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Dave Chappelle insulted a group that no one mentions

The long list of iconic black comics that have claimed gender non-conforming people or were themselves members of the LGBTQ community.

Black comics have indeed peddled their fair share of nefarious stereotypes about LGBTQ people. Eddie Murphy, for example, sparked a slew of homophobic slurs in his early stand-up routines – performances he has since apologized for.

But the scene was one of those rare places in the black community where LGBTQ members had some freedom to be themselves – or to escape the cruelty they faced in the outside world. Chappelle took part of this space.

“There is a long tradition of trans and gender non-conforming performers in our history, from the Harlem Renaissance to our entire performing history,” says Marlon M. Bailey, author of “Butch Queens Up in Pumps: Gender, Performance. , and Ballroom Culture in Detroit. “

This is what gets lost in the controversy over Chapelle’s comments in his latest stand-up film, “The Closer”. Much of the attention has been focused on the content of his jokes. Chappelle joked about trans women’s genitals and told a story about beating a lesbian woman. And then there are the fallout. Netflix employees and supporters demonstrated on Wednesday to protest the streaming company’s reaction to the complaints. GLAAD, the LGBTQ media organization, also condemned Chapelle’s comments in “The Closer”.

It’s easy to forget, however, with all the attention paid to Chapelle that there were black comedians who took big risks to assert LGBTQ people and be honest about their own sexuality.

Richard Pryor and Mabley Moms

Consider the story of Richard Pryor, arguably the greatest stand-up comic of all time.

Richard Pryor has spoken openly about his bisexuality to his friends.  During a notorious public performance, he opened up to an audience about his attraction to men.

There is a generation of moviegoers who only know him through the tasteless Hollywood movies he starred in like “The Toy”. But Pryor was a different artist on the stand-up comedy scene: fearless, unpredictable, profane. And honest about his bisexuality.

In 1977, Pryor was headlining a gay rights fundraiser where he spoke on stage about having sex with a man. Pryor’s bisexuality was well known to his friends, although some of his relatives still deny that he was gay.
“With this confession, Pryor may have become the first major Hollywood celebrity to speak graphically about their own positive experience with gay sex – and certainly the first to do so in front of tens of thousands of people,” according to an excerpt from the book, “Becoming Richard Pryor” by Scott Saul.
Moms Mabley, another great black comic, was so open about her gender identity that she was known as “Mr. Moms” off the stage, some say.
Other black artists like artist and actress Josephine Baker, who has been dubbed “a radical bisexual artist and activist, and Ma Rainey, the blues singer known as the” Mother of the Blues, “have shaken the genre tropes.
    Jackie Moms Mabley was a comic pioneer on stage and an open backstage lesbian.  Friends say she didn't try to hide her identity.
Rainey sang openly about lesbian relationships and cross-dressing in the early 20th century, when homosexuality was seen as a form of mental illness. In her 1928 song, “Prove it on Me Blues, she sang:

“I went out last night with a crowd of my friends,

It must have been women, because I don’t like men.

Wear my clothes like a fan,

Talk to girls like any old man. “

From Geraldine ‘to RuPaul

Chappelle may have issues with trans women, but black audiences have traditionally embraced black male comics that create gender characters in dresses.

And so are many contemporary black male comics. It’s almost a rite of passage for a comedic black man to create a female character or a stage character. Artist and author Tyler Perry built his entertainment empire on the generous bosom of “Madea”, the carefree and wise black matriarch. RuPaul has a huge following.

Comedians as diverse as Martin Lawrence (“Big Momma’s House”), and Marlon and Shawn Wayans (“White Chicks”) have donned dresses for some of their most popular films.

There is of course a debate to be had about black men posing as women or portraying LGBTQ characters on stage and in movies. Some of these representations may have reinforced stereotypes or be in bad taste. But none of them have the gratuitous cruelty to LGBTQ people that Chappelle brings to his Netflix specials.

As one reviewer asked, “What’s Dave Chapelle’s problem with gay people?
The timing, it has been said, is all in comedy, and the timing for “The Closer” is horrible. Chapelle’s comments come in a year in which at least 33 states have introduced bills to restrict the rights of transgender people – and while record numbers of transgender people, mostly women transgender people of color, were murdered.

