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August 2021

Non profit living

Saginaw Neighborhood Celebrates Planned Return of Children’s Community Center

SAGINAW, MI – Eight-year-old Asia Pratt was sitting breathlessly laughing next to her friends during a break as she jumped inside the inflatable house set up for an event reconnecting a neighborhood in Saginaw on the south side with an old community center ready to reopen in the coming month.

“I feel very happy,” she said of the celebration going on outside the facility at 3145 Russell. “It was so much fun. I can’t wait to be able to go here.

Organizers say the building – known as “The Nabe” – will likely not open to the community until 2022, but the excitement surrounding the news warranted some sort of block party on Saturday, August 28. The rally included The Nabe’s future target demographic. : Pratt and children his age.

Pratt plans to be the third generation in his family to run and play inside the facility when it reopens. Her father, Michael Pratt, 50, was part of a group of nine adults who formed a non-profit organization and bought the community center where they once played as children.

The Saturday celebration also catered to its demographic age. A DJ played Rick James; Earth, Wind and Fire; Kool and the Gang and other old hitmakers.

Still, the rally seemed to remain focused on the future: more specifically, The Nabe’s potential for the South Side neighborhood that has become largely desolate over the past two decades. Organizers say they hope when the community center reopens it will help revive the area and provide a place to grow up for children living nearby.

Leola Gochett, 80, moved to the South Side neighborhood in December 1970. Her three children spent their youth at The Nabe, known for decades as the Lutheran Charities Neighborhood House Community Center. After several changes of ownership, the building has remained largely unused in recent years, after decades of declining participation.

Gochett said she was delighted to hear that former attendees are planning to resuscitate the community center. She has known the nine members of the association since they played there when they were children.

“I believe in them,” said Gochett, who attended the celebration on Saturday. “This community needs this, to help us get back to the way things were in this neighborhood.”

After purchasing the old building, members of the nonprofit – which bears the same name as the community center – began tidying up the Nabe earlier this summer. It has fallen into disrepair in recent years, so the walls have been repainted, the floors have been repaired and the rooms have been cleaned.

The work remains, organizers say, but the progress of their efforts was visible to anyone who saw the interior of the 24,000-square-foot facility a month ago compared to today.

During the visits organized on Saturday, the participants got a glimpse of this renovated interior. However, much of the event activity at the start of the day took place on the community center lawn and parking lot, which organizers have turned into something that looks like a small fair.

Food vendors were camping on the outskirts of the rally. Children rushed between two inflatable houses and a mobile truck carrying playable video game consoles. Within sight of these children were their parents and other adults socializing to the music of the event.

“I’m so grateful that it brought this community together again,” said Anthony Dent, a 52-year-old man who once attended the community center as a child. “I can’t wait to see how this place will grow when it opens. “

James Carthan, a member of the nonprofit that owns the facility, said the support expressed by the community on Saturday was a sign that more success could be in store for the Nabe.

“It takes a village to raise a child,” said Carthan, 50. “I want this place to be a bright light for the young people of Saginaw.”

Organizers have organized tours of the interior of The Nabe, a Saginaw community center that the owners hope to open within the next year. Here, participants visit a basketball court where a mural was being completed.

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Childhood friends reunite to revive Saginaw children’s community center


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History organization

Tommy Lasorda fights with Phillie Phanatic

Tommy Lasorda gained a reputation for having a fiery, if not combative, personality throughout his tenure as manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers. While this was often funneled to motivate his team, it led to an altercation with a mascot on this day in Dodgers history.

As the Dodgers faced the Philadelphia Phillies at Veterans Stadium on August 28, 1988, Lasorda became enraged with Phillie Phanatic dressing a model in his jersey. Lasorda barged out of the canoe and started picking up Phillie Phanatic’s all-terrain vehicle.

As the Phillies mascot started walking towards Lasorda, the Dodgers skipper turned and chased after him. A showdown ensued and Lasorda ended up with the doll, which he used to repeatedly punch Phillie Phanatic with.

It wasn’t Lasorda’s only run-in with a mascot during his tenure as manager of the Dodgers. The following August, Lasorda started yelling at the refs for some reason during a game against the Montreal Expos.

