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Salvation Army wants one last shot to reach $ 117,000 goal

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Major Sean Furey is counting on a last-minute push in campaign giving to the Salvation Army to make his Christmas shine.

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The annual fundraising campaign to help the hungry in Sault Ste. Marie received about $ 97,000 in contributions last weekend or so. Furey wants to raise at least $ 85,000 or, preferably, up to $ 118,000. History might help Furey. December 23 is usually the best day to raise dollars, with donors contributing $ 4,000 to $ 5,500 each year.

“We’re really getting closer,” Furey said of the six-figure goal. “It’s always best when you have enough resources to do what needs to be done. “

The 2020 campaign raised $ 111,703.

Kettles at Eight Sault Ste. Marie, including Walmart, Rome’s Your Independent Grocer and Canadian Tire, ends Friday at 1 p.m. Six of the kettles have tap options for contributions of $ 5, $ 10, or $ 20 by credit or debit card.

More than 1,000 donors have chosen to use the tap option, Furey said. Most give $ 5. Problems plagued the units in 2020, but they are much more reliable this year, Furey said.

“They are doing very well,” he said.

Checks can be mailed to 78 Elgin Street, Sault Ste. Marie, P6A 2Y5. Mention the kettle campaign in the subject line.

The spike in COVID-19 cases in recent weeks has scared off about 20% of Furey’s volunteer roster to help with kettle locations. He is responsible for the work shifts. Furey found enough help, but his efforts were “very stressful.

“It was brutal for me,” Furey said. “It took hours and hours and hours on the phone.”

The kettle campaign started on November 19.

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The Salvation Army began partnering with five Metro and Food Basics locations as part of Sault’s One More Bite program in August. Salvaged foods, including meat, dairy, and ready-to-eat meals, are collected three times a week and shared with Salvation Army customers. Furey estimates that approximately 45,000 meals have been distributed since the summer.

The Salvation Army also distributed between 500,000 and 750,000 pounds of food to its customers in 2021.

“Every month it seems like we’re setting a record,” Furey said of public demand. “We carry a lot of food. “

He estimates that the Salvation Army has helped around 3,000 families this year. Furey sees larger families, with three to five children, needing help.

“A lot of people tell us that the rising cost of food is really affecting them,” he said.

Job loss and reduced working hours affect their ability to shop for groceries.

Seniors assisted by The Salvation Army’s mobile food bank have almost doubled, from 70 to 80 by the end of 2020 to around 150.

“If we had more manpower, that number could actually increase,” Furey said. “We don’t have the capacity.

The pandemic is also bringing clients “much poorer” and with “much more mental health issues” to downtown The Salvation Army.

“It makes it a little harder for everyone – them and us,” Furey said.

Volunteers could help with various programs offered by The Salvation Army, including the food bank, One More Bite and the mobile food bank.

“There are tons of ways people can help if they want to give back,” Furey said.

[email protected]

On Twitter: @Saultreporter


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Adventurous brothers’ 1930s Yukon tales come to life in richly illustrated new book

Ernie and Art Barz’s colorful stories of bush pilots, miners, trappers, dog teams, murderous canyons and a lost era in Yukon history looked like shiny little pebbles strewn across the creek of the childhood of Don Barz in British Columbia.

Sooner or later someone would have to pick them up and sift the gold, Don thought. Ernie was his father.

“So I thought I should take on the task,” Don said.

The result is Don’s new book, Yukon Wanderlust, a richly detailed and illustrated chronicle of brothers Ernie and Art Barz’s five-year adventure in the Yukon from 1937 to 1942 – a period just before the construction of the Alaska Highway and the arrival of the modern era on the territory.

“They were basically at the very end of an era, you know, right before the whole north changed,” said Don, who now lives in Kamloops. BC

Don spent several years researching and writing the book. His father and uncle are now deceased, but before he died, Don managed to tape lengthy interviews with the two. It also had a mother lode of over 300 historical photos to work with, taken by the Barz brothers at the time.

“Yukon Wanderlust” contains several of the hundreds of photos of Art and Ernie Barz taken during their time in the Yukon. (Paul Tukker / CBC)

The German-Canadian brothers were drawn to the Yukon by the same thing that attracted so many before and after them: the smell of money. It was 1937 and they were living in Victoria.

“They heard about this man who came down from the Keno silver mines with several thousand dollars in his pocket. And, you know, in 1937, that was a lot of money,” Don said.

“So they were on the first boat going north.”

The Barz brothers initially worked as miners in the Dawson area, but eventually partnered with a Whitehorse businessman to run a trapping operation and trading post in the Bonnet Plume River area.

“They were treating him almost like an industrial enterprise,” Don Barz said of his father and uncle’s trapping operation in the Bonnet Plume area. Art Barz is seen here with the dog Whitey and a collection of skins in 1939. (Art and Ernie Barz)

This is where their bush skills were really tested. They were largely alone, miles from the nearest settlement, and only occasionally saw other people.

“They treated it almost like an industrial company,” Don said.

“I mean, the equipment and supplies they took – four loaded planes, when they set up. It was quite a business. “

They built their own cabins and hunted for subsistence and occasionally traveled to Dawson or Aklavik in the Northwest Territories to trade furs and supplies. They befriended some of the Indigenous people they had encountered on their travels, including Johnny Semple, a Gwich’in hunter and trapper, and his nephew Peter Henry. Henry ended up staying and working with the Barz brothers for a few years.

