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Evening update: pandemic dominates federal campaign after Jason Kenney’s overthrow in Alberta


Have a good evening, let’s start with today’s best stories:

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau calls the COVID-19 situation in Alberta “heartbreaking” and says Ottawa will send ventilators to the province. Meanwhile, Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole wouldn’t say if he still supports Prime Minister Jason Kenney’s response to the pandemic.

The federal campaign has been disrupted by Kenney’s decision this week to declare a state of public health emergency and introduce a vaccine passport system in the province. Trudeau on Thursday criticized O’Toole’s previous support for the premier of Alberta. In turn, Mr. O’Toole sued Mr. Trudeau for calling an election amid a pandemic, and said the $ 600 million spent on the campaign could have been sent to the provinces to fight the Delta variant. highly contagious instead. .

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“The fans are on. Anything more we can do, be it sending more health professionals like we did to Ontario a few months ago when they were overwhelmed. We’re going to make sure Albertans get the support of everyone in this country in the way they need to get through this time. “

Alberta Health Services said on Wednesday the agency will ask other provinces if they can take care of patients in Alberta’s intensive care units, as well as if they can send frontline staff.

Related:

  • Federal campaigns must do everything to get supporters to the polls
  • Saskatchewan to Require Proof of COVID-19 Vaccination to Try to Increase Adoption

This is the daily evening update bulletin. If you’re reading this on the web, or if it was sent to you as a transfer, you can sign up for Evening Update and over 20 other Globe newsletters. here. If you like what you see, share it with your friends.

Chinese PLA general collaborates with licensed scientist at Canada’s top infectious disease lab

A high-ranking People’s Liberation Army officer collaborated on Ebola research with one of the scientists who was later fired from the Canadian High Security Infectious Disease Laboratory in Winnipeg.

Research by Major-General Chen Wei and former Canadian government laboratory scientist Xiangguo Qiu indicates that cooperation between the Chinese military and scientists at the National Microbiology Laboratory has gone much further than previously thought. previously. major-general. Chen Wei was recently praised by President Xi Jinping for developing a Chinese vaccine against COVID-19,

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major-general. Chen Wei and Dr Qiu, who until recently headed the vaccine and antiviral therapy development section at the Winnipeg lab, collaborated on two scientific papers on Ebola, in 2016 and 2020. These papers did not identify the major-general. Chen as a high-ranking officer in the military wing of the ruling Chinese Communist Party. Instead, she is identified as Wei Chen, who holds a PhD and works at the Beijing Biotechnology Institute.

Common? SpikeVax? Health Canada Authorizes Rebranding for Approved COVID-19 Vaccines

Health Canada has approved new names for the Pfizer, Moderna and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine will now carry the brand name Comirnaty, which the company says represents a combination of the terms COVID-19, mRNA, community and immunity. The Moderna vaccine will go through SpikeVax and the AstraZeneca vaccine will be called Vaxzevria.

Manufacturers said the changes followed full approval of the vaccines by Health Canada on Thursday. During the interim order, which expired Thursday, the vaccines did not carry their brand names.

Read more:

  • NHL says it expects 98% of players to be fully vaccinated before the start of the season
  • France suspends around 3,000 health workers for failing to comply with COVID-19 vaccine mandate

ALSO ON OUR RADAR

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Ontario is requiring universities and colleges to update their policies on sexual assault: The province says policies need to better support students who file complaints. The guidelines were released amid calls from University of Western Ontario students to tackle the threat of sexual violence on campus after allegations that young women were drugged and sexually assaulted in residence last week.

The world risks missing its climate targets despite the pandemic pause in emissions, according to the UN: The economic slowdown linked to the virus caused only a temporary drop in CO2 emissions last year and that was not enough to reverse the rising levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, said the ‘World Meteorological Organization, adding that there is a growing likelihood that the world will miss its Paris The deal aims to reduce global warming to 1.5C above pre-industrial levels.

Suncor is partnering with eight Indigenous communities to purchase TC Energy’s remaining interest in Northern Courier Pipeline: Suncor, three First Nations communities and five Métis communities will own a 15% interest in this approximately $ 1.3 billion pipeline asset. The partnership is expected to generate roughly $ 16 million per year in gross revenue for its partners and provide reliable revenue, Suncor said in a statement.

The Maple Leafs and Sabers will play an outdoor game in Hamilton on March 13: Buffalo is listed as the home team against the Maple Leafs in the NHL Heritage Classic, which will be played at Tim Hortons Field. Buffalo becomes the first US-based team to compete in what will be the sixth Heritage Classic.

WAKE-UP

A drop in commodities depressed the major Canadian stock index a day before heightened volatility associated with the quarterly expiration of options known as quadruple witching.

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The S & P / TSX Composite Index closed 91.69 points lower at 20,602.10.

In New York, the Dow Jones Industrial Index lost 63.07 points to 34,751.32. The S&P 500 Index lost 6.95 points to 4,473.75, while the Nasdaq composite was up 20.39 points to 15,181.92.

The Canadian dollar was trading at 78.90 US cents against 79.05 US cents on Wednesday.

Got a topical tip you’d like us to review? Write to us at [email protected]. Need to share documents securely? Contact us via SecureDrop.

DISCUSSION POINTS

Climate change puts Canada’s seniors at risk

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“If you think the pandemic has been incredibly difficult, remember that the World Health Organization and The Lancet have both declared climate change to be the number one health threat of this century. And just as we’ve seen with COVID-19, climate change won’t affect all Canadians equally. “- Amit Arya and Samantha Green

Canada’s gun violence epidemic is unlike what you might think

“Instead of just hearing an audio clip of Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole’s opinion on Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau’s semi-automatic rifle ban, it would have been nice to hear it as well, as well as other leaders, discuss the details of Bill C-21. Gun owners and community leaders have voiced opposition to the legislation, which contains many provisions that are not rooted in evidence-based science. “- Jooyoung lee

Low-income Canadian households will suffer the most from surging inflation

“If we truly appreciate the essential services that our workers provide to our economy, we should also appreciate the increase in their wages. Higher wages will cushion the impact of inflation on low-income Canadians, encourage more of these workers to re-enter the workforce, and alleviate labor shortages in businesses. – Sohaib Shahid

LIVE BETTER

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Five shows to see across Canada (and five to watch online) as theater returns to normal

Globe Theater columnist J. Kelly Nestruck says it has never been clearer than this month that theater is a local art form. As such, Canadian cities are in very different return states.

In Montreal, for example, the performing arts have almost returned to a pre-pandemic level of activity. In Toronto, on the other hand, many large theater companies wait until winter or even spring to resume in-person performances indoors.

Nestruck is taking a look at some in-person shows to look forward to this fall, but also has a few alternatives online.

LONG READING OF THE DAY

Ocean Cleanup struggles to deliver on pledge to eliminate plastic from the Pacific

An offshore supply vessel used by the nonprofit Ocean Cleanup to remove plastic from the ocean is docked in a port in Victoria on September 8, 2021.

GLORIA DICKIE / Reuters

Ocean Cleanup, a non-profit organization launched in 2013 and funded by cash donations and support from companies such as Coca-Cola, had hopes of ridding the world’s oceans of 90% of floating plastic by here. 2040. The meager transport shows how difficult the task will be.

The group’s best-case scenario allows it to remove 20,000 tonnes per year from the North Pacific, a small fraction of the roughly 11 million tonnes of plastic dumped into the oceans each year. And that amount entering the ocean is expected to nearly triple to 29 million tonnes per year by 2040, according to the Pew Charitable Trusts.

During a month’s 120-hour trip, Ocean Cleanup collected 8.2 tonnes of plastic – less than the standard haul of a garbage truck.

“I think they came from a good place to want to help the ocean, but by far the best way to help the ocean is to prevent plastic from getting into the ocean in the first place,” said Miriam Goldstein, Director of the Ocean. politics at the Center for American Progress think tank.

Read the full story here.

The evening update is presented by Rob Gilroy. If you wish to receive this newsletter by e-mail every weekday evening, go to here register. If you have any comments, drop us a line. Remark.


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DVIDS – News – US Army EOD soldiers to participate in Multinational Exercise Ardent Defender in Canada


CANADIAN FORCES BASE BORDEN, Ontario, Canada – U.S. Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal Soldiers will train with military and law enforcement personnel from 11 partner nations during Exercise Ardent Defender on 18 September to October 22.

Army EOD technicians from Fort Bragg, North Carolina, the 192nd Field Artillery Battalion (EOD) will participate in the explosive threat countermeasures exercise with military and law enforcement personnel from the States- United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, France, Italy, South Korea, Australia, Colombia, Mexico and Ecuador.

The annual exercise has been held since 2012 at bases across Canada, including the Royal Canadian Air Force Base in Trenton and Fleet Diving Unit Pacific Base in Esquimalt.

Major Atif Rizvi, the Canadian Armed Forces’ principal planner for Exercise Ardent Defender, said Canadian Forces Base Borden is the primary location for the exercise.

“Exercise Ardent Defender enables partner countries to work collaboratively, share best practices and improve their preparedness for current and emerging threats,” said Rizvi. “The unique opportunity to interact with a wide range of local law enforcement agencies and other government departments simulates the complex and real environments expected in high-stake missions. “

Part of the Canadian Air Mobility Fleet, Rizvi is an Aerospace Engineering Officer and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Flight Commander from Mississauga, Ontario, Canada.

“The objective of the exercise is to use a bottom-up approach to ensure that EOD and improvised explosive device training activities continue as emerging threats to counter IED are observed around the world.” , said Rizvi.

Assigned to the 192nd EOD Battalion, Soldiers from the 754th EOD Company based in New York and the 760th EOD Company at Fort Drum, as well as the 55th EOD Company based in Fort Belvoir, Va., Represent the United States during the exercise.

The battalion is part of the 52nd EOD Group based out of Fort Campbell, Ky., And the 20th Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives Command (CBRNE).

The 20th CBRNE Command at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., Is the United States Department of Defense’s first all-hazards formation.

Based at 19 facilities in 16 states, the soldiers and civilians of 20th CBRNE Command face and fight the world’s most dangerous weapons and dangers.

Maj.Thomas N. Shanahan, operations officers for the 192nd EOD Battalion, said the exercise will provide an opportunity for EOD soldiers to train the way they fight – in a combined, interagency and joint forces.

“Our EOD technicians must be prepared to deploy anywhere on short notice,” said Shanahan, a native of Cecil, Pa., Who served in Iraq. “Ardent Defender gives our EOD soldiers the opportunity to hone their skills and leverage the expertise of our joint, allied and interagency partners.”

Date taken: 09/16/2021
Date posted: 09.16.2021 12:17
Story ID: 405406
Site: BORDEN, ON, CA
Hometown: MISSISSAUGA, ON, CA
Hometown: CECIL, PA, United States

Web Views: 4
Downloads: 0

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Oakville woman, 21, among several accused of dating scam in Burlington


A 21-year-old Oakville woman is one of many arrested by the Halton Police 3rd District Criminal Investigation Bureau in a series of frauds related to a Burlington romance scam.

In October and November 2020, an elderly victim was contacted by someone claiming to be a retired Canadian Army sergeant named Darren Michaelson, and began a romantic relationship online.

For several weeks, the victim was swindled over $ 150,000 after sending money to people she said were helping Michaelson settle legal issues and help her return to Canada.

The Oakville woman was arrested and charged with fraud over $ 5,000, possession of property obtained by crime over $ 5,000 and laundering the proceeds of crime.

A 38-year-old woman from London, accused of fraud over $ 5,000, was also arrested and charged; a 36-year-old man from Toronto, charged with fraud under $ 5,000; a 35-year-old man from Toronto charged with fraud over $ 5,000, possession of property obtained by crime over $ 5,000 and laundering of proceeds of crime; and a 28-year-old man from Toronto, charged with fraud over $ 5,000 and laundering proceeds of crime.

More arrests are planned and police believe there may be more victims.

Police would like to remind residents of the danger and frequency of these types of scams and not to send money or gift cards to people you haven’t met in person. Do not provide your personal information such as financial documents, identification or passwords when communicating online.

More information on scams is available on the Anti-Fraud Center website or on the Halton Regional Police Service website.

Visit https://www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/index-fra.htm Where

https://www.haltonpolice.ca/en/staying-safe/frauds-and-scams.aspx

According to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Center, online romance scams cost Canadians more than $ 7.3 million in 2020 alone.

Anyone with information regarding this investigation is asked to contact Detective Constable Derek Gray of the Burlington Bureau of Criminal Investigations – Seniors Liaison Team at 905-825-4747, ext. 2344.

Tips can also be submitted anonymously to Crime Stoppers. “Do you see something? Do you hear something? Do you know something? Contact Crime Stoppers ”at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or via the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.ca.


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Remember this, Newmarket: when soldiers came from across Canada to train


In this week’s column, History Hound Richard MacLeod continues his examination of the pivotal years of 1939 and 1940

Let’s continue our look at the 1939s and 1940s of Newmarket history. When we last stopped by, they were starting construction on the military camp and the first soldiers were about to arrive in Newmarket. You can read the first part here.

Local businesses are starting to reap the benefits of having 3,500 new soldiers in town. The city’s business register indicates that there were approximately 200 active businesses in Newmarket, 99 businesses and trades located on the east side of Main Street and another 91 on the west side of Main Street.

There have been some changes in our council as Dr Boyd has left and Dr L. Dales replaced him as mayor and A. Armstrong replaced Dennis Mungoven on the council. James Sloss was still our chief of police with Kenneth Mount and W. Curtis identified as official agents.

Max Boag is the local customs officer and LP Cane is the postmaster. The local public school board is made up of WH Eves, President, RL Pritchard, Secretary-Treasurer, RE Manning, Dr Charles Edwards, Frank Bothwell and LB Rose.

City records identify 13 municipal properties on the list:

  • Fire Station – Main Street West
  • Clerk’s office – Main Street West
  • Town Hall and Market Square – Botsford Street
  • Police Office – Botsford Street
  • Water and lighting plant – rue Prospect Est.
  • The reservoir, rue Prospect
  • Pumping Station – Srigley Street
  • Agricultural park – Rue des Pins Est
  • Memorial park – Rue D’Arcy
  • Widdifield Park – Water Street
  • Lions Club Park – From the Church to Lorne Avenue
  • York County Hospital – Huron Street (Davis Drive)
  • York County Nursing Residence – Next to York County Hospital on Davis Drive

There were also four government properties listed:

  • The post office – main street
  • York County Registry Office – Main Street
  • York County Industrial House – Yonge and Eagle Street
  • Dominion of Canada Army Training Camp – Fairgrounds

The wartime entertainment scene has started to heat up. In March 1940, Newmarket’s own group Max Boag performed to a full house at the ‘Y’ Theater at Camp Borden with Polly Dobson and Gene McCaffrey as vocal soloists.

The hot thing in June 1940 was the expected increase in tax revenues, as reported by Mr. Mathews, our city clerk.

Economically, however, all was not rosy. Foreign markets for fine leather products forced the Davis Leather Company to lay off men at the local factory. The office specialty had however been asked to increase production on its government contracts and therefore the specialty would increase its staff, absorbing some of those men who were made redundant at the tannery.

Fundraising campaigns through the sale of war savings bonds and rationing of essential items have started in earnest at the local level. In July 1940, it was reported in the local newspaper that $ 235 in savings bonds had been sold at the local Strand Theater on Main Street.

In addition, local musicians have organized performances throughout the region. Local musicians like Jack Arlitt and Mr. Donnie Cribber on cornet, James Bradford and his father on drums and Harold Gadsby, a local vocal soloist and the Art West Band presented performances to benefit the war campaign.

In October 1940, the first class of trainees arrived for the opening of the Newmarket military camp. There were already over 100 officers and staff here, including the lieutenant. Colonel RB Harkness who was the camp commander and Major B. Hanley who was the second in command.

I mentioned in the first episode of this series that the land in the Connaught Gardens development was turned over to the military camp for its use. For the record, there were, at the time, 81 building plots on the books when ownership was transferred to the military camp.

A local newspaper article tells us that Ross Caradonna, a local businessman and proud new Canadian, donated $ 100 to the local Red Cross and $ 25 to the Veterans Comfort Fund. The generosity of the local business community is highlighted in most publications.

The main news of 1940 was, of course, the initial deployment of our local boys, in basic training and then overseas. The newspaper posted their photos weekly, proudly listing where they had been deployed and quite often giving a bit of background on them.

According to those I had the honor to interview, including my own mother, there was a great sense of pride that our people had left to save the world, but there was also an underlying sense of apprehension and fear on everyone’s lips regarding these young men. , the fear that they will not come back safe and sound.

For some of our boys, it actually was. I think that’s why we opened our hearts to those passing through our military camp, we hoped someone would take care of our boys wherever they were and we in turn were determined to take good care of them. these young men who arrived here even for a limited time.

Under the title “Newmarket Boys Help Whallop Hitler,” published December 31, 1940, in the Newmarket Era, we were introduced to some of the local men who had previously been called up for service. The article lists their name, rank and where they are currently serving. I have included this era page with the other photos for your information. I recognize several of the names listed.

Our boys have been deployed to a variety of destinations. Here is a list of the young men who were now serving their country in December 1941. You may recognize several of them. Some of the young men had crossed the ocean before and were now serving in England. They included: Ate. Don Lyall, Pte. Albert Skelton, Pte. Reg. Bell, Pte. Fred Evans, cap. Tom Smith, Pte. Chuck Harrison, Gunners J and G. Harmon, Sdt. Allan McDonald, Pte. Earl and Walter Wrightman, Pte. Percy Myers, Pte. Wilfred Pipher, Driver Percy Lloyd, Pte. Art Brymer, Pte. R. Chappel, Cpl. Gordon Thompson, and Cpl. Ted Robinson.

Still stationed here in Canada, we have Pte. Vic Bridges, Airman A, Rowland, Lieutenant Dr. Bartholomew, Seaman Joe Gladman, Gnr. Howard Brown, Gn. Art Dobbie, Pte. Elias Fairey, Pte. Roy Chant, Pte. Bob Fontaine, Airman Walter Gilroy, Airman JR Eakins, Sgt. Albert Lindenbaum, Pte. Ross Greenwood, Pte. David Tait, Pte. Percy Pemberton, and Pte. Bill Dowling. And in the service of our military camp, we had Captain Dr Edwards.

The names of these men listed above are just a brief example of the parade of local guys who registered in Newmarket from the fall of 1940, and this will continue until the end of the war.

As you can imagine, the fall of 1940 was a turning point in our history for so many of our local families, indeed for the whole community. The war had taken on a fierce reality for the city, and I believe it profoundly changed the very soul of Newmarket. The streets of Newmarket were now populated by young men from across Canada, of all religions, races and ethnicities. He brought the world to our doorstep.

This will continue for the next five or six years. Every six weeks a new group of 3,500 young men would come in and be absorbed into our community. Some would return after the war and settle in Newmarket. Unfortunately, some would never come back. The harsh reality of the war was now upon the town of Newmarket. It tends to change a community, to anchor itself in the very fiber of the city.

I hope you enjoyed this brief look back at the years 1939 and 1940, two years which I believe were defining years in the history of our Newmarket.