In the end, it was because Expos mascot Youppi !, was dancing on the visitors’ canoe and taunting Lasorda and the players for most of both innings. Lasorda was furious with what was going on, and the result was Youppi! being the first mascot ever to be ejected from an MLB game.

Whether it’s coincidence or not, the Dodgers won both games in which Lasorda got mad at a mascot. They defeated the Expos in 22 innings behind Rick Dempsey’s solo homerun and scored three runs in the first inning on Franklin Stubbs’ brace en route to a 5-0 victory over the Phillies.

Lasorda spent 20 seasons managing the Dodgers and has proven to be a worthy successor to Alston. Lasorda went 1,599-1,439-2, won eight NL West titles, four pennants and two World Series. He abruptly announced his retirement in July 1996 in part due to health issues and at the time he became vice-president of the Dodgers.

Lasorda maintained close ties and an active presence with the organization and had his No. 2 jersey removed by the organization on August 15, 1997. He died in January 2021.

Dodgers honoring Lasorda

The Dodgers are celebrating Lasorda’s memory throughout the 2021 regular season with a No.2 patch on their shirt sleeve.

Have you subscribed to Dodger Blue’s YouTube channel? Don’t forget to activate the notification bell to watch player interviews, participate in shows and giveaways, and more!


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International headquarters

Defense Intelligence Agency BREAKING Says Retired Commodore Olawunmi Wanted for Channels TV’s Anti-Buhari Interview, May Seize International Passport

The Defense Intelligence Agency said a former Nigerian navy commodore Kunle Olawunmi was wanted for exposing in an interview how President Muhammadu Buhari’s administration refused to question high-level politicians as Boko terrorists Haram have appointed them as their sponsors.

SaharaReporters has learned that the DIA asked Olawunmi to report to its headquarters in Abuja on Tuesday with his international passport, which could be seized.



The Defense Intelligence Agency is Nigeria’s main military intelligence agency.

“The agency said retired Navy Commodore Kunle Olawunmi was wanted for overthrowing Boko Haram sponsors under Buhari’s rule. They asked him to come with his international passport on Tuesday to the DIA office in Abuja, ”a prominent source said.

SaharaReporters reported last Wednesday that Olawunmi spoke when he appeared on Channels Television’s “Sunrise Daily” breakfast show.

He had condemned Tuesday’s attack by bloodthirsty bandits on the Kaduna campus of Nigeria’s main military university, the Nigerian Defense Academy, where two military officers were killed and another kidnapped.

The professor of global security studies said: “This is an aberration; you are not attacking the Nigerian Defense Academy and not getting out of it. In 2017, I conducted an investigation by the Minister of Defense who wanted me to verify what was going on with the training and security there (NDA). I remember spending about a week in the NDA with the commander and the staff but something struck me: every Friday the door of the NDA is wide open and everyone has access to the mosque to pray.

“On Fridays, you will see the same thing happen in all the military formations in the country. If you go to Defense Headquarters, I served at Defense Headquarters as Deputy Director, Defense Administration, between 2015 and 2017, during my two years at Defense Headquarters, j Have received visitors twice due to the strict security architecture but every Friday the door to Defense Headquarters is wide open for everyone to come in and observe Juma’at.

“This is the time when terrorists have time to profile our security environment. It always has been. I have served in military intelligence for the past 35 years. Our problem is religious and socio-cultural.

Olawunmi had added that he was a member of the Intelligence Brief at Defense Headquarters under the direction of the then Chief of Staff, General Abayomi Olonisakin (retired).

The intelligence expert said he told the CDS at the time that the center of gravity of the Boko Haram insurgency ravaging the northeast and spreading to other parts of Nigeria was the sponsor.

“I then told General Olonisakin that the core of this problem cannot be solved the same way we solved the Niger Delta problem. The Niger Delta problem was solved during (ex-president Umaru) Yar’adua mainly by me and I told them that we cannot use the same model for Boko Haram.

“I told General Olonisakin to look at the center of gravity of the problem. I was appointed a member of the committee in 2016-2017, including the former army chief of staff, the lieutenant general. Ibrahim Attahiru who is deceased.