Johnny Semple, Henry Schmidt and Peter Henry are photographed with wolf skin in the winter of 1939. Many historical photos of the Barz brothers have been donated to the Yukon Archives. (Art and Ernie Barz)

Their trapping operation – covering an area “about the size of Lebanon,” according to Don – was a huge success, and at first not quite legal.

Yukon law at the time required people to live in the area for at least two years before they could obtain a trapping license. Art and Ernie – with the help of their local patrons and business partners – managed to rig things up for those first two years. Don must have made this discovery himself while researching the book.

“They weren’t telling all their stories,” Don said of his talks with Art and Ernie.

It’s time to go out

As World War II began, Art and Ernie couldn’t be further from the action. Don’s book describes the idyllic summers the brothers spent hunting and trapping in the bush, swimming in the river, or building cabins.

While the brothers’ German ancestry raised suspicion during these years, they never heard of it. Don thinks it just wasn’t a problem because the people of the Yukon got to know and respect the Barz brothers.

The Barz brothers in a cabin in the Wind River Valley, Yukon, March 1942. (Art and Ernie Barz)

But the war – and the construction of the Alaska Highway in 1942 – would essentially put an end to the Barz brothers’ adventure in the Yukon. The bush planes they relied on for supplies and shipping their furs were suddenly busy with other things.

“Pilots made their fortunes flying for the US military. So basically [the Barz brothers] realized they weren’t going to be able to continue their operations the way they had, and decided it was time to step down, ”Don said.

The brothers moved south to Salmon Arm, British Columbia, and bought a farm. Ernie will eventually sell his half to Art and enlist in the Canadian army. Ernie was involved in frontline actions in Italy and after the war bought his own farm in Pitt Meadows, British Columbia.

The brothers lived in British Columbia for the rest of their lives. They both died within a year of each other, in 2011. Ernie was 93 and Art 95.

“Quiet Period” in Yukon History

The construction of the Alaska Highway was not only a turning point in the life of the Barz brothers – it was a pivotal event in the history of the Yukon, and the territory and its culture would never be quite the same again. same.

This is in part why the story of the Barz brothers intrigues Michael Gates, a passionate historian, writer and laureate of Yukon history. Gates calls this period the “doldrums” of Yukon history, which means that the stories are few.

“The gold rush was in the rearview mirror, and World War I certainly ended the pink hue of that era, and there was nothing big or spectacular to replace it,” Gates said.

“It was a very quiet time in Yukon history and I think we tend to ignore it which is a shame.”

Gates enjoys hearing from people like Don Barz, who realized the historical value of his father’s old photos and stories and decided to share them. Barz said he had done so much additional research – Yukon Wanderlust has an extensive index and nearly 400 footnotes – so his book could be a resource for future historians.

He also donated most of these old photos to the Yukon Archives.

White Pass Airways pilot Ralph Oakes, Ernie Barz and Ernest ‘Chappie’ Chapman at Chappie’s Trading Post, run by the Barz brothers. They relied on bush planes for their operations and by 1942 when the Alaska Highway was built, these planes were busy with other things. (Art and Ernie Barz)

The Barz brothers sometimes returned to the Yukon in their later years to visit old friends. Don came with his father once in the 1980s and later lived and worked in Whitehorse for a few years.

“People pay a lot of money to go out and have a wilderness adventure similar to what my dad and uncle did,” Don said.

“My dad said at one point, ‘you know, if we knew the risks we were taking, I don’t know if we would have done it again, you know? “

“I think when they came back south, becoming farmers, it was almost like cake in a way, compared to what they had done in the Yukon.


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NHL postpones two Vancouver Canucks games as league emphasizes cross-border travel

The Vancouver Canucks won’t play until Christmas.

The NHL announced on Sunday afternoon that a dozen games would be postponed during the holidays due to concerns about cross-border travel.

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“Due to concerns over cross-border travel and given the fluid nature of federal travel restrictions, as of Monday, all games involving a Canada-based team versus a United States-based team from Monday, December 20 to start of the Dec. 23 vacation will be postponed and rescheduled, ”the league said in a statement.

For the Canucks, two games will be affected: Tuesday in San Jose against the Sharks, and Thursday when the Anaheim Ducks were due to visit.

The following other games are affected:

Monday, December 20

  • Montreal Canadiens vs. New York Islanders
  • Anaheim Ducks vs. Edmonton Oilers

Tuesday, December 21

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  • St. Louis Blues at the Ottawa Senators

Wednesday 22 December

  • Montreal Canadiens vs. New York Rangers
  • Winnipeg Jets vs. Dallas Stars
  • Edmonton Oilers vs. Los Angeles Kings

Thursday, December 21

  • Saint-Louis Blues vs. Toronto Maple Leafs
  • Carolina Hurricanes to the Ottawa Senators
  • Montreal Canadiens vs. New Jersey Devils
  • Edmonton Oilers vs. San Jose Sharks

The league has said it expects the regular season to resume normally.


Zach Laing is the Nation Network’s chief news officer and senior columnist. He can be followed on Twitter at @zjlaing, or contactable by email at [email protected]




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Brandon soldier helped feed an army in Iqaluit

A Brandon serviceman returns home today after spending the past two months on a mission in Iqaluit, where he helped produce clean drinking water for the city during its drinking water supply crisis.

Cpl. Yannick Gagnon, a cook with the 4th Engineer Support Regiment of the Canadian Armed Forces, said he got the call he would send to Nunavut on a Sunday in October and was on a plane at 5 a.m. the following Tuesday morning to travel to Iqaluit as part of Operation LENTUS.

“You don’t know when [the calls] are going to happen because they’re usually just a disaster like Iqaluit was with the water situation, ”said Gagnon.

