kids would get rid of last year’s wardrobe anyway,” Cannon recalls. “For a month, we put the clothes together and separated them into boys ‘and girls’ clothes, tops and bottoms, and approximate sizes. We put them in boxes of bananas that I continued to collect in grocery stores. “

Eventually, Cannon said they had enough clothing to fill a large storage unit. With financial help from the local wireless technology company Qualcomm, they put the clothes in a shipping container and shipped them to Romania.

“I have had many wonderful opportunities to live a life of love and I am blessed to have encountered these things,” said Cannon, noting that the first congregational church in Ramona that she attends has a motto of living a life of love. love life. “And that’s also my mission statement to be who I am. It suits us perfectly.

Over the years, Cannon has said that she has parted ways with many animals, but she still has four pigs, a few goats and alpacas, a llama, a deer, a miniature horse and an emu in addition to a few dogs and cats.

“If I was young and could live my life, that’s all I would do is continue to save animals that need a home,” she said, adding that she appreciates the help she receives from her husband. “This is my main reason for being, is to help animals and we have done a lot of it over the years.”

How to help

Anyone interested in helping Help for the Homeless Pets, a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit, can send donations to PO Box 1406, Ramona, CA 92065.

Animal adoptions are organized in conjunction with the AmazingDogs.org website at least twice a month at the Poway PetCoach store and at a private residence in Carlsbad, Hoskins said. Adoption event schedules are posted on the website.

For more information call 760-789-4483 or email [email protected]


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Non profit living

Clinic works tirelessly during pandemic to help impoverished patients


BRUNSWICK COUNTY (WWAY) – A local clinic run by volunteers is working to keep their patients and their community safe in the fight against COVID-19.

Studies show that people living in rural communities are twice as likely to die from COVID-19 as those living in metropolitan areas. The New Hope Clinic offers free medical care, tests, vaccines and, yes, hope to anyone living below 150% of the poverty line in Brunswick County.

The New Hope Clinic serves between 500 and 600 residents of Brunswick County living below the poverty line and unable to afford health care. Dr. James Boston worked with the clinic for more than two decades, treating chronic illnesses of the uninsured until they were eligible for Medicare at age 65.

“If you have uncontrolled diabetes at 65, you can be on dialysis, you can be blind, you can have lost your limbs,” he said. “It is therefore important that those people who do not have access to health care have health care. “

The non-profit clinic is run by six staff members and over 100 medical volunteers who return because they care about their patients. During her years as CEO, Sheila Roberts says she has seen doctors and patients form special bonds here. For the most part, it is their only source of care.

“It’s really telling for some people who haven’t had certain experiences in life,” she said. “You just want to bring everyone home with you. “

Already a staple of health care in Brunswick County, when the pandemic hit, the New Hope Clinic was one of the first free clinics in North Carolina to get vaccinated. Boston remembers its patients being hesitant. During his years in the clinic, some were more willing to listen to him than other providers.

According to Boston, “Some people will trust above all if they have seen me for about a year, they might have some trust in what I’m trying to explain to them. But it is a process.

Feeling a responsibility to the community in which they volunteered, the staff spent endless hours educating and talking with the locals. They finally vaccinated more than 2,000 people in early 2021.

“From February to May, with a huge one, we called them Sheila’s Army,” said New Hope Pharmacy Director Hailey Murray, “but with lots of volunteers, we ran vaccination clinics on the car park.”

And although the pandemic has dried up many resources the nonprofit usually relied on and reduced the number of volunteers able to help, Murray said those who can…. do. Many continue to help in addition to their full-time health care jobs.

“Because we thought it was the right thing to do,” she explained. “And I think a lot of us during the pandemic had to do something to feel like we were helping instead ofto wring our hands. I feel very strongly that I need to be of service in my community. And that’s a great way for me to do it.


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Non profit living

Beloved Puerto Rican chocolatier Cortés opens ridiculously good restaurant in the Bronx


For nearly 93 years, the Cortés family have been making chocolate in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, creating a brand as well known on these islands as, say, Hershey’s is here in New York. Particularly famous for their hot chocolate, they opened their first restaurant in 2013 in Puerto Rico’s Old San Juan, an all-day cafe with an extensive menu of both savory and sweet.

Last week, after several pandemic delays involving the construction of the current building in which they reside, the family finally opened their second Chocobar Cort̩s, on Alexander Avenue in Mott Haven. Here they serve a mix of savory and sweet Рwith a menu that is suitable for breakfast, brunch, lunch, snacks, drinks (alcoholic and / or chocolate) or dessert Рand based on a feast that I had earlier this week in the friendly, vibrant space, this is one of the best new restaurants in town right now.

That Chocobar Cortés landed in the South Bronx is no accident. As Carlos Cortés, who runs the restaurant arm of the business, told Gothamist: “If you’re Puerto Rican or Dominican, you grew up with our chocolate. So for us it was important to come to where our food is. community in New York. I “I have lived here for 15 years and have seen how many quintessentially Puerto Rican or Dominican neighborhoods, like Williamsburg or the Lower East Side, have lost their essence due to gentrification. And so if Mott Haven is going to be the next frontier in terms of downtown expansion, it’s important for us to plant our flag and say, yes this neighborhood is going to change, but we the Puerto Rican and Dominican community are going. be included. We’re going to be a part of what this change will look like. “

The food here is great, and while almost everything on the menu has chocolate as an ingredient in one way or another, the inclusion is subtle most of the time. The Top Notch Chocoburger, for example, is a thickly textured, oily patty (eaten more like a meatball than a typical burger) topped with melted cheddar, onion, lettuce, and tomato, and served with a mixture of curly fries. The chocolatey part of the dish is in the ketchup, which is served on the side and is very good when spilled all over the rest of the plate.

The platters and sandwiches featuring steak, chicken, and roast pork are also light chocolatey, with a little cocoa in the meat. And one of the best things I ate involved no discernible chocolate, a Mallorca Iberica sandwich of salted serrano ham, a strong manchego and a layer of guava butter squeezed between the sweet bread of the same name Purto Rican, which the restaurant specially prepared by the local South Bronx bakery Il Forno. It’s a sensational comfort food.

Meanwhile, other dishes are extremely chocolatey. There’s Chocolate French Toast, Chocolate Vanilla Pancakes with Strawberry Marmalade, and a wonderful Chocolate Grilled Cheese Sandwich, which doesn’t hide any ingredients and is a must order. The chocolate-cheese combo is a sort of Cortés signature; their legendary hot chocolate comes in nine different varieties here – I’ve had the traditional Puertorriqueño – and each is served with a little chunk of cheddar on the side, which you drop into your drink like a lump of sugar.

The menu in the South Bronx is pretty much the same as what you’ll find in Old San Juan and was developed by Cortés business owner Ricardo De Obaldia. The secret weapon here, however, appears to be chef Maria Martinez, originally from Quebradillas, Puerto Rico, who had ten years of experience in New York kitchens before leading things on Alexander Avenue. She has a knack for balancing delicate blends in a way that gives everything a chance to shine. To give another example, his mangú, or mashed plantain, is superb, even buried under three eggs coulis, sprinkled with chorizo ​​and splashed with hot sauce. The food is fun, sure, but Martinez is a really good cook.

The space is divided into two rooms, the main dining room with a full bar to the right and a counter service store to the left with coffee and hot chocolate, a few pastries and lots of Chocobar products and provisions. Both are filled with specially commissioned works of art (“my family’s other passion,” as Cortés puts it), including pieces from their non-profit organization Fundación Cortés, like the framed images of the super -Afro-Puerto Rican comic book heroine, La Borinqueña, created by Bronx native Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez.

Read more: Meet La Borinqueña, the Puerto Rican superhero from New York

“The community here is amazing,” says Cortés, who lives a few blocks from the restaurant. “One of the perks of being here in the South Bronx is that everyone is thrilled to collaborate and help make this community something different and special. You can feel that commitment on so many different levels. whether it’s other businesses, local government, or all the folks who live here. I had grandmothers who came by asking me just so they could sing our jingle. They tell me : “Thank you so much for coming here, thank you for opening in the Bronx. I am going back to my childhood. ‘”

Chocobar Cortés is located at 141 Alexander Avenue at the corner of East 134th Street. To follow @chocobarcortesbx for hours, which are in flux right now. Dinner to come. Seating inside only for now. (718-841-9310; chocobarcortes.com)



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Non profit living

Obtaining results awards: a year in review


ORLANDO, Florida – Each week, as part of the News 6 Getting Results Award segment, we spotlight people in Central Florida who are going above and beyond and making a difference for their neighbors.

The people and how they chose to help were as diverse as the communities they served.

As this year draws to a close, we thought it was a great time to reflect on their stories and the moments that impacted so many people.

[TRENDING: Become a News 6 Insider (it’s free!)]

We started the year in Brevard County, where Brevard Mask Makers volunteer Marsha Plog made masks for students and the elderly.

A d

Mary Ann Laverty spent her days driving across the county, delivering supplies and finished masks to those in need.

“We have so many talented sewers and seamstresses in our community who were willing to help, but they had certain limitations,” Laverty said. “We have made over 35,000 masks that we have donated to the community and we continue to be strong. “

It might be hard to remember now, but at the time, the COVID-19 vaccine was just starting to become available and people were struggling to get appointments through online portals.

Linda and Richard Griffing, who are retirees, tried several times, but each day the date schedule was full before they could register.

“You were going to the site and you couldn’t get anything,” recalls Richard Griffing. “Suddenly all the appointments are gone. Boom, end of story, ”added Linda.

But Mary Steele used her spare time and computer skills to help those who couldn’t register.

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“I just hope if it was my mom someone would help her,” Steele said when asked why she spends most of her free time helping others.

We visited the Greenwood Place Assisted Living Center. Mary Ann Ball has written to us to congratulate the staff there for keeping her parents safe and in a good mood during COVID security protocols.

“One day it was raining and the staff was there with umbrellas saying that was what we were doing,” Ball said. “Our loved ones need to see family.

We met a school resources manager who is changing perceptions.

Assistant Brian Jensen has been the School Resources Manager at Mollie Ray Elementary School for the past three years and wins over students and their parents, one semester at a time.

A d

“Kids who when I started here didn’t even speak to me in large part because of my uniform,” Jensen recalls. “Now they come to see me every day. “

From the moment he arrived on campus, Jensen made it his mission to get involved. Netisha Thornelant’s parents learned about it. Thornelant nominated him for the News 6 Getting Results Award.

“Well I sent the email because I know Channel 6 comes at a price for results and with everything going on between police interactions, especially with minorities, I think Deputy Jensen is someone who provides that good example of police interaction with our youth. “

We met Jerry Vaughan, a veterans advocate who goes to great lengths to honor the last wills of the men and women who have served our country.

A d

Vaughan collects vintage uniforms as part of his Dover Detail project. Uniforms are used for veterans who wish to be buried in the uniforms they wore while on duty.

“One of the last things he did was ask me to find a uniform for him so that when he got out he could go out however he wanted,” Vaughan said as we watched him put on a uniform. the WWII Navy to decorate it. veteran Philip Bradstreet, who died at the age of 94.

We were there the day longtime children’s champion Linda Sutherland retired. Sutherland was Executive Director of the Healthy Start Coalition of Orange County for 20 years.

She was nominated by her colleague Jarred McCovery.

“We made the decision to name Linda, it was a no-brainer,” said McCovery. “She’s just accomplished so much during her tenure here, everything she’s done for families, it made perfect sense to nominate her for this award.”

A d

We showed you horseback therapy at Freedom Ride Stables in Orlando. Every day for almost 20 years, riders of all ages have climbed these magnificent giant creatures and become one with nature. Staff and customers are eagerly awaiting the new facilities a few miles away.

We have witnessed the friendship in the alleys of the Villages. The Special Friends Bowling Club meets weekly to provide activities and socialization for village residents with special needs.

Ray Kleczowski has been organizing the meetings for over 20 years.

“There are no faults here.” Kleczowski said, as dozens of people played, laughed and cheered around him. “This is how life should be. “

A d

We saw Paddle With A Purpose volunteers cleaning up our waterways. The organizer, JR Tanhgal, is a leader with several non-profit organizations in the region.

“I don’t think people realize the magnitude of what he does,” said volunteer Briona Jones. “The amount of money he raised for different organizations. “

We have featured several people who dedicate their time to help feed their neighbors. Mike Hayes took advantage of his restaurant experience and opened a non-profit kitchen called God’s Table.

Shereece Mitchell turned her knowledge of healthy eating and exercise into a drive-thru pantry called Butterfly Lifestyle.

A d

Kelli Marks started Backpack Buddies to help feed children in their Orange City community.

And Deryl Ames helped build and stock a small pantry in his St. Cloud neighborhood.

Finally, with a new year upon us and hope for the future, we saw a special group of volunteers remember the service members we lost in 2021.

Volunteers from the Cape Canaveral Ladies were on hand for every funeral at Cape Canaveral National Cemetery while no other friends or family could attend.

A d

“There are times when I’m here where some of these services touch me and I find myself in tears,” Debra Griffin, president of the Cape Canaveral Ladies, told us.

The coming year will certainly have more surprises in store for you, but as we have seen, your neighbors never fail to “get results” and we will be there to share them with you.