“I told them that the center of gravity of Boko Haram in Nigeria is the program sponsors. It was beyond us because the work that we had to do was kinetic but we cannot solve the problems of the sponsors of Boko Haram who were in the government of Buhari that we know of. That’s why we couldn’t pursue this aspect which could have solved the problem because we have to stop people.

“Recently 400 people were rounded up as Boko Haram sponsors, why did the Buhari government refuse to try them? Why can this government not bring them to justice if it is not that they are partisan and that they are part of the charade that is going on?

“You remember this Boko Haram problem started in 2012 and I was in military intelligence at the time. We arrested these people. My organization conducted interrogations and they (the suspects) mentioned names. I can’t go on the air and start mentioning the names of people who are in government right now that I know the boys we arrested mentioned. Some of them are now governors, some of them are in the Senate, some of them are in Aso Rock.

“Why should a government decide to cause this kind of embarrassment and insecurity in the sense of what happened yesterday (Tuesday at the NDA)?”

Olawunmi had also said that the Department of State Services had considerable information on the terrorists, but could do nothing except through the body language of the Commander-in-Chief.


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Canadian army

“Catastrophe” in Afghanistan: Canada saves only a fraction of the performers, according to an NGO

“As soon as the Canadians leave, the United States will leave, they will be massacred … It’s a disaster”

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Despite repeated government promises that Canada would save endangered interpreters and other Afghans who worked for that country, only a small fraction of them are airlifted out of Kabul, say advocates for local workers.

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About 90 percent of those flown by Ottawa from Afghanistan are Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Afghan origin, said Dave Fraser, a retired army general with the Veterans Transition Network.

Most performers and other ex-Canadian military and government employees are still waiting for a quickly fading opportunity to flee, he said.

“It’s always absolutely chaotic,” said Fraser, who led Canadian troops on Operation Medusa, that country’s most notorious offensive in Afghanistan. “It’s still incredibly dangerous.”

Chris Ecklund, founder of the Canadian Heroes Foundation, said only 100 of the 1,500 former employees and family members his group helps have made it to Canada. He estimates that the interpreters and their relatives represent only 5 to 10% of the evacuees.

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Meanwhile, the Taliban recently killed several former employees of that country, he said. Although he did not provide any details, such targeted assassinations have long been a hallmark of the organization.

“The government is just not interested in this, they never have been,” Ecklund accused. “We are there now, we have one week left. Are we going to take them all out? The math doesn’t make sense. It does not indicate that.

It’s still absolutely chaotic

Most have not received a visa from Canada and face a dangerous trek from privately funded secure homes in central Kabul to the airport, a trip that may include walking a mile down a sewer. in the open, according to defenders.

Other countries, like the British and the French, brought in hundreds of Afghans from the city in bus convoys.

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Although Canadian government officials told reporters that country’s special forces ventured outside the airport to bring people in, private lawyers say they see little evidence of this happening. produce.

As the August 31 deadline approaches for the departure of foreign forces from Afghanistan, desperation is growing among veterans and other Canadians helping ex-employees.

“It’s a nightmare,” said another Canadian NGO volunteer, who works with government officials and asked not to be named. “It is a disaster of epic proportions.”

Spokesmen for Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) could not be reached before the deadline for comment – or to describe who exactly is being evacuated.

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But Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Tuesday that Canada was prepared to stay in Afghanistan to continue evacuation efforts past the August 31 deadline, if possible.

“We will continue to work every day to bring out so many people alongside our allies,” Trudeau told reporters after a virtual meeting of G7 leaders. “The commitment of our G7 colleagues is clear: we will all work together to save as many people as possible.

  1.     In this file photo taken on August 15, 2021, Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau holds a press conference at Rideau Hall after asking Governor General Mary Simon to dissolve Parliament.

    Trudeau says Canada is ready to stay in Kabul past August 31 deadline after G7 meeting

  2. British and Canadian soldiers stand guard near a canal as Afghans wait outside the foreign military-controlled portion of Kabul airport, hoping to flee the country on August 22, 2021.