He arrived in Nunavut on October 26 and will be leaving the city today. He was originally scheduled to leave town on November 17, but was delayed until potable water was established in the community in early December.

Gagnon served as a kitchen officer while deployed, tasked with providing meals to troops on rotation in and out of town.

His service came with significant challenges.

“When you’re in such a small community like this, you can’t take advantage of the economy. I can’t go take a government credit card and buy groceries to feed 35 people, ”said Gagnon.

To feed the troops, Gagnon would liaise with a major in Ottawa, Yellowknife and 8 Wing in Trenton, Ont., Establishing weekly ration orders, and food would be flown into the area once a week. It was an act of logistical juggling that became even more complicated due to the unforeseen flooding in British Columbia.

“I definitely had to dig a lot into my back pocket to adapt and overcome logistical situations that were out of my control,” said Gagnon. “The overall logistics of receiving rations, which is all the food here, is something I’ve never had to do in my career. I wasn’t 100% sure what was going to happen and then had to adapt and overcome each time I got a ration order.

Gagnon’s days started at 6 a.m. and ended at 6 p.m. for the duration of his deployment.

“In the end, for my part, by trade, I am a cook, but my number one job is the morale and esprit de corps of the troops,” said Gagnon. “Cooking is your second job; the morale and esprit de corps of the troops is your number one priority.

Seeing the troops come in to eat after spending countless hours pumping water in temperatures dropping below -40 ° C gave him a little more energy to wake up each morning and push himself to create the best hearty meals possible for them. Gagnon would feed about 30 people per meal and make sure fresh bread and hot soup were available from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

The unforeseen circumstances that arose throughout their time in Iqaluit only demonstrated the resilience of the troops and residents of the city. Gagnon said it was amazing to see the troops at work, spending up to 16 hours a day bringing clean drinking water to the community.

“They would be absolutely beaten, but they know why they are here and that pushes them to be able to produce water.”

Gagnon’s feeding plan for the troops is affected by the water crisis. He had a 15,000-liter tank in the kitchen and had to boil anything that came through the back of the house.

“I just had to boil anything all the time. Imagine doing the dishes: I had to boil the water, then I would have a sink that I would pour water in all the time and that would be my cold water. And then I would have more water that was constantly boiled so that we knew the water was safe enough to use to properly clean the dishes.

He had time to explore the city and at the end of the operation some troops called him the “Operation Guide”. He earned this nickname because of how he got to know Iqaluit during the nearly two months he was there.

“It was a great experience,” said Gagnon. “It probably doesn’t sound like what you would expect. It is the most diverse, cultured, and smallest little community I have ever seen in my life. “

One of the most memorable experiences was participating in a Remembrance Day ceremony outside in freezing temperatures. The soldiers wore toques, gloves and several layers of clothing as they marched with the Iqaluit RCMP Detachment.

“If you’ve ever seen the RCMP in their parade uniforms, they can’t wear toques. They’re just wearing a top hat… so you just watched their ears turn an icy red, ”said Gagnon. “It has been a great experience to be able to relax a bit from the day-to-day operations of trying to produce water through the filtration systems so that we can recognize our dead who served before us.”

Gagnon’s father served in the Canadian Forces and was posted to CFB Shilo when Gagnon was eight years old. He then graduated from Neelin High School.

He first joined the military in January 2014 and completed his basic training in St. John, Quebec.

“I wasn’t originally born in Brandon, but this is my home. When someone asks me where the house is, I tell them it’s Brandon, Manitoba, ”said Gagnon.

»[email protected]

»Twitter: @The_ChelseaKemp

Chelsea Kemp, Local Journalism Initiative reporter, Brandon Sun


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Mel Lastman “had a connection and a love affair with the people of Toronto”

Hundreds of people gathered in a chapel in North York with Lastman’s family after his death to pay their respects to the beloved former mayor on Thursday

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Toronto’s first megalopolis mayor and prominent businessman Mel Lastman was known to those around him as a colorful and at times scandalous politician who loved his family and his city. From creating a unified Metro Toronto area to participating in eye-catching TV commercials, Lastman knew how to make an impact.

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On December 11, the former mayor of North York and Toronto passed away at the age of 88. Hundreds of people gathered at Benjamin’s Park Memorial Chapel in North York with Lastman’s family after his death to pay their respects to the beloved former mayor. Many notable names were in attendance, including Premier Doug Ford, Ontario Long-Term Care Minister Rod Phillips, former Toronto Mayor David Miller and Mayor John Tory.

In a statement posted to social media, Tory, who served as Co-Chair of Lastman’s Campaigns for Mayor of Toronto, said he was “a kind, generous man with a larger-than-life personality who always wanted to do the job. good thing for people.

Lastman’s impressive career in city administration spanned more than three decades. He was the third mayor of North York and the 62nd mayor of Toronto – the first to follow the 1998 merger of Metro Toronto.

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  1. Former Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman gets in the mood at Toronto Police Chief Julian Fantino's farewell dinner at the Royal York Hotel

    Outspoken former Toronto mayor Mel Lastman dies aged 88, PM says

  2. Former Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman Remembers As Larger Than Life

As mayor of North York and the then newly formed megalopolis, Lastman was favored by his constituents for his efficiency at city hall and his promise to keep property taxes low. He was instrumental in the development of the Yonge and Sheppard area, including the creation of the Sheppard Subway Line and downtown North York, which became a bustling business hub and home to Mel Lastman Square .

“He was a great mayor and touched many lives,” tweeted Premier Ford, adding that Lastman was “a true leader and builder.”