Sources: The Memorable Merchants and Trades 1930 to 1950 by Eugene McCaffrey and George Luesby; The Newmarket era

********************

Newmarket resident Richard MacLeod the history dog ​​has been a local historian for over 40 years. He writes a weekly article on the history of our city in partnership with Newmarket Today, organizes local heritage lectures and walking tours, and conducts local oral history interviews.


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A boon in arms and equipment for the Taliban


There are dozens of key bases around Afghanistan which are now in the hands of the Taliban after the withdrawal of the international armed forces.

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As the Taliban came to power in Afghanistan, they seized an arsenal of military equipment that in some cases exceeded parts of the inventory of Western armed forces such as the Canadian Forces.

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Taliban fighters staged a victory parade in Kandahar City on Wednesday, showing off dozens of US-made armored vehicles and other weapons they captured in their lightning victory over the Afghan army and police. An American-made Black Hawk helicopter, dragging a Taliban flag, also flew over the city to highlight the insurgents’ ability to use more sophisticated equipment.

As the United States retreated from Afghanistan, it attempted to deactivate at least some of the equipment.

General Kenneth McKenzie, head of the United States Central Command, told reporters that 70 armored vehicles, 27 Humvee trucks and 73 planes were deactivated before the troops left Kabul. “These planes will never fly again,” he said. “They can never be operated on by anyone. “

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Pentagon spokesman John Kirby told CNN that the only usable equipment remaining at the airport included fire trucks and forklifts.

But there are dozens of other key bases around Afghanistan that are now in the hands of the Taliban and, with that, tons of military equipment.

The Afghan army operated more than 600 armored vehicles, similar to the tactical armored patrol vehicles of the Canadian Forces. In contrast, the Canadian Forces have approximately 500 APRTs.

The Afghan army also had over 22,000 Humvee, 150 anti-mine vehicles, 8,000 transport trucks, 160 M113 armored vehicles, over 350,000 assault rifles, 64,000 assorted machine guns, 120,000 pistols and over 170 pieces of artillery, according to various reports. Also left behind 33 transport helicopters, over 30 Black Hawk helicopters and 40 other light helicopters. In addition, there were approximately 65 assorted fixed-wing aircraft. The current state of the arsenal is not known.

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The operating time of this equipment is subject to question. The United States spent more than $ 500 million on 16 military transport planes for the Afghan army. But in 2013, planes were abandoned in Kabul due to a lack of spare parts.

A Department of National Defense official said on Wednesday that there were only limited amounts of Canadian equipment left in Afghanistan and that was years ago. This did not include weapons or large vehicles.

But Canada continued to fund Afghan security forces even after the military’s official departure in 2014, earmarking $ 330 million for the initiative.

Canada's former military installation, Camp Nathan Smith, in Kandahar City, was handed over to Afghan security forces but abandoned in late 2013. DAVID PUGLIESE / Postmedia
Canada’s former military installation, Camp Nathan Smith, in Kandahar City, was handed over to Afghan security forces but abandoned in late 2013. DAVID PUGLIESE / Postmedia Photo by David Pugliese /Postmedia

The Taliban also now control large amounts of infrastructure built and paid for by Western taxpayers. Base Kandahar, which once housed thousands of Canadian troops, was captured intact.

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Canada spent about $ 50 million on the Dahla Dam project which the Canadian government declared a success. The dam is still not functioning properly and needs hundreds of millions of dollars to complete.

The Dahla Dam project was one of Canada’s most controversial aid programs in Afghanistan. Some $ 10 million from the budget went to security provided by an Afghan company whose owner was convicted of drug-related crimes and accused of being an interpreter for the Taliban.

When Canadian soldiers withdrew from Kandahar in 2011, they left Camp Nathan Smith – the former base of Canada’s Provincial Reconstruction Team – to the Americans. A year later, the United States handed it over to the Afghans. At the end of 2013, it was discontinued.

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A similar pattern followed the withdrawal of Russian troops from Afghanistan in 1989. The Soviets embarked on a much more ambitious aid program than the United States and NATO, building thousands of kilometers of roads, tunnels, bridges, schools, buildings and military bases.

But, with the Taliban in charge, much of the infrastructure has fallen into disrepair.

One of the bridges is however still intact. In February 1989, the Soviet Army used the “Friendship Bridge” connecting Afghanistan to Uzbekistan to complete its withdrawal from Afghanistan. Last week, NATO-trained Afghan National Army troops used the same bridge to escape the Taliban.

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“Catastrophe” in Afghanistan: Canada saves only a fraction of the performers, according to an NGO


“As soon as the Canadians leave, the United States will leave, they will be massacred … It’s a disaster”

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Despite repeated government promises that Canada would save endangered interpreters and other Afghans who worked for that country, only a small fraction of them are airlifted out of Kabul, say advocates for local workers.

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About 90 percent of those flown by Ottawa from Afghanistan are Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Afghan origin, said Dave Fraser, a retired army general with the Veterans Transition Network.

Most performers and other ex-Canadian military and government employees are still waiting for a quickly fading opportunity to flee, he said.

“It’s always absolutely chaotic,” said Fraser, who led Canadian troops on Operation Medusa, that country’s most notorious offensive in Afghanistan. “It’s still incredibly dangerous.”

Chris Ecklund, founder of the Canadian Heroes Foundation, said only 100 of the 1,500 former employees and family members his group helps have made it to Canada. He estimates that the interpreters and their relatives represent only 5 to 10% of the evacuees.

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Meanwhile, the Taliban recently killed several former employees of that country, he said. Although he did not provide any details, such targeted assassinations have long been a hallmark of the organization.

“The government is just not interested in this, they never have been,” Ecklund accused. “We are there now, we have one week left. Are we going to take them all out? The math doesn’t make sense. It does not indicate that.

It’s still absolutely chaotic

Most have not received a visa from Canada and face a dangerous trek from privately funded secure homes in central Kabul to the airport, a trip that may include walking a mile down a sewer. in the open, according to defenders.

Other countries, like the British and the French, brought in hundreds of Afghans from the city in bus convoys.

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Although Canadian government officials told reporters that country’s special forces ventured outside the airport to bring people in, private lawyers say they see little evidence of this happening. produce.

As the August 31 deadline approaches for the departure of foreign forces from Afghanistan, desperation is growing among veterans and other Canadians helping ex-employees.

“It’s a nightmare,” said another Canadian NGO volunteer, who works with government officials and asked not to be named. “It is a disaster of epic proportions.”

Spokesmen for Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) could not be reached before the deadline for comment – or to describe who exactly is being evacuated.

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But Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Tuesday that Canada was prepared to stay in Afghanistan to continue evacuation efforts past the August 31 deadline, if possible.

“We will continue to work every day to bring out so many people alongside our allies,” Trudeau told reporters after a virtual meeting of G7 leaders. “The commitment of our G7 colleagues is clear: we will all work together to save as many people as possible.

  1.     In this file photo taken on August 15, 2021, Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau holds a press conference at Rideau Hall after asking Governor General Mary Simon to dissolve Parliament.

    Trudeau says Canada is ready to stay in Kabul past August 31 deadline after G7 meeting

  2. British and Canadian soldiers stand guard near a canal as Afghans wait outside the foreign military-controlled portion of Kabul airport, hoping to flee the country on August 22, 2021.

    Former Canadian interpreter fears for his life while awaiting evacuation from Afghanistan

However, US President Joe Biden, who set the deadline, has indicated his country will not stay beyond the end of this month.

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Trudeau also said Canada will continue to pressure the Taliban to allow people to leave the country even after the current phase ends.

Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan said in a tweet that Canada had flown 500 people out of the country just on Monday, adding to several hundred previously.

But Fraser said his group believed that only 11% of the 1,000 former interpreters and their families followed by VTN had received visas to come to Canada.

Even if they do receive a visa, getting into the airport and boarding a Canadian plane is a major challenge.

IRCC officials are telling Afghans to make their own way to the compound, despite the threat posed by huge crowds and Taliban guards, Fraser said.

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An Afghan-Canadian working for a Canadian NGO at the airport said it took people several days to get from the city to the airport. The quickest route takes them for three hours through an open sewer, where they then have to wait while Canadian authorities check their papers, said the man, who asked not to be named to avoid conflicts with government officials.

A friend who managed to cross and board a plane said he had traveled for several days as his children were injured by barbed wire and then had to wade through the sewers, he said by phone from Kabul.

A Canadian soldier walks through an evacuation checkpoint during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, August 24, 2021.
A Canadian soldier walks through an evacuation checkpoint during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, August 24, 2021. Photo by Staff Sgt. Victor Mancilla / US Marine Corps / Document via Reuters

The NGO worker estimated that about 95 percent of those who board Canadian planes are citizens or permanent residents. Most of the interpreters he knows have not even received a visa.

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Once they make contact with Canadian authorities, the fleeing Afghans face another obstacle. IRCC staff categorically reject any family member – including in one case the widowed mother of a former employee – who does not themselves have a visa, the airport worker and a lawyer said based in Canada.

A former Canadian military interpreter in Kandahar province who immigrated to Canada in 2010 argued that Afghan nationals and their families should in fact be given priority over Canadian citizens. They do not have passports that would allow them to leave the country after the departure of foreign forces, he said.

Khan, who asked that his last name not be released to avoid reprisals against his family in Afghanistan, said the policy should extend to relatives of performers like him who have already settled in Canada, as those relatives are at increased risk of retaliation by the Taliban.

There are over 200 ex-performers in Canada and so far no family member in Afghanistan has made it, he said.

“As soon as the Canadians leave, the United States will leave, they will be slaughtered,” Khan predicted. “It’s a disaster.”

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Edmonton women scramble to save brother from hiding in Afghanistan


Two Edmonton sisters were unable to sleep or eat as they hope their family will be selected under an Afghan resettlement program announced by the federal government last week.

CBC News has agreed to identify them only by first name for the safety of their families.

Malali and Maska say their brother worked for NATO and the US military, which now puts him and the rest of the family at risk.

According to Malali, they have been in hiding for about two weeks.

“The whole family – my brother and my mother and my two sisters and four brothers – they all live in the same house. And all of their lives are in danger because of this brother who worked with the US military,” he said. she declared.

“The 20,000 Afghan refugees they announced they would bring, I want my family to be one of those 20,000.”

Malali, a woman from Edmonton, became emotional as she spoke of the danger her family currently faces in Afghanistan. (Jamie McCannel / CBC)

The Taliban seized power in Afghanistan last week as the United States and its allies withdrew their troops after a 20-year war.

The sisters have appealed to the Canadian and US governments for help, they said on Sunday. They received no response.

The women say they feel helpless to be so far away, knowing how their families in Afghanistan are struggling and knowing that supplies are running out – for their families and in the country in general.

“He risked his life for seven years for these people and they left him behind,” said Malali. “Without any help or anything. He is very desperate. The situation is very desperate. We don’t know what to do.”

Federal ministers provided an update on the situation in Afghanistan on Sunday.

Foreign Minister Marc Garneau said the government understands how desperate Afghans are to flee the country and Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino has vowed to speed up resettlements.

The Canadian military airlifted about 1,100 people – mostly Afghans – out of the country, Mendicino said. So far, 12 flights have left the country.


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Victory is not always on the battlefield, says father whose son was killed in Afghanistan


“The Taliban are not afraid of guns and bombs; they are afraid of school children with textbooks. That’s why (Kevin) left, ”says Fred McKay

With Afghanistan now under Taliban rule, Canada’s involvement in this war-torn country is commemorated, celebrated and questioned.

Perhaps more than by the Silver Cross mothers and fathers of fallen soldiers who served with honor.

When the Canadian soldier and native of the Barrie region Pte. Kevin McKay was killed in action in Afghanistan on May 13, 2010, he died knowing he had made a difference in a country that needed all the help it could get.

“The reason Kevin wanted to go to Afghanistan was so the kids could go to school,” says his father, Fred McKay. in a telephone interview from Perth in the Ottawa area. “He wanted them to at least have a glimpse of what life could be like if they could go to school and reject Taliban ideology.

“The Taliban are not afraid of guns and bombs; they are afraid of school children with textbooks. That’s why he left. “

Kevin McKay, who grew up in the Horseshoe Valley of Oro-Medonte Township and attended WR Best Public School and Barrie’s Eastview Secondary School, was 24 when he was killed by an improvised explosive device during of his last night patrol, just two days before the end of his tour of duty.

Fred McKay (pronounced “mac-eye”) says the village his son was assigned to at one time was a hotbed of Taliban activity.

“When our troops reached the village and were able to tell the elders that it was safe for the children to return to school, Kevin volunteered for the first patrol which started in the morning at 6 a.m. He said. “He wanted to do the first patrol because he wanted to see the smiles on the children’s faces when they returned to school after a long absence, or for the first time.

“It is the key to the future in Afghanistan, it is to give an education to the children. He had this little personal victory and could see the smiles on the children’s faces, and this magical moment of feeling of accomplishment and mission accomplished.

As distant as they seem now, there have been some victories, and others not so small.

“The Canadian military has built 55 schools and most Canadians don’t know it,” says McKay. “They built clinics and helped farmers with pumps and generators and a bit of know-how. That’s how they conquered the people, but you can’t keep the soldiers there forever.

So what kind of legacy is left?

“It’s not just Kevin, it’s the Canadian military and all NATO troops,” McKay says. “They got this country 20 years of education for children. It’s a generation.

“See it all go down now when the troops have retreated …” he said with a pause. “My question for the Canadian government, the Afghan government and NATO is, ‘What did you think was going to happen?’

“Donald Trump wanted to be the great peacemaker, so he made a deal with the devil (the Taliban as opposed to the Afghan government) I think… and he covered his tracks.”

Before Trump, however, there were years of NATO-led training of Afghan soldiers.

“Our soldiers did their best to train the Afghan army. They had 300,000 trained and equipped soldiers, but they stopped engaging with the Taliban, ”McKay said. “They are afraid of the Taliban because they are ruthless.

“But if they are not going to fight for their country, then I don’t think it is appropriate that we fight for their country for them,” he adds. “We taught them how to do it and we equipped them. You can lead a horse to the watering hole, but you cannot force it to drink. They trained the Afghan army and I think it was the Afghan government that dropped the ball. They did not take advantage of this training and the education that the children received.

Recognizing that coalition forces could not stay in the country forever, McKay says he maybe like many, many other Canadians I would have liked to see a different result.

“They should have stayed until the job was done,” he said of the coalition forces. “They are soldiers. They wanted to be there. Kevin wanted to be there. They went there to help, not to hurt.

“They were crippled by the rules of engagement where they weren’t allowed to search and destroy the enemy,” McKay adds. “Instead, they did other things. Better things, in fact.

Does he think Kevin died in vain?

“Not for a second. We are very proud of what Kevin and all the soldiers have done. It was because he wanted to see the looks of those Afghan children when they returned to school that he went there, ”McKay says. “As we know, there will be no victory day in Afghanistan when the enemy is defeated and the good guys have won. It’s just going to go on and on.

“But at least for a while then there were a lot of kids going to school. So it was a victory. “


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World News Roundup: Trudeau Sentences 11-Year Chinese Court in Canada’s Espionage Case; Iranian Raisi appoints anti-Western hard line as new foreign minister, more


Here is a summary of the news in the world.

Trudeau condemns Chinese court’s 11-year sentence in Canadian spy case

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Wednesday that a Chinese court’s sentencing of Canadian businessman Michael Spavor to 11 years in prison for espionage was “absolutely unacceptable” and called for his immediate release. The US Embassy in Beijing also condemned the conviction in a statement, saying the prosecution of Spavor and another Canadian accused of espionage was an attempt to “use human beings as a bargaining chip.”

Iranian Raisi appoints anti-Western hard line as new foreign minister

New President Ebrahim Raisi on Wednesday appointed an anti-Western diplomat as foreign minister as Iran and six world powers seek to restore their 2015 nuclear deal. Raisi, a hardline supporter under Western sanctions for allegations of human rights violations while a judge, was sworn in on August 5 with religious leaders in the Islamic Republic facing growing crises at home and abroad.

Taliban could take Afghan capital in 90 days – US intelligence

Taliban fighters could isolate the Afghan capital in 30 days and possibly take control of it in 90 days, a US defense official told Reuters on Wednesday citing US intelligence as militants took control of an eighth Afghan provincial capital. The Taliban now control 65% of Afghanistan and have captured or are threatening to take 11 provincial capitals, a senior EU official said on Tuesday.

Ramaphosa de S. Africa says he tried to resist corruption as deputy to ex-president Zuma

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa, testifying in a corruption probe on Wednesday, said he chose to “stay but resist” rather than resign as vice president when allegations of widespread corruption surfaced. surfaced under his predecessor Jacob Zuma. Ramaphosa, Zuma’s number two from May 2014 to February 2018, made anti-corruption a mainstay of his presidency, although opposition parties criticized him for not doing enough to stop the rot during his tenure of deputy.

Germany arrests Briton suspected of spying for Russia

German police have arrested a Briton who worked at the British embassy in Berlin on suspicion of passing documents on to Russian intelligence services in exchange for cash, prosecutors said on Wednesday. German prosecutors said the apartment and workplace of the man, identified only as David S., had been searched and he would be brought before an investigating judge later on Wednesday.

North Korea warns of “security crisis” if US, South Korea escalate tensions

North Korea said on Wednesday that South Korea and the United States had missed an opportunity to improve relations and risked a “serious security crisis” by choosing to escalate tensions as they conduct joint military exercises . Kim Yong Chol, a general and politician who played a leading role in historic summits between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and former US President Donald Trump, criticized South Korea and the United States for responding to Pyongyang’s goodwill with “hostile acts”.

Belarus calls on US to cut embassy staff by September 1, RIA says

Belarus has called on the United States to cut staff at its embassy in Minsk and revoked its consent to the appointment of Julie Fisher as ambassador in response to the latest Washington sanctions, Russian news agency RIA reported on Wednesday. RIA quoted a spokesperson for the Belarusian Foreign Ministry as saying that Minsk wanted the embassy staff to be reduced to five by September 1.

At least 65 dead in forest fires in Algeria

Forest fires that ravaged forest areas in northern Algeria have left at least 65 dead, state television reported on Wednesday, as some of the most destructive fires in the country’s history continued to rage . The government has deployed the military to help fight the fires, which have ravaged the mountainous region of Kabylia the hardest, and 28 of the dead are soldiers, with 12 others seriously injured from burns.

Analysis-Brazil Bolsonaro deploys tanks to cover weak position

Clouds of black exhaust fumes spewing aging tanks and amphibious vehicles passing far-right President Jair Bolsonaro on Tuesday were a bad smokescreen for a leader whose political support is crumbling and whose re-election is in trouble. Politicians and analysts said this week’s unusual military display outside the Presidential Palace https://www.reuters.com/world/americas/brazil-military-parade-presidential-palace-rattles-politicians-2021- 08-10 in Brasilia had not revealed the strength but rather the political weakness of a president on the ropes for not having taken Brazil out of the coronavirus pandemic and an economic crisis.