“Right now the trans community is under siege, especially the trans community of color,” said Bailey, who is also a professor in the African and African American studies department at Arizona State University. “Artists should take this into account.”

Chappelle should take something else into account.

From a certain point of view, his last special is a success. He generated headlines, viewers and added millions for his personal fortune. It can be said that all the great actors arouse indignation. It’s part of their job description. This is how they get people to think. This is one of the reasons Chapel, who studies comic book history, received the Mark Twain Prize for American humor.

Tyler Perry built his entertainment empire on

But ambitious comedians also face another invisible audience – the greats who inspired them, some of whom are still alive. They face this audience during each performance. They have to come to terms with and borrow from the masters before developing their own voice. Chappelle says he was inspired by Pryor. Pryor was inspired by Lenny Bruce. Key & Peele’s black comedy duo (Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele) have been inspired by everyone from Abbott and Costello to Steve Martin.

The betrayal of Chapel of the black comic tradition

Chappelle turned his back on that audience by doing something they’ve never done – make a career out of pursuing a group even more vilified than black.

The great comics that Chapelle says inspired him didn’t make this mistake.

“Ancestors like Bruce and Pryor reveled in infiltrating the general public with beliefs about gender, race and culture so progressive that they were dangerous,” commentator Charles Bramesco said in a 2019 article where Chapelle , again, offended the LGBTQ community with comments on what he calls “people of the alphabet”.

“Chappelle would prefer to retire to his niche as an old crank, where everything is expected and safe,” says Bramesco.

The Chapel Ox with the LBGQT community dishonours the memory of all those black comic book greats who made his career – and millions – possible.

They created a safe space on the comic book scene for people who didn’t fit traditional gender norms. Black comics like Pryor weren’t perfect when it came to their sexual politics (Pryor ended his gay rights fundraiser by going after white gays and telling the crowd to “kiss my rich man and happy black ass “.

But they proved that a black comic could be bold and brilliant without hitting another stigmatized group to be considered a big one.


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Following her release, Whitney Mercilus posted her farewells to the city of Houston, her fans and the Texas organization on Instagram.

Texans president and CEO Cal McNair issued a statement on the defensive lineman’s release.

“There aren’t many players in franchise history who have impacted our organization and our community in the same way that Whitney Mercilus has,” McNair said. “I can remember a number of times over the past 10 seasons he has stepped in for us on the pitch with a sack or a big play at a pivotal moment, but that’s his unique connection to the Houston community. which made him one of the most popular actors in franchise history.Our fan base turned to Whitney from day one, and he always found ways to give back and serve through his foundation and her culinary work. My family and the entire organization will always consider Whitney to be a Texan. “

Mercilus ranks second in franchise history for sacks (57.0), loss tackles (72), quarterback hits (115), forced fumbles (13), recoveries from fumbles (eight) and multi-sack games (13) in 134 games (102 starts)) as Texan, the third tallest in franchise history. He’s also made eight playoff games (five starts), recording 26 tackles (15 solo), seven tackles for loss and a franchise record of 7 sacks.

Off the pitch, Mercilus has advocated and supported families of children with disabilities and special needs through its WithMerci Foundation. Nominated by Texans for the Walter Payton Man of the Year Award 2018, Mercilus and his foundation have donated countless hours and monetary contributions to numerous organizations, such as the Houston Independent School District’s Special Education Department, the Smartie Pants Academy Center, Easter Seals. of Greater Houston and the Foundation for Autism Care, Education and Services.

The Texans will practice Wednesday at the Houston Methodist Training Center. Sunday in Arizona, they face the Cardinals at 3:25 p.m. CT.

The next time you get to see the Texans at NRG Stadium, it’s October 31, as they host the Los Angeles Rams in Week 8. Kick-off is scheduled for noon CT. Click here for tickets.


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WaterFire Welcomes First-Ever Lighting in Honor of BIPOC Residents

As the sun set on Saturday, hundreds of visitors and residents of Providence gathered at the Providence River to watch WaterFire, a community gathering and fire-lighting show that takes place regularly from summer to late. of autumn. The October 16 show was the first WaterFire to celebrate Blacks, Indigenous people and people of color.

