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Chris Dare, dental student at the University of Toronto, climbed the “Seven Summits” in his spare time

What do climbing the world’s tallest mountains and practicing dentistry have in common? Interrogate Chris Dare, a graduate student in periodontology from the University of Toronto who has climbed the “Seven Summits” – the highest peaks on each of the seven continents.

A third-year master’s candidate, Dare says the parallel between mountaineering and dental school is that you can accomplish anything if you can dream it and work hard.

“A lot of people think things are too hard and give up too soon,” says Dare. “I’m not superhuman – I’m just a hard worker. If you really want something, you have to put everything you have in it – any time of the day. I believe anyone can do this.

Dare, who grew up in Victoria, didn’t always envision a career in dentistry. He attended the Royal Military College of Canada from 2001 to 2005 and served as an Army Communications Officer for five years, including a 10-month deployment to Afghanistan.

In 2009, his mother came to visit him while on assignment in Quebec.

Chris Dare at Mount Everest Camp 3 (Photo courtesy of Chris Dare)

“My mom complained about missing a few teeth and the discomfort it was causing her,” Dare says. “She had tried dentures and other options. She wanted implants, but they were too expensive.

“As she told me about these issues, I realized I couldn’t help her. From that moment on, I decided that I wanted to be able to help her and others by becoming a dentist myself.

Dare, who was also studying for a Masters of Commerce at the time, changed course and began the Doctor of Dentistry program at the University of British Columbia. After graduating, Dare worked in the Canadian Armed Forces as a dentist, then began his Masters in Periodontology at the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Toronto in 2019.

Between his studies, Dare did something that only a few hundred people in the world accomplished: climb the Seven Summits.

He says his passion for mountaineering flared up during his time in Afghanistan. After working for weeks around the clock, Dare took a two-week break that he used to travel. He had heard of Mount Kilimanjaro and decided that it would be a great adventure and a challenge with his best friend. After conquering his first mountain, he became hooked.

“When I returned to Afghanistan, I thought about all the things I had accomplished and how amazing it is to test the limits of the human body,” says Dare. “You can push yourself and feel like you have nothing more to give, and then you can get some more out of it. “

Chris Dare working on the MV Asterix, a naval supply ship (photo courtesy of Chris Dare)

Dare says his time spent in both mountaineering and dentistry has been extremely rewarding. Each experience taught her the importance of good communication, compassion and the need to help others.

“In dentistry, it is essential to have strong communication with colleagues and patients, and to be compassionate to help understand where patients are coming from,” says Dare. “It’s the same with mountaineering – you need compassion to see yourself in another person going through something extremely difficult. In any situation, the most rewarding feeling is being able to help another person, be it a patient or a friend.

Dare says his ability to balance his studies with an adventurous lifestyle stems from his belief in saving time and using every extra ounce of the day. He notes that this sometimes comes at the expense of sleep, which has helped him prepare for another challenge: becoming a new dad.

Which of his activities does he find the most difficult?

“A new baby, because you can’t prepare for it no matter how badly you want it.” Dentistry and mountaineering are for me, but with a baby it’s a different person and a whole different ball game. No matter how tired you are, you have a baby and a partner to take care of.


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DVIDS – News – Sea Breeze Sailor Profile: Meet Lieutenant-Commander Elizabeth Eldridge of the Royal Canadian Navy

Lieutenant-Commander Elizabeth Eldridge of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) is honored and proud to share her experiences as a Naval Logistics Officer during her deployment as a mentoring staff officer for Exercise SEA BREEZE 21 in Odessa, Ukraine, June 28 – July 10, 2021 SEA BREEZE is an annual multinational exercise co-hosted by the United States Navy (USN) and Ukrainian Navy (UN) with support from the Partnership for the NATO peace, and this year’s Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) participation is part of Operation UNIFIER, the CAF’s military training and capacity building mission in Ukraine.

“As the Navy Logistics Officer, we are responsible for all logistical requirements on board the ship, from administration to finance, food, transport, supply, movement of sailors. and equipment to and from the ship, all types of port services and hospitality, to name a few, ”said LCdr Eldridge. “So we really manage the whole range of logistical support activities that allow the ship’s crew to accomplish our mission,” she noted.

Coming from a military family, LCdr Eldridge had the privilege of living in Ottawa and Halifax. Although she comes from a family spanning several generations of military service, she said, surprisingly, that was not her primary motivation for becoming a sailor. “I wanted to join because I wanted to do everything,” she said. “I first joined the Canadian Army Reserve as a clerk when I was in high school just to get a taste of it and since I’ve always wanted to be a Naval Logistics Officer, I decided to go this route when I pursued my undergraduate studies. at the Royal Military College (RMC), ”she added.

LCdr Eldridge says the most appealing part about going to RMC is that you can pursue a variety of interests and hobbies in addition to earning your degree. “Unlike other universities where students may only have the opportunity to pursue or become interested in a new interest, at RMC you are encouraged and supported to do it all – you have to show leadership. , you have to play sports, you have to do extracurricular activities, you have to do a second language – and for me that was the biggest draw. So the inspiration to join was not really on the family side, but more because of the vast opportunities offered by the military, where you can have the space, time and resources to do so, ”he said. she declared.