Greece says EU “is not ready for another migration crisis”

The European Union is unable to cope with another migration crisis like the one in 2015 and must act to try to prevent people from fleeing the growing conflict in Afghanistan, Greek Migration Minister Notis Mitarachi said on Wednesday. . Mitararchi, who last week co-signed a letter with ministers from five other EU countries saying deportations of failed asylum seekers should continue despite the fighting, said ending such returns “would send a bad message ”and would encourage more Afghans to try to reach Europe.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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Afghanistan will sanction Pakistan? Vice-President Saleh reacts to ex-Canadian call for “invasion”


Responding to a tweet from former Canadian politician and diplomat Chris Alexander, Afghan Vice President Amrullah Saleh described the current period as a “period of shock” and has flooded confidence as he recovered. The Canadian diplomat spoke of the “Pakistan invasion of Afghanistan” and how it should be treated. With the hashtag “Sanction Pakistan”, the Canadian politician blasted Pakistan for its alleged involvement in the violence in Afghanistan.

“It’s on its way. The Afghan route,” the vice president wrote amid fierce fighting with Taliban forces.

Demonstration of the Afghan vice-president against Pakistan

As Afghanistan is in the throes of war, the country’s first vice president, Amrullah Saleh, joined a civil protest against the Taliban and Pakistan last week. As he marched through the streets of Kabul on August 3, the Afghan First Vice President was seen chanting Allah-o-Akbar and criticized Pakistan for supporting the Islamist movement Deobandi and the organization. military. The former director of the National Security Directorate, who has consistently spoken out against Pakistan’s support for the Taliban, took to the microblogging site and called the protest a “historic moment” against Tablian terrorists and their supporters.

25 Pakistani fighters killed by Afghan forces

According to reports, 25 Pakistani terrorists have been killed by Afghan forces so far in Nijrab, located 100 kilometers from Kabul. Among them, five are said to be Pakistani army commandos dressed as Taliban terrorists. The major revelation came as evidence regarding Afghanistan’s claims of Pakistani involvement on its soil. Reports further indicated that one of the commandos fighting alongside the Taliban had been ambushed by Afghan forces. After the assault, Afghan forces returned the bodies of Pakistani commandos through the Red Cross.

Imran Khan calls Taliban “normal civilians”

Anger against Pakistan escalated after a shocking statement was recently adopted by Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan in which he described the Taliban as not in military dress, but “normal civilians”. In an interview, Khan asked how Pakistan was supposed to hunt down the Taliban as it hosts three million Afghan refugees, the majority of whom are Pashtuns, the same ethnic group as the Taliban fighters. Khan has also denied claims about the Taliban’s alleged safe havens on Pakistani soil and has repeatedly shifted his argument in favor of the three million refugees in the country.


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Military will likely need more help with natural disaster response, DND says


With wildfires and flooding raging across the country this summer, hundreds of members of the Canadian Armed Forces have been called in to help with provincial emergencies – but they will likely need help to keep it going. do, a spokesperson for the Department of National Defense told iPolitics this week..

“WWe expect requests for assistance to increase, depending on the availability of provincial emergency resources, ”the spokesperson said in an email response. “This is consistent with the increase in the frequency and severity of natural disasters, both at home and abroad.”

Provincial emergency management organizations are the first to respond, but they can call in the military if they are overwhelmed.

“WWe expect that the need for Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) support for missions (Operation Lentus) will continue to increase at a constant rate in the medium to long term, which will result in an increased need for resources, ”he said. declared the spokesperson.

Operation Lentus is the CAF’s mission to respond to natural disasters.

While the military expects more deployments to require more resources, it is difficult to know when and how.

As the nature of the missions (of Operation Lentus) is unpredictable, there is no way to say exactly how or when this might impact our resources, ”the spokesperson said. “CAF’s requests for assistance are not predictable and therefore no amount is planned or set aside in advance. “

The cost of disaster relief has fluctuated wildly since 2013, according to figures provided to iPolitics by the Department of National Defense (DND).

In fiscal year 2017-18, thousands of troops and hundreds of vehicles were sent across the country to help six provinces deal with ice storms, floods and wildfires, according to a ministry. breakdown. DND spent $ 14 million on incremental costs, which are costs attributable to a specific mission.

In fiscal year 2014-2015, however, natural disaster relief cost the ministry just under $ 150,000.

While DND cannot predict with certainty how much future deployments will cost, it anticipates “more cyclical events,” the spokesperson said. These include the seasons of fires and floods, said Jonathan Vance, former Chief of the Defense Staff, speaking to the House Defense Committee in 2018.

The CAF plans for cyclical events, such as floods and forest fires, including such things as forecasting critical areas and assessing capacity gaps, ”the spokesperson said.

This planning includes “the identification, preparation and pre-positioning of Forces, facilitators and reserves (who) would be required to respond to fire, flood, natural disaster and the routing of goods.” humanitarian aid ”, as well as“ computer simulations, planning conferences, teleconferences, tabletop exercises, field simulations, etc. “Said the spokesperson.

The use of the military for more and more natural disasters is a source of concern, said Lt. Gen. Wayne Eyre, acting chief of staff, talk to the canadian press Last year. If this continues to be commonplace, which the ministry said it expects, it could hamper the military’s combat readiness, Eyre said.

Despite the expected increase and four deployments to date in 2021, the CAF is still ready to fight, the spokesperson said..

Although the increase in natural disasters has had an impact on the number of missions (Operation Lentus) performed by the CAF, it has not yet affected our combat readiness, ”they said.

“Mincentives are always in place to ensure that CAF support on the international stage, both for combat and non-combat missions, never suffers, ”the spokesperson said.

“This includes relying more heavily on the Reserve Force for domestic operations, at times, or working with federal and provincial partners to ensure the most efficient use of CAF resources here at home. “

The more frequent use of reserves has not changed the structure of the reserve forces, “nor the way they train or are employed, but simply the frequency with which they are called,” said the spokesperson.

The military response to more natural disasters is also of concern to Adam MacDonald, member of the International Council of Canada, who wrote a test on the subject for the Institute of the Conference of Defense Associations.

There is a “growing trend for the military (increasingly responding to national and) localized environmental disasters, which are expected to increase, given climate change,” he told iPolitics.

MacDonald worries “that this is already built into what the military was going to do in the future, without really thinking politically about whether or not we want the military to do it,” he said. declared.

As climate change continues to cause large-scale natural disasters and the military expects the military to continue to assist, MacDonald has suggested two solutions, without explicitly arguing for either. ‘other.

The first is that army reserves play a more active role in emergency management.

“I don’t think it’s realistic for a number of reasons,” he said. “Number 1 is that the reserve is a force of volunteers,” and volunteers might not want to fight fires or other disasters.

The second is that reserves are trained to do the same job as regular forces, so playing a more active role in emergency management could take time compared to training to replace regular forces when deployed overseas. , did he declare.

The other option is to create a new department, similar to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in the United States, which is explicitly responsible for responding to disasters.

“This is the question, ‘do we need to build capacity and expertise to (deal with) the increasing likelihood of natural disasters and other national problems? ”Said MacDonald.

“This is where the FEMA structure could work, but it could be a bit difficult, given that each province has their own emergency management organization, so there could be (battles) over who is in charge. enough to.”

Helping provinces deal with natural disasters is a core function of the CAF, as defined in the 2017 Defense Ministry report. policy document, “Strong, secure and committed”.

The use of CAF members to help provinces is increasingly common, says analysis by military experts Christian Leuprecht and Peter Kasurak for the Center for International Governance Innovation.

From 1996 to 2006, the CAF was deployed on 12 weather-related missions. Between 2007 and 2016, this number rose to 20.

From 2017 to 2019 alone, the CAF was mobilized for 15 missions.

In a mission last year dubbed Operation Laser, the CAF even helped long-term care homes in Quebec and Ontario that were overwhelmed by COVID. Other than this effort, the CAF has only been deployed to the provinces once: to help Newfoundland and Labrador weather a major snowstorm in January 2020.

In 2021, the army has so far been deployed in Manitoba, Ontario and British Columbia to fight forest fires, and in the Yukon to help protect against flooding.

More iPolitics


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Mundell brings the history of vets to life in downtown Terre Haute


August 6 — Downtown Terre Haute hosts another mural, this one honoring deceased Vigo County veterans, as well as veterans from surrounding counties.

“The intention is to honor fallen soldiers,” said Brian Mundell, owner of the Terre Haute Veterans Memorial Museum, 1129 Wabash Ave.

“My goal is to have names there that have passed, not only from Vigo County, but also from surrounding counties. several different counties. Local artist Becky Hochhalter has started the piece and expects her part of the work to be finished early next week, depending on the weather. Then, once Mundell receives the signs with the names of the fallen soldiers, it will be complete.[memorialhonoringfallensoldiersfromseveraldifferentcountiesocalartistBeckyHochhalterhasstartedthepieceandexpectsherpartoftheworkwillbefinishedbyearlynextweekdependingontheweatherThenonceMundellreceivesthepanelswiththenamesoffallensoldiersitwillbecomplete[memorialhonoringfallensoldiersfromseveraldifferentcountiesocalartistBeckyHochhalterhasstartedthepieceandexpectsherpartoftheworkwillbefinishedbyearlynextweekdependingontheweatherThenonceMundellreceivesthepanelswiththenamesoffallensoldiersitwillbecomplete

Nine years ago, Mundell opened the museum to pursue his passion for military history and memorabilia.

He started collecting objects in 2004 after a trip to France, and his basement quickly began to overflow with history. So he decided to move his growing collection to a space that would honor local veterans.

“I have a lot of personal things like uniforms, photos, helmets and a lot of things that belonged to soldiers,” Mundell said. “I have German, Japanese and Vietnamese things. I try to identify everything with the veteran he belonged to. I also try to get a picture of the veteran, so that people passing by can put a face on that person. “

Mundell is always on the lookout for military memorabilia from the First World War to the present day.

“There are so many things in people’s closets, attics, basements and garages,” he said. “It’s amazing how many things came through the door that were donated by the people here.”

The museum is always looking for volunteers and is open every Saturday from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. or by appointment.

Visitors who wish to make an appointment can call 812-208-1396.


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IDF Facing Israel’s Next Major Threat: Climate Change


The Israel Defense Forces has started to consider how to incorporate the dangers of climate change into their threat assessments, although some are urging the military to do much more and recognize that global warming is a major strategic threat to the country.

Netta Blass, an officer in the military’s strategic division, told a meeting of the Ministry of Environmental Protection on Monday that her unit was working with her counterparts in the IDF planning unit to examine the possibility a climate-related work plan and the creation of a special unit.

These two divisions, she said, also liaise with the Department of Environment’s Climate Change Preparedness Directorate, which held the sixth meeting on Monday since its inception in 2018, opening up part to more of 100 external people.

“The subject is on our agenda,” she said.

Michael Herzog, international researcher at Washington Institute and a retired IDF brigadier general who headed the army’s strategic planning division, was involved with a small team of academics and others in trying to get the defense establishment to recognize and adapt to the enormous implications of global warming.

Brigadier General (Retired) Michael Herzog. (Courtesy)

He told The Times of Israel on Tuesday that he thought the military was “waking up,” but, he said, “there isn’t enough awareness at the top.

“It’s good that they appointed someone down there, but I think what we really need to see is top executives taking care of it and the budgets are allocated and then you know that it is serious, ”he added.

The IDF’s work is still in its infancy, officials said.

In June, former IDF chief of staff Gadi Eisenkot told the Institute for National Security Studies (INSS), where he is now a senior researcher, that unlike the US military, where climate change was an integral part, it was “not discussed” within the IDF and relegated to the “most marginal” place among all issues handled by the military.

This despite the potential of global warming to have an impact on runways and aircraft formation, he said during a confab held (in hebrew) to launch the INSS publication “Environment, Climate and National Security: A New Front for Israel”. The military was already changing training schedules to make sure soldiers were not outside during the hottest hours, he added.

An abandoned watchtower near a military road, Judean Desert, January 4, 2018 (Dario Sanchez / Flash90)

Gideon Behar, the Foreign Ministry’s special envoy for climate change and sustainability, has also been actively involved in the attempt to have climate change recognized as a threat to national security.

Gideon Béhar. (Courtesy)

“We have to go much faster,” he urged attendees at Monday’s meeting. “The rhythm of [climate] change is faster than expected and impacts are increasingly difficult to predict. No one else will correct the things that we ourselves don’t do today. This is our shift and we need to work day and night to strengthen preparedness, as well as mitigation. “

Stressing the importance of regional cooperation to ensure that neighboring states can build their resilience against the effects of global warming, Behar revealed that two years ago, Cyprus launched a regional climate cooperation initiative between countries Mediterranean and Middle Eastern (excluding North Africa).

Despite a business disruption during the coronavirus pandemic, 12 working groups have been set up and a regional meeting is scheduled for mid-October, in which Israel will participate, he said.

The IDF could look to the US military for advice, with the Pentagon leading the way in mainstreaming climate change, Dr Yehuda Troen of the Knesset’s Research and Information Unit said at the time. from the same meeting.

Work on the plans began in 2014 in light of the U.S. military’s need to be more active at the North Pole – where melting glaciers have enabled a higher Russian presence, and to provide humanitarian assistance, conduct operational activities, intelligence gathering and training, in a warming world.

In this file photo from July 22, 2017, a polar bear comes out of the water to walk on the ice in Franklin Strait in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. (AP Photo / David Goldman, on file)

Two years ago, the U.S. military presented Congress with a comprehensive climate preparedness report at 148 military bases, detailing the risks of events such as recurrent floods, droughts and wildfires today and 20 years to come, Troen said.

Last year, it published a Climate Resilience Handbook, outlining measures that must be implemented.

The Israeli military has already experienced these problems.

At the start of last year, flooding of a number of underground hangars caused damage estimated at NIS 30 million (9.3 million) to eight F-16 fighter jets and their infrastructure.

However, it does not appear to have prompted the military to take major action.

“It is not really clear what the IDF is doing,” Troen said, adding that “the National Security Council has said it is not really dealing with the matter, although it would be ready to cooperate.”

An F-16 fighter jet sits in a flooded hangar at Hatzor Air Base in southern Israel in January 2020 (Social media)

The current director of the NSC, Meir Ben-Shabbat, is due to retire at the end of August. He will be replaced by the 45-year-old former Mossad officer Eyal Hulata.

Environmental Protection Minister Tamar Zandberg is also trying to get the government to recognize climate change as a national strategic threat.

The climate crisis and responsible journalism

As an environmental reporter for The Times of Israel, I try to convey the facts and science behind climate change and environmental degradation, explain – and criticize – official policies affecting our future, and describe the Israeli technologies that can be part of the solution.

I am passionate about the natural world and disheartened by the dismal lack of awareness of environmental issues of most of the public and politicians in Israel.

I am proud to do my part to keep The Times of Israel readers properly informed on this vital topic – which can and must lead to policy change.

Your support, by joining The Times of Israel community, allows us to continue our important work. Would you like to join our community today?

Thank you,

Sue surke, Environment Journalist

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Global Military Land Vehicle Industry Expected to Reach $ 31.6 Billion by 2031


DUBLIN, August 03, 2021– (COMMERCIAL THREAD)–The “Global Military Land Vehicle Market to 2031 – Market Size and Drivers, Major Programs, Competitive Landscape and Strategic Outlook” report was added to ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

The global military ground vehicles market is valued at US $ 21.9 billion in 2021 and will grow at a CAGR of 3.74% to reach a value of US $ 31.6 billion by 2031.

The cumulative global military ground vehicles market is expected to reach US $ 292.8 billion during the forecast period. The demand for military ground vehicles is expected to be driven by the European region, especially in countries like France, Russia and the UK. The North American region will occupy the second place in the world, showing a steady growth rate during the forecast period with a CAGR of 2.34%. Major military forces around the world are now undertaking modernization efforts to replace their old platforms in the face of modern threats. These efforts will support market growth over the next decade.

Heightened geopolitical tensions, the need to deploy forces to regions around the world and the demands for standardization under alliances such as NATO are some of the reasons that push military forces to acquire military ground vehicles. modern. In addition, tensions with Russia in Eastern Europe are pushing other countries in the region and NATO to improve their conventional capabilities with new platforms capable of countering the heavy armored and mechanized formations of the United States. Russian army. In addition, the old Soviet equipment currently in the stocks of the armies of Eastern Europe must be replaced with new platforms, which further stimulates the growth of the market in the region.

The global military land vehicle market is expected to be dominated by Europe. Major European countries have increased their defense budgets and tried to maintain them even during the pandemic. This will allow them to implement large-scale procurement projects without major delays. North America will follow the European market. This growth is attributed to the implementation of a wide range of supply programs by the US Army and the US Marine Corps. The most notable programs are the JLTV and the Stryker, which will standardize the country’s vehicle fleet and provide increased protection for its deployed forces. The Canadian military also contributes to regional growth through the implementation of a series of programs covering several market segments.

Highlights

  • The global military land vehicles market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 3.75% during the forecast period.

  • The global military land vehicles market is categorized into different categories; Armored personnel carrier, infantry fighting vehicle, main battle tank, multipurpose armored vehicle, tactical truck, armored support vehicle, armored engineer vehicle and light utility vehicle.

  • The global military land vehicle market is expected to be dominated by Europe with a revenue share of 41.1%. The growth of the European market is attributed to spending by countries such as the UK, Russia and France, among others.

  • Armored personnel carriers are expected to be the largest segment of the military ground vehicles market during the forecast period.

Reasons to buy

  • Determine potential investment areas based on a detailed analysis of global military ground vehicle trends over the next ten years

  • Gain an in-depth understanding of the factors underlying the demand for different segments of military ground vehicles in the world’s heaviest spending countries and identify the opportunities offered by each of them

  • Strengthen your understanding of the market in terms of demand drivers, industry trends and the latest technological developments, among others

  • Identify the major channels driving the global Military Land Vehicle market, providing a clear picture of future opportunities that can be exploited leading to increased revenue

  • Channel resources by focusing on ongoing programs undertaken by defense ministries of different countries in the global military land vehicle market

  • Make the right business decisions based on an in-depth competitive landscape analysis consisting of detailed profiles of the major military ground vehicle vendors around the world. Company profiles also include information on key products, alliances, recent contracts awarded, and financial analysis where applicable.

Main topics covered:

  • Summary

  • Global Military Land Vehicle Market – Overview

  • Market dynamics

  • Global Military Land Vehicles Market – Segment Analysis

  • Global Military Land Vehicles Market – Regional Analysis

  • Global Military Land Vehicle Market – Trend Analysis

  • Analysis of key programs

  • Competitive landscape analysis

Companies mentioned

For more information on this report, visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/a6e7e2

View the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210803005491/en/

Contacts

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Canadian army

Defense Minister urged military to create controversial aid role in Vancouver: Documents – National


Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan called on the military to create a post possibly occupied by a reserve officer from his former unit who had been suspended from Vancouver Police for an inappropriate relationship with a subordinate, according to notes from recently published information.

Sajjan also wanted the military to upgrade the post less than two months after Major Greg McCullough was hired, as the minister wanted even more support in his Vancouver constituency, the notes say, although that request has not come true. .