If you know someone “Getting Results”, use the form below to let us know. You may see them featured in the coming weeks.

Copyright 2021 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All rights reserved.


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Non profit living

A sober living house that closes its doors after decades of service | News


After providing homes for thousands of people with no place to go for more than 20 years, Griffin’s Gate in east Bakersfield will soon be closing.

The understated residential house, which the nonprofit Casa de Amigos has operated on a historic property on Monterey Street since 1999, will close on Friday. Its founders say providing the service has become unaffordable as funding has dried up.

“It’s a little bittersweet,” said Jack Hendrix, who founded Griffin’s Gate with his adopted son Pepe after retiring as a teacher at East Bakersfield High School. “That was the difficult part of the decision to close the doors because there were still people who needed this place, but we can’t provide it anymore just because we don’t have the money. “

Griffin’s Gate served as a place of refuge for people with addiction and mental health issues, parolees, and people who needed medical attention after a hospital stay but lacked a place to receive this care. The association has used contracts with organizations like Kern Behavioral Health and Kern Medical Center to stay afloat, but organizers now say those contracts are no longer available.

At a time when homelessness appears to be at its peak in Kern County history, the community is losing one of the few places ready to welcome people.

“We have helped a lot of people in the community,” said Pepe. “I am sad that we are closing. I really like this kind of work.

One of the people Griffin’s Gate has helped is Hal Joyner. Around 2002, he was addicted to methamphetamine and on his way to jail. Instead, he ended up staying on the Monterey Street estate for three years as he got his life back on track.

He now occupies the position of house manager, a position which will expire at the end of the year.

“I made a lot of good friends,” he said. “I am still friends with a lot of them. I watched the changes he made in people’s lives.

Reyes Gamino, one of the last residents of the house, reflected on his stay at Griffin’s Gate on Monday afternoon.

“I feel good here,” he said. “I’m still pretty young and I don’t like to be a burden on anyone. Here I can still live a semi-normal life.

Gamino first stayed on the property in 2019 after being hospitalized with complications from congenital heart disease. After leaving the county, he returned after his ex-wife died of coronavirus last month.

He is now looking for a place to live with his children and will be allowed to stay on the property until he is successful.

“To find real hearts like that is difficult,” he said of the Griffin’s Gate operators. “It’s more of a house than anything else.”

The home is known for much more than its work with the homeless and disadvantaged. Built in the late 1800s by a major Italian immigrant, it is known as one of the oldest houses in Kern County.

Hendrix plans to rent the house to tenants until he decides to sell the property. He said he started the house to provide him with an activity when he retired, and since he wasn’t golfing it was the right thing to do.

It’s been over 20 years since the doors to this historic home were opened for charity, and after such a long time it can be hard to know what to do next.

“People were like, ‘Why are you wasting your time with these people? They’ll never do anything, ”Hendrix said. “I have always been an optimist. I felt like people needed a chance sometimes. They needed a place to rise.

He described the closure as frustrating and fondly recalled the time he spent leading the operation.

“Over the years,” he added, “we’ve had a lot of people come and see if we’re still here and tell us they’re grateful to have a place to be.”

You can reach Sam Morgen at 661-395-7415. You can also follow him on Twitter @smorgenTBC.


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Non profit living

‘Insecure’ plus: HBO comedy leaves with satisfying confidence


We carry a common set of expectations in the series finals, and “Insecure” co-creator Issa Rae can’t resist them. As she ends our time with her alter ego Issa Dee, Rae ticks several boxes on the bingo card closer to the Universal Series – answering lingering questions, delivering happy endings, tying bows on wishes.

But it’s all part of the larger meaning of Rae and his characters Issa (Rae), Molly (Yvonne Orji), Tiffany (Amanda Seales) and Kelli (Natasha Rothwell) arriving at this finish line. If the farewell of every great show can be summed up with a succinct moral, this invites us to look back not with nostalgia for what might have been, but with total appreciation.

Moreover, each episode title of “Insecure” answers a question. How are Issa and Molly, asks the pilot? “Insecure as f ** k.” So it goes through the second season of “Hella” (“Hella Great”, “Hella Shook”) and the omnipresent ambience of uncertainty of the third, captured in titles such as “Better-Like” and “Ready-Like “, describing how 30-year-old life generally feels like one sets a course by their ambitions.

RELATED: We’re Not Ready To Give Up On “Insecure”

It involves seeing a lot of goals and directions, but not quite getting to where you want to be when you expect it to be. It was the greatest story in Issa’s life and that of Molly’s. If you identify with this show, you know it. Season 4, “Lowkey” season (with episode titles such as “Lowkey Distant”, “Lowkey Done” and “Lowkey Lost”) expresses the latent frustration and resentment of being stuck on a set, the genre that can make best friends match up against each other… or propel us to a new place.

This explains the decisive “Okay ?!” complete every fifth title of the season. Each reads in different ways depending on the tenor of that week’s story, expressing everything from frustration (“Failure, okay ?!”) to resignation (“Choice, okay ?!”) “).

By announcing “Everything Gonna Be, okay? The finale reassures its audience – and Issa, who chats with the personal mirror at the start of the 41-minute episode and sighs, “I just want to quickly move forward to the part of my life where everything is fine.” Trust the title.

“Insecure” ends on its own terms, an unsecured victory on television and certainly not with shows centered on non-white actors and characters (a truth that “Insecure” co-creator Larry Wilmore can attest to). We take for granted the praise and status this one has earned over his breathtaking five seasons – a coat that Rae, along with showrunner Prentice Penny and everyone else in his cast, wear with a pride lacking in arrogance.

Certainly, “Insecure” paved the way for shows like Amazon’s “Harlem” and Starz’s “Run the World”. But “Living Single”, the ’90s Fox sitcom, which followed six friends living in Brooklyn Brownstone before “Friends.” Deprived of the level of promotion received by its Warner Bros. counterpart, it was canceled at the end of a curtailed season in 1998 despite its continued popularity with black audiences.

Another “Insecure” predecessor, “Girlfriends”, ended in 2008 without their quartet receiving their farewell flowers. So if Rae, who wrote the Penny-directed finale, places Issa in a classic two-princes contest between Lawrence (Jay Ellis) and Nathan (Kendrick Sampson), recognize that this is the making of a moment that black characters, actors and writers don’t usually appear on television.

It is also the creator of Issa Dee and Molly Carter who grants the wishes expressed by these best friends in the very first episode. Take note of this. The last few seasons of our favorite shows usually inspire a full rewind of the series, which many “Insecure” fans did regularly anyway. But to fully savor the end of the show, which is satisfying in itself, just revisit the series premiere.

That was only five years ago, but five years ago it was a lifetime, a feeling that Rae and Penny play with throughout the conclusion. The first features Issa when she is 29 and working for “We Got Y’all”, the archetypal nonprofit dedicated to serving a segment of the population that its founder and staff do not understand.

Issa is the only black person working there and Molly is in the same situation in her law firm. And it’s one of the freeway markers we can use to measure how far their stories and the show itself have traveled since 2016.

When “Insecure” first launched, producers believed it was essential to feature white characters in shows that focused on black stories to broaden their audiences. But “Insecure” didn’t lose its white audience when the show dropped its white characters after Issa and Molly quit their old jobs. In 2018, Rae confirmed at an event in Cannes that the show’s audience was 62% white.

And that shouldn’t be surprising. All great shows speak to everyone. This one offers reassurance and reassurance about the challenges of thriving in our 30s, when many of us are still figuring out what we want to do and how we want to live as we sink deeper into the midst of careers. in which we may not have imagined ourselves. . Aspiring to be unique, and better, is an ideal that “Insecure” defends and which also appeals to American history.


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The show differs from the above by representing this philosophy through visions of black excellence as uniqueness. This is expressed through her avant-garde fashion sense, her hairstyle play, hazy and alluring music, featuring tracks from emerging artists, and the dreamy visual style established by executive producer Melina Matsoukas, who set the tone by directing much of its first season and episodes of the second season.

We see it in its distribution, of course; “Insecure” raised the profile of all of its stars, introducing Orji and Seales to a wider audience and pulling Rothwell’s enormous talent out of the writers’ room to give him one of the funniest roles on television. (She’s also one of the highlights of the limited series “The White Lotus.”) And we witness it in Rae’s meteoric rise to become one of Hollywood’s most sought-after talents, both as an actor and producer.

The questions this show asks at the start are the same ones Issa, Molly, and their loved ones carry with them five years later, and into the future, as many of us do. Issa has always been able to answer some of those questions that had once blocked her.

“How different would my life be if I was really looking for what I wanted?” She asks hypothetically in front of an elementary school class during the series premiere. In turn, the children make her feel small with their inquiries: “Is that what you always wanted to do?” “Are you single?” “Why aren’t you married? “

From there, Issa and Molly continue to question everything about their careers, their love lives, each other. “Where are we going?” “Are we here?” »« Am I official? ”

It goes “Everything is going to be, okay ?!” the correct final answer as well as a statement of determination and confidence – not just for the characters but for everyone watching.

“You’ve gone from We Got Y’all to ‘I have mine’,” one of Issa’s relatives told him, marveling at how far we’ve come and perhaps reminding us to appreciate our own travels around the world. ‘uncertainty. And that ensures that this show will keep talking to us long after we’ve gone our separate ways.

The “Insecure” series finale airs Sunday, December 26 at 10 p.m. on HBO. All episodes air on HBO Max, which premieres the behind-the-scenes documentary “Insecure: The End” on Sunday, December 26.

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Non profit living

Pastor Monroe’s work to help underserved creates believers


Pastor Heather Boone once dubbed a campaign to buy a larger church for her growing community mission the “Miracle on Second Street,” and some say the title still applies to the neighborhood she remodeled. to help the under-served.

Oaks Village, a Monroe nonprofit that serves thousands of struggling residents each year, and its dynamic leader have drawn attention to their attention even on the little things that can change lives, from products to clothing to ‘interview. Boone recently won USA Today’s Best of Humankind Awards, and that award made her even more determined to serve.

If his mission was not simple, the way forward is now.

“We just want the world to know what we’re doing in this little corner,” Boone said. “And we hope others will replicate what we do.”

His victory caught the national attention of Boone and his team. She said this would only amplify their mission and broad reach in Oaks Village, with its grocery store, daycare, tutoring, addiction recovery, health clinic and more.

“She’s a great woman,” said Robert Tucker, a former resident of the Oaks shelter who now works there. “… This is not a job for her. It’s his life. “

The program had humble beginnings, with twists and turns and miracles reflecting the scriptures she often shares for inspiration.

Boone grew up in Detroit, where the 45-year-old said she was “a very bad teenager.”

Through a religious awakening and conversion at the age of 20, Boone joined the African Methodist Episcopal Church, met her husband, Britton, and became a youth pastor.

“Once I found God, I wanted to help other young people not to go through all the trials I went through,” she said.

Over a decade ago, Boone was assigned to lead a small congregation in Monroe. The denomination leaders wanted to relocate her after three years, “but I really felt that God had called us here,” she said. “My husband and I made the decision to start our own ministry. “

Inspired by a Bible passage referring to God’s people, the couple launched Oaks of Righteousness in 2012, meeting for the first time at a community center and school. The following year, they bought a building that once housed a Salvation Army church, which also housed shelter for the homeless during the colder months, Boone said.

The first winter drew over 90 people and convinced the Boones to establish a year-round facility. Guided by prayer, they moved into space while working to raise enough money to do so.

Then came what they called a divine turn of events which brought forth an abundance of blessings.

Learning that the Archdiocese of Detroit was selling the nearby St. Joseph’s Church, which had several buildings, Boone embarked on a “Miracle on 2nd Street” fundraising campaign. Supporters raised over $ 320,000 purchase the property in 2016, which paved the way for upgrading the shelter as well as expanding or creating initiatives under the umbrella of Oaks Village.

Today the shelter has 75 beds, with separate floors for men, women and families. Clients are offered help finding housing, recovering from drug addiction and more.

Among them is Eric Uselton, who recently moved there after meeting Britton Boone on the job. He said he lived in a motel in Detroit and spent hundreds of dollars a day on drug addiction.

This month, Uselton marked 35 days of abstinence. Before heading back to a bunk bed one recent night after volunteering to install spotlights outside, he praised the Boones and their work which he calls transformative.

“If I had stayed where I was, I would have ended up in jail or dead,” Uselton said. “They have their hearts in the right place and they do it for the right reasons. They don’t do it to get credit or anything like that. They do it because they are Christians and want to help.

News of this aid regularly draws hundreds of visitors to the mostly volunteer-run “campus” as well as numerous partnerships.

Boone has seen a growing need since the COVID-19 pandemic.

The US Census Bureau estimates that 9.7% of Monroe County residents live in poverty. According to the website of the national network of food banks Feeding America, the county has a food insecurity rate of about 11.9%.

Boone estimates that Oaks Village, which has an emergency pantry, summer lunch cafe and soup kitchen, serves up to 10,000 meals each year.

The donated items come from supporters such as David Voggenreiter, 16, who arrived with his father on Monday to unload canned goods, bread and other items.

The Monroe County Middle College student discovered the site while preparing for a civic engagement project and immediately decided to contribute. “It feels good to be able to help people,” Voggenreiter said.