    Former Canadian interpreter fears for his life while awaiting evacuation from Afghanistan

However, US President Joe Biden, who set the deadline, has indicated his country will not stay beyond the end of this month.

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Trudeau also said Canada will continue to pressure the Taliban to allow people to leave the country even after the current phase ends.

Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan said in a tweet that Canada had flown 500 people out of the country just on Monday, adding to several hundred previously.

But Fraser said his group believed that only 11% of the 1,000 former interpreters and their families followed by VTN had received visas to come to Canada.

Even if they do receive a visa, getting into the airport and boarding a Canadian plane is a major challenge.

IRCC officials are telling Afghans to make their own way to the compound, despite the threat posed by huge crowds and Taliban guards, Fraser said.

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An Afghan-Canadian working for a Canadian NGO at the airport said it took people several days to get from the city to the airport. The quickest route takes them for three hours through an open sewer, where they then have to wait while Canadian authorities check their papers, said the man, who asked not to be named to avoid conflicts with government officials.

A friend who managed to cross and board a plane said he had traveled for several days as his children were injured by barbed wire and then had to wade through the sewers, he said by phone from Kabul.

A Canadian soldier walks through an evacuation checkpoint during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, August 24, 2021.
A Canadian soldier walks through an evacuation checkpoint during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, August 24, 2021. Photo by Staff Sgt. Victor Mancilla / US Marine Corps / Document via Reuters

The NGO worker estimated that about 95 percent of those who board Canadian planes are citizens or permanent residents. Most of the interpreters he knows have not even received a visa.

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Once they make contact with Canadian authorities, the fleeing Afghans face another obstacle. IRCC staff categorically reject any family member – including in one case the widowed mother of a former employee – who does not themselves have a visa, the airport worker and a lawyer said based in Canada.

A former Canadian military interpreter in Kandahar province who immigrated to Canada in 2010 argued that Afghan nationals and their families should in fact be given priority over Canadian citizens. They do not have passports that would allow them to leave the country after the departure of foreign forces, he said.

Khan, who asked that his last name not be released to avoid reprisals against his family in Afghanistan, said the policy should extend to relatives of performers like him who have already settled in Canada, as those relatives are at increased risk of retaliation by the Taliban.

There are over 200 ex-performers in Canada and so far no family member in Afghanistan has made it, he said.

“As soon as the Canadians leave, the United States will leave, they will be slaughtered,” Khan predicted. “It’s a disaster.”

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Non profit living

Study: Food insecurity and poverty rate increased for Colorado children during pandemic

Referrals to early intervention services, which help young children from birth to 3 years old with developmental skills like speech therapy, also dropped dramatically in the first few weeks of the pandemic, dropping 63% over the course of the pandemic. during the first two weeks of March 2020.

That’s because primary care physicians, who make about a third of all referrals for such support, stopped doing good health checks on children at the start of the pandemic.

Providers aim to provide children with early intervention services in their ‘natural environment’, be it home or childcare – with the aim of making them function at the same level as their peers. said Christy Scott, director of the early intervention program at Colorado’s Office of Early Childhood. “And if we don’t get the early intervention they need, then we might see the ramifications when they get into kindergarten, special education, or even kindergarten.”

Scott said there has been an increase in referrals recently, and advocates for child care are hoping that trend continues.

Household income has fallen and food insecurity has increased

Almost half of households with children have reported loss of employment income since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. At the beginning of March 2021, a third declared having difficulty paying the usual household expenses.

Meanwhile, about 10 percent of Colorado households with children reported not having enough food to eat over the past week.

Black and Latino families have suffered disproportionately, reporting more food and rental insecurity – and more job losses – than white families.

“They entered the pandemic with higher rates of child poverty, higher proportions of children without health insurance, limited access to high quality child care, and kindergarten to grade 12 education.” , Manoatl said. “During the pandemic, they were hit harder than other households (economically)… it’s kind of like an aggravated effect.”


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History organization

Tourism alliance could raise billions to preserve Gullah Geechee culture

CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) – The Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Commission is mobilizing a new tourism alliance to raise awareness of Gullah Geechee culture.