A proud Naval Logistics Officer, she said the most rewarding part of being a Logistician is the fact that you can make a difference every day, and you see the immediate results of what you do to support the mission.

“Whether it’s processing a travel expense claim or organizing a hospitality event during a port stopover to represent Canada abroad, you know you always have an impact. positive, ”she said.

A seasoned sailor proudly wearing the gunmetal Maritime Service Badge (SSI), he has been deployed several times in Canada and abroad. Some of its national deployments include Operation NANOOK and Operation NUNALIVUT in the Arctic. Abroad, she participated in RIMPAC in Hawaii and was deployed aboard Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Charlottetown as part of Operation REASSURANCE ROTO 5 in Europe.

During exercise SEA BREEZE 21, LCdr Eldridge is part of the CAF mentoring team. “As a naval logistics mentor in this exercise, I advise and guide Ukrainian naval logisticians on logistics planning and the importance of looking at logistics from an operational perspective,” she said. “My goal is to provide options and other perspectives in handling logistical issues related to operations. It’s about sharing our best practices and giving advice they can take into account in their problem-solving process.

Asked about her advice to aspiring sailors and those considering joining the RCN, “Logistics is cool! Never discredit the importance of logistics and the importance of the support professions that work for operations – to join the Navy as a supporter you can see and experience so much, while making a tangible difference, ”he said. she declared.

Date taken: 07.08.2021
Date posted: 07.08.2021 11:23
Story ID: 400531
Location: ODESA, UA

Web Views: 1
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Ministers of Veterans Affairs and National Defense mark 10th anniversary of end of Canada’s combat mission

Canada has joined the International Security Assistance Force led by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and authorized by the United Nations. Canada has provided nearly $ 3.7 billion in international assistance since 2001 and continues to support security, development and humanitarian efforts in Afghanistan. Canada remains committed to upholding the security, development and human rights gains of the past two decades, in particular the rights of women and girls.

The combat phase of Canada’s mission ended in July 2011, when it shifted to a training mission focused on curriculum design and the development of instructional skills in military and military training institutions. Afghan police officers. The Canadian Armed Forces would continue these efforts until the end of our military mission in Afghanistan in March 2014.

More than 40,000 Canadians have served in the theater of operations in Afghanistan. Canada’s first contributions came from the deployment of warships to the waters off Southwest Asia in October 2001, followed by elements of Joint Task Force 2 and the Canadian Army, which moved in. deployed to Afghanistan in December to support efforts to overthrow the Taliban regime and al-Qaeda. Additional Canadian troops would soon be sent to Kandahar province in January 2002.

From 2003 to 2005, Canadians were primarily stationed in Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan, before returning to the more volatile Kandahar region. From 2005 to 2011, the Canadian Armed Forces assumed command of international efforts to secure Kandahar Province, working with civilian colleagues to help restore stability to the Southern Province of Afghanistan while supporting major efforts. humanitarian and nation-building organizations throughout Afghanistan. In Kandahar, Canadians engaged in heavy fighting, most notably during Operation Medusa in September 2006, which was launched to oust the Taliban from Panjwai District. With the participation of over 1,000 Canadians, it was Canada’s largest combat operation in over 50 years.

A total of 158 members of the Canadian Armed Forces died in Canadian service in Afghanistan, along with seven Canadian civilians, including a diplomat, four aid workers, a government contractor and a journalist. Thousands more returned with physical and psychological injuries.

Canadians recently had the opportunity to view and share their thoughts on the five proposed designs for the National Monument to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan. When completed, this new monument in Ottawa will recognize the commitment and sacrifice of those who served and the support they received from home.

This 10e anniversary of the end of the combat mission is an opportunity to reiterate our gratitude for the efforts that Canadians have made to bring greater stability to Afghanistan and to strengthen peace and security in the world.

Quote

“For nearly a decade, Canada’s combat mission in Afghanistan was the longest in our military history, and we all have a duty to remember the bravery displayed by all Canadians who served there,” both military and civilian. Today we pay tribute to the 165 Canadians killed in Afghanistan and thank the more than 40,000 people who answered the call to serve for peace and security in Afghanistan.

The Honorable Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defense

“This month we remember the courage and resilience of the members of the Canadian Armed Forces deployed in Afghanistan. We honor those who paid the ultimate price during and after the mission. And we are thinking of all who have borne the physical and mental wounds of the battle to this day. On this tenth anniversary of the end of Canada’s combat mission in Afghanistan, we are reminded of the real costs of war and the price of freedom. We are grateful today and every day for the selflessness and bravery of the Canadian military.

The Honorable Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National Defense


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John Wilkinson: Puslinch’s Forgotten Hero of a Forgotten War

John Wilkinson was a decorated victim of a long forgotten conflict that contributed in many ways to the region

On January 6, 1903, a special reception was held at Guelph City Hall in honor of two distinguished soldiers.

One of them was Corporal John K. Minchin of Milton, paralyzed by a gunshot wound to his leg. The other, and the horseman who was truly the man of the hour, was King Sergeant John A. Wilkinson, who had lost his right arm and his right eye. Like their comrade-in-arms John McCrae, also present at the reception, they had fought in the South African War (aka the Boer War).