This is the objective of the association, which also has a “clothes closet” full of accessories, toiletries and free household items as well as a free health clinic which has opened its doors. doors in 2019.

The clinic is run by medical staff from the ProMedica health system and dedicated volunteers such as Sandy Libstorff, a retired registered nurse who first met Boone after helping deliver a patient living at the homeless shelter. -shelter.

Much of their work is now focused on COVID-19 testing, Libstorff said, as well as on patients who “have had bad experiences with mainstream medical care and are suspicious”.

Noting that some patients have reported diabetes or high blood pressure and cholesterol without any transportation to reach fresh food, Boone and his team worked to acquire an old party store shortly before Christmas 2020 and turn it into one. neighborhood market with fresh produce.

Village Market opened this year through a partnership with Meijer, which supplies the products.

“Pastor Boone’s unique approach to bringing fresh food to an underserved community was compelling to us, and something we were delighted to support,” said Frank Guglielmi, senior director of corporate communications at Meijer.

The store participates in a state program that allows EBT / Bridge card users to ‘double’ their fruit and vegetable purchases and is a partner in the special federally funded supplemental nutrition program for women, infants and children. children. He also owns a cosmetics business, tutoring space, and products from a local independent dairy.

All of this “means access to the community,” Boone said as he stood in an aisle wearing a black shirt emblazoned with the words “Be kind.”

“We understand that we don’t have everything because we are still a very small store. But when you don’t have transportation, you can get the things you need.

Recognizing a need for some residents of the shelter and others in the neighborhood looking for work sparked another business. Acorn Children’s Village, which opened last year in a donated building renovated through an Art Van charity challenge that raised over $ 50,000, offers free, low-cost child care for children. children up to 5 years old.

It’s licensed for over 30 kids who “love to learn and grow with us,” said Becky McCollum-McCrea, who helped start the installation and working on it.

The longtime educator argues that the long waitlist for his classrooms is a testament to the community’s need and Boone’s vision.

“She has a genuine love for people, and I’ve seen miracles happen because of her,” McCollum-McCrea said. “In my entire life of involvement in the church, I have never seen anything like this happen. I just feel like God is giving him ideas on what is needed or what to do and before long it will come true.

This prompted Libstorff to nominate Boone to the USA Today competition, which recognizes “everyday people who have demonstrated the highest level of kindness, compassion and persistence,” her website said.

His nomination joined more than 600 others before an advisory committee selected the finalists and 72,000 votes were cast to determine the 11 winners.

In a ceremony broadcast live this month to announce the winners, NBC personality Jenna Bush Hager, daughter of former President George W. Bush, described Boone as “living a life of service.”

The accolade underscores the commitment of a pastor who is known to donate bedding if someone else needs it, Libstorff said. “She has dedicated her whole life to helping people. She is an incredible woman.

Tucker acknowledged his support for helping him quit drugs, embrace spirituality, and become a homeowner. “My fall has become a rise,” he said.

Kellie Vining, a member of Monroe City Council whose precinct includes the non-profit organization, said that “her generous spirit has rubbed off on a lot of people. She has a true pastor’s heart.”

Boone is now focused on the future. Amid her daily watch and long hours meeting with residents, she hopes to find support for a program to build affordable housing on plots near the market.

With her businesses making headlines, she gets calls from across the country to repeat the success.

“There is a role model we can give them,” Boone said. “It has been amazing because we want to be successful and multiply. “

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Non profit living

Three lives transformed through the healing power of tissue donation, plus 27 tissue donors who have helped heal thousands of lives to be part of the Donate Life 2022, “Courage to Hope” Rose Parade float


Honoree’s Stories Highlight the Life-Changing Power of Cornea, Skin, Bone, and Musculoskeletal Tissue Transplants, and the Saving Power of Organ Donation

LOS ANGELES, December 23, 2021– (BUSINESS WIRE) – Three men and women whose lives were saved and healed thanks to the generosity of others through donated corneas and tissue will be among the 54 participants in the Donate Life Rose Parade® on January 1, 2022 in Pasadena.

The 2022 Donate Life, “Courage to Hope” float is the centerpiece of a national effort to reach large audiences with the important message that organ, eye and tissue donation saves and heals lives. The three tissue recipients, as well as 27 floral portraits or floragraphies of cornea and tissue donors, represent the healing and transformative power of tissue donation.

Thanks to tissue donors, millions of people are healed each year and thousands of lives are saved. Tissue from a single donor can touch the lives of more than 75 people. Some of the tissues that can be donated include vital heart valves and skin grafts for burn survivors. Other tissues that are crucial in helping to heal and restore mobility include bone, ligament, and nerve allografts, among others.

Donate Life 2022 float tissue recipients include the following float riders:

Kim McMahon, a 63-year-old flight attendant whose involvement in organ, eye and tissue donation began when her 16-year-old son William suddenly needed a transplant. liver in 2004. Unfortunately, he passed away in 2005. Kim started a non-profit association. William Memorial Foundation to champion the cause of organ, eye, tissue and blood donation. In 2021, at the age of 63, Kim underwent eight-hour spinal fusion surgery, receiving donor bone to repair and strengthen her spine.

Chris Brown, a 36-year-old tissue recipient from Georgia. In March 2019, Chris’s right arm was traumatically amputated. A few months later, Chris began to suffer from chronic pain. Chris was referred to a neurosurgeon who explained that injured nerves from the amputation were the cause of the pain and recommended surgical repair of the nerves. During the procedure, Chris’s nerves were rebuilt by connecting them to nerves in his shoulder muscle. There were large gaps that had to be filled with donated tissue. Thanks to a gracious gift from a donor, Chris is back at work, back on the baseball field with his four children and living pain free.

Aliza Marlin, a 52-year-old New Yorker whose float participation is sponsored by CryoLife. Aliza’s journey with congenital heart disease and tissue donation began when she was diagnosed with aortic stenosis. She had her first open heart surgery at the age of 8, her second at 18 and her third at 27. In 2015, Aliza experienced overwhelming exhaustion. An emergency visit to his cardiologist confirmed endocarditis, an infection of the heart that required pulmonary valve replacement. Aliza received a heart valve from a young woman in New York City and is grateful to her family who, in the midst of their grief, chose life.

The Donate Life Rose Parade float, produced by OneLegacy, is made possible by more than 40 sponsors. The 2022 float will honor 54 participants, including 19 riders and walkers who are either living donors or recipients of organs and tissues.

The 2022 Donate Life float, “Courage to Hope”, features the majestic Winged Lion of Venice in Piazza San Marco or St. Mark’s Square in Italy, in the midst of the Venetian Gothic architecture of the Doge’s Palace or the Palazzo Ducale and quintessential Venetian gondolas and canals. As the world’s most visible campaign to inspire organ, eye and tissue donation, the Donate Life Rose Parade is calling on viewers to help more than one million people in need of organ transplants, eyes or tissues each year. Register today to become an organ, eye or tissue donor by visiting DonateLife.net.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211223005370/en/

Contacts

Ross Goldberg
818-597-8453, x-1
[email protected]

Tania Llavaneras
213-503-9285
[email protected]


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“The time is right” for COVID-19 vaccines, recalls, experts in retirement homes and care – News


(Credit: Wachiwit / Getty Images)

With the omicron COVID-19 variant in 73% of coronavirus cases and on the rise, the country is three weeks away from an increase that could potentially overwhelm the healthcare system. That’s why “now is the time” to get vaccinated – or get vaccinated – against the virus, to enter winter with maximum protection, public health and long-term care experts said Tuesday. .

The long-term care industry aims to vaccinate – or provide booster shots – to all eligible residents and staff by the end of 2021, said David Gifford, chief medical officer of the American Health Care Association / National Center for Assisted Living. . Gifford hosted a virtual town hall on Tuesday co-hosted by LeadingAge and AARP, to answer questions about the virus and vaccines for those who work or live in long-term care facilities.

Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary Admiral Rachel Levine, MD, has recommended diaper protection through vaccination, booster shots and masking to help contain the spread of COVID-19 and its variants.

“We never imagined the pandemic would last this long,” Levine said, adding that the aging service industry’s response to the pandemic has come at the cost of “great personal sacrifice.”

“But there is hope,” she said. “Unlike 2020, last winter, we have the power to protect ourselves.

Fully vaccinated and stimulated individuals have a 10-fold lower rate of obtaining COVID-19, showing that existing vaccines work against omicron, Levine said. The country averages over a million recalls a day, she said, but cases are doubling every two or three days as the omicron spreads across the country.

Natural immunity is not enough to protect individuals against omicron, Levine added.

“The boosters offer people optimal protection against this new variant,” she said. “Do not wait.”

Rogerson Communities President and CEO Walter Ramos, JD said the education provided by the Boston-based seniors’ residence nonprofit in 2020 has helped him achieve a rate of 90% vaccination in its communities. The organization is also approaching a 90% recall rate, he added.

Bringing in experts who “looked like the people who live and work in the facilities we manage and own”, as well as those who speak multiple languages ​​and understand the culture of each community, was important to build confidence in vaccines and reminders. . Ramos said.

“We take the time to meet people where they are,” he said. “I cannot stress enough how important it is for them to have a comfort level to receive the boosters.”

Rogerson has worked with pharmacies and local vendors to provide on-site vaccination clinics or off-site vaccine access to mobile residents and staff, Ramos said.

Levine said she is supporting an effort to get booster shots in the arms of all eligible people by the end of this year, to provide maximum protection for the coming winter. She referred to President Biden’s speech on Tuesday afternoon on the White House’s efforts to step up its fight against COVID-19, including increasing access to free tests, increasing the capacity of hospitals and working to obtain more shots.

“Now is the time,” Levine said. “We can’t give up because COVID-19 doesn’t stop.

“Staying one step ahead of the virus and protecting communities against COVID-19 with safe and effective vaccines and boosters is critical, especially in the context of the evolution of the virus and the new variant. omicron, ”she added.


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Non profit living

To open homeless shelters, NYC leaned on a landlord with a turbulent history


In addition to owning dozens of buildings used as shelters, Mr. Levitan has another steady source of income – he operates a for-profit maintenance business, Liberty One, which maintains several of his properties. In the building it bought in 2018 in College Point, Queens, the maintenance company received more than $ 800,000 in the past fiscal year – money that also comes from the city, according to the budget documents.

The city’s procurement rules require the nonprofit groups that run the shelters to control costs by soliciting at least three independent service offers. But in two cases – identified in an independent audit and a lease – Mr. Levitan asked nonprofit groups to use his business without bidding, the Times found.

Mr Levitan said there was “no requirement” for nonprofit groups to hire his company. However, Mr McGinn, the city’s spokesperson, said a review, conducted in response to questions from The Times, discovered such a provision in a group’s lease. He called the arrangement inappropriate and said it would be changed.

Mr Levitan also owns an extermination company used in at least one of the new shelters, according to city records and a company disclosure. When ants infested parts of the apartment building in the Mott Haven neighborhood of the Bronx, his company, Squash Exterifying, was called in to help.

Mr Levitan said he started the maintenance and extermination business to streamline operations and provide better services.

In the more than two decades he has been entangled in the machinery of homeless people in New York City, Mr. Levitan has been repeatedly accused of neglect and poor conditions in some of his buildings.

In 2014, elected officials fought against plans to open a permanent shelter in Elmhurst, Queens, at the former Pan American Hotel, which was owned by a limited liability company linked to Mr Levitan. Residents of that apartment building, which housed hundreds of homeless families, reported bedbug infestations, peeling lead paint and a lack of heating or hot water. The New York Daily News published a video, provided by tenants, of a growing horde of rats near a children’s playground.


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Non profit living

Celebration of five centenarians, all “young at heart”


According to Ellen Gordon, director of resident life at Kaplan, it was the biggest celebration of 100-year-old residents to date in the assisted living community run by the non-profit Chelsea Jewish Lifecare. She said the five people, who participate in daily recreational and social activities, are proof that the aging process can be a process of grace, dignity and humor.

“Each of them has something to teach us,” she said. “They are wonderful.”

At the party, guests of honor were seated at a circular table in the center of the room, surrounded by around 35 of their fellow citizens and staff. Each winner wore a special pin and either a tiara or a bow tie because, as Gordon said, “You are always ladies and gentlemen. “

Left to right: Thelma Taylor, 100, Marty Lawson, 101, and Leon Ditchek, 101. They are all members of the Century Club.
Suzanne Kreiter / Globe Staff

As guests enjoyed appetizers and a birthday cake, Gordon paid tribute to each winner: Taylor for her social commitment and daily exercise; Lawson for appreciating each generation, including the children he volunteered with at the on-site preschool before the pandemic; Ditchek for keeping up to date with the news while retaining his signature sense of humor; Morocco for giving back through volunteering; and Regis to live on his own terms.

Gordon then toasted champagne and sparkling apple cider. As the room filled with neighbors, friends and caregivers raised their glasses, she said, “God bless you and let all of us in this room take lessons from five of them on how to live well our life. life. Yours!”

Between kudos from his supporters, Ditchek said he was as surprised as anyone when he turned 101 on February 28. A native of New York and a World War II veteran, he moved to Kaplan Estates several years ago to be closer to his family in Ipswich.