The briefing note comes amid lingering questions about how and why McCullough found himself in the unique position before his dismissal last month following revelations about the complaint and the disciplinary action taken against him while he was sergeant in the Vancouver Police Department.

McCullough was hired to support Sajjan in March 2020 despite an external investigation that found him guilty in 2018 of two counts of misconduct for his relationship with Const. Nicole Chan, who later committed suicide in January 2019.

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READ MORE: Sajjan’s assistant had an inappropriate relationship, suspended while with Vancouver Police

It also follows opposition calls for Sajjan’s resignation for his handling of allegations of sexual misconduct involving senior military commanders. Global News first reported allegations against retired General Jonathan Vance in February – which he denies – and since then concerns about an “Old Boys Network” protecting top brass have sparked a military sexual misconduct record.

Defense experts have described the case as an institutional crisis for the military.

Vance was charged earlier in July with one count of obstructing justice. Military police brought the charge but turned the matter over to civilian court, citing the “limitations” of the military justice system.


Click to play the video: “Gén.  Jonathan Vance accused of obstructing justice '







General Jonathan Vance accused of obstructing justice


General Jonathan Vance charged with obstructing justice – July 15, 2021

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Sajjan’s office acknowledged that the Minister and McCullough knew each other as officers of the British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own) and that they both served concurrently with the Vancouver Police Department.

But he says the military was responsible for the process that led to McCullough’s hiring, and neither the minister nor his staff were aware of the complaint and disciplinary action taken against him while he was a sergeant. in the Vancouver Police Department.

READ MORE: Officer suspended for inappropriate relationship no longer working as Sajjan’s assistant

The Department of National Defense announced last month that McCullough was no longer working as Sajjan’s assistant, although he remains a member of the Canadian Army Reserve.

Prepared for Jonathan Vance, then Chief of the Defense Staff, dated May 6, 2020, the briefing note obtained by The Canadian Press through access to information does not mention McCullough’s name, but shows the minister personally led the charge for a new assistant in Vancouver.

While Sajjan at the time already had four military assistants in Ottawa, and the Defense Ministry says he has no record of such a post being created outside the capital, the memo reads: “The Minister has determined that additional full-time support is needed while in Vancouver.

He goes on to say that a “suitable candidate” was selected in March 2020 and was currently working with the minister, but that “based on the recent direction of the minister” Sajjan would need even more support and therefore the position should be reclassified from part-time to full-time role.

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Such an upgrade would have represented a significant pay rise for whoever held the post.

READ MORE: Sajjan censored by House of Commons for dealing with military sexual misconduct

The briefing note recommends that the post be reclassified and filled through an “open, fair and equitable” competition, although Defense Ministry spokesman Daniel Le Bouthillier said the reclassification no. had not taken place because such full-time positions only concern exceptional circumstances.

Sajjan spokesman Daniel Minden defended the creation of the post of military assistant in Vancouver, saying in an email: “In order to avoid the high costs of moving military personnel based in Ottawa to Vancouver, a post of military assistant Vancouver-based military assistant was created.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, Minister Sajjan spent part of the last year working remotely from his constituency of Vancouver, where this support was even greater. “

The pandemic is not mentioned in the briefing note.


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Military Ombudsman blames Ottawa for inaction on sexual misconduct


Military Ombudsman Blames Ottawa for Inaction on Sexual Misconduct – June 22, 2021

Le Bouthillier said the post remains vacant.

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“Military assistants from Ottawa travel to Vancouver as needed to perform these tasks,” he added in an email.

“The function is still required, but an updated feasibility and effectiveness analysis (after several months of COVID-19 restrictions) is underway by the Canadian Armed Forces to make a decision on how best to structure the office of the military assistant. “

Reached by phone Thursday, McCullough declined to comment, saying he had gotten into trouble for previously speaking to The Canadian Press and was not allowed to speak further.

“Minister Sajjan had nothing to do with my hiring process,” he said last month. “He needed a military assistant on the west coast because of the time he’s spending here, and that’s it. I have not spoken with Minister Sajjan about this process, and I serve the Canadian Armed Forces.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau insisted that Sajjan, who has been Canada’s only defense minister since the Liberals took office in late 2015, is the right person to lead the charge when it comes to change military culture and eradicate sexual misconduct and hatred.

© 2021 The Canadian Press


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Smoke from wildfires in the west causes air pollution across the country


July 20 (Reuters) – Raging wildfires across the western United States and Canada, including a two-week “monster” fire in Oregon, spewed smoke and soot on Tuesday which blew eastward and caused harmful air pollution to New York City.

In 13 western states, more than 80 large active wildfires have charred nearly 1.3 million acres (526,090 hectares) of vegetation desiccated by drought in recent weeks, an area larger than the Delaware, according to the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) in Boise, Idaho.

Several hundred more fires have burned in western and central Canada. They included 86 classified as uncontrollable on Tuesday in British Columbia alone, which led authorities to declare a state of emergency.

The jet stream and other transcontinental air currents carried smoke and ash thousands of kilometers. Residents of remote towns felt the contamination of the air in their eyes, noses and lungs.

In New York City, where a gray haze enveloped the Manhattan skyline, the Air Quality Index (AQI) for fine particles reached 170, a level considered harmful even to healthy people and nine times higher than World Health Organization exposure recommendations. Philadelphia reached 172.

Other northeastern cities, including Boston and Hartford, Connecticut, had readings in the unhealthy zone above 150. Residents were advised to wear face masks outdoors to limit exposure.

Smoke from Canadian wildfires in Manitoba and Ontario in the United States likely pushed the AQI in Detroit and Cleveland above 125, considered unhealthy for sensitive people, the NIFC meteorologist said, Nick Nauslar. Smoke from forest fires from the western provinces of Canada has reached east to Ontario, triggering broad government air quality warnings.

In the western United States, parts of Idaho and Montana suffered unhealthy levels of air pollution from 40 nearby large fires and smoke from the Bootleg fire in southern Oregon, currently the largest in the United States.

Heavy exposure to smoke from wildfires has been linked to long-term respiratory consequences for firefighters, including a significantly elevated risk of developing asthma, according to a University of Alberta study released this week. week.

The general population also faces serious health effects.

The Bootleg Fire burns through vegetation near Paisley, Oregon, USA, July 20, 2021. REUTERS / David Ryder

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“Exposure to smoke from wildfires (…) increases susceptibility to respiratory infections, including COVID, increases the severity of these infections and makes recovery more difficult,” the Federal Councilor said by email. Margaret Key Air Resources.

THE “MONSTER” FIRE ENTERING THE 3RD WEEK

The forest fires themselves posed a more direct risk to life and property.

The Bootleg Fire has blackened 388,600 acres (157,260 hectares) of dry brush and wood in and around the Fremont-Winema National Forest, about 250 miles south of Portland, since July 6. Only three other forest fires in Oregon in the past century have burned more territory.

As of Tuesday, an army of some 2,200 people had succeeded in digging containment lines around 30% of the outskirts of the blaze, as the blaze spread further east and north.

Incident commander Rob Allen said in his daily report that the dry fuels in the fire area “will continue to burn and smoke for weeks.”

“Fighting this fire is a marathon, not a sprint,” Allen wrote. “We’re in there for as long as it takes to contain this monster safely.”

At least 67 houses were destroyed and 3,400 others were listed as threatened, with around 2,100 people ordered to evacuate or to be ready to flee at any time.

Western conflagrations, marking a heavier-than-normal start to the wildfire season, coincided with record heat that has ravaged much of the region in recent weeks and left hundreds dead.

Scientists said the increasing frequency and intensity of forest fires is largely attributable to prolonged drought and increased episodes of excessive heat that are symptomatic of climate change.

The Bootleg fire is so large that it sometimes generated its own climate – towering clouds of pyrocumulus of condensed moisture sucked through the fire’s smoke column from the burnt vegetation and of the surrounding air. These clouds can create thunderstorms and strong winds capable of starting new fires and spreading flames.

Reporting by Peter Szekely in New York and Steve Gorman in Los Angeles; additional reporting by Nia Williams in Calgary; Editing by Cynthia Osterman

Our standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Letters to the Editor: July 20: “How many people … would vote for a party that does not recognize climate change as real?” Verification of curators as well as other letters to the editor


Keep your opinions sharp and informed. Receive the Opinion newsletter. register today.

Legal process

Re This is a crime scene. When will Canada take responsibility for delivering justice? (July 16): How we deal with all of these crimes is far from clear.

It is true, as one letter writer tells us (Things To Come – July 15), that the federal Crown has constitutional responsibility and has fiduciary obligations to Indigenous peoples. It is also true that the Crown is also responsible for others in Canada and has duties to them. The need to balance different functions like these, when they come into conflict, is one of the reasons we have a justice system.

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I find that indigenous peoples have, on the whole, been well served by the judiciary, and the author of the letter is wrong to suggest that the government should stop using the courts to resolve these issues fairly.

Pierre Amour Toronto

You and what army?

Re Former High General Vance Charged with Obstructing Justice (July 16): There is an old adage that every country has a choice of two armies – their own or someone else’s. A strong army is vital, but it is quite obvious to me that the army in this country is broken.

Maybe someone else’s army is better.

Douglas Cornwall Ottawa

Conservative confusion

Re The conservative temperament is repulsive (July 14): It is especially politics that prevents me from voting conservative. It is a mystery to me why we do not have a socially liberal and fiscally conservative party in Canada.

Maybe the pollsters know this better, but I would like a party to be selective about what the government does, make sure it does these things well and make it clear why it does not go above and beyond. I have seen the Conservatives spend too much energy getting the government to interfere in the lives of citizens on social issues.

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When they were in government I think they spent way too much money on subsidy programs like home renovations in the name of job creation. What about infrastructure, the encouragement and regulation of competitive markets, effective and efficient plans to tackle climate change, a good balance between public and private health care options and public services? effective?

So maybe over 41 percent of the population would consider voting Conservative.

Gord flaten Regina


Given our recent historic heat wave, I wonder how many people in Lytton, or anywhere in British Columbia, would vote for a party that won’t recognize climate change as real?

Arlene Churchill Surrey, BC

Careful examination

Re Liberals Bank on Urban Votes with Affordable Child Care Plan (July 16): Child care is not just an urban issue. Evidence shows that quality child care is important to rural / remote / suburban families, but its delivery is hampered by the approach to the child care market in Canada.

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Is the Liberal child care program expensive? Not when compared to spending by peers at the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, or astronomical child care costs paid by Canadian parents.

Intrusive? Not with the evidence-based program elements of Ottawa and the provinces willingly collaborating in the development of their own programs.

Inflexible? A federal role should not mean a “one size fits all” outcome. Responsive public policy is the best way to meet a diversity of child care needs – shaped by diverse cultures, abilities, needs and schedules – using a pan-Canadian approach similar to Medicare. .

We now have a much better understanding of the importance of quality child care for children, families, women and the economy, and the best ways to ensure that this becomes a reality.

Martha Friendly Childcare Resource and Research Unit Toronto

Lack of food

Re Indoor Dining Is Back – But Restaurant Staff Are Not (July 15): Maybe if restaurants offered safer working environments, more staff would be willing to come back. I have been disappointed by the negative reactions of many restaurateurs to any pandemic restrictions.

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My advice: make vaccination compulsory for staff and customers, then workers would be more willing to come back and the still vulnerable elderly would feel at ease in catering establishments.

Glen morehouse Washago, Ont.


As sympathetic as I am to contributor Stephen Beckta’s cry for a feedback from his staff, I can’t help but think back to those first months, about 20 years ago, after quitting my job as a professional cook in some of the best restaurants in Toronto. .

Two weeks later, I noticed that the arch of my foot was returning to normal, I was well rested with no 12-hour workdays, and most notably, I had a social life again.

I can’t help but think of all the cooks who are suffering without work, but it seems the pandemic has given them a reason to reconsider their career choice. As long as bad hours and most importantly terrible money play out in the restaurant job in the back of the house, I think we can expect a talent shortage to continue for some time.

David Roy Toronto

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Medical memory

Re Remembering Our Front-line Heroes (Editorial, July 16): I can understand and sympathize with nurses in this country.

Imagine working long hours with all the stress of COVID-19 and having to deal with thousands of people who are hesitant to vaccinate or those who think it’s a hoax. They put their lives on the line for people who don’t care.

After 15 months they had had enough, especially when the provincial governments praised them but refused to raise wages. Indeed, praise is not enough and we now have a nursing shortage in Canada.

What a tragedy, and so easily resolved.

Robert Tremblay Gatineau, Que.


Alberta Health Services recently returned to the bargaining table with the United Nurses of Alberta and demanded much denigration and a 3 percent pay cut!

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All frontline healthcare workers should receive bonuses, not pay cuts. It is a shameful treatment.

Dorothy Watson Toronto

Re New Toronto Park Honors Frontline Heroes of the 1840s (July 16): Perhaps pandemic memorials should be as common as those of our politicians.

Over the past 400 years, dozens of pandemics have ravaged North America. Smallpox, measles and influenza ravaged the northern half of the continent in the early 1600s, and several times thereafter. Typhus, tuberculosis and polio followed.

Each of these pandemics had more serious consequences than COVID-19. Entire generations have been marked and orphaned, especially among indigenous communities. We forget this story because of our modern successes in public health, especially through vaccination and the provision of clean water.

Maybe now is a good time to remember a little more of our medical history, teach it and commemorate it.

John riley Mono, Ont.


Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Globe and Mail. Include your name, address, and daytime phone number. Try to limit the letters to less than 150 words. Letters can be edited for length and clarity. To send a letter by e-mail, click here: [email protected]


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‘Unknown Blackfoot Warrior’ receives burial ceremony where River Old Man meets River Belly


CALGARY – A skull that has been determined to be a prehistoric native was buried on June 26, more than 40 years after it was found in the waters of the Old Man River west of the Monarch Bridge on Highway 3A in the southern Alberta.

This happened in 1979 when someone found a skull and turned it over to the Fort Macleod RCMP detachment.

In October 1979, with the help of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Alberta, it was determined that the skull was from a man over the age of 60 and of prehistoric – and therefore Aboriginal – origin.

Fort Macleod RCMP handed the skull over to the researcher for safekeeping, and that seemed like the end of the story until 2017, when someone handed it over to the local detachment.

In March 2021, members of the detachment consulted with the Blackfoot Elders Council to determine a way to re-bury the skull in an appropriate and respectful manner.

The ceremony consisted of wrapping the box containing the remains of the skull in a traditional blanket, followed by a ceremony of purification and internment.

Songs and prayers were sung for this Blackfoot ancestor as he was buried in a small tomb near the confluence of the Old Man and Belly rivers.

The grave is marked with a white bleached stone which reads “Unknown Blackfoot Warrior”.

Kainai Spiritual Elder Joe Eagle Tail Feathers was consulted with other Spiritual Elders and Sundancers, and a traditional burial ceremony was held on June 26, 2021 on the Blood Nation.

The funeral was presided over by Elder Martin Eagle Child and several other Elders and Blackfoot Sundancers.

A military style salute was delivered by ex-Sgt D. Vernon Houle (Canadian Armed Forces) and Mr. Alvin Many Chief, retired (Canadian Armed Forces / US Army Infantry).

Blood Tribe Police Chief Kyle Melting Tallow, Sgt. Bryan Mucha and Const. Benjamin Stubbe from the Fort Macleod RCMP Detachment was also present.


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Why Canada Matters to Texas


For over 150 years, Canada has been more than just a neighbor: we are your best customer, your closest security partner and your largest energy supplier. Texas is an important part of all of these mutual benefits.

Texans may think of other countries first when considering international trade and cooperation. We understand that, but we think we should go against the grain and brag a bit about Canada’s contribution to the Texas economy.

Canada is often seen as friendly, polite, and snowy. We own them all, but we also have a fascinating economic and business story to tell in Texas – we are Texas’ second largest export market after Mexico. Texas exported $ 27.8 billion in goods and services to Canada in 2020, and nearly 700 Canadian-owned companies operate right here in Texas. These companies represent nearly 57,000 jobs statewide.

Beyond our common North American geography, we share values ​​and interests, as well as economic ties on many levels. Here are the adjectives I would use to describe our bilateral relationship and the importance of Canada:

Prosperous. Canada and the United States share the world’s largest trading relationship. Our trade is balanced, fair and supports growth and innovation in our two countries. Every day, nearly US $ 2 billion in goods and services cross the Canada-US border. This thriving economic partnership supports well-paying jobs in both countries. More than 5,500 Canadian companies in the United States support nearly 900,000 jobs. We buy more goods from the United States than China, Japan and the United Kingdom combined.

Integrated. Canada and the United States don’t just sell each other, we make things together. Since the start of the pandemic, our countries have worked hard to maintain the two-way flow of goods, especially medical supplies and essential inputs across our borders, while protecting our communities from COVID-19. On average, over 25% of a finished product that we sell to you is US content. Just like most imports from Canada are used in production that puts Americans to work. These long-standing bi-national supply chains have not only kept us secure, they have also kept us competitive globally.

Reliable. Canada’s energy – more than any other country – contributes directly to the economic prosperity, security and environmental goals of the United States. We are your largest and most secure supplier of all forms of energy, transported by 71 oil and gas pipelines and 35 transmission lines across our shared border. We are also investing in new technologies and infrastructure to become a global leader in clean energy and innovation. Canada is developing its energy resources; in a way that creates prosperity and engages communities, while reducing emissions and preserving the environment.

Closed. Canada fought alongside the United States to defend our shared values ​​during World Wars I and II, the Cold War, Korea, the Balkans, the Middle East and Afghanistan. In fact, officers from the Canadian Army, Navy and Air Force are integrated throughout the United States Army and within the Binational North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) at all levels – protecting and defending our common continent in search and rescue operations, banning illegal narcotics, intercepting unallied military aircraft, and humanitarian aid and disaster relief missions.

Canadian tourists contribute millions to the Texas economy every year. Canadian snowbirds, who feel welcome when their neighbors in Texas call them “Winter Texans,” contribute significantly through real estate investments, business sales and tax revenues.

On July 1, as we mark the first anniversary of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), Texas businesses continued to access Canada’s duty-free supply chains. Formerly known as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the updated agreement preserves key elements of NAFTA, modernizes arrangements to meet 21st century trade challenges, cuts red tape at the border and provides increased predictability and stability for workers and businesses in Texas. .

Being more than 1,000 miles from the tip of the Texas Panhandle may make America’s neighbor to the north forgetful, but our common values ​​and interests, and our deep ties, coupled with powerful economic ties on many levels are certainly reasons for which Canada should be kept in mind as we move forward together towards economic recovery.


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Taliban will ‘hang’ me: Afghan interpreters ask Canada for help


TORONTO – As Taliban insurgents have made rapid territorial gains across Afghanistan in recent weeks, a chilling new audio from a local performer who has worked with the Canadian Forces illustrates just how much he and others like him face in their own country.

In an audio file posted to YouTube, an interpreter in Helmund province recounts how he and others risked their lives alongside Canadian soldiers to support the mission against the Taliban from 2010 to 2011. He now asks why Ottawa and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau are not moving. faster to get his family to safety.

“Mr. Trudeau, I am a father. My daughter is one and a half years old. From father to father, I beg you to please help me and my family out of Afghanistan before the Taliban don’t find us, ”he said.