The South African War of 1899-1902 was not exactly Britain’s best hour. Even though the British won the war, the tough Afrikaner fighters gave the armed might of the British Empire all it could take. But it was the first foreign war in which Canadian soldiers fought. Over 7,000 men from communities across Canada, including Guelph, volunteered to fight for the crown, and 284 of them died. 252 others were injured.

In the words of Lieutenant-Colonel William Nicoll of Guelph, they stood up for the dignity of the empire and showed the world the true courage of Canadians. They were national heroes, and none more than Wilkinson.

John Wilkinson was born circa 1874 to a pioneer family in Puslinch. He grew up on a farm and attended Killean School. At fifteen, like so many other Canadian teenagers, he enlisted in the militia. Wilkinson enlisted in the “A” Battery of the Guelph First Field Artillery Brigade.

Wilkinson had clearly found his vocation in the army, especially as an artilleryman. He took an artillery course in Kingston and then won a silver medal in an artillery competition there. He was promoted to sergeant and was part of the Canadian artillery team that traveled to England in 1896 to compete for the Queen’s Prize. The Canadians won by beating teams from across the British Empire. They traveled up the Thames on the Royal Yacht Britannia to Windsor Castle where they had lunch with Queen Victoria.

By the time the South African War broke out, Wilkinson had been promoted to sergeant major. In 1899 he enlisted in the Canadian Mounted Rifles and volunteered to serve overseas. His regiment left Halifax for Durban on January 14, 1900.

Wilkinson participated in several engagements, including the Battle of Harts River, also known as the Battle of Boschbult. It was one of the last major engagements of the war, but also one of the bloodiest. On March 31, 1902, a British column of 1,800 men which included a company of Canadians faced a force of 2,500 Boers. The outnumbered British took up defensive positions around some farm buildings. In a battle that lasted over four hours, a group of 21 Canadians broke away from the main British force. Wilkinson and Minchin were with them.

Eighteen of these 21 soldiers were killed or wounded. Wilkinson received 10 bullets. An exploded bullet shattered his right arm below the elbow and a fragment of it blinded his right eye. He also lost hearing in his right ear. Wilkinson continued to fire his rifle until he ran out of ammo. Then he threw the bolt on his rifle so that it would be useless to the enemy if captured. He lay injured on the battlefield in cold rain for hours before being finally picked up by British stretcher bearers.

A doctor amazed that Wilkinson was still alive operated on him in a bell tent. The surgeon had no hot water and was working by the light of a lantern. Wilkinson and the other injured men stayed in this tent for eight days, then endured three days and two nights in mule-drawn wagons transported 98 miles to a military hospital.

In June 1902, Wilkinson was sent to Netley Military Hospital, England. There he received the visit of Queen Alexandra. Wilkinson was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, which ranked second in prestige after the Victoria Cross. On Lord Kitchener’s recommendation, he was presented to King Edward VII who awarded him the rank of king’s sergeant. Wilkinson was the only Canadian to receive this honor during the South African War.

Wilkinson returned home and in 1909 married Hattie Mae Bailey of Galt. Over the years, he served on the Puslinch Council, as Reeve of Puslinch Township and as Auditor of Puslinch and Nassagaweya Townships and Wellington County. The Wilkinson family eventually moved to Guelph, residing on Glasgow St., then Home St. and finally Mont St. They belonged to St. George’s Anglican Church. In 1938 Wilkinson opened the Wilkinson Insurance Agency on Douglas Street in downtown Guelph.

Wilkinson was introduced to royalty again on June 6, 1939, when King George VI and Queen Mary visited Guelph. After Wilkinson’s death on May 15, 1947, his widow received a letter of condolence from the King and Queen. Flags were hoisted at half mast at Guelph City Hall and Wellington County buildings in honor of the decorated South African War Veteran.


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C-130 crashes in Patikul, Sulu – Philippine Canadian Inquirer

FILE: The site of the C-130 crash at Patikul, Sulu on Sunday (July 4, 2021). The plane was on a troop transport mission, according to AFP chief General Cirilito Sobejana. (Photo: Bridge Bridge, PTV via Philippine News Agency / Facebook)

MANILA – A Philippine Air Force (PAF) C-130H Hercules transport plane crashed Sunday morning in Patikul, Sulu, the Chief of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) General Cirilito Sobejana confirmed.

In an interview with reporters, Sobejana said the incident happened around 11:30 a.m.

“One of the C-130s, while transporting our troops from Cagayan De Oro, n / A-Mademoiselle nya ‘yung track, trying to regain power, to hindi nakayanan, bumagsak doon sa mai Barangay Bangkal, Patikul, Sulu (One of our C-130s, while carrying troops from Cagayan De Oro, missed the trail, tried to regain power but failed and crashed at Barangay Bangkal , Patikul, Sulu), ”he said.

Sobejana has not identified the runway but the closest and unique airport in the area is at Jolo.

Efforts are underway to rescue passengers from the ill-fated plane.

About 40 passengers were rescued and are currently being treated at the 11th Infantry Division hospital in the town of Busbus.

No further details were immediately available, Sobejana said.

Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said initial reports indicated there were 92 people on board, including three pilots and five crew members.