“I lived on my own and didn’t eat very well,” said Ditchek, who enthusiastically maintained his habit of watching CNN in the assisted living facility. “All the food here is very good.”

In fact, Ditchek has said he’s especially happy to celebrate alongside Lawson, with whom he eats all three meals.

“Marty is a good man,” said Ditchek. “I am honored to be by his side.

“And I’m honored to be here with him,” said Lawson, a retired businessman who turned 101 on Nov. 9. “I never dreamed that I would be 100 years old. I thought 75 would be my limit. I think it’s very appropriate to draw attention to people who have turned 100 and over. ‘appreciate.

Taylor, who turned 100 on March 10, worked in retail and office administration until the age of 85. At Kaplan Estates, she enjoys all daily activities including arts and crafts, current events, and exercise classes.

“I’m lucky. It’s nice to be around people and keep busy, especially at this age,” she said.

“It’s wonderful to come together and see so many of us still active,” added Morrocco, a retired accountant and avid ballroom dancer turned card shark who celebrated her 101st birthday on August 10. The year before, her friends from the Peabody Senior Center, where she volunteered for nearly 30 years, arrived in a van adorned with a photo of Morocco to celebrate with her at Kaplan Estates.

Asked about her secret to longevity, the Moroccan replied: “Good Italian genes!

“You can either do something or sit down. I’d rather have a homework assignment, ”she added, joking that a kid 100“ sounded like 1000. And now I’m so old. Older, in fact!

Marblehead pianist Bill Sokolow closed the party with a performance of “Young at Heart,” after which he drew laughs and cheers for congratulating Regis on passing his age in the lyrics to the song “What if you had to survive until 105 / Look at all you ‘I’ll shoot from being alive.

“You beat the song by two years!” He said to a smiling Regis.

As the winners accepted balloons and plants to take back to their apartments, Morocco took one last look around.

“The party was amazing,” she said. “I am very grateful that I had this time to take advantage of it.”

Cindy Cantrell can be reached at [email protected].

Thelma Tayor, 100, tasted sparkling cider during the party.
Thelma Tayor, 100, tasted sparkling cider during the party. Suzanne Kreiter / Globe Staff
Kay Morrocco, 101, helps Rose Regis, 107, with her badge.  While there are differing opinions on why Century Club members live such long and independent lives, there is general agreement that they are proof that the aging process can be a process of aging. dignity, joy and humor.
Kay Morrocco, 101, helps Rose Regis, 107, with her badge. While there are differing opinions on why Century Club members live such long and independent lives, there is general agreement that they are proof that the aging process can be a process of aging. dignity, joy and humor.

Suzanne Kreiter / Globe Staff


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These rock stars to perform Lou Reed and Sex Pistols albums at concert to benefit mental health – Daily News


Since 2018, Jane’s Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro and Billy Idol guitarist Billy Morrison have joined forces to host an annual celebrity concert that raises funds for the nonprofit MusiCares to benefit mental health treatment.

The show, dubbed Above Ground, did not take place in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but will resume for its third installment on Monday, December 20 at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles. It will feature a host of special guest musicians including Corey Taylor, Slipknot frontman, Foo Fighters drummer Taylor Hawkins, Sugar Ray’s Mark McGrath, Jane’s Addiction Perry Farrell, singer Etty Lau Farrell, Idol rocker. and guitarist Steve Stevens and more.

“I missed it last year, because Billy and I fell in love with the cause, with the mission statement; we fell in love with the job and all the things that are needed to make this show happen, ”Navarro said in an interview with Zoom.

“It’s actually quite a different experience from our day jobs,” Morrison added on the same video call. “This kind of show is so different in terms of production, and when Dave said we fell in love with the job, it’s because he doesn’t show up and play ‘Jane Says’ or ‘Rebel Yell’ . We can do it with our eyes closed, but we really have to work on this show. “

  • Jane’s Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro (left), Ministry’s guitarist Al Jourgensen and Billy Idol Billy Morrison perform at the Above Ground benefit party for MusiCares at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles in 2019 (Photo by Jim Donnelly)

  • Jane’s Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro (left) performs with singer Juliette Lewis during the Above Ground benefit concert for MusiCares at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles in 2019 (Photo by Jim Donnelly)

  • Jane’s Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro (left) performs with Tenacious D frontman and actor Jack Black to benefit Above Ground for MusiCares at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles in 2019 (Photo by Jim Donnelly)

  • Each year, Jane’s Addiciton guitarist Dave Navarro (left) and Billy Idol guitarist Billy Morrison host Above Ground, a star-studded benefit concert that raises awareness and raises funds for mental health for MusiCares. This year’s event will take place on Monday, December 20 at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles.

Faithful to the tradition of choosing influential two-act musical releases – an American act and a British one – for the evening, the performers will cover all the songs in order from Lou Reed’s 1972 album “Transformer” and the Release of the Sex Pistols in 1977. “Don’t forget the bullshit, here are the Sex Pistols. “

In 2018, artists from the “Above Ground” lineup performed 1980s “Kings of the Wild Frontier” by Adam and the Ants and the eponymous 1967 album by The Velvet Underground and Nico. In 2019, they took on David Bowie’s 1972 “The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars” and the 1969 Stooge’s self-titled debut album.

“Every year we have to dive deep into these records and find parts that we maybe a little overlooked or missed when we just listened to them and we really dissect them and kind of go into the songs and doing that process is rewarding. , frustrating, distressing, ”said Navarro.

“And scary,” Morrison added, laughing. “Right before this interview, we go through the songs on the show and ask ourselves, ‘Are we doing something right? Is everything alright ?’ “

“It’s a little scary because we choose the albums that mean the most to us,” Navarro continued. “We want to render the greatest possible service to these albums. Therefore, there is no harsher criticism of our sound than Billy and I. Lots of bands do covers, and Billy and I are in a cover band called Royal Machines, but for Above Ground we tried our best not to just do our version of the songs, we try to get as close as possible. the sound of the album and it’s difficult.

Navarro said he chose Reed’s “Transformer” to play because “it was one of the most interesting and provocative albums I’ve ever heard.”

“If you listen to the lyrical content and the message Lou is talking about on this record and think about the climate today – but then you think about the climate when he wrote these things – that was light years ahead. on his time, “he said. noted. “He was basically saying these are people living their lives and doing well and just as complete and whole as you or me or anyone else.”

Morrison agrees.

“Hearing ‘Transform’ and someone singing about different sexualities, drugs and all that stuff affected me a lot,” Morrison added. “The other thing we’re trying to do with this show is play albums that you can’t go and listen to. We’re not going to play a Coldplay album. We love Coldplay, but they still exist. So we play albums that you can’t listen to live.

“The greatest album of all time for me – being British and being a teenager when it was released – is ‘Never Mind the Bollocks’,” Morrison continued. “It changed my life and I was very loud about it.”

The recipient of the evening, MusiCares, is an organization that provides funds and resources to workers in the music industry, and with so many of those people out of work and unable to tour or create over the past 18 In recent months, fundraising and efforts to encourage open talk about mental health is imperative, Navarro and Morrison agree.

“When we started this concept, it was before COVID and it was very necessary,” Morrison said. “Dave and I felt that we both suffered from trauma and mental health issues, but our philosophy is really very simple and it’s okay to ask for help. So if he and I can be really public about, listen, we’ve been there, we’ve been asking for help, and we’ve been very lucky to get some help, and we’re now living a loving life and fulfilling, so can you. It’s pre-COVID. Imagine the world now as we are? This message must be spread more than ever.

There’s also an on-site auction with artwork donated to raise more money by artists such as Morrison and Navarro, contemporary street artist Shepard Fairey, and Los Angeles-based graffiti artist Risk.

“I don’t know how we do this,” Navarro said with a laugh. “It’s not just us. It’s everyone who comes to perform and is part of it. Getting back to sanity, which is the most important aspect, at the end of the day here you are looking at two ex-junkies. It is therefore clear that we can overcome what causes suffering. “

Above ground 3

With: Billy Idol, Taylor Hawkins, Perry and Etty Farrell, Corey Taylor, Mark McGrath, Steve Stevens and more

When: 7 p.m. Monday, December 20

Or: Fonda Theater, Los Angeles

Tickets: $ 59.50 on AXS.com


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New famous free store | News, Sports, Jobs


MARQUETTE – The New Free Boutique is currently celebrating the fifth anniversary of its grand opening. It’s a small store with a big goal. A little story reveals how a group of determined organizers joined the community and enabled The New Free Store to supplement more than 1,175 families in need with some of the basic necessities of life.

In 2014, some members of a local church made a commitment to help community members who were experiencing financial difficulties. The group held a series of free clearance sales in the basement of their church, which soon became known as the “The free store”. The organizers have solicited donations from the community in order to be able to supplement the necessities of life for free as many people in financial difficulty as possible. The group worked tirelessly and formed an all-volunteer non-profit organization, renamed “The new free store.” In 2016, the store moved to a small apartment building in Harvey.

Adopt the philosophy: “In God’s economy, there is always enough” the store continues its mission of serving those who need it most with clothes, linens, towels, sheets, blankets and other lightly used items to help others lead healthier lives. New personal hygiene and housekeeping products are also distributed each month and are mainly purchased through grants from community organizations. All items in the store are free for registered participants.

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Craig Sincock to receive highest honor at Living Legends of Aviation Awards


Craig Sincock, Owner, President and CEO of Avfuel Corporation, will receive the Kenn Ricci Lifetime Aviation Entrepreneur Award 2022 at the 19th Annual Living Legends of Aviation Awards. The award is the highest honor awarded during the ceremony on January 21, 2022.

When Sincock, a passionate aviator with a keen business sense, acquired Avfuel 37 years ago, he sought to disrupt and reinvent the aviation fuel supply chain. His tenacity has led to Avfuel’s evolution from a regional fuel distributor to a leading global supplier of aviation fuel and full service, offering everything from refueling equipment and comprehensive training programs. , aviation insurance and sustainable development solutions.

Sincock has dedicated his career to shaping and supporting the aviation industry. In this capacity, he was instrumental in reinventing the role of fuel distributors. Its competing counterparts quickly followed its business model and the industry changed forever.

Under Sincock’s leadership and entrepreneurial vision, the Ann Arbor, Michigan-based company has grown rapidly on a global scale. Avfuel now operates in 149 countries and serves more than 5,500 air services with more than 3,000 refueling locations worldwide, including more than 650 Avfuel-branded FBOs. Today, Avfuel supports all sectors of aviation including FBOs, Airports, Commercial Operators and Helicopters, Airlines, Cargo / Freight, and the Military.

Sincock sees his business as a way to serve the community through philanthropic initiatives, including health research, flight and aviation medical training institutions, veterans organizations, and aviation scholarships. . Sincock is an ATP pilot who frequently flies Avfuel planes.

Illustrating Ricci’s energy, enthusiasm and success, Sincock will also be inducted into the prestigious “Living Legends of Aviation” – an elite group of remarkable people with extraordinary accomplishments in aviation and aerospace. The Legends have over 100 accomplished men and women in their ranks, including entrepreneurs, innovators, industry leaders, astronauts, record breaking, pilots turned celebrities and celebrities who became pilots. Legendary actor John Travolta is “the official ambassador of aviation”.

The 2022 Living Legends of Aviation Awards will be held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, honoring the new honorees of the year.

The Kiddie Hawk Air Academy, a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit, annually produces the Living Legends of Aviation Awards. Kiddie Hawk’s mission is to give children ages 4-7 their first flying lesson.


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As violence increases in Haiti, aid groups struggle to help


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FILE – People line up for food aid in Camp Perrin, Haiti on August 20, 2021, six days after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake struck the region. The United Nations agency estimates it needs $ 97 million to help 1 million people in Haiti next year. (AP Photo / Fernando Llano, file)

PA

A spike in violence has worsened hunger and poverty in Haiti while hampering aid organizations fighting these problems in a country whose government struggles to provide basic services.

Few aid workers are willing to speak publicly about the cuts – perhaps worried about drawing attention after the October kidnapping of 17 people from Ohio-based Christian Aid Ministries – 12 of whom remain hostages.

But several confirmed, without giving details, having sent personnel out of the country and having been forced to temporarily reduce aid operations.

Gang-related kidnappings and shootings have prevented aid groups from reaching parts of the capital, Port-au-Prince, and beyond where they had previously distributed food, water and equipment. ‘other commodities.

A severe fuel shortage also prevented agencies from operating at full capacity.

“It’s only getting worse in every way it can,” said Margarett Lubin, Haiti director for CORE, a US nonprofit organization.

“You see the situation deteriorating day by day, affecting life at all levels,” Lubin said, adding that aid organizations have gone into “survival mode”.

Few places in the world depend as much on aid groups as Haiti, a nation often referred to as “the republic of NGOs.” Billions of dollars in aid have flowed to hundreds – by some estimates several thousand – of aid groups even as government has become weaker and less efficient.

Shortly after the assassination of the president on July 7, Prime Minister Ariel Henry took charge of a country still struggling to regain political stability. Almost all seats in parliament are vacant and there is no specific date yet for a long-delayed election, although Henry has said he expects them early next year.

Less than ten elected representatives currently represent a country of more than 11 million inhabitants.

And in the streets, the gangs hold the power.