The event was sponsored by Papitto Opportunity Connection, a Rhode Island nonprofit that aims to invest in “education, skills training and entrepreneurial ventures” for BIPOC communities across the state, according to the website organisation.

Besides the long tradition of lighting fires and the presence of many local food vendors, participants also had the chance to attend dance performances and learn about different initiatives sponsored by Papitto Opportunity Connection.

Peter Mello, Managing Director of WaterFire Providence, told the Herald he was grateful for the opportunity to host the “first BIPOC-themed WaterFire, where we celebrate Blacks, Indigenous people and people of color. in the arts, business and culture in the State of Rhode Island. “

“The WaterFire event has been going on for 25 years, and a big part of what happens at WaterFire is that we celebrate the best of Providence and Rhode Island – the people, the organizations, the culture, the history,” Mello said. . He noted that local organizations often use the platform provided by WaterFire “to engage their audience” with social issues relevant to the community, so they were “super excited to work with (Papitto Opportunity Connection) to create a special evening. “uplifting the members of the BIPOC community.

“Each event is a little different,” added Mello. This week’s WaterFire included performances by members of the BIPOC community and demonstrations of Capoeira, a Brazilian form of martial arts that integrates dance and music.

A number of local organizations were invited by Papitto Opportunity Connection and spent the evening educating passers-by on community initiatives to support residents of BIPOC Rhode Island. One of those organizations was Southside Community Land Trust, a non-profit organization that aims to help low-income neighborhoods in Rhode Island access organic food.

“We’ve been around for over 30 years,” said Chandelle Wilson, SCLT training program manager. “Our hope and goal right now is to support many immigrant and migrant farmers, people from other countries, and our hope is to connect more with the people of BIPOC.”

Throughout the event, SCLT discussed current food safety initiatives and distributed products such as “chayote squash, kale or collard greens, fresh lemongrass (and) dried onions” to community members in attendance, Wilson added.

“We’re here to connect people with a space to grow their own food,” Wilson said. All products distributed were “grown here in Providence and Cranston”.

Allison Cavallo ’24, who first attended WaterFire on Saturday, enjoyed the performances and the music. Considering it was the family weekend at college, “my mom dragged me a bit (to the event), but I’m having a great time,” she said.

“I was surprised at the amount of activities, tents and music,” she said. “I didn’t know they were doing all of this. I thought it was just fire and water, but I like the festival aspect.

Lisa Tutaj, a medical assistant from Chicago, attended the event as she visited her stepdaughter for the family weekend. “So far it’s been a lot of fun,” Tutaj said, pointing out how much she enjoyed one of the dance performances of the evening.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on WaterFire, and the first insights and performance since the onset of the pandemic took place on September 4 in honor of those who served as essential workers during the pandemic.

Mello noted that despite the challenges posed throughout the pandemic, events like Saturday’s WaterFire show the organization’s renewed commitment to supporting local arts. “It’s probably the most complicated fire we’ve done,” Mello said.

Mello remains confident that WaterFire will remain important in uniting community members in the weeks and years to come. “There is no special language you have to know to experience this. There is nothing intimidating, ”he said. “It’s a visceral experience.

This year’s WaterFire will take place every two weeks until December 4th.

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October 18 Business Files | News, Sports, Jobs

Avera scores highest among ‘most hardwired’ healthcare systems

Avera once again achieved the highest level of recognition as a Tier 10 organization in the 2021 Most Wired Digital Health Survey conducted by the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME).

The CHIME Digital Health Most Wired program conducts an annual survey to assess the effectiveness with which healthcare organizations are applying basic and advanced technologies in their clinical and business programs to improve health and care in their communities.

This is the third year that Avera has been named as a Tier 10 organization, reaching the highest level for acute and ambulatory care, with previous elite designations including Top 10 and “Advanced.” This is the 22nd time that Avera has been on the most connected list.

“Avera’s history of Most Wired awards as well as our latest designation as Level 10 demonstrate that we are an industry leader.” said Bruk Kammerman, chief information officer of Avera. “Avera fosters a strong culture of innovation, combining the latest technologies with medical expertise for the benefit of our patients. “

A total of 36,674 organizations were represented in the 2021 Digital Health Most Wired program, which includes four separate surveys: acute care, outpatient, long-term care, and international acute care. The surveys assessed the adoption, integration and impact of technologies in healthcare organizations at all stages of development, from early development to industry leadership.