“If Canada does not act immediately, my wife, daughter and brothers will be captured by the Taliban. They will hang me, shoot me and cut my head off. They will kill my wife and my daughter. They will kill my brothers … you promised me that my family would one day come to Canada [and] enjoy the peace your family enjoys every day.

Canadian veterans have expressed, with increasing urgency, the need for Canada to assist Afghan translators and interpreters who worked with Canadian soldiers during the war to come to Canada with their families.

Canadian Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Minister Marco Mendicino said the government was working on a plan to help families, but did not say when that plan could go into effect.

“We know the Afghans are putting their own lives at risk by helping the Canadian effort in the war there, and we want to do what is right for them,” he said on Friday. “And so we hope to have more to say about it as soon as possible. Near future.”

Sayed Shah is worried about his two brothers who face threats due to his work with the Canadian Forces more than a decade earlier. The Taliban know him well, Shah said, and it is certain that if they take control of Kandahar and Kabul, his brothers will die. He has already lost five family members in 2013 when they were killed by a roadside bomb set off by the Taliban.

“They are in danger because of me, because I worked with the Canadian military,” he said. “I put my family in danger. “

A former battlefield interpreter who worked with the Canadian military between November 2007 and March 2010, Shah was able to come to Canada under the original special immigration program. The soldiers who supported his visa application acknowledged that his bravery under intense Taliban fire had saved Canadian lives. Now that the Taliban is closing in on Kandahar, he is seeking similar protection for his brothers, who are now in hiding.

“If they are not evacuated from Afghanistan, they will be targeted and killed,” Shah said.

Ottawa previously announced the creation of a dedicated refugee stream for “human rights defenders,” including journalists and others who may seek asylum to escape persecution in their country.

As the September 11 departure deadline approaches, other NATO allies have already announced evacuation plans for thousands of Afghans. The United States said this week that flights for eligible Afghan citizens will begin by the end of July.

Interpreters have played a vital role in NATO operations in the Middle East, including the more than 40,000 Canadian troops who have served in Afghanistan. Many Afghans risked their lives helping on the front line.

A special immigration program put in place in 2009 and completed two years later brought some 800 former interpreters and their families to Canada, but thousands have been left behind. Many now face the possibility of being tortured or killed for their role in helping Canadian troops, advocates say.

The sudden withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan in early July after nearly two decades of fighting accelerated the movement of the Taliban across the country, with Taliban officials claiming the group now controls more than 85% of the territory – a figure which is disputed by others.

With files from CTV National News Parliamentary Bureau reporter Annie Bergeron-Oliver, CTVNews.ca editor Christy Somos and The Canadian Press


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Discovery Canyon, CSU sprinter Lauren Gale, heads to Tokyo with Team Canada | Colorado Springs High School Sports


Lauren Gale, Canadian Olympic Track and Field Team.

“I’m going to put it on my Instagram bio, on my resume when I apply to dental hygiene school,” said Gale, 21, noting that these schools are difficult to access. “Maybe that will help, I don’t know.”

The former Discovery Canyon student, who just finished her junior year at Colorado State, is heading to the Tokyo Games as part of the 4×400-meter relay team.

Gale and his parents had coffee on his porch in Fort Collins in early July 3 as they waited for the life-changing email from Athletics Canada, but Gale’s former track club, the Lions d ‘Ottawa, beat him with a Tweet. Gale was the youngest member of Canada’s track and field team.

Gale’s time of 51.96 put her firmly in contention before Rio Olympian Alicia Brown tied her at the 2021 Olympic Trials. Brown handed in a 51.82 later in June, casting minor doubts on the inclusion of Gale.

She is due to leave for Japan on Saturday.

“To have to compete on the biggest stage of the biggest track event possible – that’s crazy,” said Gale. “I still can’t believe it.”

Gale was always the one chasing the ball down the field in youth football, giving her parents the idea to try athletics. Years later, at an indoor competition, they cheered on Lauren after what they thought was a good 400-yard run, but other spectators saw more.

“After all, everyone looked at us and said, ‘Wow, this is a really good time,’” her mother Lisa said. “We didn’t even know what a good time was, but apparently for that age it was super fast.

“We thought, ‘We need to look at this a bit further. “”

Lauren’s father’s work as a Canadian Army Engineer took him to Peterson Air Force Base and family in Colorado Springs for six years. Lauren arrived at Discovery Canyon in 2015. In 2016 and 2018, on both sides of hip surgery, she won the 100, 200 and 400-meter state races in 4A. She was named Gazette Preps Female Peak Performer of the Year in 2017-18.

Lauren tried out international competition at the 2017 Commonwealth Youth Games, where she competed in the 200 meters and 400 meters for Team Canada. After graduating from high school, she competed in the 200 at the 2018 IAAF World Under-20 Championships.

“I love Canada and I love representing them. I still claim it as my home even though I’ve been here for a few years now, ”Lauren said.

“But it’s always good to be able to display a Ram sign in other places. It’s cool to be able to represent them both.

She set school records in the indoor and outdoor 400 this season. She finished 13th in the NCAA West prelims on May 29, with a place to qualify for the NCAA Championships. It was a good enough time for Team Canada.

She had hoped to attend the trials, but crossing the border in Montreal from June 24-27 required a two-week quarantine. A strange season, full of mask mandates and canceled meetups, had required a creative solution – times and world rankings were factored in, Lauren said.

Lauren’s own dental hygienist’s work will be on display when she visits the stage at Tokyo Olympic Stadium.

His parents, preparing for a move across the country, will try to install their TVs as soon as they arrive. If that doesn’t get sorted out quickly, they’ll be them at a Washington DC sports bar telling everyone who their daughter is.

“She can go against the best in the world,” Lisa said.

“We’re so proud it’s crazy.”

One day, the gloved hands in your mouth might belong to an Olympian.

“If I can help build people’s confidence, then my job is done,” Lauren said.

Colorado heptathlete Annie Kunz can celebrate with family as she secures trip to Tokyo

Olympic athletes to wear their own medals at Tokyo ceremonies

How Draymond Green helped reignite Team USA’s offense to rebound from two losses


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US soldiers at NT say close contacts


A plane loaded with U.S. military personnel in the Northern Territory was declared to be close contacts after another passenger tested positive for COVID-19.

The infected woman, who is an active member of the US military, arrived in Darwin on Thursday, July 8 before being diagnosed with the virus on Monday evening.

The 22-year-old is one of some 9,000 foreign service members in Australia for the 2021 Talisman Saber military war games, which began on Wednesday.

She was quarantined at the US Navy-leased Bladin Village worker camp 36 km south of Darwin along with around 1,000 other US servicemen when she tested positive.

The woman has since been moved to the red zone at the Center for National Resilience in Howard Springs, with her travel companions now considered close contacts, according to NT Health.

“All personnel who have traveled on the plane with the member of the United States military who tested positive are treated as close contact,” said a spokesperson.

“They are undertaking quarantine procedures at the village of Bladin, including daily checks.”

A defense spokesperson said the woman did not come into contact with the community despite being contagious.

More than 17,000 military personnel from Australia, United States, United Kingdom, Canada, New Zealand, Japan and South Korea will participate in TS21.

The majority of war game simulations are expected to take place in Queensland and off the east coast of Australia.

British, Canadian, Japanese and Korean service personnel have been quarantined in Sydney. Other foreign troops have been stationed in hotels in Brisbane, a spokesperson said.

All foreign military personnel arriving in Australia for TS21 undergo a mandatory two-week quarantine.

NT Health and Defense declined to respond to the number of service personnel on the affected flight.


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He worked with Canadian soldiers. He helped try to save Captain Nichola Goddard. Now this Afghan interpreter is waiting for the Taliban and fears being sentenced


For over two years, Kohistany served as a combat interpreter for the Canadian Forces in the Kandahar and Helmand provinces of Afghanistan.

He would translate meetings, workshops, trainings and conferences with local elders, the Afghan National Army and the police. He also participated in interrogations and investigations of prisoners and translated documents and intelligence reports from sources on the ground.

When not in combat mode, Kohistany advised his Canadian commanders on Afghan cultural, religious and tribal customs or taught their soldiers the Pashto and Dari languages.

At least twice he and the troops he was with have been attacked by insurgents, most notably in the incident of May 17, 2006, when his convoy commander, Captain Nichola Goddard, was killed in an ambush. by the Taliban. He helped his crew get her out of the turret so the medic could perform first aid.

“I was in a light armored vehicle with about nine soldiers. We’ve all been hurt, some more seriously. I had little shrapnel on my neck and pulled them out right there, ”recalls Kohistany, who worked for the Canadian military in Afghanistan between 2005 and 2007.

Considered “the eyes, the tongue and the ears of the infidels and the occupiers”, Afghans who have worked for foreign governments – and their families – have already been targeted and have received constant death threats.

Now, as the United States and its NATO allies withdraw all ground troops in Afghanistan by August 31, and Taliban insurgents reclaim many territories, Kohistany fears he will be doomed.

“The threat has increased day by day. You can easily see the Taliban slogans on the walls. You can see Taliban flags on the houses, ”said Kohistany, who asked that his full name not be released for his safety. “Targeted assassinations are escalating.”

As he sees other foreign governments such as the US, UK and other European countries making plans to resettle their former Afghan aides, Kohistany said he felt abandoned by Canada.

“If I had known that one day we would be left behind by the Canadian government, I would never have joined the Canadian military to work and fight with them, shoulder to shoulder, against the Taliban and put my life in danger. , ” he sighed.

“I feel very disappointed. “

In a letter last week to Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino, Veterans Affairs Minister Lawrence MacAulay and Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan, three retired Canadian Majors Generals called on the federal government to relaunch a resettlement program for Afghan civilians like Kohistany.

“There is an urgent need to ensure the safety and well-being of Afghan nationals who served alongside Canadian soldiers, development officers and diplomats during our intervention,” said the letter signed by the three. former task force commanders Denis Thompson, Dean Milner. and Dave Fraser.

“Many Canadian veterans come into contact with the Afghans who served alongside them, and their stories are poignant. These people are considered “comrades in arms” and their plight affects these veterans, like all Canadians. “

Specifically, veterans are calling on the federal government to immediately reintroduce a special immigration program that helped resettle 780 Afghans and their families to Canada between 2009 and 2011.

The Afghan-Canadian Interpreters – an advocacy group made up mostly of veterans, serving military personnel, and supporters – have identified at least 115 former interpreters, cultural advisers and local staff who they say are in need of the protection of the Canada.

Volunteers contacted them and compiled a list for Ottawa. Time, they say, is running out.

“The Western presence will no longer exist in the country. Therefore, there will be no protection for any of them, ”said group spokesman Dave Morrow, a retired lieutenant who served in Kandahar in 2010 and 2011.

“We don’t have a plan. We don’t have a list other than the one we created as an organization. This is where we fill the void, to hopefully provide some kind of visibility and awareness of this huge humanitarian issue that is unfolding very, very quickly.

Canada’s initial resettlement program was limited to Afghan civilians who provided 12 consecutive months of service to Canadians between October 2007 and July 2011. To be eligible, they also had to provide testimonials from their Canadian supervisors as well as proof that they were in danger in Afghanistan. .

Immigration Minister Mendicino’s office told reporters that Afghan civilians not eligible for the previous program may apply to immigrate to Canada through other immigration programs or on humanitarian and compassionate grounds.

Morrow says these options are not viable.

“If you were in a war-torn country with no internet access, no cell service, and maybe an iPhone 3 to fill out all your paperwork, no access to printers, paper, or whatever, this statement in itself was disturbing, ”he said. mentionned.

Kohistany went into hiding with his wife and children in Kabul, a relatively safer area where most of the foreign diplomats are located. They moved around several times to avoid detection and threats from insurgents, he said. Just two months ago, two bikers shot at his house with an AK-47.

“There is no option for us. Key roads and borders are all controlled by the Taliban. We are like prisoners. The only option or hope we have is to find or ask someone or a government to come and get us in a safe country, ”said the 36-year-old, a graduate in law and political science.

He was not eligible for the previous Ottawa relocation program because he left the force before October 2007.

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“We are between life and death. The insurgents occupied more territory and found more influence in the big cities and created more threats for everyone. Life has become more dangerous than ever.

Cpl.  Robin Rickards, who served in Afghanistan on three missions before retiring in 2010, says Canadian soldiers would not be able to do their jobs without the help of local interpreters, who saved soldiers' lives at many times.

Retired Corporal Robin Rickards first met Kohistany in 2006 on the first of his three missions in Afghanistan and the two became good friends because they spent a lot of time together on the front lines.

He said the armies would not have been able to do their job without the help of these interpreters.

“The most important thing they did, to save the lives of Canadians, was that they were essential to monitor ICOM radios. All communication between the Taliban elements in the field was by two-way radio, ”says Rickards, who retired in 2010 and now lives in Thunder Bay.

“The interpreters would bring the conversations to us in real time and also add their perspective on legitimacy. … The longer a person is employed by Canadians or Coalition Forces, the better they determine if it is legitimate, but it increases the risk they face in the long run.

Rickards asserts that these civilian employees of foreign governments are considered “apostates” by the Taliban and that Canada has more than a moral obligation to save them. And they should be on the front lines for resettlement in order to save the lives of Canadian soldiers, he added.

Wherever the Canadian military is deployed, they need local translators to serve as cultural and linguistic ambassadors, he said, whether in Ukraine, Latvia or Mali.

“The plight of our interpreters in Afghanistan will be seen by people in other countries,” Rickards warned. “People in these other places where we go in the future will be wary of helping us because they will be wary of the consequences when we go. And that will hamper our ability to be successful in these missions. “

Marcus Powlowski, Liberal MP for Thunder Bay — Rainy River, has been a strong advocate for Afghan civilians.

“They risked their lives for our country,” said Powlowski.

Ottawa has an ambitious goal of welcoming 401,000 permanent residents this year, and in the past the government has resettled tens of thousands of people vulnerable to wars and violence in Syria and Myanmar, he said. he adds. According to him, the Afghan civilians in question are only a drop in the ocean.

Powlowski said his government told him any resettlement plan in Afghanistan was a logistical challenge due to Canada’s limited presence in the country as well as security concerns.

“I don’t think it’s insurmountable at all that we’re doing this in Afghanistan. It could be as simple as sending a plane, letting (in) all the people because a lot of these people are in contact with our office, ”he said.

“Now, I’m not advocating that we do this. But potentially, it could be as easy as sending a plane. There is a source to verify who they are, to make sure they don’t have guns on them, to have them stolen, and to do all the bureaucratic tasks afterward.

Sayed Shah Sharifi, a former Afghan interpreter now in Toronto, says five of his family were killed by the Taliban because of their connection to him.  Threats against former employees to foreign governments are real, he says.

Sayed Shah Sharifi, a former Afghan interpreter resettled in Canada in 2012, knows firsthand how the Taliban treat “infidels” and their families. Five of his family members – his sister and his son; his brother’s wife and two children – were killed by insurgents because of their connection to him.

“These are not just threats. These are real risks, ”says Sharifi, who served alongside Canadian troops in Kandahar between 2007 and 2010 and now works as an electrician in Toronto.

With insurgents making significant gains in recent months, he said, there are growing concerns that they will steal internal Afghan government data to track down these former Western government employees with credentials. personal.

“The Taliban may not have found those in hiding yet, but if they are found, they are dead. “

Nicholas Keung is a Toronto-based reporter who covers immigration for The Star. Follow him on Twitter: @nkeung



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As the Taliban retake Afghanistan, a disastrous sense of déjà vu


Kabul by Christmas.

This is where we were, Kabul at Christmas 2001, when the Taliban had just been overthrown, driven out by an intense campaign of bombing by American and British forces, along with the brutal regime’s Al Qaeda “guests”. routed and on the run.

As the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks approached, the United States extricated itself from its longest foreign war – in an unseemly military race for exits – the British and NATO went offline, and Afghanistan is on the precipice of an already disastrous one. seen.

Leaving behind the vast Bagram airfield outside the capital, with thousands of civilian trucks and hundreds of armored vehicles right there. A ghost base, hastily evacuated and handed over to Afghan forces, awaiting search by the Taliban.

Also leaving behind a litany of broken promises – the West’s assurance that Afghanistan would never be abandoned again.

But, just like the Soviets in 1989, dragging their tails between their legs, militarily crippled by a grueling war against the Mujahedin that could not be – or would not be, in the long game tactically waged by the Taliban – won. With President Joe Biden claiming, in a surprising and deceptive way, that the United States has never been in the business of nation building. After some $ 133 billion (US) has been spent on exactly that, most of it on US cents. And more than 2,300 of its soldiers killed.

“I will not send another generation of Americans to war in Afghanistan without expecting a different outcome,” Biden said on Independence Day.

In the wake of the departure of the United States, the dominoes are falling rapidly.

Hours after the evacuation of Bagram, the Taliban were on the march, increasing and widening their reach, with only the Afghan Air Force to control their advance. They captured hundreds of rural districts in the north and surrounded the capital of Badakhshan, with more than 1,000 Afghan soldiers – demoralized and ill-equipped – fleeing their posts, crossing a river bridge to border Tajikistan. Hundreds more – the Afghan army, police and intelligence services – laid down their arms and surrendered when their positions were overwhelmed.

Badakhshan was once the stronghold of anti-Taliban resistance, the last stronghold of Mujahedeen fighters under the revered Ahmad Shah Massoud, assassinated on September 9, 2001, a murder allegedly committed on Al-Qaeda’s orders, by two killers pretending to be journalists. Now trade routes and checkpoints to Tajikistan are controlled by Islamist insurgents, who already collect customs revenue.

On Friday, Taliban forces entered Kandahar, Afghanistan’s second-largest city, the Pashtun heartland in the south and the birthplace of the Taliban, aided by Pakistani intelligence services. Kandahar Province, which was under the responsibility of the Canadian Forces during the NATO mission, where 158 of our soldiers sacrificed their lives.

The militants first invaded Panjwai – the lush region that Canadians had once cleared and made safe – using it as a springboard for the assault on Kandahar City, a military and metaphorical triumph.

In the western part of Afghanistan, the powerful warlord Ismail Khan, whose vast militia helped US forces topple the Taliban regime, is mobilizing loyalists to defend Herat. “We call on all remaining security forces to resist courageously,” he said over the weekend. “We hope that the men and women of Herat decide at this time to support the resistance front to defend their freedom and safeguard their honor.

Which sounds a lot like a call to arms for another civil war. The latter decimated Afghanistan and turned Kabul into rubble.

While many Western experts claim that it is highly unlikely that heavily fortified Kabul will be seized again by the Taliban by the end of the year, there is little reason to believe in such hissing assurances from the Empire cemetery. Kabul will fall, if not December 31, then quite early thereafter. And the never-ending cycle of conflict will continue in a country that has known nothing but war for the past four decades, from outside and inside.

The only silver lining for the Afghans is that the Taliban will turn out to have undergone some sort of internal reform, less determined to murder civilians and impose draconian interpretations of Islamic law. That there will always be music and schools for girls and civil rights for women and protected rights for ethnic minorities such as the eternally persecuted, predominantly Shia Hazaras bracing for a backlash.