The history of the Gullah Geechee people dates back to the 1700s. The food, dances, music and culture of the Gullah Geechee people continue along the coast from Wilmington, North Carolina to St. Augustine, Florida.

Gullah Geechee Tourism Alliance representative Laura Mandala said her organization is stepping up efforts to preserve this rich history.

“We are really trying to make people appreciate what their ancestors brought to this country and their current contributions to the region,” Mandela said. “I mean the food, the spices, the crabs, a lot of what’s in the hallway, comes from those traditions.”

The aim of the alliance is both to create more events and museums, as well as to think about how to bring together resources that strengthen those that already exist.

Mandela says the corridor along the coast has the potential to generate $ 35 billion in annual spending for visitors.

She says for Wednesday’s meeting.

The meeting starts at 2 p.m. on Wednesday and Mandala says more than 220 people have already registered. She says it will be completely virtual.

Those interested can register for the Gullah Geechee Tourism Alliance meeting via zoom.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.


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International headquarters

Central American Countries Ask: Can Bitcoin Reduce Remittance Costs? | News from banks

Central American countries are eagerly awaiting to see if El Salvador’s adoption of Bitcoin as a parallel legal tender reduces the cost of remittances, a major source of income for millions of people, according to the development bank of the United States. region.

President Nayib Bukele’s allies in Congress have already approved legislation giving cryptocurrency official currency status alongside the US dollar, a world first. The move takes effect in September.

Bukele touted the adoption of Bitcoin as a way to facilitate remittances for Salvadorans living abroad.

“Everyone is watching if everything is going well for El Salvador and if, for example, the cost of remittances drops significantly… other countries are likely to seek this advantage and adopt it,” Dante Mossi, executive chairman of the Bank. Central American economic integration. (CABEI), Reuters news agency said on Wednesday. CABEI is an international multilateral development finance institution headquartered in Honduras.

Mossi called the plan an “extraordinary experiment” to increase financial inclusion in a region where many people do not have access to bank accounts or credit cards and depend on money sent by. parents living in the United States.

Technical assistance

CABEI, the regional development bank, is providing technical assistance to El Salvador for the implementation of cryptocurrency, a major show of support as the World Bank refused to help, citing environmental drawbacks and transparency.

The bank’s technical assistance aims to help El Salvador design a legal framework for the adoption of Bitcoin and ensure that strict international money laundering protocols are followed.

The aid is intended to help El Salvador “navigate waters that have yet to be explored,” said Carlos Sanchez, chief investment officer of CABEI.

Mossi said the Central American countries that receive the most remittances are the ones that prioritize the use of Bitcoin the most and stressed that CABEI has a “fiduciary duty” to support El Salvador in its request for aid.

“Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are the countries that stand to gain the most if the adoption of Bitcoin reduces the cost of remittances,” Mossi said.

CABEI participated in a recent meeting of the Central American Monetary Council, which is part of the Central American Integration System (SICA), where participants asked about El Salvador’s Bitcoin plans and discussed expressed interest, he added.

The Central Bank of Honduras referred Reuters to a June 11 statement that the bank does not prohibit, supervise, or guarantee the use of cryptocurrencies as payment methods in the country.

The governments of Guatemala and Honduras did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Bitcoin ATMs

El Salvador has started installing Bitcoin ATMs, allowing its citizens to convert cryptocurrency to U.S. dollars and withdraw it for cash, as part of the government’s plan to make the token legal tender.

The government will install 200 ATMs to initially accompany its digital wallet called Chivo, a local slang term for “cool,” President Bukele said on Twitter on Sunday. Transactions will be commission-free, he said, adding that there will also be 50 financial branches across the country to withdraw or deposit money.

Adopting Bitcoin will save Salvadorans $ 400 million a year in fees for receiving remittances from abroad, Bukele said.

According to Autonomous Research, less than 1% of the volume of global cross-border remittances is currently made in cryptocurrencies, but in the future, cryptocurrencies are expected to account for a larger share of the more than $ 500 billion. global annual remittances.

Bitcoin offers, in theory, a fast and inexpensive way to send money across borders without resorting to traditional channels.