Paul Godfrey, a former city politician and longtime friend of Lastman, said Lastman was “the king of the citation.”

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“He wasn’t afraid to call a spade a spade,” said Godfrey, president of Postmedia Network, owner of the National Post. The media knew that if they put a microphone in front of him he would say something worth printing.

Lastman did not shy away from the controversy. After the January 1999 blizzard, the former mayor caught the nation’s attention when he called on the Canadian military to help clear the 118 centimeters of snow that had immobilized the city. While the move was frowned upon by some, Godfrey said “they cleaned the streets faster than anyone else.”

Ontario Premier Doug Ford arrives for the funeral of former Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman on December 13, 2021.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford arrives for the funeral of former Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman on December 13, 2021. Photo by Jack Boland / Postmedia

While he was known in public to be loud and confident, Godfrey said that in private, Lastman was shy, calm and not so outgoing. Most importantly, he said the former mayor was devoted to his constituents.

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“Mel Lastman had a connection and a love affair with the people of Toronto,” Godfrey said. “And the grassroots Toronto public loved Mel because he was telling the truth.”

Brampton Mayor Patrick Brown tweeted: “I am so sorry to hear of the passing of Mel Lastman. I got to know him while I was serving at the provincial level. He had extensive knowledge of Toronto, Ontario and Canada. He leaves behind a very impressive legacy of the construction of the city. Condolences to his family and friends. “

Prior to entering politics, Lastman was one of Toronto’s foremost businessmen, Godfrey said. He first made a name for himself following the ice cream trucks through town. When they stopped to deliver ice to someone for their cooler, Lastman would then go up to the door and try to sell them a fridge.

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“He probably knew that if he promoted his brand, which was Mel Lastman, he would become a household name,” Godfrey said.

Postmedia president Paul Godfrey was among those mourned at Mel Lastman's funeral on December 13, 2021.
Postmedia president Paul Godfrey was among those mourned at Mel Lastman’s funeral on December 13, 2021. Photo by Jack Boland / Postmedia

In 1955, Lastman opened Bad Boy Furniture, which he eventually transformed into a chain of stores located in the Toronto area. In a publicity stunt for his business, Lastman traveled to the Arctic to “sell an Eskimo a refrigerator.” In the 90s, Blayne, Lastman’s son, relaunched the channel. The duo created a television commercial that became memorable in Ontario for their last line: “Who’s better than Bad Boy?” Nooooonbody! ”

At Lastman’s memorial service, Godfrey said most of the moving speeches were made by the sons of the former mayor. Dale Lastman spoke about the impact that the death of his mother, Marilyn, in January 2020 had on his father.

“As Dale said, ‘My father died of a broken heart,’” Godfrey said.

While Godfrey has said the memorial service is on the move, it did not serve as a final goodbye to the iconic mayor of the megalopolis.

“Mel will live in the hearts of all of us for many years to come,” he said.

Lastman is survived by his sons Blayne and Dale, six grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

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Biden calls on tribes to influence high-stakes pipeline talks

The Biden administration has invited Great Lakes tribes to participate in unprecedented talks with Canada over the fate of a contentious pipeline that is creating what sources say is a rift between the two countries.

The Enbridge Inc. Line 5 litigation is at issue in a dispute resolution process established by the “1977 Transit Pipeline Treaty” that Canada first invoked in this case.

The treaty, Canada argues, secures the uninterrupted flow of petroleum products between the United States and Canada, while Michigan Democratic Governor Gretchen Whitmer pushes to close Line 5 in state court (Energy wire, 1st December).

Because the negotiations are unprecedented, experts say there is no way to tell when the talks will begin, how long they will last, or if the results will be public.

“That thing was never really used – period,” said Andy Buchsbaum, a lawyer with the National Wildlife Federation and lecturer at the University of Michigan Law School. “And certainly, the negotiations between these two countries never took place within the framework of this treaty.”

The 68-year-old Line 5 pipeline, which transports light crude oil and natural gas liquids from Superior, Wisconsin, to Sarnia, Ontario, has become a lightning rod among tribal communities and activists concerned about the effects that ‘a spill could have on the Great Lakes.

In addition to treaty negotiations, the pipeline is also at the center of a fight in Michigan state court and an environmental review by the Army Corps of Engineers.

While the State Department has repeatedly said it is weighing political options and plans to enter into treaty talks with Canada soon, the Department has provided few details.

But Aaron Payment, president of Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, confirmed that the State Department invited her tribe to participate in treaty negotiations with Canada.

Payment joined the 12 federally recognized tribes of Michigan last month in to call President Biden in supporting Whitmer’s efforts to decommission the pipeline, citing tribal fishing and hunting rights in the pipeline area that date back to an 1836 treaty.

The White House and State Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The Biden administration’s invitation to the Great Lakes tribes to intervene is notable given the limited information available on how the treaty talks would unfold. But the White House has spoken openly about giving tribes a big say in treaties and spurring consultation on energy issues.

“The Biden administration has been very silent on this issue and will soon have to take a stand,” said Kristen van de Biezenbos, professor of law at the University of Calgary.

“Yes [the White House] accepts that this treaty applies, and that appears to be the case since they agree to the arbitration process, “she said,” so do they think the provisions of the treaty would prevent Michigan from doing what he is trying to do this by forcing the removal of the Straits of Mackinac section of line 5? “

“You do not have public access”

Canada kicked off the arbitration process by invoking the pipeline treaty in early October and said formal negotiations would begin soon.