More than 460 kidnappings have been reported by the Haitian National Police so far this year, more than double what was reported last year, according to the United Nations Integrated Office in Haiti.

The agency said Haitians “live in hell under the yoke of armed gangs. Rapes, murders, thefts, armed robberies and kidnappings continue to be committed on a daily basis, on populations often left to their own devices in the disadvantaged and marginalized neighborhoods of Port-au-Prince and beyond.

The agency added: “Without being able to access these areas under gang control, we are far from knowing and measuring the extent of these abuses and what Haitians really experience on a daily basis …

“Humanitarian actors have also limited their interventions due to security risks for their staff and access problems,” he added.

Large organizations like the United Nations World Food Program have found other ways to help people, such as using barges rather than vulnerable trucks to transport goods from the capital to the southern region of Haiti. But small organizations do not always have such resources.

World Vision International, a California-based organization that helps children in Haiti, told The Associated Press it had moved at least 11 of the 320 employees due to the violence and was taking undisclosed safety measures for other members of the team. staff.

Water Mission, a South Carolina nonprofit, said it was considering moving to other parts of Haiti and said kidnappings and general violence had forced it to change its staffing plans. to ensure the safety of people.

“These issues sometimes cause a slowdown in progress in our ongoing work on the drinking water project,” the organization said. “However, we continue to work despite the temporary disruptions that occur.”

The difficulties arise at a time when calls for help multiply. A magnitude 7.2 earthquake in mid-August destroyed tens of thousands of homes and killed more than 2,200 people. The country is also struggling to cope with the recent arrival of more than 12,000 deported Haitians, the majority from the United States.

In addition, more than 20,000 people have fled their homes due to gang violence this year, according to UNICEF, many of whom are living in temporary shelters in extremely unsanitary conditions and the pandemic. The United Nations agency estimates it needs $ 97 million to help 1 million people in Haiti next year.

Among them, Martin Jean Junior, a fifty-something who sold scrap metal. He said his house was burnt down in mid-June amid fighting between police and gangs.

“I’ve been on the street ever since,” he said as he lay on a blue sheet he had spread out on the hard floor of a school in Port-au-Prince temporarily converted into a shelter.

Things could soon get worse: A prominent gang leader warned Haitians this week to avoid the besieged community of Martissant, as rival gangs will fight each other in the coming days.

“Even dogs and rats will not be saved. Anything that moves, trucks, motorcycles, people, will be considered an ally of Ti-Bois, ”the gang leader known as“ Izo ”said in a video, referring to a rival gang. “Martissant is declared a combat zone, and those who ignore this warning will pay with their lives.” “

Most are already avoiding the area for fear of being kidnapped, shot, or having their cargo looted. This largely cut off the southern peninsula from the country because the main road runs through the neighborhood.

Among those recently killed by crossfire in Martissant include a nurse, a 7-year-old girl and at least five passengers on a public bus. Violence forced aid group Médecins Sans Frontières in August to close an emergency clinic that had served the community for 15 years.

Liman Pierre, a 40-year-old mechanic, said he had recently had to drive through Martissant to get to work and saw four dead, including two elderly neighbors and the biker carrying them.

“Criminals kill with impunity and leave the dead to dogs,” he said. Those who are not devoured by dogs are set on fire, outright. It cannot be.

For the moment, Pierre is sleeping in the streets of Port-au-Prince because he fears having to cross Martissant to get home: “We don’t even have the opportunity to visit relatives and friends in difficulty.

“The state does not exist,” says Pierre. “Criminals have been in power for over six months. It is December and we do not see the light at the end of the tunnel.


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Live With This Herbal Recipe From Youth Health Advocate Haile Thomas – Food Tank


At each age, Haile Thomas’ life has revolved around nutritious food. Her Jamaican immigrant mother taught her how to cook when she was five, and three years later, when her father was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, her family turned their diet and lifestyle into a nurturing center and restorative food. When Thomas was 12, she founded The organization HAPPY, a non-profit organization that promotes the mental and physical well-being of young people by developing knowledge about diet and self-advocacy. At 17, she was the youngest certified integrative health coach in the United States. With her messages of healthy eating and youth empowerment, she has appeared in the White House, at Food tank tops, and in the national media.

And last year she published a cookbook-slash-empowerment-manifesto, Live alive, which was nominated for an NAACP Image Award. In addition to the more than 80 herbal recipes, his book opens with a series of essays on his upbringing, how we are shaped by what we consume and Thomas’s seven “Power Points”. From wellness and relationships, to education, creativity and community, and conversations with young women who embody these principles, Thomas breaks down the components of a lively life. And as one of the essays notes, the book is meant to be interactive – “a place where food stains and deep thoughts can coexist!” She writes – so there are journal pages and writing prompts to encourage thought and action.

“We really want [youth] see food and cooking as something that can really permeate their daily life and be something super fun and accessible ”, Thomas told Food Tank President Danielle Nierenberg at the Food Tank Summit 2018.

For our third monthly cookbook series, Food Tank is excited to share Thomas’ recipe for Red Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Chimichurri Sauce. If you missed the first few installments of our cookbook series, we’ve featured two recipes from Jubilee, Toni Tipton-Martin’s award-winning exploration of hundreds of years of black cuisine, and a selection of fall recipes from Beth Dooley’s local and seasonal cookbook The lively cuisine. Make sure to grab these recipes, but first, join us as we cook and live a busy life with Haile Thomas!

And one more thing: when you cook this recipe at home, let us know! Tag us on social media @FoodTank or #FoodTank so we can admire your meals and share your photos.

* * * * *

Red roasted cauliflower steaks with chimichurri sauce

Makes 4 servings

Knowing how to season and roast a good cauliflower steak is essential at home, so I pass this favorite recipe on to you! Due to the neutral flavor of cauliflower, it’s a great canvas for spices and sauces that really pop. Serve with your favorite vegetables and grains!

—Haile Thomas, Living Lively: 80 Herbal Recipes To Activate Your Power And Nurture Your Potential

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER

  • 1 tablespoon of garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon of paprika
  • 1 tablespoon of dried thyme
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 medium cauliflower, cut through the core into four slices about ½ inch thick
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil

CHIMICHURRI SAUCE

  • ½ cup of fresh cilantro, leaves and stems
  • ½ cup of fresh parsley, leaves and stems
  • ¼ cup fresh basil leaves
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • Kosher salt

1. To roast the cauliflower: Preheat the oven to 425 ° F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. In a medium bowl, combine garlic powder, paprika, thyme, cayenne pepper and salt to taste.

3. Arrange the cauliflower “steaks” on the prepared baking sheet and drizzle with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Sprinkle the herb and spice mixture evenly on both sides of each cauliflower steak. Drizzle the cauliflower steaks with the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil.

4. Roast for 20 to 25 minutes, until the cauliflower is golden and crisp on top.

5. Meanwhile, to make the chimichurri sauce: In a food processor, combine the cilantro, parsley, basil, garlic, olive oil, vinegar and salt to taste and mix until smooth consistency. Put aside.

6. Drizzle the steaks with the chimichurri sauce and serve.

From LIVING LIVELY by Haile Thomas Copyright © 2020 by Haile Thomas. Reprinted with permission from William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

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For the first time in decades, earnings grow faster for low-wage workers


Abramson pays his employees at ECI stores about $ 3 more per hour than they were two years ago, and now offers a pension plan. The bump doesn’t just keep its businesses on staff, it attracts better employees, including some who have been exhausted by stressful jobs in education and healthcare. “As a company that is surviving the pandemic,” he said, “we are more adaptable now. “

In the past year, the lowest-paid workers have seen their incomes rise by around 8%, according to a new To analyse by Arindrajit Dube, economist at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. While 5.5% of this gain was absorbed by inflation, those in the bottom third of the salary scale (taking into account occupation and worker demographics) saw their incomes rise in average, while in the top 70% they declined. .

Over the summer, for example, those earning $ 15 an hour saw their wages increase by about 1%, which explains inflation, while incomes fell by 0.2%. for those earning $ 30 an hour.

“It’s striking,” said Dube, “because it’s pretty much against the grain of the past 40 years where we’ve seen wage growth be the exact opposite.”

And it is particularly noteworthy that this is happening during a pandemic that has wreaked havoc on many employers who are raising wages, he said, including those in retail, hospitality and transportation. Workers are quitting their jobs at an all-time high, especially in lower-paying industries, as safety and childcare concerns persist. Early retirements are on the rise and the number of immigrant workers is falling. Some people are also rethinking their priorities.

“There’s a sense in which people who had particularly bad jobs, if you will, are less likely to want to stay there, and that creates that pressure,” he said.

Overall, real average hourly earnings, which represent inflation, have declined 1.2 percent over the past year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. But wage growth “has accelerated considerably” in the past six to eight months, according to a Conference Board poll released Wednesday. And it is expected to continue to climb.

Employers are expected to raise wages 3.9% next year, the highest rate in 14 years, the nonprofit business group reported. This jump is due to an increase in wages for new hires – especially for those under 25 and workers who have changed jobs – and inflation, which has increased at the highest rate in nearly 30 years. year. Persistent labor shortages will likely drive wage growth above 4% until next year, the board said.

Some of the increases at the bottom of the earnings scale are due to the increase in the minimum wage. In Massachusetts, the minimum of $ 13.50 will drop to $ 14.25 on Jan. 1 and to $ 15 in 2023. Yet about half of American workers earn less than $ 20 an hour, according to the organization in nonprofit Living Wage for US, but 80% of the population live in a place where the salary needed to pay for housing, health care, child care, and other expenses to support families is more than that .

In Massachusetts, 92% of the population resides in a county where a family of four needs an annual family income of at least $ 100,000 to live with a “basic level of decency,” according to Living Wage for US, which has just launched a certification program. for employers who pay a living wage. But less than 44% of the state’s households earn that much.

A higher salary for those who need it most could be a silver lining for the pandemic, which has wreaked havoc among many immigrants and people of color in lower-paying jobs – provided it increases enough, a said Zeynep Ton, professor at MIT Sloan School of Management and co-founder of the Good Jobs Institute.

“The wages are sticky,” she said. “Once you raise them it’s very difficult to go back. “

Raising wages can also improve job performance, forcing companies to view workers as more valuable and give them more responsibility – and treat them with more respect, Ton said. But planning more regular hours is also essential.

“I think the workers are finally fed up,” she said. “They are used like robots.

Several national employers have announced wage increases in recent months. Amazon offers a starting salary of $ 18 to $ 22.50 an hour – versus $ 15 – for warehouse and transportation workers, and Costco just moved up to $ 17 an hour, after rising to $ 16 in February. Starbucks, CVS, and Walgreens all increase base pay to $ 15 an hour.

At Bank of America, the entry-level salary was $ 15 an hour when Ajna Angjeliu started as a cashier in Boston in 2019. Since then it has increased several times and hit $ 21 in October.

“It created a trusting relationship between me and the company,” said Angjeliu, 22, who now assists clients with their accounts and studies part-time at Boston University, while helping his parents pay. the bills. “I know this organization is a business that will help me grow.”

Bank of America branch manager Tilan Perera has seen interest in jobs grow as entry-level salary increases.Pat Greenhouse / Globe Staff

Tilan Perera, the branch manager at 100 Federal St., where Angjeliu works, found that interest in jobs increased as wages rose. “There are more people applying,” he said.

The bank plans to hire 5,000 people this quarter and increase starting salaries to at least $ 25 an hour by 2025.

Small employers are also increasing wages. More than three-quarters of owners in a recent National Federation of Independent Business survey said they had already increased their pay or were planning to do so soon, the highest percentage in 48 years. David Weaver, chairman of Compensation & HR Group in Burlington, said wages are increasing mostly at the entry level, with quick service restaurants, grocery stores, retail stores and banks announcing higher hourly wages in the range from $ 17 to $ 21.

Yet soaring inflation means these increases may not mean much.

It’s sort of a vicious cycle, said Christopher Carlozzi, Massachusetts director of the National Federation of Independent Business. “A lot of the price increases that consumers are seeing are the result of wage increases due to labor shortages. “

At Whole Foods Market in the Boston area, starting wages went from $ 15 to $ 16 an hour this fall, and employees above received a 50-cent raise. Workers also get an extra $ 2 an hour until early January, and overtime and Sunday pay are doubled.

A local employee, who asked not to be identified because he was not authorized to speak to the media, said he made $ 19.20 an hour after the increase and $ 38.40 on Sunday . “It’s a teacher’s salary,” he said, noting that a client told him she could apply because the Sunday rate is higher than what she earns as a teacher. nurse.

The 50-cent increase doesn’t make a big difference to him, but the extra Sunday pay means he can work fewer days. That will likely change in January, however. “It’s a little depressing,” he said.

Fred Goff, managing director of Cambridge-based job platform Jobcase, said employers love to brag about pay increases, but when you consider how many of them are temporary, and how much the cost of the life has increased – and how high some corporate profits are. hovering – it sounds hollow.

“There are a lot of people who want to be applauded for raising wages from $ 13 to $ 15 an hour,” he said. “Don’t do me a favor if you’re just keeping up with inflation.”


Katie Johnston can be reached at [email protected] Follow her on twitter @ktkjohnston.