“There are rumors circulating that the Taliban is imposing restrictions or even a total ban on the media, individuals and women in the newly liberated areas,” Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said in a statement released last week. “We reject such propaganda. All schools are fully open, the media are allowed to operate in a free and neutral manner within the framework of Islamic rules, clinics and health centers can work without any constraints. Civil servants, journalists can also live and perform their duties without fear. ”

Right. Pull the other.

It was the fundamentalist regime that banned music and television, forced men to grow beards, executed, threw suspected gays from rooftops, and carried out public executions for those caught breaking Taliban edicts.

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There are reports of schools already burned down and teachers in hiding. The Taliban have been blamed for a wave of killings targeting lawyers, journalists and working women. Dozens of people have been shot or killed in car bombings. The Taliban denies any responsibility.

Reports also indicate that ISIS, what remains of it, is recovering in Afghanistan.

Although the central government still owns most of the country’s major cities, urban areas will inevitably come under siege. The descent into widespread violence seems inevitable and without end in sight. The Soufan Center, which provides analysis of global security threats, revealed that recent US intelligence assessments concluded that the government of besieged President Ashraf Ghani could collapse within the next six months.

As expected when Biden announced earlier this year that the US withdrawal would be completed on September 11, a date chosen for symbolic reasons, although the US exodus was likely to be completed before then, leaving behind only a thousand troops to protect diplomats. missions, the American Embassy and the Kabul airport.

Unacceptable, retorts the Taliban. All foreign troops present on Afghan soil after September 11 will be considered “legitimate targets”.

The Taliban’s territorial gains have been swift and astounding this year. In the past two months alone, they have seized at least 150 districts – they claim many more – in 34 provinces, comprising half the country. In some areas, they have been greeted by war-weary citizens and a corrupt government.

“I don’t like leaving friends in need,” admitted General Austin Scott Miller, commander of US and NATO forces, in a recent interview with ABC, acknowledging that the situation he is leaving behind is disastrous. “War is physical, but it also has a psychological or moral component, and hope really matters. What you don’t want to happen is for people to lose hope. ”

Except that there is no hope for the Afghans. They are doomed to fail, even though the Taliban say they will present a written peace proposal to the government as early as next month during the stalled negotiations in Doha. The United States has repeatedly asked for help from neighboring Pakistan in convincing the insurgents to come up with a written plan. But Pakistan is a traitor. He incubated the Taliban and his regional aspirations have long been based on the Taliban. It is, after all, the country that housed Osama bin Laden, his denials are not worth a fig.

My fixer, driver and friend for nearly two decades, sends desperate texts. “I have to get my family out. They will come first for the interpreters. Please can you help? ”

He has been an interpreter for NATO for years.

Canada’s combat mission in Afghanistan ended in 2011, transitioning to a training mission. Ottawa said it would welcome hundreds of vulnerable Afghans, interpreters, embassy staff and their families. The United States has promised to relocate thousands of interpreters by next month. Which could be too late.

I’m sorry Faramaz. I am really sorry.

Rosie DiManno is a Toronto-based columnist covering sports and news for The Star. Follow her on Twitter: @rdimanno



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A pine tree in London, Ontario. transmits healing lessons 30 years after the Oka crisis


Indigenous leaders invite the public to gather around a towering white pine in downtown London, Ontario. park on Sunday to reflect on why it was planted three decades ago.

The little-known tree, called the Tree of Peace, was planted in Ivey Park following the Oka crisis in Quebec which saw Mohawk protesters clash with police for more than two months.

Elders of the Oneida Nation of the Thames, and others who traveled to Quebec during the stalemate to act as negotiators in the summer and fall of 1990, want young people to understand the conflict.

“We planted it because it was a symbol of the great law of peace and how we are peaceful people still living by the precepts of peace, power and righteousness,” said Dan Smoke, who, along with his wife Mary Lou, will assist by leading a prayer circle and a sacred fire.

The colored bands on the tree represent the four Colors of Man (red, white, black and yellow), blue for Heavenly Father, green for Mother Earth and purple for the Creator. Some of the tapes were taken by vandals. (Angela McInnes)

The smoke was there, alongside hundreds of others in the London area, when the tree was planted on July 11, 1991. Although the conflict took place hundreds of miles away, it had an impact on the world. time and still today.

Also known as the Kanesatake Resistance, the armed standoff was sparked by the proposed golf course and townhouse expansion at a sacred Mohawk burial site known as the Pines. The land was not officially Kanesatake territory under the Indian Act, but it was considered sacred.

“The reason they stood up to protect the earth was because their ancestors were buried there,” Smoke said. “So there they were, protecting their ancestors.”

On July 11, the police and army were dispatched to dismantle the barricades with tear gas, resulting in gunfire from both sides and the death of an officer.

September 1, 1990: A Mohawk warrior sits in a golf cart and uses binoculars to view Canadian Army armored vehicles on Route 344 on the Kanesatake reserve in Oka, Quebec. (Tom Hanson / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Smoke said that following the shooting, the Oneida Nation sent their own skilled negotiators to advise the Mohawk people to work towards a peaceful disengagement.

“In our belief system as an indigenous people, the evil of one is the evil of all of us,” he said. “So if one of us is hurt and hurt, then we are all hurt and we are all hurt. So we have to stand up to protect him. It is our responsibility.”

For 78 days, the Mohawk people resisted law enforcement with encampments and blockades under Canadian watch. Before social media, the Oka Crisis shed light on the rights of Indigenous peoples.

“It was at this point that we and all kinds of people in Canada became much more aware of Aboriginal issues,” said John Turner.

Turner and his wife, Anita, were present when the white pine was planted in Ivey Park. “I firmly believe that if different cultures understand each other, it’s just a positive thing.”

From left to right: Mary Lou Smoke, Anita Turner and John Turner. All three were there when the Tree of Peace was first planted in Ivey Park on July 11, 1991. (Angela McInnes)

On the day the crisis ended, a soldier stabbed Waneek Horn-Miller, 14, in the chest with a bayonet as she and other protesters left the barriers, nearly killing her.

Smoke said the Tree of Peace was planted as a healing gesture after the Oka Crisis. Some of those who were at the plantation 30 years ago will return on Sunday to speak and honor the tree. There will also be veterans who were present in Kanesatake.

But Smoke said he was also eager to see new generations come to discover its history and meaning.

“I think it is time for us to pass on this knowledge and this wisdom to our young people so that they can benefit from it in a good way, so that they do not have to go through what we have experienced and what my ancestors lived, “he said.

The Tree of Peace is located beside the Fork of the Thames, off York Street, to the west of the London Labor Council sculpture, “The Praying Hands”. The ceremony begins Sunday at 6 p.m.

Mohawk director Tracey Deer’s debut film, Beans (2020), highlights the strength and resilience of Mohawk women. It finally gets its theatrical release on Friday. 5:25


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Chris Dare, dental student at the University of Toronto, climbed the “Seven Summits” in his spare time


What do climbing the world’s tallest mountains and practicing dentistry have in common? Interrogate Chris Dare, a graduate student in periodontology from the University of Toronto who has climbed the “Seven Summits” – the highest peaks on each of the seven continents.

A third-year master’s candidate, Dare says the parallel between mountaineering and dental school is that you can accomplish anything if you can dream it and work hard.

“A lot of people think things are too hard and give up too soon,” says Dare. “I’m not superhuman – I’m just a hard worker. If you really want something, you have to put everything you have in it – any time of the day. I believe anyone can do this.

Dare, who grew up in Victoria, didn’t always envision a career in dentistry. He attended the Royal Military College of Canada from 2001 to 2005 and served as an Army Communications Officer for five years, including a 10-month deployment to Afghanistan.

In 2009, his mother came to visit him while on assignment in Quebec.

Chris Dare at Mount Everest Camp 3 (Photo courtesy of Chris Dare)

“My mom complained about missing a few teeth and the discomfort it was causing her,” Dare says. “She had tried dentures and other options. She wanted implants, but they were too expensive.

“As she told me about these issues, I realized I couldn’t help her. From that moment on, I decided that I wanted to be able to help her and others by becoming a dentist myself.

Dare, who was also studying for a Masters of Commerce at the time, changed course and began the Doctor of Dentistry program at the University of British Columbia. After graduating, Dare worked in the Canadian Armed Forces as a dentist, then began his Masters in Periodontology at the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Toronto in 2019.

Between his studies, Dare did something that only a few hundred people in the world accomplished: climb the Seven Summits.

He says his passion for mountaineering flared up during his time in Afghanistan. After working for weeks around the clock, Dare took a two-week break that he used to travel. He had heard of Mount Kilimanjaro and decided that it would be a great adventure and a challenge with his best friend. After conquering his first mountain, he became hooked.

“When I returned to Afghanistan, I thought about all the things I had accomplished and how amazing it is to test the limits of the human body,” says Dare. “You can push yourself and feel like you have nothing more to give, and then you can get some more out of it. “

Chris Dare working on the MV Asterix, a naval supply ship (photo courtesy of Chris Dare)

Dare says his time spent in both mountaineering and dentistry has been extremely rewarding. Each experience taught her the importance of good communication, compassion and the need to help others.

“In dentistry, it is essential to have strong communication with colleagues and patients, and to be compassionate to help understand where patients are coming from,” says Dare. “It’s the same with mountaineering – you need compassion to see yourself in another person going through something extremely difficult. In any situation, the most rewarding feeling is being able to help another person, be it a patient or a friend.

Dare says his ability to balance his studies with an adventurous lifestyle stems from his belief in saving time and using every extra ounce of the day. He notes that this sometimes comes at the expense of sleep, which has helped him prepare for another challenge: becoming a new dad.

Which of his activities does he find the most difficult?

“A new baby, because you can’t prepare for it no matter how badly you want it.” Dentistry and mountaineering are for me, but with a baby it’s a different person and a whole different ball game. No matter how tired you are, you have a baby and a partner to take care of.


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DVIDS – News – Sea Breeze Sailor Profile: Meet Lieutenant-Commander Elizabeth Eldridge of the Royal Canadian Navy


Lieutenant-Commander Elizabeth Eldridge of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) is honored and proud to share her experiences as a Naval Logistics Officer during her deployment as a mentoring staff officer for Exercise SEA BREEZE 21 in Odessa, Ukraine, June 28 – July 10, 2021 SEA BREEZE is an annual multinational exercise co-hosted by the United States Navy (USN) and Ukrainian Navy (UN) with support from the Partnership for the NATO peace, and this year’s Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) participation is part of Operation UNIFIER, the CAF’s military training and capacity building mission in Ukraine.

“As the Navy Logistics Officer, we are responsible for all logistical requirements on board the ship, from administration to finance, food, transport, supply, movement of sailors. and equipment to and from the ship, all types of port services and hospitality, to name a few, ”said LCdr Eldridge. “So we really manage the whole range of logistical support activities that allow the ship’s crew to accomplish our mission,” she noted.

Coming from a military family, LCdr Eldridge had the privilege of living in Ottawa and Halifax. Although she comes from a family spanning several generations of military service, she said, surprisingly, that was not her primary motivation for becoming a sailor. “I wanted to join because I wanted to do everything,” she said. “I first joined the Canadian Army Reserve as a clerk when I was in high school just to get a taste of it and since I’ve always wanted to be a Naval Logistics Officer, I decided to go this route when I pursued my undergraduate studies. at the Royal Military College (RMC), ”she added.

LCdr Eldridge says the most appealing part about going to RMC is that you can pursue a variety of interests and hobbies in addition to earning your degree. “Unlike other universities where students may only have the opportunity to pursue or become interested in a new interest, at RMC you are encouraged and supported to do it all – you have to show leadership. , you have to play sports, you have to do extracurricular activities, you have to do a second language – and for me that was the biggest draw. So the inspiration to join was not really on the family side, but more because of the vast opportunities offered by the military, where you can have the space, time and resources to do so, ”he said. she declared.

A proud Naval Logistics Officer, she said the most rewarding part of being a Logistician is the fact that you can make a difference every day, and you see the immediate results of what you do to support the mission.

“Whether it’s processing a travel expense claim or organizing a hospitality event during a port stopover to represent Canada abroad, you know you always have an impact. positive, ”she said.

A seasoned sailor proudly wearing the gunmetal Maritime Service Badge (SSI), he has been deployed several times in Canada and abroad. Some of its national deployments include Operation NANOOK and Operation NUNALIVUT in the Arctic. Abroad, she participated in RIMPAC in Hawaii and was deployed aboard Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Charlottetown as part of Operation REASSURANCE ROTO 5 in Europe.

During exercise SEA BREEZE 21, LCdr Eldridge is part of the CAF mentoring team. “As a naval logistics mentor in this exercise, I advise and guide Ukrainian naval logisticians on logistics planning and the importance of looking at logistics from an operational perspective,” she said. “My goal is to provide options and other perspectives in handling logistical issues related to operations. It’s about sharing our best practices and giving advice they can take into account in their problem-solving process.

Asked about her advice to aspiring sailors and those considering joining the RCN, “Logistics is cool! Never discredit the importance of logistics and the importance of the support professions that work for operations – to join the Navy as a supporter you can see and experience so much, while making a tangible difference, ”he said. she declared.

Date taken: 07.08.2021
Date posted: 07.08.2021 11:23
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Ministers of Veterans Affairs and National Defense mark 10th anniversary of end of Canada’s combat mission


Canada has joined the International Security Assistance Force led by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and authorized by the United Nations. Canada has provided nearly $ 3.7 billion in international assistance since 2001 and continues to support security, development and humanitarian efforts in Afghanistan. Canada remains committed to upholding the security, development and human rights gains of the past two decades, in particular the rights of women and girls.

The combat phase of Canada’s mission ended in July 2011, when it shifted to a training mission focused on curriculum design and the development of instructional skills in military and military training institutions. Afghan police officers. The Canadian Armed Forces would continue these efforts until the end of our military mission in Afghanistan in March 2014.

More than 40,000 Canadians have served in the theater of operations in Afghanistan. Canada’s first contributions came from the deployment of warships to the waters off Southwest Asia in October 2001, followed by elements of Joint Task Force 2 and the Canadian Army, which moved in. deployed to Afghanistan in December to support efforts to overthrow the Taliban regime and al-Qaeda. Additional Canadian troops would soon be sent to Kandahar province in January 2002.

From 2003 to 2005, Canadians were primarily stationed in Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan, before returning to the more volatile Kandahar region. From 2005 to 2011, the Canadian Armed Forces assumed command of international efforts to secure Kandahar Province, working with civilian colleagues to help restore stability to the Southern Province of Afghanistan while supporting major efforts. humanitarian and nation-building organizations throughout Afghanistan. In Kandahar, Canadians engaged in heavy fighting, most notably during Operation Medusa in September 2006, which was launched to oust the Taliban from Panjwai District. With the participation of over 1,000 Canadians, it was Canada’s largest combat operation in over 50 years.

A total of 158 members of the Canadian Armed Forces died in Canadian service in Afghanistan, along with seven Canadian civilians, including a diplomat, four aid workers, a government contractor and a journalist. Thousands more returned with physical and psychological injuries.

Canadians recently had the opportunity to view and share their thoughts on the five proposed designs for the National Monument to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan. When completed, this new monument in Ottawa will recognize the commitment and sacrifice of those who served and the support they received from home.

This 10e anniversary of the end of the combat mission is an opportunity to reiterate our gratitude for the efforts that Canadians have made to bring greater stability to Afghanistan and to strengthen peace and security in the world.

Quote

“For nearly a decade, Canada’s combat mission in Afghanistan was the longest in our military history, and we all have a duty to remember the bravery displayed by all Canadians who served there,” both military and civilian. Today we pay tribute to the 165 Canadians killed in Afghanistan and thank the more than 40,000 people who answered the call to serve for peace and security in Afghanistan.

The Honorable Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defense

“This month we remember the courage and resilience of the members of the Canadian Armed Forces deployed in Afghanistan. We honor those who paid the ultimate price during and after the mission. And we are thinking of all who have borne the physical and mental wounds of the battle to this day. On this tenth anniversary of the end of Canada’s combat mission in Afghanistan, we are reminded of the real costs of war and the price of freedom. We are grateful today and every day for the selflessness and bravery of the Canadian military.

The Honorable Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National Defense


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John Wilkinson: Puslinch’s Forgotten Hero of a Forgotten War


John Wilkinson was a decorated victim of a long forgotten conflict that contributed in many ways to the region

On January 6, 1903, a special reception was held at Guelph City Hall in honor of two distinguished soldiers.

One of them was Corporal John K. Minchin of Milton, paralyzed by a gunshot wound to his leg. The other, and the horseman who was truly the man of the hour, was King Sergeant John A. Wilkinson, who had lost his right arm and his right eye. Like their comrade-in-arms John McCrae, also present at the reception, they had fought in the South African War (aka the Boer War).

The South African War of 1899-1902 was not exactly Britain’s best hour. Even though the British won the war, the tough Afrikaner fighters gave the armed might of the British Empire all it could take. But it was the first foreign war in which Canadian soldiers fought. Over 7,000 men from communities across Canada, including Guelph, volunteered to fight for the crown, and 284 of them died. 252 others were injured.

In the words of Lieutenant-Colonel William Nicoll of Guelph, they stood up for the dignity of the empire and showed the world the true courage of Canadians. They were national heroes, and none more than Wilkinson.

John Wilkinson was born circa 1874 to a pioneer family in Puslinch. He grew up on a farm and attended Killean School. At fifteen, like so many other Canadian teenagers, he enlisted in the militia. Wilkinson enlisted in the “A” Battery of the Guelph First Field Artillery Brigade.

Wilkinson had clearly found his vocation in the army, especially as an artilleryman. He took an artillery course in Kingston and then won a silver medal in an artillery competition there. He was promoted to sergeant and was part of the Canadian artillery team that traveled to England in 1896 to compete for the Queen’s Prize. The Canadians won by beating teams from across the British Empire. They traveled up the Thames on the Royal Yacht Britannia to Windsor Castle where they had lunch with Queen Victoria.

By the time the South African War broke out, Wilkinson had been promoted to sergeant major. In 1899 he enlisted in the Canadian Mounted Rifles and volunteered to serve overseas. His regiment left Halifax for Durban on January 14, 1900.

Wilkinson participated in several engagements, including the Battle of Harts River, also known as the Battle of Boschbult. It was one of the last major engagements of the war, but also one of the bloodiest. On March 31, 1902, a British column of 1,800 men which included a company of Canadians faced a force of 2,500 Boers. The outnumbered British took up defensive positions around some farm buildings. In a battle that lasted over four hours, a group of 21 Canadians broke away from the main British force. Wilkinson and Minchin were with them.

Eighteen of these 21 soldiers were killed or wounded. Wilkinson received 10 bullets. An exploded bullet shattered his right arm below the elbow and a fragment of it blinded his right eye. He also lost hearing in his right ear. Wilkinson continued to fire his rifle until he ran out of ammo. Then he threw the bolt on his rifle so that it would be useless to the enemy if captured. He lay injured on the battlefield in cold rain for hours before being finally picked up by British stretcher bearers.