Each participating organization received a personalized benchmarking report, overall score, and scores for individual levels in eight segments:

Infrastructure

Security

Business / disaster recovery

Administrative / supply chain

Data analysis / management

Interoperability / population health

Patient involvement

Clinical quality / safety

Participants also received certification based on their overall performance, with level 10 being the highest.

“The digital transformation of healthcare has accelerated to an unprecedented level since 2020, and the coming years will bring a wave of innovations that will empower healthcare consumers and amaze the industry” said CHIME President and CEO Russell P. Branzell. “The Digital Health Most Wired program recognizes outstanding digital leaders who paved the way for this impending revolution in healthcare. Their pioneering commitment to rapid transformation set an example for the entire industry on how to pursue a leadership vision with determination, brilliant planning and courage to overcome any challenge.

In addition to the CHIME Most Wired designation, Avera Health has many accomplishments including being named one of the Top 15 Health Systems by IBM Watson Health as well as numerous 5-star ratings through the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

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Lexington’s Blue Grass Trust Gets New Executive Director | Kentucky News

BY BETH MUSGRAVE, The Lexington Herald-Leader

LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) – One of Lexington’s oldest historical preservation groups has chosen a longtime historian and co-founder of an effort to preserve the city’s LGBTQ history as its new executive director.

Jonathan Coleman, who has served as deputy director and curator at the Mary Todd Lincoln House for the past six years, will become executive director of the Blue Grass Trust for Historic Preservation on November 1.

The Blue Grass Trust, which has led numerous preservation efforts for over 60 years, has been without an executive director since March 2020, when longtime director Sheila Ferrell resigned.

Coleman, who received his doctorate in history from the University of Kentucky in 2014, has led many local history initiatives, including co-founding the Faulkner Morgan Archives, which chronicle the LGBTQ history of Lexington. Coleman is from Pike County.

Political cartoons

Faulkner Morgan has achieved state and national recognition, most recently from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, for his success in “Creating a More Inclusive and Polyvocal American History. “.

During his tenure at the Mary Todd Lincoln House, Coleman also led other initiatives, including “A House Divided,” a Kentucky Humanities Council-funded project that used Lexington Cemetery to explore the history of the civil war in the region.

“For over sixty years, the Trust’s mission to educate, advocate and serve has been vital to preservation in central Kentucky, and with the help of our donors, community partners and Trust leaders, I look forward to building on this incredible legacy, ”said Coleman.

Janie Fergus, chairman of the board of the Blue Grass Trust, said Coleman’s selection as executive director comes at a critical time in the organization’s history.

The association was founded in 1955 to save John Wesley Hunt’s home in Gratz Park from demolition.

“With many initiatives underway, Jon looks forward to moving the Trust forward to an even stronger position as a leader in historic preservation in central Kentucky. “

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Spirits of Port Isabel organizes ghost tours

PORT ISABEL, TX (ValleyCentral) – Halloween is fast approaching and many Port Isabel natives believe their town is haunted.

A local organization dug into this myth by organizing ghost tours for locals and tourists.

“Several years ago a group of ghost hunters came to Port Isabel and the Rio Grande Valley and they declared Port Isabel the most haunted town in the Rio Grande Valley,” said Douglas Best, designer by Spirits of Port Isabel.

There’s a reason Port Isabel is considered so haunted. History experts said it was the whole history stretching back centuries that involved so many traumatic deaths in the area, including the Port Isabel Lighthouse.

“A lot of things have happened here. The Mexican-American War [and] the civil war took place, and it was a staging area for many problems, ”Best said. “Conservative General Banks actually tried to detonate the lighthouse.”

Four years ago, Douglas wanted to deepen this story by teaching others. That’s why he launched the Sprits of Port Isabel Ghost Tours.

“It starts at the lighthouse, then we descend to the haunted fire station. We go around the cemetery and go back down to what is called the road of misfortune, ”said Best. “To know why it is called the Route du Malheur, you have to do the tour because it is explained by one of the ghosts.”

In addition to researching real spirits, Best also creates its own historical experts and ghost figures to teach people all about local history. Best said he always enjoys teaching people something new.