The rest were army personnel reporting for duty.

“So far 40 wounded and injured have been rescued and 17 bodies recovered,” Lorenzana said in a statement.

The PAF also confirmed the incident.

“A Philippine Air Force C-130 plane with tail # 5125 was the victim of an incident while landing at Jolo,” PAF said.

The plane took off from Villamor Air Base in Pasay en route to Lumbia Airport and then transported personnel to Jolo, PAF spokesman Lt. Col. Maynardo Mariano said.

The aircraft was one of two C-130Hs acquired with a grant from the US government. He arrived in the country on January 29 and was officially welcomed into the PAF fleet at Villamor on February 18.

The cost of acquiring the two C-130H aircraft had previously been estimated at PHP 2.5 billion, with the Philippines contributing PHP 1.6 billion and the United States contributing around PHP 900 million.

it is a four turboprop military transport aircraft originally designed and built by Lockheed, now Lockheed Martin.

Capable of using unprepared runways for takeoffs and landings, the C-130 was originally designed as a personnel carrier, medical evacuation, and cargo aircraft.


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AFP urges CHR to deepen Absalon murder – Philippine Canadian Inquirer

Kieth Absalon (Photo courtesy of Facebook via PNA)

MANILA – The Armed Forces of the Philippines Center for the Law of Armed Conflict (AFPCLOAC) has asked the Human Rights Commission (CHR) to conduct a side investigation into the Masbate incident that killed college footballer Kieth Absalon and his cousin, Nolven.

Brig. General Jose Alejandro Nacnac, director of AFPCLOAC, sent a letter of request to the president of the CHR, Jose Luis Martin Gascon, to investigate the “heinous, despicable and reprehensible” attack perpetrated by the New People’s Army (NPA) June 6, 2021.

“As a vanguard of human rights and international humanitarian law, we call on your office to pursue justice for the Absalons and all the victims of the latest anti-personnel mine (APM) explosions and the protection of civilians from use of MPAs by the NPA and the CTGs (communist terrorist groups). We also ask for your help and support in the government’s overall effort to end the local communist armed conflict, ”the letter dated June 29 reads.

Nacnac condemned the incident, saying NPA rebels must be held accountable for indiscriminate use of PAM and attacks on innocent civilians.

“The continued use by ANPs of anti-personnel mines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) that kill and maim civilians and soldiers in flagrant disregard and in willful violation of international humanitarian law is worrying and must be stopped,” said Nacnac in a press release on Friday. .

Nacnac noted that “the distinction between civilians and combatants is a cardinal principle” of international humanitarian law, “intended to minimize damage to civilians by making violence a combatant’s business”.

Quoting Article 14 of Republic Law (RA) No. 9851, or the Philippine Law on Crimes Against International Humanitarian Law, Genocide and Other Crimes Against Humanity, promulgated on December 11, 2009, Nacnac said that the communist leader who orchestrated the violent attacks must also face criminal charges.

“In addition to the other grounds of criminal responsibility for the crimes defined and sanctioned by RA 9851, section 10 thereof provides that NPA leaders like Joma Sison will be criminally responsible as the principal for these crimes committed by subordinates under his effective command and control, or effective authority and control, as the case may be, due to his inability to properly exercise control over those subordinates, ”added Nacnac.

“The responsibility of the leaders of these CTGs for the damage and prejudice that their subordinates inflicted on non-combatants must not go unpunished,” he continued.

In May, the CHR pledged to investigate the 1,506 atrocities and IHL violations committed by the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) -NPA and the National Democratic Front from 2010 to 2020.

The CPP-NPA is listed as a terrorist organization by the United States, European Union, United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the Philippines. (With reports from Priam Nepomuceno / PNA)


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The Rebel to Rabble Review: A Canceled Canada Day

“Pathetic.”

It’s like that Ricochet Columnist Katsi’tsakwas Ellen Gabriel, whose biography says she “has been an indigenous human rights and environmental activist since 1990,” sums up the “shock and horror” with which “mainstream” Canadian society reacted to news of the discovery “hundreds of Aboriginal children on the grounds of two former Indian residential schools” – a number that is expected to increase with site surveys.

“The hearts and souls of indigenous peoples have been breaking for generations,” she says.

“Our pain and anger have been boiling for ages. While most compassionate people mourn with us, the majority of Canadians still do not know the truth about their country. How can anyone claim to have never heard of the residential school system? Or not knowing that there are thousands of Indigenous children buried in anonymous graves across Canada? The Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) traveled across Canada for seven years. There was media coverage. Millions of dollars have been spent. That alone must have attracted attention!

She is also attacking the “insidious Indian Act,” which she says “remains a tool to control the native population, or, as Duncan Campbell Scott, a key architect of the residential school system, said,” to get rid of the Indian problem. ‘ “

His response: “We are not a problem; we are human beings. The sooner this is achieved, the sooner we can implement an education program that will protect against (current) and future generations from making the same apathetic mistake of not recognizing when a crime against humanity is committed. “

Meanwhile, Ricochet writer Brandi Morin, “An award-winning French / Cree / Iroquois journalist from Treaty 6 territory in Alberta,” shares the latest news on the standoff between indigenous rights activists and ancient logging operations in Fairy Island, Alta.