A doctor amazed that Wilkinson was still alive operated on him in a bell tent. The surgeon had no hot water and was working by the light of a lantern. Wilkinson and the other injured men stayed in this tent for eight days, then endured three days and two nights in mule-drawn wagons transported 98 miles to a military hospital.

In June 1902, Wilkinson was sent to Netley Military Hospital, England. There he received the visit of Queen Alexandra. Wilkinson was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, which ranked second in prestige after the Victoria Cross. On Lord Kitchener’s recommendation, he was presented to King Edward VII who awarded him the rank of king’s sergeant. Wilkinson was the only Canadian to receive this honor during the South African War.

Wilkinson returned home and in 1909 married Hattie Mae Bailey of Galt. Over the years, he served on the Puslinch Council, as Reeve of Puslinch Township and as Auditor of Puslinch and Nassagaweya Townships and Wellington County. The Wilkinson family eventually moved to Guelph, residing on Glasgow St., then Home St. and finally Mont St. They belonged to St. George’s Anglican Church. In 1938 Wilkinson opened the Wilkinson Insurance Agency on Douglas Street in downtown Guelph.

Wilkinson was introduced to royalty again on June 6, 1939, when King George VI and Queen Mary visited Guelph. After Wilkinson’s death on May 15, 1947, his widow received a letter of condolence from the King and Queen. Flags were hoisted at half mast at Guelph City Hall and Wellington County buildings in honor of the decorated South African War Veteran.


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C-130 crashes in Patikul, Sulu – Philippine Canadian Inquirer


FILE: The site of the C-130 crash at Patikul, Sulu on Sunday (July 4, 2021). The plane was on a troop transport mission, according to AFP chief General Cirilito Sobejana. (Photo: Bridge Bridge, PTV via Philippine News Agency / Facebook)

MANILA – A Philippine Air Force (PAF) C-130H Hercules transport plane crashed Sunday morning in Patikul, Sulu, the Chief of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) General Cirilito Sobejana confirmed.

In an interview with reporters, Sobejana said the incident happened around 11:30 a.m.

“One of the C-130s, while transporting our troops from Cagayan De Oro, n / A-Mademoiselle nya ‘yung track, trying to regain power, to hindi nakayanan, bumagsak doon sa mai Barangay Bangkal, Patikul, Sulu (One of our C-130s, while carrying troops from Cagayan De Oro, missed the trail, tried to regain power but failed and crashed at Barangay Bangkal , Patikul, Sulu), ”he said.

Sobejana has not identified the runway but the closest and unique airport in the area is at Jolo.

Efforts are underway to rescue passengers from the ill-fated plane.

About 40 passengers were rescued and are currently being treated at the 11th Infantry Division hospital in the town of Busbus.

No further details were immediately available, Sobejana said.

Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said initial reports indicated there were 92 people on board, including three pilots and five crew members.

The rest were army personnel reporting for duty.

“So far 40 wounded and injured have been rescued and 17 bodies recovered,” Lorenzana said in a statement.

The PAF also confirmed the incident.

“A Philippine Air Force C-130 plane with tail # 5125 was the victim of an incident while landing at Jolo,” PAF said.

The plane took off from Villamor Air Base in Pasay en route to Lumbia Airport and then transported personnel to Jolo, PAF spokesman Lt. Col. Maynardo Mariano said.

The aircraft was one of two C-130Hs acquired with a grant from the US government. He arrived in the country on January 29 and was officially welcomed into the PAF fleet at Villamor on February 18.

The cost of acquiring the two C-130H aircraft had previously been estimated at PHP 2.5 billion, with the Philippines contributing PHP 1.6 billion and the United States contributing around PHP 900 million.

it is a four turboprop military transport aircraft originally designed and built by Lockheed, now Lockheed Martin.

Capable of using unprepared runways for takeoffs and landings, the C-130 was originally designed as a personnel carrier, medical evacuation, and cargo aircraft.


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AFP urges CHR to deepen Absalon murder – Philippine Canadian Inquirer


Kieth Absalon (Photo courtesy of Facebook via PNA)

MANILA – The Armed Forces of the Philippines Center for the Law of Armed Conflict (AFPCLOAC) has asked the Human Rights Commission (CHR) to conduct a side investigation into the Masbate incident that killed college footballer Kieth Absalon and his cousin, Nolven.

Brig. General Jose Alejandro Nacnac, director of AFPCLOAC, sent a letter of request to the president of the CHR, Jose Luis Martin Gascon, to investigate the “heinous, despicable and reprehensible” attack perpetrated by the New People’s Army (NPA) June 6, 2021.

“As a vanguard of human rights and international humanitarian law, we call on your office to pursue justice for the Absalons and all the victims of the latest anti-personnel mine (APM) explosions and the protection of civilians from use of MPAs by the NPA and the CTGs (communist terrorist groups). We also ask for your help and support in the government’s overall effort to end the local communist armed conflict, ”the letter dated June 29 reads.

Nacnac condemned the incident, saying NPA rebels must be held accountable for indiscriminate use of PAM and attacks on innocent civilians.

“The continued use by ANPs of anti-personnel mines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) that kill and maim civilians and soldiers in flagrant disregard and in willful violation of international humanitarian law is worrying and must be stopped,” said Nacnac in a press release on Friday. .

Nacnac noted that “the distinction between civilians and combatants is a cardinal principle” of international humanitarian law, “intended to minimize damage to civilians by making violence a combatant’s business”.

Quoting Article 14 of Republic Law (RA) No. 9851, or the Philippine Law on Crimes Against International Humanitarian Law, Genocide and Other Crimes Against Humanity, promulgated on December 11, 2009, Nacnac said that the communist leader who orchestrated the violent attacks must also face criminal charges.

“In addition to the other grounds of criminal responsibility for the crimes defined and sanctioned by RA 9851, section 10 thereof provides that NPA leaders like Joma Sison will be criminally responsible as the principal for these crimes committed by subordinates under his effective command and control, or effective authority and control, as the case may be, due to his inability to properly exercise control over those subordinates, ”added Nacnac.

“The responsibility of the leaders of these CTGs for the damage and prejudice that their subordinates inflicted on non-combatants must not go unpunished,” he continued.

In May, the CHR pledged to investigate the 1,506 atrocities and IHL violations committed by the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) -NPA and the National Democratic Front from 2010 to 2020.

The CPP-NPA is listed as a terrorist organization by the United States, European Union, United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the Philippines. (With reports from Priam Nepomuceno / PNA)


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The Rebel to Rabble Review: A Canceled Canada Day


“Pathetic.”

It’s like that Ricochet Columnist Katsi’tsakwas Ellen Gabriel, whose biography says she “has been an indigenous human rights and environmental activist since 1990,” sums up the “shock and horror” with which “mainstream” Canadian society reacted to news of the discovery “hundreds of Aboriginal children on the grounds of two former Indian residential schools” – a number that is expected to increase with site surveys.

“The hearts and souls of indigenous peoples have been breaking for generations,” she says.

“Our pain and anger have been boiling for ages. While most compassionate people mourn with us, the majority of Canadians still do not know the truth about their country. How can anyone claim to have never heard of the residential school system? Or not knowing that there are thousands of Indigenous children buried in anonymous graves across Canada? The Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) traveled across Canada for seven years. There was media coverage. Millions of dollars have been spent. That alone must have attracted attention!

She is also attacking the “insidious Indian Act,” which she says “remains a tool to control the native population, or, as Duncan Campbell Scott, a key architect of the residential school system, said,” to get rid of the Indian problem. ‘ “

His response: “We are not a problem; we are human beings. The sooner this is achieved, the sooner we can implement an education program that will protect against (current) and future generations from making the same apathetic mistake of not recognizing when a crime against humanity is committed. “

Meanwhile, Ricochet writer Brandi Morin, “An award-winning French / Cree / Iroquois journalist from Treaty 6 territory in Alberta,” shares the latest news on the standoff between indigenous rights activists and ancient logging operations in Fairy Island, Alta.

“Noah Ross, a Vancouver Island-based lawyer who assists the Rainforest Flying Squad – as the loose group of volunteers behind the roadblocks is called – says the RCMP are systematically working to reduce the number of witnesses (of) their actions using exclusion zones. », Reports Morin.

According to Ross, the RCMP “are like a ‘colonial army’ occupying Indigenous lands … and they do not treat Indigenous peoples the same as white settlers in these situations.” In fact, he told Ricochet, “there are certainly times when they (the RCMP) behave in a very peaceful manner, largely when it (the protest or the blockade) is dominated by militants of the settlers. “

Also unabashedly in favor of canceling the usual Canada Day celebrations was Canadian Dimension columnist and longtime Indigenous activist Pam Palmater.

“A national day of mourning and collective reflection in honor of these children is far more appropriate than the usual fireworks and parades, which celebrate a country founded on genocide – a genocide that continues unabated”, she argued.

“It will be a summer of truth for Canadians as more and more graves of Native children are discovered,” Palmater wrote. “At the same time, it will be a summer of great suffering for Indigenous peoples, especially residential school survivors and the families of those children who never made it out alive. Calls for the cancellation of Canada Day celebrations this year (had) nothing to do with the so-called “cancellation culture” – the term dog whistle used by angry white men taking advantage of the status quo. On the contrary, #CancelCanadaDay is what true reconciliation looks like. “

More than Rabble, political writer Karl Nerenberg explains why Carolyn Bennett should step down as Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations – which she believes goes way beyond the now infamous snipe of a note she texted to her former cabinet colleague , Jody Wilson-Raybould.

“Voters would do well to not only remember this incident, but also to carefully consider Carolyn Bennett’s record since taking on this new post, leading a new ministry,” he wrote.

“Bennett has been successful in negotiating a few small-scale deals with individual First Nations bands. But the government has done nothing systemic to reform the current colonial relationship between the Crown and Indigenous peoples. “

In fact, he argues, “whenever large resource projects are on the table, transnational corporations can count on willing partners from the provincial and federal governments, (who) normally collude to put pressure on small underfunded First Nations bands to accept vague promises. jobs and benefits, no co-ownership, no meaningful partnership and not a dime in royalties, ”something Bennett“ has done very little to change, ”in his opinion.

“In fairness to the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, she received little support from federal government centers of power, such as the departments of Finance, Treasury Board, Natural Resources and Industry,” as well as the Privy Council and the Prime Minister’s Office. . That, more than a verbal insult, might be a good reason for Bennett to quit.

Elsewhere on the site, Rabble blogger and self-proclaimed “street nurse,” Cathy Crowe, looks at “the militarized operation to evict two dozen people from Toronto’s Trinity Bellwoods Park,” which she notes was not just “a gruesome story of city hall against the poor “, But a repeat of what happened two decades earlier in Tent City, a” 140-person waterfront encampment “that also found itself” brutally evicted early one morning, “with the courtesy of then-mayor Mel Lastman.

“A fence was erected around the site, a convoy of trucks and heavy machinery arrived, a substantial amount of security and police arrived to remove the traumatized residents and, within hours, their homes – a combination of auto shacks. -built and prefabricated houses. – were flattened, ”she recalls.

“Solidarity demonstrations took place within the hour and included members of the union squadron. “

The move also sparked “tears from housing activists, including residents of Tent City,” who “fought and secured housing through a pilot rent supplement program.” Yet 20 years later, under current Toronto Mayor John Tory, “homelessness has exploded” and the city “is more than unraveled; it is broken by surgical assistance from other levels of government.

Also keeping a close eye on events at Trinity Bellwood is Passage essayist Matthew Alexandris, who criticizes Toronto City Council for failing to keep its promise to fight “devastating changes” to the Residential Tenancies Act under Ontario Premier Doug Ford.

“Almost a year later, the city has yet to launch this legal challenge,” he says.

“And beyond doing nothing to prevent people from becoming homeless, the city hasn’t done much to help those who are, making matters worse. Campsites have emerged in increasing numbers throughout the pandemic, serving as places for those who have been evicted and who cannot afford rent. “

In fact, Alexandris notes, “The violent methods used by police and security guards to clear encampments reflect the violence of being forced out of your residence, not knowing where you will be staying next, and having your belongings thrown away. … By evicting people and pushing them from place to place, it is more difficult for them to have stability in a community and to have access to support networks.

To finish, Progress of the press recounts the latest twist in the ongoing Alberta investigation into “foreign funding of anti-Alberta energy campaigns,” sending official notices to environmental groups and other organizations formally requesting their support. response to “research materials, evidence and conclusions report.”

The twist: “The letters were missing specific allegations of all kinds,” which, according to Greenpeace Canada – one of several groups to confirm receipt of the mass letter – “puts the legal right to the investigation of make an allegation public on a legal basis. “

Or, as the group’s senior energy advisor, Keith Stuart, put it in an interview with PP, “It’s a bit of a puzzle.

PP adds, “The letter of inquiry further states that its evidence was ‘mostly’ drawn from publicly available information online, including websites and government documents that the organizations have already published themselves. “

“Paradoxically, it is also clear that the recipients, a number of whom received identical letters, according to Stuart, were not found guilty of acting unlawfully during the two-year investigation.”

Trends on the right side of the Canadian activist media universe:

  • Adam Soos, correspondent for Rebel News in Alberta has an “exclusive” interview with Pastor Artur Pawlowski, who he reports was found “guilty of all contempt of court charges” for refusing to comply with the province’s social distancing restrictions, which Soos describes as a “much worse – case scenario.
  • Meanwhile, after responding to a tweet from Alberta’s chief medical officer, Deena Hinshaw, accusing her of “sentencing hundreds of Albertans to death for depression, suicide and drug overdoses,” and l called “a wicked woman going to hell,” Ezra Levant, Commander of Rebel News is faced with a retort from former Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s son Ben for his “ridiculous and unbalanced claims”.
  • Levant also offers his thoughts on Catherine McKenna’s announcement that she will not stand for re-election. McKenna “quits politics in a typically futile way” and “will be remembered as a bully,” he says.
  • To finish, True North News compiled a timeline of “every community that has decided to give in to Canada Day cancellation requests.”

More iPolitics


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Coronavirus: What’s Happening in Canada and Around the World on Wednesday


The last:

Ontario moved to the next step in its plan to reopen on Wednesday, just hours before health officials reported the lowest single-day case count the province has seen since September 10.

The province reported 14 additional deaths and 184 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday.

The update came a day after the province’s top doctor said he would prefer to wait 21 full days before further lifting the restrictions.

“The two to three week cycle is very important to maintain so that we open Ontario in stages, always moving forward and not having to back down,” said Dr. Kieran Moore on Tuesday.

Moore made the comments during his first pandemic briefing since officially taking over as Ontario’s chief medical officer of health.

Ontario has exceeded COVID-19 vaccination targets to enter the second phase of its plan to reopen, which will allow more outdoor activities and more indoor services like haircuts. resume Wednesday.

More than 77% of people had received at least one dose of the vaccine by Tuesday morning and 37% were fully immunized.

The province has set 21 days between each stage of its economic reopening to observe public health trends and allow vaccines to take full effect. He brought forward the second stage of the plan a few days based on vaccination rates and other positive trends from COVID-19.

Ontario also exceeded the target to enter the third stage of the reopening plan, which would further increase the capacity of indoor gatherings.

But Moore, like his predecessor Dr David Williams, argued on Tuesday that vaccination is not the only measure. He advised to proceed with caution with the spread of the more infectious delta variant.

Region of Waterloo not moving to step 2

People who have received a dose of the vaccine are less protected against this variant and this has contributed to local spikes in infection in the Gray Bruce and Waterloo region. Waterloo will not reopen with the rest of the province on Wednesday as it manages the increase in infections.

Moore said he is monitoring the impact of the variant locally and internationally and that reopening must be done with caution to avoid losing the progress made in fighting the virus so far.

“He’s a tough opponent. He’s aggressive. He wants to spread quickly,” he said of the variant.

“We have to be careful and we need 21 days to be able to understand the impact of openness on our communities.”

-Based on the latest update from The Canadian Press and CBC News at 10:20 a.m. ET


What’s happening across Canada

WATCH | Masks still matter as Canada faces a more transmissible delta variant, according to an expert:

Masks are our “last line of defense” against the highly transmissible delta variant of COVID-19 as Canada opens up, says pulmonologist Dr Samir Gupta. (Ben Nelms / CBC) 1:39

As early as Wednesday morning, Canada had reported 1,414,746 confirmed cases of COVID-19, of which 7,400 were considered active. A CBC News death tally stood at 26,274. More than 36.7 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered across the country so far, according to the CBC vaccine tracker.

A total of five cases of COVID-19 were reported in Atlantic Canada on Tuesday, including:

No new cases of COVID-19 have been reported in Newfoundland and Labrador Tuesday.

In Quebec, health authorities have reported four additional deaths and 71 new cases of COVID-19.

In the Prairie provinces, Manitoba Tuesday reported no new deaths and 61 new cases of COVID-19. Saskatchewan, meanwhile, reported two more deaths and 52 more cases of COVID-19.

WATCH | Laina Tuckanow lost her mother and grandmother to COVID-19 and says for her, life will never be normal again:

While many Canadians celebrate a return to normalcy, for many the pain is still too great. Laina Tuckanow lost her mother and grandmother to COVID-19 and says for herself that life will never be normal again. 2:44

In Alberta, health officials on Tuesday reported four deaths and 61 new cases of COVID-19.

“Overall, our numbers are heading in the right direction,” Dr Deena Hinshaw said on Tuesday, before a wider reopening later this week.

“Cases, hospitalizations, ICU admissions and our positivity rate are the lowest since last summer, early fall.”

In the North, no new cases were reported in Nunavut or the Northwest Territories Tuesday, as 10 new cases and one additional death were reported in yukonese.

“We are in a new phase of this pandemic, one that we hoped not to see,” Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr Brendan Hanley said in a statement on Tuesday. “But we are here and we will continue to work together to contain this tide.”

British Columbia will move to step 3 of its pandemic reopening plan on Thursday, lifting the provincial mandate of the mask and the government’s declaration of a state of emergency. The news came as British Columbia reported 29 new cases and no new deaths on Tuesday.

-From CBC News and The Canadian Press, last updated 10:20 am ET


What is happening in the world

A street is seen in Brisbane’s central business district on Wednesday as the city goes silent after a lockdown. Australia is battling outbreaks of the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus. (Patrick Hamilton / AFP / Getty Images)

As of Wednesday morning, more than 181.8 million cases of COVID-19 had been reported worldwide, according to data released by Johns Hopkins University in the United States. The death toll worldwide was over 3.9 million.

In the Asia Pacific region, Australian authorities on Wednesday extended lockdown and physical distancing measures to more of the country, with four major cities already under strict lockdown in a race to contain an outbreak of the highly contagious variant of the delta coronavirus.

Bangladesh is deploying army troops from Thursday to enforce a strict lockdown amid a record spike in coronavirus cases caused by the delta variant first detected in India, the government said on Wednesday.

“No one will be allowed out except in an emergency during this time,” the government said in a statement, warning that army troops alongside law enforcement would be deployed to enforce the lockdown.

In the AmericasDr Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said the CDC is leaving it up to local authorities to establish guidelines for wearing the mask as the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus increases in areas with low vaccination rate.