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An aging country shows others how to manage


ESINCE 1,495 residents of Gojome, a town in northern Japan, gathered for a morning market. One recent weekday, along a street with closed and almost empty shops, elderly vendors display their autumn wares: mushrooms and chestnuts, okra, eggplants and pears. It wasn’t always so empty, sighs Ogawa Kosei, who runs a bookstore on the street. He shows pictures taken by his father which show the scene filled with customers.

Gojome’s population has halved since 1990. More than half of its residents are over the age of 65, making it one of the oldest towns in Akita, the oldest prefecture in Japan, which is in its own right. tour the oldest country in the world. Still, Gojome is less of an outlier than an omen. According to UN, each country is experiencing growth in the size and proportion of its elderly population; by 2050, one in six people in the world will be over 65, up from one in eleven in 2019. UN also predicts that 55 countries, including China, will see their populations decline by 2050.

Demographic change has two drivers that are often grouped together: increasing longevity and a falling birth rate. Their convergence requires “a new map of life,” explains Akiyama Hiroko, founder of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Tokyo. The infrastructure created when the population was younger and the population pyramid more solid must be rethought, from health to housing to transport. The new reality demands a “completely different way of thinking,” says Kashiwa Kazuyori, head of Gojome’s planning department. When he started working in the 1970s, the focus was on growth. Now it is a matter of managing the decline.

Part of the challenge is that demographic change affects everyone differently. Two cities or regions may look alike from afar, but have distinct historical, cultural and environmental conditions; two people can be the same age, earn the same money, and live on the same street, but have different mental and physical health. “Context is often lacking,” says Kudo Shogo of Akita International University. He is one of dozens of young foreigners who have been welcomed to Gojome, which was a trade hub at the crossroads of agricultural districts. Comparable agriculture-focused neighbors have been less open to newcomers.

This makes it difficult to design a national policy. “There is no single model,” says Iio Jun, political scientist at HANDLES. While the national government is responsible for finances, including pensions, the new life map is best drawn from scratch. A lot of ideas come from listening to citizens, says Ms. Akiyama. “They know what the problems are and often they know how to solve them. “

One question is how aging is discussed: as a problem or a burden. “Older people feel that society doesn’t need them,” says Hatakeyama Junko, 70, head of Akita Partnership, a non-profit organization that runs a community center. Longevity in itself is not a problem, it should be celebrated. Problems arise when people lead long but unhealthy, lonely or dependent lives. The goal in Japan has shifted from increasing life expectancy to improving “healthy and independent life expectancy,” says Akiyama.

It means finding ways for older people to continue working. Almost half of the 65-69 age group and a third of the 70-74 age group are employed. The Japanese Gerontological Society has called for reclassifying people aged 65 to 74 as “pre-old.” Ms. Akiyama talks about creating “second life workplaces”. But the work of the second life will be different from that of the first; its contribution may not be easily captured in growth statistics. “We need to strive for well-being, not just economic productivity,” says Akiyama. Experiences abound, from municipalities that train retirees to become farmers, to businesses that encourage older employees to launch startups. The elderly “want dignity and respect,” says Matsuyama Daiko of Taizo-in temple in Kyoto, which has a “second life program” that offers courses for retirees to become priests.

The other key is to stay healthy, physically and mentally. Wiser municipalities focus on preventive care. At the stylish Kadokawa Care Center, a former school in Toyama, northwest Tokyo, 70s, 80s and 90s splash about in a pool and soar on exercise machines. “Without this place, I would be in a retirement home,” exclaims Kyoda Taketoshi, 82. Socialization is no less important. “It was expensive to build this place, but it was worth it,” says Saito Yoneaki, 80, before jumping to join friends in the sauna. Although healthy life expectancy in Japan is eight to 12 years less than overall life expectancy, the gap narrowed slightly between 2010 and 2016.

The birth rate is more difficult to change. It fell to 1.34 in 2020, well below the 2.1 needed to maintain a stable population. Even if Japan could increase it, rural areas would still struggle. One study estimates that more than half of Japan’s 1,700 municipalities could disappear by 2040, as young people, especially women, leave. Yet while a return to growth is unlikely in most regions, there is an alternative to outright disappearance: a critical core of newcomers. Even a handful of transplants can revitalize an aging city without fully replacing the population, notes Iio.

Gojome is a good example. Although the population is decreasing, “a new wind is blowing in the city”, explains Watanabe Hikobe, its mayor. Over the past decade, a small group of young foreigners have arrived, drawn by visions of a slow, bucolic life, and the chance to try out new models of loose work and community living. Yanagisawa Ryu, 34, a computer science graduate from Japan’s leading university, quit his job in Tokyo and became a “social entrepreneur”. He oversees Babame Base, a business center in an empty school in Gojome that is home to a graphic design studio, an ecotourism business, a local doctor, and a business that trains farmers in the use of drones, among others.

Such “urban migrants” are still a relative rarity. Mr. Yanagisawa admits his college friends find his lifestyle choices “weird.” But in many ways, they are the vanguard. “Rather than trying to recreate the past, we need to think about: what kind of community, what kind of city do we want now? Mr. Kudo said. They are not the only foreigners to settle. â– 

This article appeared in the Special Feature section of the print edition under the title “Le vieux pays”


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Non profit living

Houston NFL player Emmanuel Ellerbee launches Bee’s Believers nonprofit to help expose student-athletes to STEM careers


HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) – There comes a time when athletes need to hang up their cleats. A Houston native, in his fourth season in the NFL, started a nonprofit aimed at building young student-athletes for life after the game.

“The most important thing for you is your mind, and your mind is something that no one can take away from you,” said Atlanta Falcons linebacker Emmanuel Ellerbee.

Ellerbee’s nonprofit Bee’s Believers aims to bridge the gap between student-athletes and science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM.

“Our mission is to offer students opportunities through athletics and STE (A) M, so that they have the chance to discover new passions, on and off the field”, indicates the association on his website. “No child should be limited in what they seek to accomplish in this life, and we made it our mission to help them raise.”

Ellerbee, a product of Strake Jesuit College Preparatory, said it was his geometry teacher who told him that at the end of the day he must have more than just playing football.

“Bee’s Believers was an idea that really developed when I was at Strake Jesuit,” Ellerbee said. “Everyone at this school made sure that what I was doing on the football field was not a total synthesis of who I was. They always made sure I had it in class too.”

So that’s exactly what he did. Ellerbee had two dreams: playing in the NFL and getting a civil engineering degree.

“When I left school and during the recruiting process, a lot of people said to me, ‘Oh, you’re going to have to choose one or the other. be a great athlete. I was like ‘Why can’t I do both?’ ”

Ellerbee received her civil engineering degree from Rice University and is still living her NFL dream.

“I don’t think anyone’s dreams or what they want in life will ever be easy. You always have to go through trials and tribulations, hills and valleys, to be able to make sure it comes true. you have to kind of be stubborn with how you approach your dream, ”Ellerbee said.

He said he hopes his experiences will encourage all athletes, especially blacks and Latinos, to consider STEM as an option.

“There are a smaller number of African Americans in STEM careers, as well as Hispanic Americans,” Ellerbee said. “For us, it was about going to inner-city schools and just giving them the opportunity to have that exposure that they usually wouldn’t have.”

In March 2022, ninth grade students are invited to a seminar hosted by the nonprofit association, where students will be introduced to other like-minded student-athletes from other high schools in the region of Houston. In addition to meeting other students, they will also be able to meet and talk to former and current professional athletes who are now pursuing careers in STEM. Students will be able to experience and learn firsthand the many layers that STEM has to offer.

“We believe that when we welcome people of different beliefs, origins and socio-economic status, you would be able to create a better world because everyone understands the difficulties that others are going through,” said Ellerbee.

Copyright © 2021 KTRK-TV. All rights reserved.


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Confront the “myth of more money”


Part three in a series on the last eight years of my Seattle housing work.

From 2016 until the end of Washington State’s legislative session in 2019, I changed my approach to challenge the idea of ​​charging fees on new housing development and giving that money to organizations in non-profit. My argument was that the state’s largest city, Seattle, enforced the most rules, slowing production and thus creating higher prices as demand increased. As a result, most of the state’s available grants were consumed by Seattle, which was unfair to the rest of the state. Not only that, I argued, but building nonprofit housing in Seattle was very expensive and inefficient. Conventional wisdom was and still is that what is needed to solve housing problems is not more housing, but more and more money.

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to challenge big business and government allies to crush your critics, forget the idea that it’s like the movie Silkwood. There is no Cher or Kurt Russell and above all there is no journalist waiting somewhere to write about it. It’s more like the X Files, if you go up against the big guys you’ll be caught on and ignored. The prize will be an effort to make you irrelevant, mad, or part of some kind of unreasonable clique. I had no idea when I took over the industrial non-profit housing complex.

Here is my logic. Having been a nonprofit developer, I knew these developers had to face a steep climb to build their projects, arguably a steeper climb than for-profit developers. The number of contracts, commitments, and acres of paperwork were all stacked on the same demands as the for-profit sector: finding land, zoning, design review, utilities, and labor costs. But because they had political favors, they could ask for more money to solve these problems and the political structure would oblige them with interventions like Mandatory Housing Affordability, the program that would make it worse and not better for the poor because “affordable housing” would be paid for. for with higher rents (see my last post and many more).

I knew the costs and difficulty of building non-profit housing, housing paid for by the MHA program, when exposed, could make people question the whole program itself. If nothing else, if I could find a way to show that more money was being spent on subsidized nonprofit housing in Seattle (where the MHA extortion program operated) than in the Washington countryside. , maybe we could force a conversation. The data supported my point; housing subsidies were consumed quickly by the state’s most blatant regulator of housing production, Seattle. If I could show that this was done to the detriment of the poorest immigrant farm workers, maybe we could get the press interested.

So I analyzed years of data from the state’s Housing Trust Fund and found that indeed, subsidies were piling up in Seattle while in rural areas, workers lived in their cars. I wrote an opinion piece on how access to water was choking the supply in rural areas and thus harming rural workers, primarily immigrants to Mexico. It infuriated House Speaker Frank Chopp as much as it pleased lawmakers in rural Washington, who were outraged by the rushed court decision by a left-wing Seattle advocacy organization. I had entered into a long-standing conflict on the side of the rural Republicans. Here I was a former Democrat from Seattle, working with Republicans.

My conversations with the President and with the Republican leaders were strange; I was making a valid argument, which went against everyone’s sensitivity. Democrats felt out of place, justifying more and more spending on expensive housing in Seattle (up to $ 500,000 per unit) while talking about how much they cared about rural immigrants, the people who did not benefit from housing subsidies because of rampant spending. in Seattle. Republicans were resistant to big spending schemes and more bureaucracy. So my proposal for a farm worker housing authority to take money out of Seattle and funnel it to farm worker housing fell on deaf ears there. I had managed to make valid points, but the policy was not in favor of the solution, of big changes in the subsidy system and of better management.

In a passive and aggressive Washington, my efforts have certainly been noticed. The President complimented me in an argument saying, “People are mad at you! ” Sure. But making people uncomfortable does not necessarily lead to policy change. Both left and right seem to have made peace with the inefficient way of subsidizing housing. I failed to convince Republicans in the Legislature to support the idea of ​​making the system fairer, and farmers and nonprofit real estate developers in rural Washington seemed intimidated by the task of taking over. the well-funded and politically connected non-profit organization. housing agencies in Seattle.

My campaign against the non-profit housing complex was a failure. He revealed, however, that there is an ongoing disparity in the way housing is subsidized in Washington. Recently, I showed how tax credits are pouring into Seattle, even though there is more poverty in rural Washington. Being white and awake means more money for housing. It was a deadly battle that exhausted many of my supporters, but I’m glad I made the effort. With all the money raised from the fees generated by the MHA fees and other largesse of recent federal legislation, I know the problem will not be solved with more money. It will get worse. The day may come when everyone can do the math and agree that fairness and efficiency are compassionate and that inflation is the greatest enemy of the poor.


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Saint-Louis high school students demonstrate against gun violence in honor of 19-year-old


ST. LOUIS – Hundreds of students from Cardinal Ritter College Prep High School marched against gun violence on Wednesday in honor of 19-year-old Isis Mahr.

Mahr was murdered in a quadruple shooting in St. Louis in October after returning from work at an elderly care facility. Her father said she had a heart of gold.

“My daughter was very dynamic. She gave a lot to the community during the 19 years that she lived on this land, that God gave her to me and to my family ”, declared her father Atif Mahr.

Mahr was a remarkable graduate of Cardinal Ritter College Prep in 2020. Her family said she was a part of the soccer team and naturally a person who loved and cared for everyone around her.

She volunteered in the community and was studying to be a nurse. Friends and family of Isis have said the march and the gathering mean the world.

“I am grateful for the support. It’s a beautiful day, ”said his father. “It took away the heartache and pain to have this march in her honor to stop the violence and stop the killings and put down the guns. I can say as a parent that the community has spoken about my daughter and said that it is is enough. “


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Non profit living

“It’s my super power now”: Utah residents living with HIV work to break down stigma surrounding the disease


SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – When Sequan Kolibas was diagnosed with HIV for eight years, the mother of one kept him to herself for years, largely fearing the reaction of others to her news.

Those fears were confirmed when she let out her secret one day while talking to a friend.

