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June 2021

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Eugene YMCA’s new facility to receive $ 15 million from Oregon Legislature


The Eugene Family YMCA will receive $ 15 million in state funding for a new facility, after the economic impacts of COVID-19 blocked the sale of bonds for projects in 2020.

Brian Steffen, CEO of Eugene Family YMCA, said it was the highest amount ever awarded in the organization’s 134-year history and that it would be a crucial step towards the completion of funding for a new YMCA building.

“This was pivotal funding for the new Y, and once again we are touched and grateful for the trust and support of lawmakers,” said Steffen. “From there, we’re focusing on the last major giveaways for the new Y, and we think we can clear them up by the end of the summer.”

Steffen declined to say how close the YMCA has come to its goal of $ 42 million for the project, and added that he believes he will be able to share the amount by the end of August or in early September when the organization will know if it will receive a significant amount. federal funding from new market tax credits.

The YMCA announced several important donations made by the community, including:

  • $ 4 million, April: YMCA donors helped raise $ 4 million by raising $ 1 million for the John E. and Robin Jaqua Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation.
  • $ 650,000, March: Includes donations from four different donors: $ 350,000 last winter from the MJ Murdock Charitable Trust; $ 100,000 from Herb Merker and Marcy Hammock; $ 50,000 from Joe Karcher and his wife, Cathleen; and an anonymous donation of $ 150,000.
  • $ 1.5 million, June: Gift of the Chambers Family Foundation.
  • $ 4 million, January 2020: Gift from Bill and Michelle Service.
  • $ 1 million, December 2019: YMCA donors raised $ 50,000 through a matching grant from local philanthropist Betty Soreng, who donated $ 50,000.

In 2019, state lawmakers authorized $ 15 million in funding for the Eugene Family YMCA as part of lottery bonds for 37 projects in the state.

However, because COVID-19 and the associated economic decline blocked the sale of the bonds in 2020, the 2021 legislative session re-examined each of the projects.

Related:Eugene Family YMCA makes summer programs for kids free

The $ 15 million funding, designated in Senate Bill 5534, was passed by the Legislature on Saturday, as part of a package of $ 445.2 million for 55 projects. It is expected to be signed by Governor Kate Brown in early August.

“The economic downturn due to the pandemic has had a widespread impact, including delays in the development of the much-needed new facility for the Eugene Family YMCA,” Representative Nancy Nathanson, D-Eugene, said in a statement from hurry. “My colleagues and I took the first opportunity we could to re-authorize public funding for the Y. We recognize how vital this organization is to the well-being of our community, and our community needs the Y all the more. after COVID.

The new YMCA building is expected to have an area of ​​74,000 square feet at the corner of 24th Avenue and Hilyard Street.

“The current Y building at 2055 Patterson St. was designed to serve a 1950s population of 70,000,” the statement said. “He has served the community well for 66 years, but is now in a state of costly structural decline. “

Louis Krauss covers the latest news for The Register-Guard. Contact him at [email protected] or 541-521-2498, and follow him on Twitter @LouisKraussNews.



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Coronavirus: What’s Happening in Canada and Around the World on Wednesday


The last:

Ontario moved to the next step in its plan to reopen on Wednesday, just hours before health officials reported the lowest single-day case count the province has seen since September 10.

The province reported 14 additional deaths and 184 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday.

The update came a day after the province’s top doctor said he would prefer to wait 21 full days before further lifting the restrictions.

“The two to three week cycle is very important to maintain so that we open Ontario in stages, always moving forward and not having to back down,” said Dr. Kieran Moore on Tuesday.

Moore made the comments during his first pandemic briefing since officially taking over as Ontario’s chief medical officer of health.

Ontario has exceeded COVID-19 vaccination targets to enter the second phase of its plan to reopen, which will allow more outdoor activities and more indoor services like haircuts. resume Wednesday.

More than 77% of people had received at least one dose of the vaccine by Tuesday morning and 37% were fully immunized.

The province has set 21 days between each stage of its economic reopening to observe public health trends and allow vaccines to take full effect. He brought forward the second stage of the plan a few days based on vaccination rates and other positive trends from COVID-19.