“Canada’s goal remains to work with the United States in these formal negotiations to seek a solution where Line 5 remains open and operates safely,” said the Canadian Embassy spokesperson, Diana Tan. “As this process is ongoing, we are unable to provide further details at this time. “

Now, time is running out to establish a three-person panel to decide the fate of a pipeline of disproportionate social and political importance.

Under the terms of the treaty, the United States and Canada each have 60 days to choose an arbitrator to represent them in the discussions and an additional two months to choose a third arbitrator who will serve as a neutral party.

If the two countries do not choose a third arbitrator within that time frame, either country can ask the president of the International Court of Justice to nominate a person or choose someone to make the decision, depending on the treaty. The third arbitrator, who cannot be a national of one or the other country, will then determine the place of the talks.

A decision in the dispute would be taken by majority and would be binding on both countries.

Van de Biezenbos said arbitrators usually have a legal background and some are former judges or lawmakers. Countries and large multinational companies, she added, generally opt for arbitration over court proceedings because, in addition to being confidential, the decisions do not set a legal precedent.

“Many parties (…) choose arbitration deliberately, so that if they have a dispute, the procedure and the decisions are all confidential,” van de Biezenbos said.

“It’s entirely possible that we won’t see the US submissions to the arbitrator. I mean, I’m not 100% sure, because we’ve never seen arbitration under this treaty before and there’s no specific procedure, ”she continued. “But normally you don’t have public access to arbitration submissions unless the parties agree to disclose them.”

It is unclear what role the Great Lakes tribes will play, but members called on the Biden administration to stop the pipeline and an underwater tunnel replacement project.

In a request to Biden earlier this year, the Michigan tribes that make up the Three Fires Confederacy of Ojibwa, Odawa and Potawatomi asked the president to intervene and shut the pipeline, arguing that there is a reasonable risk of spill taking into account the history of the anchor. pipeline strikes.

Tribes also pointed to Enbridge’s track record, noting that the company was at the center of a spill that polluted the Kalamazoo River watershed more than a decade ago, a disaster that is still being remedied. .

In addition to asking Biden to revoke a 1991 presidential cross-border permit for Line 5, the Great Lakes tribes claim that Enbridge for years violated the security conditions of the 1953 easement and “repeatedly concealed these violations to the state, while putting the The Great Lakes are seriously threatened.

The White House did not respond to questions about inviting tribes to treaty talks or whether it asked other parties to participate.

Cross-border conflict

Line 5 battle fuels tensions between Canada and the United States over energy issues that began with Biden’s decision to shut down the Keystone XL pipeline to credits for electric vehicles in his debated “Build Back Better” proposal at Capitol Hill.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said last month he had asked Biden directly about concerns arising from Line 5 at a trilateral summit as well as other issues complicating the countries’ trade relations. He gave no details of what they discussed.

In one letter First reported by POLITICO, Canadian officials told Senate leaders on Friday that the provisions of the “Build Back Better” bill “discriminate against Canada, Canadian workers and our auto industry”. They have officially threatened tariff retaliation against the auto industry and other parts of the U.S. economy if the provisions remain intact.

When asked about the treaty negotiations, an Enbridge spokesperson said any attempt to close Line 5 would have “serious ramifications” under the pipeline treaty and raise “substantive questions” about federal law relating to the pipeline. interstate commerce and federal jurisdiction over pipeline safety matters.

The company said Whitmer’s decision to shut down the pipeline and remove an easement for the project was a “clear violation” of the 1977 treaty.

“We greatly appreciate the Government of Canada’s efforts and its commitments to keep Line 5 open. We also greatly appreciate their desire to move forward with the timely construction of the Great Lakes Tunnel Project, ”the company spokesperson said.

Maryscott Greenwood, CEO of the Canadian American Business Council, said the pipeline and continuous flow of oil and other products – jet fuel, propane and refined fuels in the Midwest – are essential for Americans and Canadians.

“The issue of an international, multi-jurisdictional infrastructure that can be actioned by a single office holder is a daunting one, so it has a broader life,” said Greenwood. “We are completely interconnected. … It is important that we act as the integrated unit that we are and that we do not turn against each other.


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Iconic Mayor Mel is remembered as the common man

“He spoke of the lip – but the lip was connected to his heart”

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Keeping the larger-than-life Mel Lastman safe has never been boring, recalls a retired cop who once led the former Toronto mayor’s security service.

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After learning of the iconic 88-year-old’s death on Saturday, Stewart Kellock was inundated with memories of the man he described as someone who “put people first in all of his decisions.”

“He had a sincere and deeply felt commitment to the city and all of its citizens,” Kellock said fondly.

He also recalls that Lastman “liked to confuse the waiters by ordering ‘Toronto water’ as the beverage of choice, that is, Toronto tap water, of which he was so proud.”

As Detective Sergeant in 2001, Kellock led Lastman’s protection service after 9/11 and “became a confidant”, sharing his thoughts with the mayor on issues such as “how to improve the quality of life for all Torontonians ”.

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Kellock couldn’t help but smile as he remembered keeping the mayor quietly outside his house on Halloween.

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“Children from all over were dropped off there for a treat as the Lastmans distributed packets of candy to the family,” he said. “They didn’t know there was someone in the bushes with a machine gun under their jacket.”

Retired Toronto Police Sgt.  and Canadian Armed Forces Captain Stewart Kellock, seen here in his military uniform, was assigned to lead the security service to former Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman in 2001.
Retired Toronto Police Sgt. and Canadian Armed Forces Captain Stewart Kellock, seen here in his military uniform, was assigned to lead the security service to former Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman in 2001. Provided

Kellock spent time with the New York Police Department as a counterterrorism advisor and served in the Canadian Armed Forces in Kosovo and Afghanistan before retiring from the Toronto Police after 33 years in 2010. He is now a professor. Counterterrorism and Extremism Center at Durham College. .