Salvadoran Bitcoin law will come into effect on September 7 and Salvadorans will be able to download the government’s Chivo digital wallet, enter their ID number and receive $ 30 in Bitcoin, Finance Minister Alejandro Zelaya said in an interview with local television. The government has created a $ 150 million fund to support Bitcoin to U.S. dollar conversions, he said.


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History organization

The relationship between race and well-being has never been so pressing | At the Smithsonian

This summer, Simone Biles, widely regarded as the greatest female gymnast of all time, shocked the sports world by retiring from the majority of her events at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. Citing her struggles with “twisties,” a mental block that makes gravity-defying gymnastics movements incredibly dangerous, the 24-year-old has received widespread praise for putting his health first.

Biles later said she took inspiration from Naomi Osaka, the 23-year-old tennis star who retired from Roland Garros and Wimbledon in order to prioritize her mental health. The two women, both black athletes at the peak of their sport, are part of a growing wave of black individuals “publicly [taking] their sanity in their hands in a way never seen before in elite sports, ”as NBC News reported.

Lonnie Bunch, secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, says the example set by Biles, Osaka and others has brought the issue of “mental health through the lens of race” to the fore. This topic, along with the broader relationship between race and well-being, looks particularly timely in 2021, as the United States continues to contend with systemic racism and a pandemic that disproportionately affects people of color.

“Part of the fight for equity in America is the fight for equitable health care and access to mental health care,” Bunch said.

Race, welfare and wealth will feature prominently in an upcoming forum hosted by the Smithsonian’s Our Shared Future: Reckoning With Our Racial Past initiative. Scheduled for Thursday, August 26 at 7 p.m. EST, the virtually broadcast summit will put Smithsonian academics in conversation with authors, experts and activists. Planned programming includes sessions on the history and impact of race, the link between health and wealth, the role of race in mental health and trauma, and local organizations striving to reinvent a better future.

The Smithsonian announced its Reckoning With Our Racial Past initiative last summer, following the murder of George Floyd and the outbreak of widespread protests against police brutality. Funded with a $ 25 million donation from Bank of America, the goal of the campaign is to “confront race and highlight racism and social justice from a historical perspective,” Ariana said. Curtis, director of content for the initiative. Reckoning With Our Racial Past also seeks to emphasize the relevance of its topic today and to offer ideas on how to move forward as a nation.

The Smithsonian announced the initiative last June, in the wake of George Floyd’s murder and widespread protests against systemic racism.

(Photo by Tasos Katopodis / Getty Images)

In addition to virtual and live events, the multi-year initiative will include town halls, digital resources, educational tools, immersive pop-up experiences, storytelling projects, fundraising efforts and more. This week’s event will be the first of three national forums.

“When I became a secretary [in 2019], what was important for me was to recognize that the Smithsonian had a contemporary resonance, that it had an opportunity, really a responsibility, to have value, to say basically: we are going to help the public by giving him tools to grapple with everyday life, from the challenge of climate change to race issues, ”says Bunch.

He adds: “When a nation is in crisis, its institutions must be strengthened. And clearly, this country is in crisis.

The Smithsonian’s collections and researchers represent a wealth of expertise, and its status as a beloved 175-year-old American institution means it is uniquely positioned to bring together people of different backgrounds and experiences.

“Our network includes other museums and cultural centers in the United States of varying sizes and missions, as well as community organizations, academics and activists,” says Curtis. “We are certainly not assuming that the Smithsonian is the first organization to think about these [questions of race,] but thinking of the power we have as a trusted institution to bring these [issues] to a larger and larger audience is really important.

The secretary envisioned the project as a way for the Smithsonian to “do what we do best”: namely, to make complicated subjects accessible to the public, provide a historical and cultural context that illuminates the present, and forge links between people who could not otherwise interact. . With the funded initiative, the Smithsonian could shed “some light” on a moment “fraught with misinformation, hatred and partisanship.”

The team responsible for developing the initiative focused its efforts on six thematic pillars: running and well-being; race and wealth; race and location; race, politics and ethics; race beyond the United States; and race, arts and aesthetics. All of these topics tie in with ongoing Institution-wide work of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center’s Care Package, an online exhibit of creative offerings released at the height of the pandemic, when the crimes of Anti-Asian hatred was in the news across the nation — on the NMAAHC’s Talking About Race portal.