“Noah Ross, a Vancouver Island-based lawyer who assists the Rainforest Flying Squad – as the loose group of volunteers behind the roadblocks is called – says the RCMP are systematically working to reduce the number of witnesses (of) their actions using exclusion zones. », Reports Morin.

According to Ross, the RCMP “are like a ‘colonial army’ occupying Indigenous lands … and they do not treat Indigenous peoples the same as white settlers in these situations.” In fact, he told Ricochet, “there are certainly times when they (the RCMP) behave in a very peaceful manner, largely when it (the protest or the blockade) is dominated by militants of the settlers. “

Also unabashedly in favor of canceling the usual Canada Day celebrations was Canadian Dimension columnist and longtime Indigenous activist Pam Palmater.

“A national day of mourning and collective reflection in honor of these children is far more appropriate than the usual fireworks and parades, which celebrate a country founded on genocide – a genocide that continues unabated”, she argued.

“It will be a summer of truth for Canadians as more and more graves of Native children are discovered,” Palmater wrote. “At the same time, it will be a summer of great suffering for Indigenous peoples, especially residential school survivors and the families of those children who never made it out alive. Calls for the cancellation of Canada Day celebrations this year (had) nothing to do with the so-called “cancellation culture” – the term dog whistle used by angry white men taking advantage of the status quo. On the contrary, #CancelCanadaDay is what true reconciliation looks like. “

More than Rabble, political writer Karl Nerenberg explains why Carolyn Bennett should step down as Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations – which she believes goes way beyond the now infamous snipe of a note she texted to her former cabinet colleague , Jody Wilson-Raybould.

“Voters would do well to not only remember this incident, but also to carefully consider Carolyn Bennett’s record since taking on this new post, leading a new ministry,” he wrote.

“Bennett has been successful in negotiating a few small-scale deals with individual First Nations bands. But the government has done nothing systemic to reform the current colonial relationship between the Crown and Indigenous peoples. “

In fact, he argues, “whenever large resource projects are on the table, transnational corporations can count on willing partners from the provincial and federal governments, (who) normally collude to put pressure on small underfunded First Nations bands to accept vague promises. jobs and benefits, no co-ownership, no meaningful partnership and not a dime in royalties, ”something Bennett“ has done very little to change, ”in his opinion.

“In fairness to the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, she received little support from federal government centers of power, such as the departments of Finance, Treasury Board, Natural Resources and Industry,” as well as the Privy Council and the Prime Minister’s Office. . That, more than a verbal insult, might be a good reason for Bennett to quit.

Elsewhere on the site, Rabble blogger and self-proclaimed “street nurse,” Cathy Crowe, looks at “the militarized operation to evict two dozen people from Toronto’s Trinity Bellwoods Park,” which she notes was not just “a gruesome story of city hall against the poor “, But a repeat of what happened two decades earlier in Tent City, a” 140-person waterfront encampment “that also found itself” brutally evicted early one morning, “with the courtesy of then-mayor Mel Lastman.

“A fence was erected around the site, a convoy of trucks and heavy machinery arrived, a substantial amount of security and police arrived to remove the traumatized residents and, within hours, their homes – a combination of auto shacks. -built and prefabricated houses. – were flattened, ”she recalls.

“Solidarity demonstrations took place within the hour and included members of the union squadron. “

The move also sparked “tears from housing activists, including residents of Tent City,” who “fought and secured housing through a pilot rent supplement program.” Yet 20 years later, under current Toronto Mayor John Tory, “homelessness has exploded” and the city “is more than unraveled; it is broken by surgical assistance from other levels of government.

Also keeping a close eye on events at Trinity Bellwood is Passage essayist Matthew Alexandris, who criticizes Toronto City Council for failing to keep its promise to fight “devastating changes” to the Residential Tenancies Act under Ontario Premier Doug Ford.

“Almost a year later, the city has yet to launch this legal challenge,” he says.

“And beyond doing nothing to prevent people from becoming homeless, the city hasn’t done much to help those who are, making matters worse. Campsites have emerged in increasing numbers throughout the pandemic, serving as places for those who have been evicted and who cannot afford rent. “

In fact, Alexandris notes, “The violent methods used by police and security guards to clear encampments reflect the violence of being forced out of your residence, not knowing where you will be staying next, and having your belongings thrown away. … By evicting people and pushing them from place to place, it is more difficult for them to have stability in a community and to have access to support networks.

To finish, Progress of the press recounts the latest twist in the ongoing Alberta investigation into “foreign funding of anti-Alberta energy campaigns,” sending official notices to environmental groups and other organizations formally requesting their support. response to “research materials, evidence and conclusions report.”

The twist: “The letters were missing specific allegations of all kinds,” which, according to Greenpeace Canada – one of several groups to confirm receipt of the mass letter – “puts the legal right to the investigation of make an allegation public on a legal basis. “

Or, as the group’s senior energy advisor, Keith Stuart, put it in an interview with PP, “It’s a bit of a puzzle.

PP adds, “The letter of inquiry further states that its evidence was ‘mostly’ drawn from publicly available information online, including websites and government documents that the organizations have already published themselves. “

“Paradoxically, it is also clear that the recipients, a number of whom received identical letters, according to Stuart, were not found guilty of acting unlawfully during the two-year investigation.”