He recalls Lastman found himself in hot water during a meeting with a member of the Hells Angels at a downtown hotel on January 11, 2002.

Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman shakes hands with Hells Angel Motorcycle Club member Tony Biancafiore as he exits the Holiday Inn on King St. W. on Friday January 11, 2002.
Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman shakes hands with Hells Angel Motorcycle Club member Tony Biancafiore as he exits the Holiday Inn on King St. W. on Friday January 11, 2002. Toronto Sun (files)

Lastman attended a dinner for a Catholic delegation from World Youth Day to CNE and then stopped by a Holiday Inn on King St. W. where 400 outlaw bikers were celebrating the biker club’s first year. in Ontario.

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A Sun The photographer took a now infamous photo of Lastman shaking hands with a member of the Hells Angels, and the newspaper’s front page headline the next day shouted: “Mel’s Angels.”

“We were assured by his driver that he was driving home, so we were quite surprised to see this photo in the newspaper the next day,” Kellock said.

He wasn’t the only cop scratching his head in this photo.

On December 20, 2005, Toronto Police Chief Julian Fantino and Mayor Mel Lastman sat in the cockpit of a new police helicopter.
On December 20, 2005, Toronto Police Chief Julian Fantino and Mayor Mel Lastman sat in the cockpit of a new police helicopter. Toronto Sun (files)

Julian Fantino, the city’s police chief at the time, tried to leave his longtime colleague in doubt when contacted by Sun Columnist Joe Warmington for comment.

“He probably wanted to do his own intelligence work,” the former Toronto police chief said at the time. “Maybe he was tired of watching it on TV and wanted to see it for himself?”

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At the time, Lastman said he was just well behaved and explained that a lot of people wanted to shake his hand and pose with him for pictures.

“I would never refuse to shake hands with anyone,” he said at the time.

Fantino set the record straight on Saturday, telling the Sun he was at dinner with Lastman when the mayor got a message and had to leave.

Mayor Mel Lastman takes to the ice to help kick off the 17th annual North York Winter Carnival on February 14, 1997.
Mayor Mel Lastman takes to the ice to help kick off the 17th annual North York Winter Carnival on February 14, 1997. Toronto Sun (files)

Lastman later told the Chief that his decision to stop at the hotel on the way home had “nothing to do with the Hells Angels.”

“He went to see the manager of the Holiday Inn who was his friend,” Fantino said. “But they saw him come in and, the opportunists that they are, they orchestrated this photo.”

“She was just an innocent victim,” he added.

Fantino said that although Lastman’s actions and words were sometimes misinterpreted, he was “totally committed to the people.”

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“He spoke of the lip – but the lip was connected to his heart,” Fantino said.

Jack Layton (left) with Mel Lastman (center) being kissed on the cheek by Enza
Jack Layton (left) with Mel Lastman (center) being kissed on the cheek by Enza “Supermodel” Anderson to kick off Toronto Pride Week on June 22, 1998. Toronto Sun (files)

The founder of the Bad Boy Furniture chain, whose wife Marilyn died in January 2020, is survived by two children, six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

Lastman, aka Megacity Mel, was the first mayor of Toronto after the 1998-2003 amalgamation. But it was while he was mayor of North York – from 1973 to 1997 – that Fantino met him.

Mayor Mel Lastman, left, and Maple Leafs winger Tie Domi enjoy a taste of Toronto's Own, a new lager brewed for the city by Molson Breweries on November 23, 1999.
Mayor Mel Lastman, left, and Maple Leafs winger Tie Domi enjoy a taste of Toronto’s Own, a new lager brewed for the city by Molson Breweries on November 23, 1999. Toronto Sun (files)

As the personnel inspector in charge of the 31st Division in 1988, a race relations committee asked Fantino to compile numbers on race-based crime. And when the public heard about these statistics, Fantino became the butt of outrage.

“All hell broke loose, but Mel stepped in to make it all right,” he said, recalling how well Lastman stood when lesser men might have thrown him under. bus.

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Like a scene from the major Toronto blizzard in January 1999 - and with the help of fake snow - Mayor Mel Lastman heads to his 7th annual two-day charity golf event at the Lionhead Golf Club in Brampton aboard the 'a Canadian Armed Forces Bison armored personnel carrier on September 7, 1999.
Like a scene from the major Toronto blizzard in January 1999 – and with the help of fake snow – Mayor Mel Lastman heads to his 7th annual two-day charity golf event at the Lionhead Golf Club in Brampton aboard the ‘a Canadian Armed Forces Bison armored personnel carrier on September 7, 1999. Toronto Sun (files)

Yes, Lastman was ridiculed for calling up the military in January 1999 after the city was crippled by a series of unprecedented snowstorms – a move he never regretted – but he also knew s ‘have fun.

  1. Mel Lastman has passed away at the age of 88.

    Mel Lastman, Toronto’s first merger mayor, has died at 88

  2. Former Mayor Mel Lastman is pictured in February 2005 at the farewell dinner for Toronto Police Chief Julian Fantino at the Royal York Hotel.

    Large crowd expected to bid farewell to Mel Lastman on Monday

Whether he’s wrestling with professional athletes or hitting a waterslide, Lastman doesn’t leave great memories behind.