“I love watching and using education as a way to make people happy,” Best said. “Right now the world is full of negative things and it is actually positive. It’s nice.

Since the ghost tours began, Douglas said he has received numerous reports from locals and tourists of ghost sightings, not only at the lighthouse but across Port Isabel.

“One of the businesses across the way told me yesterday about an old gentleman in a rocking chair who disappears,” Best said.

However, with all of the haunted history, Best said this town remains unique.

“You should be proud of the story that is here and look forward to sharing your story with you if you haven’t been able to follow it,” Best said.

If you would like to join these ghost tours, you can visit the Spirits of Port Isabel website to get tickets.


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World Health Organization honors the late Henrietta Lacks for his contributions to scientific research

Lacks, a black woman, suffered from cervical cancer while being treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1951. A surgeon removed cells from her cervix without her consent during a procedure and this sample allowed a doctor at the hospital to create the first human cell line to reproduce outside the body.

The cell line, now known as HeLa cells, allowed scientists to experiment and create life-saving drugs, including the polio vaccine, in vitro fertilization, and genetic mapping, and helped advance the cancer and AIDS research.

Lacks, 31, died the same year from cancer, but her influence in the field of medical science continued, earning her the WHO Director-General’s Award.

“By honoring Henrietta Lacks, WHO recognizes the importance of addressing past scientific injustices and advancing racial equity in health and science,” said Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus in a statement. “It is also an opportunity to recognize women – especially women of color – who have made incredible but often invisible contributions to medical science.”

Several grandchildren, great-grandchildren and other members of Lack’s family attended the awards ceremony at the WHO Geneva office. His 87-year-old son, Lawrence Lacks, Sr., accepted the award on his behalf.

“We are moved to receive this historic recognition from my mother, Henrietta Lacks – honoring who she was as a remarkable woman and the lasting impact of her HeLa cells. My mother’s once-hidden contributions are now rightly honored for their global impact, “Lawrence Lacks said in a statement.

“My mother was a pioneer in life, giving back to her community, helping others live better lives and caring for others,” he added. “In death, she continues to help the world. Her legacy lives on in us and we thank you for saying her name – Henrietta Lacks.”

Family sues biotech company for non-consensual use of its cells

At the time of the Lacks procedure, taking cells from people without their consent was not against the protocols.

Earlier this month, the Lacks family filed a lawsuit against Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. for unfair enrichment resulting from the non-consensual use and profit of its tissue sample and cell line.

The lawsuit alleges that Thermo Fisher Scientific knowingly profits from the “unlawful conduct” of Johns Hopkins physicians and that its “ill-gotten gains belong by right to Ms. Lacks’ estate.”

He argues that the company “made a conscious choice to sell and mass produce the living tissues of Henrietta Lacks, a black woman, grandmother, and community leader, although the company knows that Ms. Lacks’ tissues have left her behind. been taken without his consent. by doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital and a racially unfair medical system. “

While the origin of HeLa cells was unclear for years, Lacks’ story became widely known in the 21st century. It was the subject of a bestselling book, “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks”, which was released in 2010, and a subsequent film of the same name starring Oprah Winfrey. The United States House of Representatives has recognized his non-consensual contribution to cancer research, and John Hopkins hosts a series of annual conferences on his impact on medicine.

The lawsuit claims that with this broad recognition, there is no way for Thermo Fisher Scientific to say that it did not know the history of its products containing HeLa cells and points to a page on the website of the ‘company which recognizes that the cells were taken without Lacks’ consent. According to the lawsuit, there are at least 12 products marketed by Thermo Fisher that include the HeLa cell line.

Thermo Fisher Scientific generates annual sales of approximately $ 35 billion, according to its website. CNN has contacted the company for comment.

CNN’s Taylor Romine contributed to this report.