Trends on the right side of the Canadian activist media universe:

  • Adam Soos, correspondent for Rebel News in Alberta has an “exclusive” interview with Pastor Artur Pawlowski, who he reports was found “guilty of all contempt of court charges” for refusing to comply with the province’s social distancing restrictions, which Soos describes as a “much worse – case scenario.
  • Meanwhile, after responding to a tweet from Alberta’s chief medical officer, Deena Hinshaw, accusing her of “sentencing hundreds of Albertans to death for depression, suicide and drug overdoses,” and l called “a wicked woman going to hell,” Ezra Levant, Commander of Rebel News is faced with a retort from former Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s son Ben for his “ridiculous and unbalanced claims”.
  • Levant also offers his thoughts on Catherine McKenna’s announcement that she will not stand for re-election. McKenna “quits politics in a typically futile way” and “will be remembered as a bully,” he says.
  • To finish, True North News compiled a timeline of “every community that has decided to give in to Canada Day cancellation requests.”

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Coronavirus: What’s Happening in Canada and Around the World on Wednesday

The last:

Ontario moved to the next step in its plan to reopen on Wednesday, just hours before health officials reported the lowest single-day case count the province has seen since September 10.

The province reported 14 additional deaths and 184 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday.

The update came a day after the province’s top doctor said he would prefer to wait 21 full days before further lifting the restrictions.

“The two to three week cycle is very important to maintain so that we open Ontario in stages, always moving forward and not having to back down,” said Dr. Kieran Moore on Tuesday.

Moore made the comments during his first pandemic briefing since officially taking over as Ontario’s chief medical officer of health.

Ontario has exceeded COVID-19 vaccination targets to enter the second phase of its plan to reopen, which will allow more outdoor activities and more indoor services like haircuts. resume Wednesday.

More than 77% of people had received at least one dose of the vaccine by Tuesday morning and 37% were fully immunized.

The province has set 21 days between each stage of its economic reopening to observe public health trends and allow vaccines to take full effect. He brought forward the second stage of the plan a few days based on vaccination rates and other positive trends from COVID-19.

Ontario also exceeded the target to enter the third stage of the reopening plan, which would further increase the capacity of indoor gatherings.

But Moore, like his predecessor Dr David Williams, argued on Tuesday that vaccination is not the only measure. He advised to proceed with caution with the spread of the more infectious delta variant.

Region of Waterloo not moving to step 2

People who have received a dose of the vaccine are less protected against this variant and this has contributed to local spikes in infection in the Gray Bruce and Waterloo region. Waterloo will not reopen with the rest of the province on Wednesday as it manages the increase in infections.

Moore said he is monitoring the impact of the variant locally and internationally and that reopening must be done with caution to avoid losing the progress made in fighting the virus so far.

“He’s a tough opponent. He’s aggressive. He wants to spread quickly,” he said of the variant.

“We have to be careful and we need 21 days to be able to understand the impact of openness on our communities.”

-Based on the latest update from The Canadian Press and CBC News at 10:20 a.m. ET


What’s happening across Canada

WATCH | Masks still matter as Canada faces a more transmissible delta variant, according to an expert:

Masks are our “last line of defense” against the highly transmissible delta variant of COVID-19 as Canada opens up, says pulmonologist Dr Samir Gupta. (Ben Nelms / CBC) 1:39

As early as Wednesday morning, Canada had reported 1,414,746 confirmed cases of COVID-19, of which 7,400 were considered active. A CBC News death tally stood at 26,274. More than 36.7 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered across the country so far, according to the CBC vaccine tracker.

A total of five cases of COVID-19 were reported in Atlantic Canada on Tuesday, including:

No new cases of COVID-19 have been reported in Newfoundland and Labrador Tuesday.

In Quebec, health authorities have reported four additional deaths and 71 new cases of COVID-19.

In the Prairie provinces, Manitoba Tuesday reported no new deaths and 61 new cases of COVID-19. Saskatchewan, meanwhile, reported two more deaths and 52 more cases of COVID-19.

WATCH | Laina Tuckanow lost her mother and grandmother to COVID-19 and says for her, life will never be normal again:

While many Canadians celebrate a return to normalcy, for many the pain is still too great. Laina Tuckanow lost her mother and grandmother to COVID-19 and says for herself that life will never be normal again. 2:44

In Alberta, health officials on Tuesday reported four deaths and 61 new cases of COVID-19.

“Overall, our numbers are heading in the right direction,” Dr Deena Hinshaw said on Tuesday, before a wider reopening later this week.

“Cases, hospitalizations, ICU admissions and our positivity rate are the lowest since last summer, early fall.”

In the North, no new cases were reported in Nunavut or the Northwest Territories Tuesday, as 10 new cases and one additional death were reported in yukonese.

“We are in a new phase of this pandemic, one that we hoped not to see,” Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr Brendan Hanley said in a statement on Tuesday. “But we are here and we will continue to work together to contain this tide.”

British Columbia will move to step 3 of its pandemic reopening plan on Thursday, lifting the provincial mandate of the mask and the government’s declaration of a state of emergency. The news came as British Columbia reported 29 new cases and no new deaths on Tuesday.