“We were just talking about HIV and, and I had kind of a seizure and I told him I had it and he was like, ‘Well, only hookers and junkies get HIV. So which one are you? ‘ “

Kolibas’ fear of the stigma surrounding the disease had proven to be justified. That had been her biggest concern when she learned she had contracted the virus from her five-year-old partner, a man.

“It was extremely scary, it changed my life,” she recalls. “To be honest. I had periods of suicidal thoughts, severe depression. I just thought my happiness was over and my life was over. I let HIV become who I am, instead of “to be a part of who I was. I let my diagnosis define me.

On Wednesday December 1, World AIDS Day will be celebrated, in memory of those who have lost their lives due to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, which is initially caused by a diagnosis of HIV. The occasion of 2021 is particularly poignant as it marks 40 years since the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) first reported the emergence of AIDS among gay communities in New York and California.

Originally dubbed “gay cancer,” the HIV and AIDS epidemic has been ravaged by misinformation, misunderstanding and, of course, stigma against those who contract the virus. Researchers ultimately reduced its primary means of transmission to sharing needles or injection equipment, exposure to blood in open wounds, and sexual intercourse. The shocking announcement of NBA star Magic Johnson’s infection in 1991 showed that HIV can affect people of any sexual orientation – gay or heterosexual – but many of the stigmas have always been hard to shake.

“I think this has persisted since the 1980s,” says Heather Bush, who manages the HIV program for the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) to ABC4.com. “In addition to facing a life-threatening disease, and all that it means, people with HIV worry about what people are going to think or how they are being paid. It’s just a huge additional burden that people have to face. And I think a lot of it is perception.

The truth is, living with HIV in 2021 is very different from what it was in 1981, as evidenced by testimonials and information from a new UDOH campaign, HIVandMe.com. While illness is still a part of life; the website says every three days a new Utah resident is diagnosed with HIV, no longer a death sentence.

Advances in prevention and treatment have made transmission nearly impossible for people with the disease who take appropriate measures, which can be as simple as a daily pill for antiretroviral therapy (ART) and extra precautions for antiretroviral therapy (ART). sexually active people. The new term in HIV medicine is “U = U”. The antiretroviral drug can reduce the amount of HIV in the blood to undetectable levels. If it is undetectable, it cannot be transmitted to others.

“We know it’s still there, we know they still have the virus, but it’s so weak that not only does it protect them and keep them from getting sick, but it also prevents them from passing it on to others. people, ”he added. Bush says, adding that those who have an HIV-positive partner who are not infected can also take preventative drugs. “We have a lot of tools that we didn’t even have 5-10 years ago.”

The biggest obstacle that remains is stigma, as both Bush and Kolibas agree. While medical advances have provided the means to make the spread of HIV and AIDS much more difficult if the right precautions are taken, opening the dialogue is still a work in progress.

Kolibas has since found purpose by sharing its story and founding a nonprofit that provides resources to those infected and information to those with outdated fears and misconceptions about HIV and AIDS.

“You don’t have to change who you are, it doesn’t define who you are,” she says, mentioning that her T-cell count, or the number of disease-fighting blood cells, is higher than before. diagnostic. “We are opening the conversation to educate people so that we can reduce this stigma for people. “

For years, many have thought that even routine, non-sexual or blood-related contact with someone living with HIV could be dangerous. Kolibas’ mission now is to shatter these misconceptions.

“It’s the misconception of ‘Well it’s just a gay disease’, or if somebody has it, you can’t share the same utensils, you can’t squeeze them in their arms you can’t drink out of the same cup as them It’s just about education now I’m kind of using HIV as my superpower now.


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Non profit living

Contra Costa Crisis Center helps parents share their grief and rediscover joy


WALNUT CREEK – Ann Khadalia and Steve Grimes interact with sometimes remarkable ease, sometimes finishing each other’s sentences or remembering another story to tell. They speak easily and think often.

They can always smile, and when the time is right, they can laugh too.

“Believe it or not,” Grimes said, “you can get away with this.”

Yet as they stand together outside the offices of the Contra Costa Crisis Center in Walnut Creek, holding a window to their soul – photos of Steve’s late son, Kevin, and Ann’s late daughter, Priya – the dark cloud of pain is never far beyond the horizon.

They are grateful that it is no longer raining sadness.

Grimes and Khadalia are close today as their respective paths connected and passed through the Contra Costa crisis center following the deaths of their children over 20 years ago. Kevin Grimes, who was almost 16, collapsed while on a scout outing with his father near Kirkwood Mountain Resort in March 1996 and never regained consciousness. Three years later, 5-year-old Priya Khadalia was struck and killed by an unlicensed driver of a car who turned on a red light at an intersection in Hayward.

WALNUT CREEK, CA – OCTOBER 12: Contra Costa Crisis Center volunteer Steve Grimes poses for a photo, with a photo of his 15-year-old son Kevin, whom he lost in a tragic event, in Walnut Creek, in California, Wednesday, October 12, 2021 (Anda Chu / Bay Area News Group)

Their parents are now volunteering on the same grief support teams that helped them survive the worst nightmare they have ever faced.

Grimes facilitates and sometimes leads bereavement groups. Khadalia does the same and was so inspired by the centre’s impact on her life that she obtained her Masters in Counseling at Cal State East Bay two years ago.

“We’re not trying to be therapists,” Grimes said. “We Listen. We are empathetic. We ask open ended questions. We have a conversation and we try to find a connection.

The Crisis Center has facilitated such conversations since 1963. The association is accredited by the American Association of Suicidology and provides 24/7 support and counseling to people in crisis, distress or suicidal, 365 days a year. . Its mission is to keep people in crisis alive until the storm passes.

WALNUT CREEK, CA – OCTOBER 12: Contra Costa Crisis Center volunteer Ann Khadalia poses for a photo, with a photo of her 8-year-old daughter Priya, whom she lost in a tragic event, in Walnut Creek, California, Wednesday October 12, 2021 (Anda Chu / Bay Area News Group)

The organization received funding this year from Share the Spirit, an annual vacation campaign that helps residents in need of East Bay. Donations will help support 56 nonprofit agencies in Contra Costa and Alameda counties. The center will use its grant for staff salaries and benefits; create the ability to return customers’ daily phone calls; train new volunteer animators; and coordinate weekly bereavement support groups.

Grimes and Khadalia said these services were essential for their ability to resume their lives after the loss of their children. Each participated in group sessions in small gatherings, meetings that turned strangers who started out into teammates united in grief.

“They helped me get through my grief, but to be more precise, they really allowed me to grieve,” Khadalia said. “I’m in this nightmare, but I was so wrapped up in the way other people were doing that I wasn’t dealing with my own feelings of loss and grief. I was just sort of surviving. The first few months were a total fog. I think for a year I cried every day. But the group helped me find a place to go with it all, and as you go through the process it starts to help you.

Grimes said the grieving groups at the center also provided a place where people were not afraid to talk with him about his loss, a key to his recovery. He said family and friends were initially reluctant to bring up Kevin for fear of opening a wound that was too painful.

Such fear is wrong, he said. The memory of Kevin is never far away, and neither is his father’s desire to talk about him.

“I’m always so happy when people ask me,” he said. “He was an adventurous young man. He had short trick type skis. He loved the Boy Scouts, he loved bungee jumping. We just did a lot, a lot of trips together during the summer. He was an explorer.

Khadalia similarly shines when the subject turns to Priya.

“She was a very lively and spirited little girl,” she said. “She was very determined, extremely curious. She loved to dance and took ballet lessons. She had a fearless personality.

In many ways, the same can be said of Priya’s mom and Kevin’s dad. They experienced the worst fear of parents. And while the scars are still there, so too are the inspiration they provide to countless others just by going forward and rediscovering the joy.

Both say the Crisis Center was an integral part of this process.

“As you get help, you come back to a place where you know you can help others,” Khadalia said. “And it seems helping others is what made that dark cloud not so close to me anymore. It’s there, but it’s very far now, and there is light now.

And the pain is less intense.

“The loss allows you to have a perspective,” Grimes said. “It teaches you what is important and what is not. We are here to show others that life can go on and on.


Share the spirit

The Share the Spirit vacation campaign, sponsored by the Bay Area News Group, provides relief, hope and opportunity to residents in need by funding nonprofit vacation and outreach programs in the counties of Alameda and Contra Costa. To make a tax-deductible contribution, cut the coupon accompanying this story or go to www.sharethespiriteastbay.org/donate. Readers with questions, as well as individuals or businesses interested in making grants or contributions, can contact the Share the Spirit program at 925-655-8355 or [email protected]


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New Mexico Legal Aid Makes a Difference for Highly Needed Clients | My opinion


New Mexico Legal Aid is a non-profit law firm that has provided free legal assistance to New Mexicans living in poverty for over 50 years. Inside our offices, the reception call center is fully loaded as soon as we open our doors.

It is very common for potential customers to start calling long before the opening, hoping to be the first when we start in the morning. Each month, over 1,000 New Mexicans living on the poverty line contact our lawyers and staff for help. In many cases, we are able to quickly resolve their issues within hours, but too often we have clients who are dealing with multiple issues at once such as evictions, unemployment, domestic violence and issues. income security.

These people are assigned to one of our advocates, who works in four specialized divisions: family, consumption, housing and economic security. They are stretched and process over 5,500 cases per year. But the high volume of cases is not as frustrating as when they are forced to turn down a viable case simply because we lack resources. For more than 100 New Mexicans per month, this is their reality.

Currently, nearly 400,000 New Mexicans live in poverty and qualify for our services, and we are already seeing that the demand continues to increase. In order to help more people, we need a stronger commitment from the legislature to increase funding for the Civil Legal Services Commission, which supports nonprofit civil legal providers in New Mexico.

We need to increase our staff and we need to be able to offer a competitive salary to a limited pool of available legal talent. A recent study by New Mexico Voices for Children looked specifically at New Mexico families and their income security. In its study, Voices for Children reported that 34 percent of children in New Mexico were food insecure in 2020, up from 24 percent in 2018. And nearly 30 percent of adults in households with children had little or no confidence in their ability to pay. their next rent or mortgage payment on time.

This study helps to put into perspective some of the reasons for the growing demand for help from our association.

Fortunately, we work alongside several other organizations that are equally focused and dedicated to the mission of helping people living in poverty by helping them with their legal issues. Each year, approximately 15,000 New Mexicans benefit from direct legal services offered by Legal Aid New Mexico, and thousands more benefit from our indirect services. When we are successful in helping a client, we keep a family at home, we improve the educational outcomes of their children, and we improve the health outcomes for the family.

We help these families to put down roots in the community, which in turn helps them to earn more income and ultimately to take root more deeply in our community.

Lewis G. Creekmore is Executive Director of New Mexico Legal Aid, headquartered in Albuquerque.


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After chronic illness, San José woman seeks help to become independent


Almost two decades after leaving the Philippines for San José, Nerissa Ramirez’s life finally started to get easier.

She had climbed the assembly line at an electronics company in Fremont and bought her first car. At night, she spent time with friends or attended local meetings of Jehovah’s Witnesses.

But then she was diagnosed with lupus – a chronic autoimmune disease in which the body attacks its own organs and tissues – as well as kidney disease.

“All of a sudden I’m fighting with my body,” recalls Ramirez, 52. “It was so hard.”

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Nerissa Ramirez cries as she shares the story of her struggles on October 12, 2021, at her new apartment in San Jose, Calif. (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group)

In the years since that 2012 diagnosis, that fight reduced Ramirez’s independence to a fraction of what it once was. After years of working and living alone, her illness forced her to spend most of the past year in a skilled nursing facility, receiving grueling dialysis treatment four times a week, and depending on others. for tasks such as eating, bathing and using the toilet.

It was around this time that she met Tita Das, a case manager at the Silicon Valley Independent Living Center, a non-profit organization that offers people with disabilities in Santa Clara County a range of free services, such as the advocacy, peer counseling and helping with the transition from hospital to independent living.

“I could see she was very sick,” Das said, “but she has that motivation, that aspiration.” Das began to think about a key question: “What can we take away from her so that her journey can end in at least one way?” “

To that end, the association hopes that donations collected through Wish Book can help make Ramirez’s life a little more comfortable.

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Tita Das, Case Manager at Silicon Valley Independent Living Center, speaks during an interview at Nerissa Ramirez’s apartment in San Jose, Calif. On October 12, 2021 (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group)

His journey so far has been marred by painful setbacks. Within months of being first diagnosed with lupus, Ramirez’s energy wore off. She was forced to reduce her working hours in the electronics business and was so exhausted that she could barely move her hands or get out of bed.

As she suffered from different flare-ups, she bounced back between treatments, even going through chemotherapy at one point. A bright spot came in January 2018, when Ramirez finally obtained U.S. citizenship and planned to return home to her home province in the Philippines to reunite with her mother for the first time in 25 years.

Shortly before his arrival, his mother passed away.

“I’ve never seen her, for how many years?” Ramirez said, covering his face with both hands as tears rolled down his cheeks. “I’m so sad – very, very sad.”

She has spent this winter in the Philippines, trying to follow the advice of her doctors to stay stress free and take advantage of the warm weather. The following fall, an unexpected glimmer of hope appeared: Thanks to church friends, she met a man and they started talking every day. After a few months of dating, they got married.