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Women’s Sports Foundation Celebrates Inspirational Athletes, Girls and Sport Leaders at Annual Women in Sport Tribute

Allyson Felix, Jordan Larson, Kim Ng, Naomi Osaka and Larry Scott honored with Foundation Signature Awards

Posted: October 13, 2021 at 8:00 p.m. CDT|Update: 4 hours ago

NEW YORK, October 13, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Tonight, the Women’s Sports Foundation celebrated the extraordinary accomplishments of athletes and leaders in women’s sport at their annual salute. Recognized as the biggest evening in women’s sport, the event paid tribute to athletes and executives who made history. Allyson Felix, Jordan larson, Kim Ng, Naomi Osaka and Larry scott – in a national broadcast on Yahoo Sports, preceded by an exclusive reception for donors and supporters of the New-York Historical Society. The salute was presented by WSF Athleta partners, espnW, Gatorade, NBC Sports Group and Yahoo Sports.

The biggest evening in women’s sport! WFTU annual tribute to women in sport.

In a year in which the first female coaches won Super Bowl rings, a former WNBA player became part-owner of the franchise and Team United States women in Tokyo By winning 58% and 60% of the team’s Olympic and Paralympic medals, respectively, there is much to celebrate. The power, impact and popularity of women’s sports and athletes continue to grow – with athletes serving as inspiration and role models, motivating the next generation of young girls to #KeepPlaying. WSF research has shown that participation in sport offers many lifelong benefits, including health and wellness, goal setting and mastery, discipline, self-confidence and leadership skills. While the Salute invites everyone to revel in the celebration, it also serves to remind people of the continued need for equitable access, inclusion and opportunities in sport for girls and women, and he mobilizes everyone to take measures to support the Foundation in its mission.

“The Women’s Sports Foundation is an ally, an advocate and a catalyst for girls and women to reach their highest potential in sport and life,” said Billie Jean King, founder of the WSF. “I am inspired by this incredible group of award winners and proud to recognize their record breaking and earth-shattering accomplishments, and encouraged by girls around the world who are boldly breaking new ground.”

The Foundation’s coveted prizes and this year’s winners included:

Sportswoman of the Year Award – presented to an athlete (in individual sport and team sport) who has shown outstanding athletic performance in the past 12 months.

  • Individual sport, Allyson Felix (Athletics) – World record holder, 18-time World Championship medalist, 11-time Olympic medalist and America’s most decorated track and field athlete in history.
  • Team sport, Jordan larson (Volleyball) – Triple Olympic medalist and captain of history United States Women’s volleyball team.

Wilma Rudolph Courage Price – presented to a female athlete or a team that shows extraordinary courage in its sports performance, demonstrates its ability to overcome adversity, makes a significant contribution to sport and serves as a role model.

  • Naomi Osaka – Four-time Grand Slam champion, social justice activist and mental health advocate

Billie Jean King Leadership Award featured with the Billie Jean King Leadership Initiative – recognizes an individual or group who demonstrates exceptional leadership and contributes significantly to the advancement of women through achievement in sport and the workplace.

  • Kim Ng – General Manager (GM) of the Miami Marlins, the highest ranked woman in Major League Baseball and the first female general manager of all professional male sports teams in the North American major leagues.

Equality Champion Award – recognizes an individual or organization that demonstrates an unwavering commitment to gender equality and the advancement of women and girls in sport.

  • Larry scott – Former Commissioner of the Pac 12 conference, former CEO of the WTA Tour

More information on the winners and their awards can be found here.

The evening’s festivities were a hybrid of virtual and in-person celebration. In addition to the award winners, the Salute show featured programs such as the recently launched Power of She Fund: Child Care Grant, with Athleta, which supports mom-athletes; and the community-based girls’ group The Cycle Effect, which empowers girls through mountain biking and mentoring. The WSF also announced its next president-elect, three-time Olympian and director of player development for the New Jersey Devils, Meghan Duggan, who will take charge of January 2022 the current president, member of the World Rugby Hall of Famer and mixed martial arts athlete Phaidra Knight. Champion athletes participating in the New-York Historical Society event included: Grete Eliassen, Aja Evans, Rachel Garcia, Jessica long, Tatiana mcfadden, Maggie Steffens and more.

“I look forward to the Salute every year to applaud and shine the much-deserved spotlight on everyone’s commitment and accomplishments,” said Phaidra Knight, President of the WSF. “At all levels of sport, women continue to excel and make history. The courage, power and determination displayed throughout the year by women in sport is exactly what the next generation of girls need to see to inspire their own limitless possibilities.

A replay of the WSF Annual Salute, produced by Springtime Media, can be found here. More information about the event can be found here.