-From CBC News and The Canadian Press, last updated 10:20 am ET


What is happening in the world

A street is seen in Brisbane’s central business district on Wednesday as the city goes silent after a lockdown. Australia is battling outbreaks of the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus. (Patrick Hamilton / AFP / Getty Images)

As of Wednesday morning, more than 181.8 million cases of COVID-19 had been reported worldwide, according to data released by Johns Hopkins University in the United States. The death toll worldwide was over 3.9 million.

In the Asia Pacific region, Australian authorities on Wednesday extended lockdown and physical distancing measures to more of the country, with four major cities already under strict lockdown in a race to contain an outbreak of the highly contagious variant of the delta coronavirus.

Bangladesh is deploying army troops from Thursday to enforce a strict lockdown amid a record spike in coronavirus cases caused by the delta variant first detected in India, the government said on Wednesday.

“No one will be allowed out except in an emergency during this time,” the government said in a statement, warning that army troops alongside law enforcement would be deployed to enforce the lockdown.

In the AmericasDr Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said the CDC is leaving it up to local authorities to establish guidelines for wearing the mask as the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus increases in areas with low vaccination rate.

Walensky said Wednesday on NBC Today show that “we’ve always said that local decision-makers should make policies for their local environment,” but added that CDC guidelines broadly say that those who are vaccinated do not need to wear masks.

Los Angeles County health officials recommend that people wear masks indoors in public places, regardless of their immunization status. Separately, the World Health Organization reiterated its long-standing recommendation that everyone wear masks to reduce the spread of the coronavirus.

In Africa, the Tunisian government extended the hours of nighttime curfew on Tuesday in a bid to stop the rapid spread of COVID-19, as the North African country hit a daily record of cases since the start of the pandemic Last year.

Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa on Tuesday imposed a dusk-dawn curfew, banned intercity travel and reduced hours of operation with immediate effect in response to the increase in coronavirus infections.

Roofing Rolling Mills workers fill oxygen tanks which will be distributed free of charge to various hospitals in Uganda at their factory in Namanve, Wakiso, Uganda on Tuesday. The factory is filling 350 to 400 oxygen tanks daily, following an increase in COVID-19 cases in the country and lack of oxygen in various hospitals. (Badru Katamba / AFP / Getty Images)

In Europe, Greece will allow people fully vaccinated against the coronavirus inside restaurants without masks, the government said, as part of measures to increase vaccination rates.

Russia will not be able to immunize 60% of its population by fall as planned due to weak demand for vaccines, the Kremlin said, after the country recorded its highest number of daily deaths from the virus.

In the Middle East, Oman has said it is expanding its vaccination campaign to anyone over 18 as it speeds up what has been the slowest rollout in the Gulf.

-From Reuters, last update 8:10 am ET


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Canadian army

Nutrition researchers saw malnourished children in residential schools as perfect test subjects – Philippine Canadian Inquirer

Two girls lay in bed in the dormitory of All Saints Indian Residential School in Lac La Ronge, Saskatchewan, in 1945. (Boorne & May. Library and Archives Canada, e010962312), CC BY

The discovery of hundreds of children’s remains in Kamloops, Brandon and Cowessess revealed the absolute devastation that settlers inflicted on Indigenous children, families and communities through the residential school system.


Read more: Amid more shocking residential school findings, non-Indigenous people must act


As a nutrition researcher and Canadian settler, I ask my peers to recognize and understand the damage malnutrition and nutritional experiences have on Indigenous peoples and the legacy they have left.

Easier to assimilate

Ian Mosby, historian of food, Indigenous health and the politics of Canadian colonialism, discovered that between 1942 and 1952, Canada’s foremost nutrition scientists carried out highly unethical research on 1 300 Aboriginal people, including 1,000 children, in Cree communities in northern Manitoba and at six residential schools across Canada.

Many were already suffering from malnutrition due to destructive government policies and dire conditions in residential schools.

In the eyes of researchers, this made them ideal test subjects.

Black and white photo: nurse takes blood sample from baby boy
A nurse takes a blood sample from a boy at the Indian Residential School in Port Alberni, British Columbia, during a medical and dental investigation conducted by the Department of National Health and Welfare in 1948 (F. Royal. Canada. National Film Board of Canada. Photo Library, Library and Archives Canada, e002504649), CC BY

Frederick Tisdall – famous for being the co-creator of Pablum infant food at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto – along with Percy Moore and Lionel Bradley Pett were the primary architects of the nutritional experiments.

They proposed that education and dietary interventions would make Indigenous people more profitable for Canada, that if Indigenous people were healthier, the transmission of diseases like tuberculosis to whites would decrease and assimilation would be easier.

They successfully presented their plan of nutrition experiments to the federal government.

Tisdall, Moore and their team based their case on results obtained after subjecting 400 Cree adults and children in northern Manitoba to a series of intrusive assessments, including physical exams, x-rays and blood tests.

Pett and his team’s pitch centered around determining a baseline. They wanted to give the children at Alberni Indian Residential School a small amount of milk for two years, enough to significantly deprive the growing children of the calories and nutrients they needed.

