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3 most disappointing jobs in KC Chiefs history

HOUSTON, TX. – SEPTEMBER 16: Kansas City Chiefs helmets on the field before an NFL game against the Houston Oilers at the Astrodome in Houston, Texas. The Oilers defeated the Chiefs 17-7. (Photo by Joseph Patronite / Getty Images)

When it comes to making deals, the KC Chiefs have certainly had their fair share of deals over their decades in the AFL and NFL. But surprisingly, they’ve done very few downright horrible deals in that long time.

While some trades didn’t work out and others got out of balance, it’s hard to find many trades that turned out to be completely devastating for the team. In fact, there is really only one such transaction in the history of leaders — which we can think of at least — that speaks well to the various decision-makers in the organization over the years.

The Chiefs have employed bad GMs in their past. Let’s not mince words here. But even those GMs were mostly bad at picking the draft or just had trades that weren’t up to par rather than getting stripped.

We decided to look back at the worst deals in chef history to see what surfaced and some of them were actually difficult to decide. Some fans might want to put Marcus Peters’ swap into the mix, but the Chiefs aren’t the only team to swap Peters and Juan Thornhill is still making his story as part of the comeback (like Armani Watts, we guess). The Chiefs have also won a Super Bowl since then.

Other blockbusters ended up doing quite well. The Chiefs ceded Jared Allen to the Minnesota Vikings, but found several starters, including Jamaal Charles, in the return lot of draft picks. They ceded a high pick to the Pittsburgh Steelers who turned out to be Troy Polamalu, but they drafted Larry Johnson with the comeback. You get the picture.

With these trades listed as potential entrants, we’re now looking at the worst three, and instead of piling up, we’re just going to go straight to the jugular and ask, “What was Hank Stram thinking?” “


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Rodney N.

The author Rodney N.