About the Women’s Sports Foundation
The Women’s Sports Foundation exists to empower girls and women to reach their potential in sport and in life. We are an ally, an advocate and a catalyst. Founded by Billie Jean King in 1974, we strengthen and expand opportunities for participation and leadership through research, advocacy, community programs and a wide variety of collaborative partnerships. The Women’s Sports Foundation has positively shaped the lives of millions of young people, student-athletes, elite athletes and coaches. We are building a future where every girl and woman can #KeepPlaying and enjoy the lifelong benefits of participating in sport. All the girls. All the women. All sportsÒ. To learn more about the Women’s Sports Foundation, please visit www.WomensSportsFoundation.org

CONTACT:
Patty bifulco
Women’s Sports Foundation
631.230.3322
[email protected]

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SOURCE Women’s Sports Foundation

The above press release has been provided courtesy of PRNewswire. The views, opinions and statements contained in the press release are not endorsed by Gray Media Group and do not necessarily state or reflect those of Gray Media Group, Inc.


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Jonathan Katz urges Elon community and nation to learn from history

Zemari Ahmadi was killed by a US drone strike in Afghanistan in August this year. Ahmadi, along with nine other members of his family, drove a vehicle that the United States mistakenly took for use by a branch of the Islamic State called ISIS-K.

According to author and journalist Johnathan Katz, this type of unapologetic brutality is not uncommon in countries around the world, including the United States. Liberal Arts Forum initiative, Katz spoke at Elon University on October 11 about the consequences of what he called the imperialist mentality and the danger of a desensitized nation.

Katz kicked off his lecture by highlighting the injustice against Ahmadi and his family. Not only were they civilians, but seven of the ten people killed in the strike were children. It was only after the United States received a backlash for the strike that the Pentagon admitted to any sort of wrongdoing. Ahmadi’s remaining family have still not received compensation or reparations, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Drawing on that concept, Katz gave a history lesson on the US occupation of Afghanistan and Haiti for nearly 20 years, as well as the Capitol Riot on January 6. Katz said these three instances can be used to examine and define America’s current economic, political and militaristic climate.

“These three places and their histories and their histories are actually very, very intertwined in a way that I think is instructive in understanding them individually, us as a country and people and understanding growth differently than we do, Americans, can take in the future, ”Katz said.

Katz was the only full-time US journalist in Haiti during the 2010 earthquake and Associated Press correspondent in Haiti from 2007 to 2011. He later revealed the story that United Nations soldiers likely caused cholera outbreak after earthquake that killed thousands. Katz has reported in more than a dozen countries and territories.

In 2011 he was awarded the Medill Medill for Courage in Journalism and in 2019 was National Fellow in New America. Katz also previously headed the Media & Journalism Initiative at the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University, and still contributes frequently to the New York Times and other publications.

Katz is currently writing a book, “Gangsters of Capitalism”, on General Smedley Butler and the legacy of the American Empire. Its release is scheduled for January 18, 2022.

At the event, Katz described in depth the reasoning reported by America behind the occupation of Haiti from 1915 to 1934 and Afghanistan from 2001 to 2021. He also explained the motivations that did not been reported.

“If the reason we went to Afghanistan was to root out Osama bin Laden and destroy the Taliban government that offered him refuge, then this mission should have ended in 2011,” Katz said. “But the mission of war … continued for another decade, and that’s because [the U.S. government had] these other ideals.

From Katz’s perspective, the world’s superpowers have wreaked havoc on Third World countries under the guise of providing aid, education and “civilization.” Katz said that after millions of deaths, entire regions stripped of their resources, and the will of stronger, foreign nations being applied to the colonized, world powers want to forget the past and pretend every country is starting from the same. starting line.

Professor Linda Dunn, who teaches in Peace and Conflict Studies at Elon University, has been a member of a peace organization located in Alamance County for over 40 years. The group, which started as Peacemakers of Alamance County, has now grown into a chapter of Peace Action. Peace action is a national organization that focuses on efforts such as war, the nuclear threat, poverty, climate change and terrorism.

Dunn attended the conference to get Katz’s advice on how best to educate the masses on how people can be conscious and active citizens.