Mayor Mel Lastman helped open the “Waterslide” at Stan Wadlow Park in East York on August 1, 1999.
Mayor Mel Lastman helped open the “Waterslide” at Stan Wadlow Park in East York on August 1, 1999. Toronto Sun (files)

“At the end of the day, he didn’t play politics, he did the right thing for the right reasons,” Fantino said.

[email protected]

On Twitter: @SunDoucette

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Local cadets participate in wreaths across Canada

Provided by the 325th Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron Kiwanis Cornwall

Since 2015, local Air, Army and Sea Cadets have participated in wreaths across Canada. This year was no different for 13 cadets from the 325th Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron Kiwanis Cornwall and Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps Stormont. On Sunday, December 5, 2021, sixty-five wreaths were laid on the headstones of men and women who served in the Canadian Armed Forces in Cornwall and South Stormont.

It was the 7th year for the cadets in what has become an annual event. The goal of Crowns across Canada is to continue the commitment to always remember those who have served for our country. The phrase We Will Remember is always associated with Remembrance Day, however, most do not continue to be remembered beyond the period of November 11. This is an event where young people can pursue the commitment to always remember.

“Wreaths across Canada are more than just laying a wreath. It is important to remember our fallen troops even outside of Remembrance Day, ”said Sgt Treyson Garner, a cadet from 325 ARCCA. “Every time I laid a wreath, I thought about the life of this fallen soldier and what they were doing so that we could live ours in peace. It was a way of showing our great gratitude to those who could not return home. That’s what Crowns Across Canada means to me.

Being able to participate in wreaths across Canada takes on special meaning for PO1 Maylee Larking, a sea cadet in the Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps Stormont. “It is a privilege to be able to recognize soldiers who sacrificed their lives to grant me the freedoms and the rights that I have today. To be able to lay a wreath on my great-grandfather’s grave is a huge honor as I can recognize the service and sacrifices he made for his friends, family and the country as a whole, ”said Larkin .

Wreaths Across Canada was created by WO (retired) Craig McPhee after being inspired by a similar event in Arlington, Virginia. The event takes place on the first Sunday in December with the aim of honoring the thousands of men and women of the Canadian Armed Forces who lay eggs in plots across the country. The main activities of Wreaths Across Canada are focused on the National Military Cemetery, located at Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa.

This year the wreaths were handcrafted by students from Cornwall Collegiate and Vocational School. Elementary and secondary school students were part of the team that made 120 wreaths under the supervision of Mr. Nigel Carlisle. The wreaths were made of evergreen branches, with a red bow attached.

Part of Wreaths Across Canada’s mission is to honor those who have served Canada as members of our military and to teach young Canadians the value of freedom. It says a lot about the role local cadets and students play in ensuring those buried locally are remembered.

The wreaths made by CCVS were for cadets in Cornwall and Glengarry, covering 21 cemeteries in Cornwall, South Stormont, South Glengarry and North Glengarry in partnership with cadets from 253 Claude Nunney VC Squadron of Royal Canadian Air Cadets , located in Lancaster.

Each year, the list of burial sites covered by local cadet units continues to grow. The list has
went from 27 in the original year to 120 this year. Each year, cadets continue to find other
graves in the spotlight, and this year was no different. While laying wreaths this year, Cornwall Cadets have found 38 additional gravestones which will be added to the list for next year.

The cost of the wreaths is currently covered by the Cornwall Air Cadet Squadron. Donations and
sponsorships are certainly appreciated to help cover the costs of remembering and honoring those who have served for Canada.


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Australian army to withdraw Taipans in favor of Black Hawks

by Gareth Jennings

Australia will replace its MRH-90 Taipan helicopters (foreground) with new UH-60M Black Hawks, the country’s defense minister announced on December 10. (The Commonwealth of Australia)

The Australian military must prematurely withdraw its fleet of NHIndustries NH90 transport and assault helicopters (MRH-90 Taipan in national service) in favor of the Sikorsky UH-60M Black Hawk.

Defense Minister Peter Dutton’s announcement on December 10 will see the Australian Defense Force (ADF) replace its 41 Taipan with up to 40 Black Hawks.

“The performance of the MRH-90 Taipan has been a constant and well-documented concern for [the Department of] Defense, and there has been a significant effort at great cost to try to address those issues, ”Dutton said.

The Department of Defense (DoD) said, “The MRH-90 helicopter fleet did not meet contractual availability requirements and expected cost of ownership prior to its planned retirement from service in 2037. To support the development of Detailed options, the Australian government has requested information from the United States government on the UH-60M Black Hawk as an alternative platform to the MRH-90 Taipan. The options will still be subject to government consideration once all the relevant information is available. “


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FIRST READING: ‘Gun-hardened’ Liberals Facilitate Gun Crime

Canada courageously joins Biden’s Olympic boycott which is not really a boycott

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First Reading is a daily newsletter that keeps you up to date on the plight of Canadian politicians, all hosted by Tristin Hopper of the National Post. To get a first draft delivered straight to your inbox Monday through Thursday at 6 p.m. ET (and 9 a.m. Sunday), sign up here.