Walensky said Wednesday on NBC Today show that “we’ve always said that local decision-makers should make policies for their local environment,” but added that CDC guidelines broadly say that those who are vaccinated do not need to wear masks.

Los Angeles County health officials recommend that people wear masks indoors in public places, regardless of their immunization status. Separately, the World Health Organization reiterated its long-standing recommendation that everyone wear masks to reduce the spread of the coronavirus.

In Africa, the Tunisian government extended the hours of nighttime curfew on Tuesday in a bid to stop the rapid spread of COVID-19, as the North African country hit a daily record of cases since the start of the pandemic Last year.

Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa on Tuesday imposed a dusk-dawn curfew, banned intercity travel and reduced hours of operation with immediate effect in response to the increase in coronavirus infections.

Roofing Rolling Mills workers fill oxygen tanks which will be distributed free of charge to various hospitals in Uganda at their factory in Namanve, Wakiso, Uganda on Tuesday. The factory is filling 350 to 400 oxygen tanks daily, following an increase in COVID-19 cases in the country and lack of oxygen in various hospitals. (Badru Katamba / AFP / Getty Images)

In Europe, Greece will allow people fully vaccinated against the coronavirus inside restaurants without masks, the government said, as part of measures to increase vaccination rates.

Russia will not be able to immunize 60% of its population by fall as planned due to weak demand for vaccines, the Kremlin said, after the country recorded its highest number of daily deaths from the virus.

In the Middle East, Oman has said it is expanding its vaccination campaign to anyone over 18 as it speeds up what has been the slowest rollout in the Gulf.

-From Reuters, last update 8:10 am ET


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Nutrition researchers saw malnourished children in residential schools as perfect test subjects – Philippine Canadian Inquirer


Two girls lay in bed in the dormitory of All Saints Indian Residential School in Lac La Ronge, Saskatchewan, in 1945. (Boorne & May. Library and Archives Canada, e010962312), CC BY

The discovery of hundreds of children’s remains in Kamloops, Brandon and Cowessess revealed the absolute devastation that settlers inflicted on Indigenous children, families and communities through the residential school system.


Read more: Amid more shocking residential school findings, non-Indigenous people must act


As a nutrition researcher and Canadian settler, I ask my peers to recognize and understand the damage malnutrition and nutritional experiences have on Indigenous peoples and the legacy they have left.

Easier to assimilate

Ian Mosby, historian of food, Indigenous health and the politics of Canadian colonialism, discovered that between 1942 and 1952, Canada’s foremost nutrition scientists carried out highly unethical research on 1 300 Aboriginal people, including 1,000 children, in Cree communities in northern Manitoba and at six residential schools across Canada.

Many were already suffering from malnutrition due to destructive government policies and dire conditions in residential schools.

In the eyes of researchers, this made them ideal test subjects.

Black and white photo: nurse takes blood sample from baby boy
A nurse takes a blood sample from a boy at the Indian Residential School in Port Alberni, British Columbia, during a medical and dental investigation conducted by the Department of National Health and Welfare in 1948 (F. Royal. Canada. National Film Board of Canada. Photo Library, Library and Archives Canada, e002504649), CC BY

Frederick Tisdall – famous for being the co-creator of Pablum infant food at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto – along with Percy Moore and Lionel Bradley Pett were the primary architects of the nutritional experiments.

They proposed that education and dietary interventions would make Indigenous people more profitable for Canada, that if Indigenous people were healthier, the transmission of diseases like tuberculosis to whites would decrease and assimilation would be easier.

They successfully presented their plan of nutrition experiments to the federal government.

Tisdall, Moore and their team based their case on results obtained after subjecting 400 Cree adults and children in northern Manitoba to a series of intrusive assessments, including physical exams, x-rays and blood tests.

Pett and his team’s pitch centered around determining a baseline. They wanted to give the children at Alberni Indian Residential School a small amount of milk for two years, enough to significantly deprive the growing children of the calories and nutrients they needed.

Other experiments involved withholding essential vitamins and minerals from children in control groups, while preventing Indian health services from providing dental care on the grounds that it could impact study results.

And even before these experiences, children in residential schools were hungry – with reports of severe malnutrition and signs of severe vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

Racial motives and foundations of nutritional experiments

Interest in nutrition research increased dramatically in the 1940s after the Canadian Council on Nutrition publicly stated that over 60 percent of the Canadian population suffered from nutritional deficiencies.

Until then, most of the experiments had been done on animals, but researchers like Pett, who was the primary author of what would become Canada’s Food Guide, took the opportunity to use Indigenous peoples as rats of laboratory.

While authors like Pett often operate under the facade of understanding and helping Indigenous peoples, the racial underpinnings of these nutritional experiences are clear.

Investigators sought to unravel the “Indian problem”. Moore, Tisdall and colleagues attributed to malnutrition discriminatory stereotypes such as “lack of speed, indolence, recklessness and inertia”.

AE Caldwell, director of the Alberni Indian Residential School, said malnutrition was caused by traditional diets and lifestyles, which he also called “indolent habits.” The nutritional experiences, along with the deeply inadequate and shoddy foods given to children in residential schools, aligned perfectly with Caldwell’s assimilation mandate.

Denying virtually all children access to adequate traditional foods is another means of colonization and cultural genocide.

Nurse watches boys spit into test tubes
A nurse from the Department of National Health and Welfare supervised the collection of saliva samples from boys at the Indian Residential School in Port Alberni, British Columbia, in 1948. (F. Royal. Canada. National Film Board of Canada. Photo library. Library and Archives Canada, e002504650), CC BY

According to Mosby’s findings, Pett said he aimed to better understand the “inevitable” transition away from country foods, but residential schools were deliberately designed to bring about this.

Their research is unethical by contemporary standards, and it’s hard to believe that it was ever okay to experiment on anyone, let alone children, without consent.

The aftermath of the Holocaust and biomedical experiments in concentration camps led to the development of the Nuremberg Code in 1947, which states that voluntary consent to research is absolutely essential and that experiments must avoid mental suffering and unnecessary physics.

The code came out the same year Pett embarked on his nutritional experiments at six residential schools.

Consequences of malnutrition and experimentation

Childhood malnutrition can be fatal, especially when combined with the risk of disease, which was often the case in residential schools.

The final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission indicates that the leading causes of death among children in residential schools were physical injury, malnutrition, disease and neglect.

For residential school survivors, malnutrition has lasting effects. Starvation in childhood increases the risk of chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes, and research indicates that severe malnutrition can even cause epigenetic changes that can be passed down from generation to generation.

Experimenting with children already in pain was immoral.

Food insecurity and nutrition issues in Indigenous communities are major issues in Canada, resulting from residential schools and colonial policies that continue to this day.

Experiences in residential schools and in communities have made health care settings precarious and traumatic places for many Indigenous peoples and led to some reluctance to be vaccinated during the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, stigma, violence and racism against Indigenous peoples in these contexts persist.

This particular story of experiences of malnutrition and nutrition on indigenous children and adults has already been told. It gained the attention of the mainstream media in 2013 after Mosby’s research and advocacy.

And this is no surprise to indigenous peoples, whose truths we must finally listen to deeply.

If you are a residential school survivor or have been affected by the residential school system and need assistance, you can contact the 24 hour residential school crisis line: 1-866-925-4419

Allison Daniel, PhD Candidate, Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.


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Change of command ceremony inaugurates new cadet leadership


“These young women and men are our future Canadian leaders,” said the lieutenant-colonel. Shaun O’Leary

A virtual change of command ceremony took place today at Canadian Forces Base Borden with the province’s new chief of cadets at the helm.

The Regional Cadet Support Unit (RCSU-Center), which is responsible for the cadet program in Ontario, welcomed a new commander on Friday, who will assume regional leadership of one of the best youth development programs in Canada. .

Lt.-Col. Shaun O’Leary, a long-time member of the Canadian Forces, who was recently assigned to an adult training role at the Canadian Army Doctrine and Training Center in Kingston, will bring extensive experience to the position, which focuses on the development of leadership, citizenship and community service skills among young Canadians.

“I sincerely believe in the Canadian Cadet Organization and am honored to play a role in this organization focused on developing the qualities of citizenship and leadership in youth, promoting a healthy lifestyle and stimulating an interest in the maritime, military and air activities of the Canadian Armed Forces, ”said Lieutenant-Colonel. O’Leary. “These young women and men are our future Canadian leaders.

O’Leary succeeds Lieutenant Colonel. Barry Leonard, who is leaving after two years to take up a diplomatic post at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC

Leonard has held the position for the past 15 months of the COVID-19 pandemic, a very difficult time that has seen the region’s approximately 280 corps and squadrons, including nearly 17,000 cadets, successfully transitioning from what is traditionally an in-person program towards an almost entirely virtually one-to-one program.

Due to current COVID-19 restrictions, this change of command ceremony went virtually.

As RCSU-Central has nearly 20,000 members (adults and youth / cadets) spread across the vast province of Ontario, the virtual adaptation also allowed more audience members to attend than during the ‘a traditionally in-person event.


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Sajjan’s office drops army reservist suspended by Vancouver police for inappropriate relationship


Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan has separated from an Army reservist who was suspended from the Vancouver Police Department for having an inappropriate relationship with a subordinate.

Major Greg McCullough has been hired at Brigade Headquarters in British Columbia as a Special Ministerial Liaison. He was laid off Thursday and returned to his unit for a new assignment.

“As of June 24, 2021, Major McCullough is no longer employed as military assistant to the Minister of National Defense,” Dan Le Bouthillier, head of media relations at the Department of National Defense, said in a brief statement to media.

“He is currently employed by the Army Reserve in Vancouver for other duties.

A spokesperson for the minister told The Canadian Press earlier this week that neither Sajjan nor his staff were aware of the complaint against McCullough or the disciplinary action taken against him while he was a sergeant in the Vancouver Police Department. .

McCullough was hired in the minister’s office in July 2020.

Sajjan and McCullough share a story. Prior to entering politics, Sajjan commanded the Army Reserve Unit in which McCullough served – the British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own). They were also both members of the Vancouver Police Department.

Asked about the relationship between the two, Sajjan spokesman Daniel Minden said, “The minister did not work with Major McCullough of the Vancouver Police Department. They had met while they were away. reservists in the British Columbia Regiment “.

Until Thursday, Sajjan had six military assistants, all of whom worked closely with the minister’s office to provide a wide variety of support.

Conservatives say they are not giving up

McCullough had been tasked as a liaison officer and flagman to help establish secure communications whenever the minister was in the area.

Opposition Tories – who first asked questions about McCullough on Wednesday, the last day of the House of Commons spring session – have vowed not to let go, despite the sacking.

“Once again, Minister Sajjan is showing Canadians that he only acts when he is caught doing the wrong thing,” said Conservative defense critic James Bezan.

“Not only has Minister Sajjan turned a blind eye to the allegations of sexual misconduct against General Vance, but he has also done so in his own office. There are still a number of questions regarding the hiring of Major McCullough. “

According to the Department of Defense, McCullough was one of two candidates who applied for the liaison post and was considered the most qualified.

Fifteen-day suspension

It has been widely reported in Vancouver in recent years that McCullough was given a 15-day suspension from the police department after an external investigation found he had not disclosed a relationship with the policeman. Nicole Chan.

British Columbia’s Office of the Police Complaints Commissioner did not name McCullough in its 2018-2019 annual report, but requested a five-day suspension for a police officer who was involved in a personal relationship and intimate with a policeman. who was under his direct supervision and that the relationship was not disclosed to his supervisor.

The OPCC report also noted that the same policeman had formed a relationship with another policeman knowing that this policeman was in a vulnerable state; the watchdog recommended a 10-day suspension, to be served simultaneously.

The commissioner noted that the police officer had cooperated with the investigation and had sought professional help.

According to local media, McCullough retired from the police force in 2018.

Chan also had a relationship with another senior officer who was later fired from the Vancouver Police Department. She committed suicide in January 2019.


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Canadian army

US Army Corps plans full review of Enbridge Line 5 tunnel plan


The US Army Corps of Engineers said on Wednesday it would conduct a thorough review of Enbridge Energy’s plan to build an oil pipeline tunnel under a Great Lakes channel in Michigan, which could significantly delay the project.

The tunnel would house the replacement of part of Enbridge’s Line 5 that crosses the bottom of the Straits of Mackinac, a waterway of approximately 6.4 kilometers connecting Lake Huron and Lake Michigan.

The Michigan Department of the Environment, Great Lakes and Energy has issued a permit for the $ 500 million tunnel, but Army Corps approval is also required. The federal agency would examine the potential effects on the straits and adjacent wetlands.

The Corps could have contented itself with a tailor-made examination of the tunnel’s needs and objectives before making its decision. But he opted for an environmental impact study, which involves a more complete study, including the examination of reasonable alternatives.

“Most appropriate level of examination”

“I have concluded that an EIA is the most appropriate level of review due to the potential for impacts significantly affecting the quality of the human environment,” said Jaime A. Pinkham, Acting Deputy Secretary of the army for civil engineering work.

Thousands of comments from the public and native tribes warranted further investigation, Pinkham said, adding that navigating the busy shipping channel was also a consideration.

Enbridge had pledged to complete the tunnel by 2024, but “is evaluating the schedule” in light of the government’s decision, which will delay construction, spokesman Ryan Duffy said.

“Placing a pipeline in a new Great Lakes tunnel will provide additional levels of safety and environmental protection and will make what is currently a safe pipeline even safer, while creating jobs in Michigan and securing the energy needed by consumers in Michigan and the region, ”said Enbridge.

The Canadian company, based in Calgary, Alta., Struck a deal in 2018 with former Republican Gov. Rick Snyder to build the tunnel. He intervened under pressure from area tribes, tourism companies and environmental groups to shut down Line 5, which carries petroleum and natural gas liquids between Superior, Wisconsin and Sarnia, Ontario.

Criticisms of the project “encouraged”

Critics argue that the submarine section – two parallel pipes laid in 1953 – is vulnerable to a spill that could pollute hundreds of kilometers of water and shoreline.

Enbridge, backed by industry and labor groups, says it is in good condition and has never leaked.

Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer ordered Line 5’s submarine lines shut down in mid-May, a deadline the company ignored. Legal action is pending in the Federal Court. Canada, which has called the continued operation of the pipeline “non-negotiable,” is pushing the Biden administration to intervene.

The proposed tunnel is a separate regulatory issue. In addition to the Army Corps, Enbridge is also awaiting approval from the Michigan Public Service Commission.

“We are encouraged to see that the Army Corps of Engineers has responded to our call to undertake a more rigorous analysis” of the project, said Whitney Gravelle, president of the Indian community of Bay Mills. The tribe, which has treaty-guaranteed fishing rights in the straits, “is very concerned that the pipeline threatens our way of life,” she said.

Drilling through bedrock and soils under the straits would violate many environmental protection laws, said David Holtz of Oil and Water Don’t Mix, an anti-Line 5 coalition.

“It’s hard to imagine how the Enbridge tunnel project can survive the kind of in-depth, independent assessment that is now possible with today’s Army Corps decision,” Holtz said.

Enbridge said it would continue to work with the Corps on its review of the company’s claim “and toward a successful conclusion of this process.”


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Canadian army

Harry O’Neill of Ridgetown was the inventor of the “Slider” baseball field


Harry O’Neill in 1924

As you travel through Chatham-Kent’s sporting history, there are many stories that will surprise you.

One of them concerns the “cursor”.

No, not a delicious miniature burger, we’re talking about the hard-to-touch baseball field.

Several pitchers in Major League Baseball history are well known for their slider, including David Cone, CC Sabathia, Zack Greinke, Clayton Kershaw, Rollie Fingers and Steve Carlton.

However, the land is believed to originate from Ridgetown, Ontario, invented by a man named Harry O’Neill.

Now this fact is debated. Some will attribute the pitch to Charles “Chief” Bender, others will credit George Uhle, still others will credit George Blaeholder; but in the middle of that discussion, there’s always Harry O’Neill from Ridgetown.

After high school, Harry O’Neill attended the University of Toronto and soon found himself in the Canadian military. In 1919, O’Neill helped the Canadian Expeditionary Force team win a tag team championship while playing in London, England.

After World War I, O’Neill returned to Canada and traveled to Alberta, where he won another title, this time throwing for the Medicine Hat Monarchs. His big breakthrough, however, came in 1921 when he was spotted playing for the Windsor Chicks.

In 1922, O’Neill was signed by Connie Mack to play for the Philadelphia Athletics. He made his Major League Baseball debut that year and also adapted for track and field in 1923.

It is while launching with Athletics that O’Neill would have discovered the “slider”. Pitching for batting practice, his teammates asked O’Neill to make easy pitches over the plate. Trying to pick up speed on his fastball, O’Neill adjusted his grip and his throws, although slightly slower, began to cut through the plate. When Hall of Fame Director Connie Mack came to investigate, he told O’Neill to “find out what it is and keep doing it.”

However, most of his professional career has been in the minor leagues, where he has presented his patented slider pitch in cities such as Augusta, Salt Lake City, Shreveport, Dallas, Hollywood and Boise. At Augusta, O’Neill threw a non-hitter.

If it hadn’t been for a car crash, where his hip was injured in his second season with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1923, O’Neill and his pioneering land might have had a much longer career. in the Major League.

At the end of his playing days, O’Neill spent two seasons as a minor league manager for the Salt Lake Bees in 1927 and the Boise Senators in 1928. During those years, O’Neill was known for enter training when needed. .

Upon retirement, Harry O’Neill returned to Chatham-Kent, where he worked for the Township of Howard. O’Neill died in 1969 at the age of 76, but his slider still lives in the big leagues.

Harry O’Neill working for Howard Township

By Ian Kennedy


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Canadian army

Volunteers introduced vaccines to poor India after deadly COVID-19 outbreak


BENGALURU – Volunteer groups are spreading the word about sending COVID-19 vaccines to the poor and elderly in India, and transporting some to vaccination centers in rickshaws and taxis following an outbreak of infections that has killed hundreds of thousands of people.

SEEDS, an organization that provides relief from natural disasters, has focused its efforts on the poorest communities, where, it says, many lack even basic information about vaccines.

“We found that a lot of people over the age of 60 didn’t even know they could get vaccinated and protect themselves,” said co-founder Dr Manu Gupta.

SEEDS members go door-to-door in Delhi’s poorest neighborhoods and villages in North and West India, helping citizens register their details on the government vaccination portal and by transporting some of them free of charge to vaccination centers.

About 170,000 people died in April and May when a second wave of infections ravaged densely populated cities and rural India’s hinterlands, and health experts say mass vaccination is the only way to avoid further loss of life if another wave occurs.

A second NGO, Robin Hood Army, has partnered with Uber Technologies Inc to provide free rides to vaccination centers in Delhi and Mumbai.

Its co-founder, Neel Ghose, urged the government to speed up the process by carrying out its vaccination campaign among people.

“For this to be truly effective it has to be like the way we thought about polio 20 years ago, where we reached the doors of the vaccinated and not the other way around.”

The government said a door-to-door vaccination campaign against COVID-19 was not possible due to the risk of contamination and waste.

Uday Sampath report in Bangalore; Editing by Sanjeev Miglani and John Stonestreet


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