Ontario also exceeded the target to enter the third stage of the reopening plan, which would further increase the capacity of indoor gatherings.

But Moore, like his predecessor Dr David Williams, argued on Tuesday that vaccination is not the only measure. He advised to proceed with caution with the spread of the more infectious delta variant.

Region of Waterloo not moving to step 2

People who have received a dose of the vaccine are less protected against this variant and this has contributed to local spikes in infection in the Gray Bruce and Waterloo region. Waterloo will not reopen with the rest of the province on Wednesday as it manages the increase in infections.

Moore said he is monitoring the impact of the variant locally and internationally and that reopening must be done with caution to avoid losing the progress made in fighting the virus so far.

“He’s a tough opponent. He’s aggressive. He wants to spread quickly,” he said of the variant.

“We have to be careful and we need 21 days to be able to understand the impact of openness on our communities.”

-Based on the latest update from The Canadian Press and CBC News at 10:20 a.m. ET


What’s happening across Canada

WATCH | Masks still matter as Canada faces a more transmissible delta variant, according to an expert:

Masks are our “last line of defense” against the highly transmissible delta variant of COVID-19 as Canada opens up, says pulmonologist Dr Samir Gupta. (Ben Nelms / CBC) 1:39

As early as Wednesday morning, Canada had reported 1,414,746 confirmed cases of COVID-19, of which 7,400 were considered active. A CBC News death tally stood at 26,274. More than 36.7 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered across the country so far, according to the CBC vaccine tracker.

A total of five cases of COVID-19 were reported in Atlantic Canada on Tuesday, including:

No new cases of COVID-19 have been reported in Newfoundland and Labrador Tuesday.

In Quebec, health authorities have reported four additional deaths and 71 new cases of COVID-19.

In the Prairie provinces, Manitoba Tuesday reported no new deaths and 61 new cases of COVID-19. Saskatchewan, meanwhile, reported two more deaths and 52 more cases of COVID-19.

WATCH | Laina Tuckanow lost her mother and grandmother to COVID-19 and says for her, life will never be normal again:

While many Canadians celebrate a return to normalcy, for many the pain is still too great. Laina Tuckanow lost her mother and grandmother to COVID-19 and says for herself that life will never be normal again. 2:44

In Alberta, health officials on Tuesday reported four deaths and 61 new cases of COVID-19.

“Overall, our numbers are heading in the right direction,” Dr Deena Hinshaw said on Tuesday, before a wider reopening later this week.

“Cases, hospitalizations, ICU admissions and our positivity rate are the lowest since last summer, early fall.”

In the North, no new cases were reported in Nunavut or the Northwest Territories Tuesday, as 10 new cases and one additional death were reported in yukonese.

“We are in a new phase of this pandemic, one that we hoped not to see,” Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr Brendan Hanley said in a statement on Tuesday. “But we are here and we will continue to work together to contain this tide.”

British Columbia will move to step 3 of its pandemic reopening plan on Thursday, lifting the provincial mandate of the mask and the government’s declaration of a state of emergency. The news came as British Columbia reported 29 new cases and no new deaths on Tuesday.

-From CBC News and The Canadian Press, last updated 10:20 am ET


What is happening in the world

A street is seen in Brisbane’s central business district on Wednesday as the city goes silent after a lockdown. Australia is battling outbreaks of the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus. (Patrick Hamilton / AFP / Getty Images)

As of Wednesday morning, more than 181.8 million cases of COVID-19 had been reported worldwide, according to data released by Johns Hopkins University in the United States. The death toll worldwide was over 3.9 million.

In the Asia Pacific region, Australian authorities on Wednesday extended lockdown and physical distancing measures to more of the country, with four major cities already under strict lockdown in a race to contain an outbreak of the highly contagious variant of the delta coronavirus.

Bangladesh is deploying army troops from Thursday to enforce a strict lockdown amid a record spike in coronavirus cases caused by the delta variant first detected in India, the government said on Wednesday.