“The term ‘systemic racism’ can seem unwieldy and overwhelming,” explains Curtis, “and so we wanted to think about how to make it knowable? How to make it understandable? How do you make it feel changeable? “

She adds that she wants the forums to give the public a sense of optimism: “We want people to think about a way forward. “

Covid-19 test

The Covid-19 pandemic has taken a disproportionate toll on people of color.

(Governor Tom Wolf via Flickr under CC BY 2.0)

The ongoing pandemic influenced the decision of the organizers to center the initiative’s first forum on race, welfare and wealth. But this week’s event doesn’t just focus on Covid-19. One session will discuss the development of race as a social construct and the lingering consequences of unsubstantiated claims that race is based on biological differences. “[This is] a time when people are trying to go beyond race as an identity and really want to question how race works, what race means, what role race and racism have in our lives today ”, Curtis explains.

Joi Lewis, founder of the Healing Justice Foundation; Monique Morris, President and CEO of Grantmakers for Girls of Color; and Diana Chao, Founder and Executive Director of Letters to Strangers, will lead a separate discussion on mental health and trauma, a topic explicitly linked to public statements made by Biles, Osaka and other black athletes.

“This particular conversation is intergenerational,” Curtis explains. “Younger generations of black women speak openly about their mental health in ways that would not have seemed acceptable or permitted to previous generations. Opening this conversation in public spaces is really important.

To ensure the initiative reaches a large part of the country, the Smithsonian is working with local partners, including cultural organizations, historically black colleges and universities, sports teams, and nonprofits. These groups will help organize pop-up events in cities across the United States, addressing issues through a local lens in recognition of the fact “that the race takes place differently in different places,” according to Bunch.

“It’s less about the Smithsonian saying we have the answers, and more about the Smithsonian as a facilitator,” he adds. “What I hope it will become [is] a driver of possibility, a driver of collaboration that… the Smithsonian can continue to do long after I’m no longer a secretary.

For Bunch, the initiative represents “an opportunity for the Smithsonian to demonstrate that it has value, not only as a place that looks back, but as a place that looks to the future.” He hopes this “will help a nation recognize that it has a common future even though race issues have always divided us.”

The initiative’s first forum, on the theme of race, well-being and wealth, will be held virtually on August 26 at 7 p.m. EST. Join Secretary Bunch and a panel of esteemed experts at oursharedfuture.si.edu.


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Canadian army

Edmonton women scramble to save brother from hiding in Afghanistan

Two Edmonton sisters were unable to sleep or eat as they hope their family will be selected under an Afghan resettlement program announced by the federal government last week.

CBC News has agreed to identify them only by first name for the safety of their families.

Malali and Maska say their brother worked for NATO and the US military, which now puts him and the rest of the family at risk.

According to Malali, they have been in hiding for about two weeks.

“The whole family – my brother and my mother and my two sisters and four brothers – they all live in the same house. And all of their lives are in danger because of this brother who worked with the US military,” he said. she declared.

“The 20,000 Afghan refugees they announced they would bring, I want my family to be one of those 20,000.”

Malali, a woman from Edmonton, became emotional as she spoke of the danger her family currently faces in Afghanistan. (Jamie McCannel / CBC)

The Taliban seized power in Afghanistan last week as the United States and its allies withdrew their troops after a 20-year war.

The sisters have appealed to the Canadian and US governments for help, they said on Sunday. They received no response.

The women say they feel helpless to be so far away, knowing how their families in Afghanistan are struggling and knowing that supplies are running out – for their families and in the country in general.

“He risked his life for seven years for these people and they left him behind,” said Malali. “Without any help or anything. He is very desperate. The situation is very desperate. We don’t know what to do.”

Federal ministers provided an update on the situation in Afghanistan on Sunday.

Foreign Minister Marc Garneau said the government understands how desperate Afghans are to flee the country and Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino has vowed to speed up resettlements.

The Canadian military airlifted about 1,100 people – mostly Afghans – out of the country, Mendicino said. So far, 12 flights have left the country.