According to Dunn, the Alamance chapter of Action pour la paix has largely focused on educating people about the current state of the country and how it has become, which includes anchoring institutional racism and funding for the American military might. With concepts and ideals brought to the forefront of American minds in light of events such as the withdrawal from Afghanistan and the riot on the Capitol, Dunn said she believed it was more practical than ever to ‘educate the public.

“I have a lot of hope right now,” Dunn said. “I really believe that you young people are more and more aware of all of these issues – of how institutional racism and all of that stuff relates to this military abuse, and our mindset of spending so much money. money for war. “

Considering that Haiti was the first country in the world to abolish slavery and gain independence in 1804Katz said the nation takes great pride in holding its own identity and its own success. About a century after gaining independence, US troops occupied Haiti under the pretext of restore stability in the Caribbean.

According to Katz, during the 20 years of American occupation of Haiti, American troops reestablished slavery, overthrew the Haitian Parliament and emptied the country of its resources for American profit. Now, as the leader of the modern world, the United States still refuses to provide reparations or acknowledge that Haiti’s current state of suffering is its fault, Katz said.

Not only did Katz draw the same correlation from the US occupation of Afghanistan, but he also pointed to the Capitol insurgency earlier this year as a byproduct of the Americans’ response to US military might. Katz pointed out that not only is the United States responsible for the horrors of colonization, political instability and poverty, but the imposition of its strength and will always occurs – regardless of the consequences on human lives.

“I think the first thing we need to do is stop and look at ourselves in the mirror and look at our history,” Katz said. “This kind of awareness has come home in a major way, and Americans are not sure what to do with it – and so some Americans are looking to America first.”

Although this is not a new concept, Katz explained the effect of “brutalizing” a country like the United States, where people are becoming increasingly numb to destruction, to violence. death and poverty left in other countries by their own nation.

“It’s the fault line that exists in America right now, and there certainly is the fault line in a lot of individual Americans with ‘which way are we going to go,’” Katz said. “Are we going to be brutalized or are we going to stop at realizing ourselves?” “

In the wake of more people learning and sympathizing with the damage inflicted on less developed countries by global superpowers, Katz warned that without proper remedies, these war-torn countries would fall into more corrupt and hostile systems. In the case of reparations, Katz said there must be an acknowledgment of what has been stripped and stolen that has put developing countries at a disadvantage from the start.

“It’s the kind of thing that can allow you to take those experiences, hold onto that story and turn it into something more productive instead of just doubling and tripling the brutality,” Katz said.



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NKY Montessori Academy begins its 54th year with a new name, Crescent Ridge Academy, and a new branding

Northern Kentucky Montessori Academy has gone beyond its name and space and begins the first step of the next chapter in the organization’s 54-year history with a new name and brand identity.

Crescent Ridge Academy is the new name of the non-profit organization that includes Montessori education for children and Montessori teacher training for adults.

“In 2019, the Northern Kentucky Montessori Academy partnered with the Greater Cincinnati Center for Montessori Education to provide Montessori education and instruction to children and adults,” said school principal Lisa Dieso.

“When these two organizations merged into one, names were often swapped and confusing for our community, so we made the decision to participate in a brand study and ultimately a new name and brand identity. “

Crescent Ridge Academy has developed a new website and logo to reflect the changes in the organization.

“In our current space, our listings are at maximum capacity and we have started working with our Board of Directors to develop a plan to meet our long-term needs,” said Lisa Dieso.

Lisa Dieso

Crescent Ridge Academy is currently the only accredited Montessori school in northern Kentucky and one of only three in Kentucky.

The new name and logo are simplistic but full of meaning. A crescent moon symbolizes opportunity and imagination. The word ridge connects to the geographic location of the school, and Montessori describes the nature of the organization.

The new name is accompanied by a new logo, mascot and website that work together to identify as a hotbed of opportunity, imagination and growth for all learners. The crest appears like an open book. With the trees at the top, it represents growth and an organization rooted in lifelong learning.

Crescent Ridge Academy welcomes children between the ages of two and twelve and has over 100 registrants. The teacher training program provides quality education for people who wish to become certified Montessori teachers. It is affiliated with the American Montessori Society and accredited by the Montessori Accreditation Council for teacher education.

For more information, visit https://crescentridgeacademy.org/.


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