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BEST STORIES

Canada – along with Australia and the UK – officially signed the US diplomatic boycott of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics . The boycott does not prevent these countries from sending their athletes to Beijing. Rather, all it does is declare that politicians and other officials will not be accompanying the national teams. That’s why critics have argued that one of the only real effects of a diplomatic boycott is that it gives China fewer figures to worry about. “Canada should not go there”, David Mulroney, Ambassador of Canada to China from 2009 to 2012, recently told Maclean’s . “To participate in the Games while genocide is taking place is deeply reprehensible. “

The Bloc Québécois obtained approval on Tuesday to form a special parliamentary committee to investigate the smuggling of illegal firearms. Ironically, this will happen simultaneously with a liberal campaign to make it easier for criminals to smuggle guns . Specifically, a new invoice seeks to remove mandatory minimum sentences for a multitude of crimes committed with firearms, many of which are related to arms trafficking. As to why, the Liberals presented it as an attempt to remove “” systemic racism in Canada’s criminal justice system . “

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All of these crimes are subject to the loss of their mandatory minimum sentences, including second and third offenses in some cases.  This is probably where it should be mentioned that Toronto and Montreal, among others, are currently experiencing a dramatic increase in gun violence involving precisely this type of crime.
All of these crimes are subject to the loss of their mandatory minimum sentences, including second and third offenses in some cases. This is probably where it should be mentioned that Toronto and Montreal, among others, are currently experiencing a dramatic increase in gun violence involving precisely this type of crime. Photo from the Department of Justice Canada

Remember when Meghan Markle complained to Oprah Winfrey that the Queen “shot our safety? “? It turns out you were paying for this security from the start. Documents obtained by Radio-Canada confirmed that Prince Harry and his family have cost the Canadian taxpayer more than $ 330,000 in security expenses during their various visits to the country since 2017 . This includes the brief episode in early 2020 where Harry and Meaghan fled London to Victoria, British Columbia and for the first time announced their intention to leave the royal family. At the time, protecting the couple in British Columbia – something Canada was obligated to do since Harry and Meaghan were officially considered diplomats – was costing the federal treasury more than $ 1,000 a day. Contrary to Meaghan’s comments to Oprah, that security was taken away because once the couple were no longer members of the Royal Family, Canada’s obligations to surround them with Mounted Police officially ceased.

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Nathan Cullen, an assistant minister in the government of British Columbia Premier John Horgan, sent a stern letter to RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki opposing some videos he has seen online claiming to show that mounted police treat activists who illegally blocked a Coastal GasLink labor camp last month. He forgot only one thing: the only reason the RCMP were there was to fill an order. issued by Cullen’s own government .

Canada barely made Forbes’ list of powerful women in the world . The 97 e place this year was occupied by Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland . (Our 95 year old queen also made number 70).

The new Parti Québécois logo (left) is not only confusing, but it was allegedly plagiarized from the logo of a Kazakh consulting firm (right).  In an analysis, Quebec graphic designer Jean-François Proulx called the design
The new Parti Québécois logo (left) is not only confusing, but it was allegedly plagiarized from the logo of a Kazakh consulting firm (right). In an analysis, Quebec graphic designer Jean-François Proulx called the design “identical” to that of QazContract from Kazakhstan. Photo of the Parti Québécois / QazContract

ECONOMIX

The Bank of Canada no longer calls our more than doubled inflation rate ‘temporary’, but it has also decided to do nothing for a while. . A updated policy statement by the central bank admitted that inflation is likely to continue until 2022, well beyond their earlier predictions that this was all “temporary” or “transient.” The inflation rate currently stands at 4.7%, more than double the usual 2%.

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Meanwhile, the bank also said it would continue to keep interest rates low. rocky bottom 0.25 percent . In summary, your dollar has hemorrhagic value because the economy currently has too much money for too few goods, and there is virtually no incentive for people to withdraw their dollars from said economy as they put it in the spotlight. bank will currently earn them -4.5 percent. per year.

It’s probably just a coincidence that mortgage debt is skyrocketing in today’s era of cheap interest in Canada . Better Living Analysis found that mortgage debt has grown more than twice as fast as GDP over the past 10 years. If you add up Canada’s outstanding mortgage debt, that works out to 71% of GDP. As Better Dwelling observes, Canada’s economy increasingly resembles a “housing ponzi scheme”.

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It is that time of year again when the Canadian Army begins to shoot at the snow.  Operation Palaci, held every winter at Rogers Pass in British Columbia, had artillery units bombarding the snowpack to prevent avalanches from hitting the Trans-Canada Highway.
It is that time of year again when the Canadian Army begins to shoot at the snow. Operation Palaci, held every winter at Rogers Pass in British Columbia, had artillery units bombarding the snowpack to prevent avalanches from hitting the Trans-Canada Highway. Photo of the Ministry of National Defense

STRONG HOLD

Terry Glavin was never a big fan of former Ambassador to China Dominic Barton. Glavin writes: “If Barton is to be remembered for anything, it is that he played a key supporting role in the catastrophic lurch from Canada to China. He also unearths a factoid which in Barton’s final year as Managing Partner at McKinsey & Company, the company literally held a global retreat within walking distance of a Uyghur concentration camp .

Despite Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s promises to end the AIDS crisis, Canada does worse on HIV than any other G7 country , notes Sabrina Maddeaux. “Our number of new HIV cases increased by 25.3% between 2014 and 2020,” she wrote, noting that during the same period, HIV cases in the UK and the US United have fallen. As to why, Maddeaux says it’s due to the same thicket of bureaucratic incompetence that has repeatedly marred Canada’s response to COVID-19. The most obvious example is that While most countries of the world are now battling HIV with liberal access to take-home HIV tests, Canada has rigged it so that self-tests cannot even be bought at drugstores .

Get all of this information and more delivered to your inbox every weekday at 6 p.m. ET by signing up for the First Reading newsletter here.

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Postmedia is committed to maintaining a vibrant but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour of moderation before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread that you follow, or if a user that you follow comments. Visit our Community rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail settings.


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