Other experiments involved withholding essential vitamins and minerals from children in control groups, while preventing Indian health services from providing dental care on the grounds that it could impact study results.

And even before these experiences, children in residential schools were hungry – with reports of severe malnutrition and signs of severe vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

Racial motives and foundations of nutritional experiments

Interest in nutrition research increased dramatically in the 1940s after the Canadian Council on Nutrition publicly stated that over 60 percent of the Canadian population suffered from nutritional deficiencies.

Until then, most of the experiments had been done on animals, but researchers like Pett, who was the primary author of what would become Canada’s Food Guide, took the opportunity to use Indigenous peoples as rats of laboratory.

While authors like Pett often operate under the facade of understanding and helping Indigenous peoples, the racial underpinnings of these nutritional experiences are clear.

Investigators sought to unravel the “Indian problem”. Moore, Tisdall and colleagues attributed to malnutrition discriminatory stereotypes such as “lack of speed, indolence, recklessness and inertia”.

AE Caldwell, director of the Alberni Indian Residential School, said malnutrition was caused by traditional diets and lifestyles, which he also called “indolent habits.” The nutritional experiences, along with the deeply inadequate and shoddy foods given to children in residential schools, aligned perfectly with Caldwell’s assimilation mandate.

Denying virtually all children access to adequate traditional foods is another means of colonization and cultural genocide.

Nurse watches boys spit into test tubes
A nurse from the Department of National Health and Welfare supervised the collection of saliva samples from boys at the Indian Residential School in Port Alberni, British Columbia, in 1948. (F. Royal. Canada. National Film Board of Canada. Photo library. Library and Archives Canada, e002504650), CC BY

According to Mosby’s findings, Pett said he aimed to better understand the “inevitable” transition away from country foods, but residential schools were deliberately designed to bring about this.

Their research is unethical by contemporary standards, and it’s hard to believe that it was ever okay to experiment on anyone, let alone children, without consent.

The aftermath of the Holocaust and biomedical experiments in concentration camps led to the development of the Nuremberg Code in 1947, which states that voluntary consent to research is absolutely essential and that experiments must avoid mental suffering and unnecessary physics.

The code came out the same year Pett embarked on his nutritional experiments at six residential schools.

Consequences of malnutrition and experimentation

Childhood malnutrition can be fatal, especially when combined with the risk of disease, which was often the case in residential schools.

The final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission indicates that the leading causes of death among children in residential schools were physical injury, malnutrition, disease and neglect.

For residential school survivors, malnutrition has lasting effects. Starvation in childhood increases the risk of chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes, and research indicates that severe malnutrition can even cause epigenetic changes that can be passed down from generation to generation.

Experimenting with children already in pain was immoral.

Food insecurity and nutrition issues in Indigenous communities are major issues in Canada, resulting from residential schools and colonial policies that continue to this day.

Experiences in residential schools and in communities have made health care settings precarious and traumatic places for many Indigenous peoples and led to some reluctance to be vaccinated during the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, stigma, violence and racism against Indigenous peoples in these contexts persist.

This particular story of experiences of malnutrition and nutrition on indigenous children and adults has already been told. It gained the attention of the mainstream media in 2013 after Mosby’s research and advocacy.

And this is no surprise to indigenous peoples, whose truths we must finally listen to deeply.

If you are a residential school survivor or have been affected by the residential school system and need assistance, you can contact the 24 hour residential school crisis line: 1-866-925-4419

Allison Daniel, PhD Candidate, Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.


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Change of command ceremony inaugurates new cadet leadership

“These young women and men are our future Canadian leaders,” said the lieutenant-colonel. Shaun O’Leary

A virtual change of command ceremony took place today at Canadian Forces Base Borden with the province’s new chief of cadets at the helm.

The Regional Cadet Support Unit (RCSU-Center), which is responsible for the cadet program in Ontario, welcomed a new commander on Friday, who will assume regional leadership of one of the best youth development programs in Canada. .

Lt.-Col. Shaun O’Leary, a long-time member of the Canadian Forces, who was recently assigned to an adult training role at the Canadian Army Doctrine and Training Center in Kingston, will bring extensive experience to the position, which focuses on the development of leadership, citizenship and community service skills among young Canadians.

“I sincerely believe in the Canadian Cadet Organization and am honored to play a role in this organization focused on developing the qualities of citizenship and leadership in youth, promoting a healthy lifestyle and stimulating an interest in the maritime, military and air activities of the Canadian Armed Forces, ”said Lieutenant-Colonel. O’Leary. “These young women and men are our future Canadian leaders.

O’Leary succeeds Lieutenant Colonel. Barry Leonard, who is leaving after two years to take up a diplomatic post at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC

Leonard has held the position for the past 15 months of the COVID-19 pandemic, a very difficult time that has seen the region’s approximately 280 corps and squadrons, including nearly 17,000 cadets, successfully transitioning from what is traditionally an in-person program towards an almost entirely virtually one-to-one program.

Due to current COVID-19 restrictions, this change of command ceremony went virtually.

As RCSU-Central has nearly 20,000 members (adults and youth / cadets) spread across the vast province of Ontario, the virtual adaptation also allowed more audience members to attend than during the ‘a traditionally in-person event.


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