It was this sense of liveliness that Das and the rest of the SVILC team noticed when they first met Ramirez. FaceTiming her husband back in the Philippines before going to bed and eating with friends.

“Even though I’m in this kind of situation, I really, really want to live a normal life like everyone else,” Ramirez said.

Working together under the Section 811 Federal Disability Assistance Program, SVILC was able to secure Ramirez a two-bedroom apartment in San Jose and she left the nursing home in August. Since then, the cozy apartment she shares with a caretaker has been lovingly decorated, with a large portrait of a lush cascading island reminiscent of the Philippines.

But depending so much on others creates constant challenges: Sometimes the van that transports Ramirez to and from dialysis is late, forcing the center to cut his treatment short. Other times, he drops her off in front of his apartment building, too far away to walk the long hallway to the elevator unassisted.

“I am crying, but I have to be patient,” Ramirez said of these cases. ” I can not do anything. Just be patient and keep talking to the right person who can help me.

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Afternoon light shines on Nerissa Ramirez as she spends time in her new apartment in San Jose, Calif. On October 12, 2021 (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group )

Ramirez and Das seek help from Wish Book readers to secure his first motorized wheelchair, which would ensure Ramirez is never left stranded outside his apartment. And to make it easier to access and return to dialysis sessions, they are also looking for help buying a car to refurbish with manual controls.

There is one more thing: a plane ticket for her husband to emigrate from the Philippines. Ramirez – who has already been approved to be her godfather – took an affectionate look at the bench she placed in the kitchen so they could dine side by side.

Until she arrives, she said, she will remain “positive, positive, positive.”

“Whatever happened, it’s happened before,” Ramirez said. “We have to keep moving forward. “

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – October 12: Nerissa Ramirez chats with her husband, who lives in the Philippines, at his new apartment in San Jose on October 12, 2021 (Dai Sugano / Bay Area News Group)

THE WISH BOOK SERIES
The Wish Book is an annual series of The Mercury News that invites readers to help their neighbors.

TO WISH
Donations will help Nerissa Ramirez Рa client of the Silicon Valley Independent Living Center Рpurchase a motorized bariatric wheelchair, power recliner, used vehicle with manual controls as well as a one-way trip from the Philippines to San Jos̩. Objective: $ 23,700.

HOW TO GIVE
Donate at wishbook.mercurynews.com or send the coupon by mail.

ONLINE SUPPLEMENT
Read more Wish Book stories, view photos and videos at wishbook.mercurynews.com.


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Non profit living

New Catawba College graduate Madison Kluge leads Salisbury towards sustainability goals – Salisbury Post


By Natalie Anderson
[email protected]

SALISBURY – Newly graduated Madison Kluge from Catawba College became the city’s first sustainability coordinator earlier this year, and she stepped up to help transform the goals of a more sustainable lifestyle into reality.

Kluge, 21, graduated from Catawba College earlier this year with a degree in environment and sustainability. She began an internship with the Salisbury Public Works Department in February before assuming a full-time role as Sustainability Coordinator in May. In 2020, she also completed an internship at Bread Riot, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting local farmers and providing access to locally produced food. Kluge said she was still a volunteer for Bread Riot.

Also during his stay in Catawba, Kluge did an internship at the school’s Environmental Center for over two years. She said her teachers helped guide her to the position she currently holds, which suits her well as she enjoys coordinating and collaborating with multiple groups.

Kluge, from Maryland, said she was living in Mocksville when her sister decided to attend Catawba College, which resulted in several trips to Salisbury with the option to explore while her sister was in class.

“I fell in love with the city, the culture it has here, the possibility of growth and the good people,” Kluge said.

Much of his work now requires him to strengthen relationships with city, county, and nonprofit organizations, in addition to strengthening environmental education and awareness of sustainable living.

Kluge is working with city staff to help draft the Forward 2040 plan, which aims to frame priorities and decisions over the next 20 years as Salisbury. In addition to this, Kluge is responsible for working on the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals of Salisbury City Council.

“I help steer the city towards a sustainable mindset,” Kluge said. “And put the goals they have in mind into perspective and make them come true.”

In March, board members adopted a set of goals for 2021 following a goal setting retreat in February. Among the priorities for the city’s infrastructure and human capital was the focus on reducing waste and promoting efficiency as well as improving infrastructure to promote foot and bicycle transport. In addition, council members have indicated that they want to support public transit for neighboring communities and explore alternative modes of transportation.

Also this year, the city used an amount of $ 818,000 Volkswagen Public transportation / facility shuttle program gdiatribe from the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality to purchase two electric buses for Salisbury Transit. Kluge said finding and applying for such grants is another part of his job. She is currently working to obtain a community subsidy for waste reduction from the NCDEQ.

Kluge told Salisbury that much of the thinking “towards sustainability” is already in place among residents and staff, which is part of what attracts him to the position. She said she is often pushed by older residents and colleagues who want to see Salisbury flourish with things such as increased use of electric vehicles and improved air quality.

“It is really my colleagues and community members who inspire me to help Salisbury follow this green vision,” she said.

Although her role falls under the Public Works Department, Kluge said she often works with communications and planning staff.

Current projects include a new Sustainability Salisbury newsletter, the first edition of which will be launched in January. This newsletter will provide more information and education for a sustainable lifestyle in Salisbury. She is also working to roll out more sustainability education through social media apps like TikTok and Instagram.

Other initiatives Kluge is working on include increasing awareness of waste, recycling, composting and waste prevention during the holiday season, promoting city and county parks, and working with neighboring schools to implement more sustainability-oriented programs. In 2022, the city will launch a nature city challenge in the spring on the occasion of Earth Day. City Nature Challenge is an event that takes place across the country, where local residents take photos and make observations of nature in their area and support the city’s naturalists.

Among its long-term goals is establishing a more robust internship program where students from Catawba, for example, can intern with the city to conduct research on sustainability, which is beneficial to the community. both for the city and students interested in careers related to sustainable development.

Eventually, Kluge said she would like to see the city’s composting program expanded to accept more types of waste. Creating a carbon inventory to assess how much carbon the city sees is another long-term goal that requires a lot of training that it is currently undergoing.

Additionally, another goal is to work with businesses to create a business alliance and neighborhood alliance with established sustainability goals, including increased recycling and waste reduction initiatives.

Kluge suggests that city residents take advantage of the free compost available at the Grants Creek Composting Facility, located at 1955 Grubb Ferry Road. Residents can pick up the compost generated from the previous year’s yard waste on Friday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, contact [email protected] or call 704-638-5260.

Contact reporter Natalie Anderson at 704-797-4246.


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Non profit living

Morning Pointe ‘Seniors Got Talent’ events raise over $ 60,000 for the Morning Pointe Foundation


Morning Pointe’s “Seniors Got Talent” presentation events across Tennessee and Kentucky raised more than $ 60,000 for the Morning Pointe Foundation among four events in 2021, after a one-year hiatus in the series. annual fundraiser at the height of the coronavirus pandemic. Over 100 seniors danced, sang and performed their way onto the big stage this year to raise funds for the philanthropic arm of Morning Pointe Senior Living founded by Greg A. Vital and J. Franklin Farrow, healthcare entrepreneurs for seniors of Tennessee.

The 501 (c) 3 nonprofit public service organization was established in 2014 to deliver caregiver support programs, sponsor education awareness events, and fund clinical scholarships to advance caregivers. care for the elderly in the South East.

“Morning Pointe’s ‘Seniors Got Talent’ events are flagship events in our four main markets, and we knew this year was going to be very special because we couldn’t have it last year,” said Mr. Vital, President of Morning Pointe. Life of the elderly. “So many of Morning Pointe’s sponsors and friends have stepped up in 2021 to help seniors showcase their talents on the theater stage. ”

Building on a 10-year tradition that began at Morning Pointe of Hixson, Seniors Got Talent events are the Morning Pointe Foundation’s primary fundraising activity as they seek to help develop the workforce. workforce and fill the pipeline of future senior nursing associates.

In total, the four events in Lexington (Ky.), Chattanooga, Franklin and Knoxville raised over $ 60,000 to support the mission of the Morning Pointe Foundation. The main sponsors include the East
Tennessee Pharmacy Services, Middle Tennessee Pharmacy Services, Propel Insurance, First Horizon Bank, CHI Health at Home, and RBA Employee Benefits Advisors.

Many others have helped make performing live on a theater stage a reality for these seniors, many of whom have only dreamed of something like this. The talent spectrum included artists such as a ventriloquist, a couple of tap dancers, a dance troupe, a choir and several bands, singers and musicians, all aged 62 and over.

“What can I say, it was an amazing experience. It was wonderful and made me want to cry, ”said Jan Douglas, 78-year-old singer-songwriter and one of the big winners.

Morning Pointe Senior Living, headquartered in Chattanooga, develops, owns and manages
35 Morning Pointe Assisting Life, Self-Care and The Lantern in Morning Pointe Alzheimer’s Center of Excellence communities in five southeastern states.

“This is what it is about: presenting an abundance of talented seniors on the biggest stage of their lives. while proving that age is really just a number. You can still dance, sing and show off your talent until retirement, ”said Mr. Vital. “We thank all of our sponsors for so generously allowing the Morning Pointe Foundation to provide much needed opportunities for nursing students. while providing support to caregivers and drawing attention to important health issues for older people. “


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Non profit living

Bay Area Nonprofit seeks 300 volunteers to participate in study on sla


Bay Area nonprofit dedicated to advancing research into an incurable – and deadly – disease of the nervous system is looking for an additional 300 people by the end of this month to participate in the largest research project ever carried out on the disease.

EverythingALS has already recruited nearly 700 people this year in a national speech study that aims to collect quantifiable data on some of the early symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Gehrig was a New York Yankees player who was diagnosed with a rare degenerative disease at age 36 and died in 1941 just before his 38th birthday.


An estimated 30,000 Americans are living with ALS, which results in a widespread loss of muscle control as nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are destroyed.

The first symptoms range from twitching, cramps, and weakness to difficulty chewing and slurred speech. Patients usually do not live more than five years after the first signs of the disease appear.

“With 1,000 participants, which is the largest group ever recruited to perform a neurological assessment of people with ALS, we are reinventing the research platform by using a patient-centered citizen science approach to get things done 1 000 times faster. EverythingALS co-founder Indu Navar said in a press release.

A smaller study on speech earlier this year collected data that only recently led to the identification of breathing patterns and mouth movements that differ significantly between healthy individuals and patients with ALS, including including those which are pre-symptomatic.

Now, EverythingALS wants to have at least 1,000 participants on board by Thanksgiving in its so-called “Speech Bucket Challenge†in the hopes that the larger trial will validate the link between ALS and speech abnormalities.

As the muscles of the face lose their flexibility, it becomes more and more difficult to open the mouth wide enough and to use the tongue to form certain sounds. The throat muscles also contract, limiting the amount of air that must pass over the vocal cords for someone to speak.

The study is carried out remotely through web-based computer software that records and analyzes the speed and depth of participants’ breathing as well as the volume of their voice when speaking into a microphone.

Anyone with an Internet connection, webcam, and microphone can participate in the project, which is open to people with or suspected of having SLA as well as healthy people who can serve as witnesses.

Volunteers converse with an avatar – a virtual assistant called Tina – while a webcam and microphone record their speech and facial gestures for the Modality.ai software to analyze.

Supporters of the study note that so far the number of ALS patients involved in the research has been low as they often have difficulty getting to the facilities where the work is being performed.

But most have smartphones and computers, making remote data collection a viable option.

For more information or to join the study, email [email protected] or call (650) 833-9100. To learn more about the organization, visit Everythingals.org.

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Copyright © 2021 by Bay City News, Inc. Republication, rebroadcasting, or any other reuse without the express written consent of Bay City News, Inc. is prohibited.


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Non-profit organization plans to build village of 50 small houses for homeless veterans at OKC


A Kansas City-based nonprofit focused on ending veteran homelessness plans to expand to Oklahoma City.

The Veterans Community Project announced last week that it will build 50 small homes, each under 300 square feet, on a property on North Phillips Avenue, between Northeast 26th and 28th Streets.

The property will also house a community center and an awareness center.

“What we are doing is we are really restarting the transition from military to civilian from day one,” said VCP Chairman Jason Kander. “No matter how long you’ve been homeless, no matter how long you’ve been fighting, let’s do this again. ”

In recent years, Oklahoma City’s homeless population has increased, according to a 2020 city survey. Veterans make up about 10% of the city’s homeless population.

“10% means 150, 160, 170 homeless vets on our streets or in our shelters every night,” said The Homeless Alliance executive director Dan Straughan.

The nonprofit model includes on-site services and transitional housing for homeless veterans. After receiving treatment and help, Kander said residents of the mini-houses were transitioning to permanent housing.

In Kansas City, Kander said 85% of their residents have moved into a permanent living situation.

Social, legal and other services help with their transition, which are provided by local groups and volunteers.

“A big part of the reason we come to Oklahoma City is because we have identified Oklahoma City as a place that has the capacity to provide this level of service and this level of passion to veterans,” Kander said.

A spokesperson for VCP said the nonprofit did not yet have a construction schedule.


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