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International headquarters

Conservatives offer alternatives to optimistic demolition

Georges Nikolajevich

At its July 26 meeting, the City of St. Louis Preservation Council heard testimony regarding the proposed demolition of the Optimist International Headquarters building (s) located at 4490-4494 Lindell Boulevard in the Historic District of Central West End, where developers are looking to develop a 150-unit building.

The hearing was an appeal against the rejection of the demolition project by the Bureau of Cultural Resources. In 2013, the CRO commissioned a survey and appraisal of 2,300 Mid-Century Modern (1945-1975) buildings in St. Louis, 50 of which were deemed highly significant. The original part of the Optimist property, located at the corner of Taylor Avenue and known as the “Pavilion”, which was built in 1961 according to plans drawn by the famous St. Louis firm of Schwarz & Van Hoefen, was listed in the 2013 Survey as a High Merit Building that is individually eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, and
was among the 25 most important of the 2,300 buildings studied.

Following lengthy testimony at the July 26 hearing, the question was put, first on a motion upholding Cultural Resources’ refusal, followed by a motion to allow the appeal and authorize the demolition, which was not passed. Both motions were tied up, and the matter was postponed for further deliberation at the next Preservation Council meeting on Monday, August 23.

The architectural context along Lindell Boulevard, particularly in the three-block section between Newstead Avenue and the Kingshighway, is rich, diverse and unique and must be respected. Notable examples of the wide variety of high quality buildings of various types and eras in the immediate vicinity of the Optimist site include: 4401 Lindell-Cathedral Basilica St. Louis (1908, Barnett, Haynes & Barnett); 4440 Lindell-Pierre Chouteau Apartments (1929, C. Odenwald); 4445 Lindell-Chancery of the Archdiocese of Saint-Louis (1962, WA Sarmiento); 4501 Lindell-Lindell Terrace (1965, Gyo Obata); 4510 Residence of Archbishop Lindell (1891, C.
Jungenfeld); 4545 Lindell (2010, Louis Sauer); 4600 Lindell-Saint Louis Woman’s Club (1895, Grable, Weber & Groves); 4625 Lindell- City Bank Building (1971, Wedemeyer, Cernik & Corrubia); 4931 Lindell-Chase Apartments (1921, Preston J. Bradshaw); 4943 Lindell-Chester Apartments (1921, Preston J. Bradshaw); 4950 Lindell-St. Regis Apartments (1908, George H. Kennerly); 212 N. Kingshighway-Chase Hotel (1921, Preston J. Bradshaw); and 114 N. Taylor-Grant Medical Clinic (1938, Harris Armstrong)!

Georges Nikolajevich

Our aim is not to thwart new development activities, but rather to encourage a more sensitive design that would both preserve buildings of merit and contribute to the rich architectural heritage and distinguished character of Lindell Boulevard. and the center-west. Thus, the supporters of the preservation of the “Pavilion” proposed an alternative approach to the redevelopment of the Optimist site which would allow the corner building to be preserved by integrating it into the base of a new structure, while allowing the development of 150 apartment units in a new tower on the eastern part of the site. This suggestion was summarily rejected without consideration by the potential promoter.

Georges Nikolajevich

The question boils down to the question of whether the well-documented justification supporting the preservation of the architectural heritage of Saint-Louis will prevail in this case, or will it be discarded to accommodate the development of a generic building of the type proposed? This important decision rests with the members of the Preservation Council. We think the answer is clear… the building must be preserved.

Georges Nikolajevich

James Dwyer
Chairman, Central West End Association Planning and Development Committee

John C. Guenther, FAIA, LEED AP
President, Society of Architectural Historians, St. Louis Chapter

Michael R. Allen
Director and Architectural Historian, Preservation Research Office
Senior Lecturer, Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design, Washington University

Andrew B. Weil
Executive Director, Landmarks Association of St. Louis

Illustrations by George Nikolajevich, retired Cannon Design alumnus.

NextSTL – Optimist replacement comes before Preservation Council

Lux Living’s proposal to replace the Optimist buildings in Lindell and Taylor.


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