“No one will be allowed out except in an emergency during this time,” the government said in a statement, warning that army troops alongside law enforcement would be deployed to enforce the lockdown.

In the AmericasDr Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said the CDC is leaving it up to local authorities to establish guidelines for wearing the mask as the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus increases in areas with low vaccination rate.

Walensky said Wednesday on NBC Today show that “we’ve always said that local decision-makers should make policies for their local environment,” but added that CDC guidelines broadly say that those who are vaccinated do not need to wear masks.

Los Angeles County health officials recommend that people wear masks indoors in public places, regardless of their immunization status. Separately, the World Health Organization reiterated its long-standing recommendation that everyone wear masks to reduce the spread of the coronavirus.

In Africa, the Tunisian government extended the hours of nighttime curfew on Tuesday in a bid to stop the rapid spread of COVID-19, as the North African country hit a daily record of cases since the start of the pandemic Last year.

Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa on Tuesday imposed a dusk-dawn curfew, banned intercity travel and reduced hours of operation with immediate effect in response to the increase in coronavirus infections.

Roofing Rolling Mills workers fill oxygen tanks which will be distributed free of charge to various hospitals in Uganda at their factory in Namanve, Wakiso, Uganda on Tuesday. The factory is filling 350 to 400 oxygen tanks daily, following an increase in COVID-19 cases in the country and lack of oxygen in various hospitals. (Badru Katamba / AFP / Getty Images)

In Europe, Greece will allow people fully vaccinated against the coronavirus inside restaurants without masks, the government said, as part of measures to increase vaccination rates.

Russia will not be able to immunize 60% of its population by fall as planned due to weak demand for vaccines, the Kremlin said, after the country recorded its highest number of daily deaths from the virus.

In the Middle East, Oman has said it is expanding its vaccination campaign to anyone over 18 as it speeds up what has been the slowest rollout in the Gulf.

-From Reuters, last update 8:10 am ET


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International headquarters

Guess & Co. Corporation Appoints Retired Senior FBI Agent


OSAGE BEACH, Mississippi, June 30, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Guess & Co. Corporation is pleased to announce that Kevin J. Kline has been appointed Special Advisor for Compliance and Risk Management. Kevin J. Kline is a shareholder and special advisor to Guess & Co. Corporation. Mr. Kline retired from the Federal Bureau of Investigation as a deputy special agent in charge of the New Haven, Connecticut division. He managed more than 175 employees in this field office and oversaw the division’s national security, intelligence and administration programs. Prior to overseeing the FBI office in New Haven, Mr. Kline was an inspector at FBI Headquarters in Washington, DC, where he was responsible for conducting compliance audits of FBI field offices and working closely with the Director of the FBI. FBI. While at FBI Headquarters, he created and implemented a new method for evaluating the performance of FBI executives. Prior to working at Headquarters, Mr. Kline was the on-scene commander in Afghanistan for the Counter-Terrorism Division of the FBI. Prior to his international assignment, Mr. Kline was Deputy Special Agent in charge of the Boston, Massachusetts Division. While overseeing the Boston division, Mr. Kline managed over 225 employees and established joint task forces for terrorism investigations. He also led the team to locate, apprehend and secure the conviction of an organized crime fugitive in Boston. As a special supervisory agent for the Newark Division in New Jersey, Mr. Kline led the investigation into the 9/11 attacks in New Jersey and United Airlines Flight 93. Mr. Kline graduated from Magna with a Bachelor of Arts in History and Education. Cum Laude from Canisius College. He holds a Juris Doctor from the Albany Law School of Union University. Mr. Kline works closely with members of the management team and our Board of Directors to ensure effective compliance and risk management for Guess & Co. Corporation. In addition to Guess & Co. Corporation, Mr. Kline is COO of The Aggeris Group, LLC, an investigation and security company. “We are delighted to have Mr. Kline as a trusted advisor to the management and board of directors of our company. His many years of experience as a Senior Federal Law Enforcement Officer are essential to our compliance and risk management programs, ”said Jerry D. Guess, President and CEO of Guess & Co. Corporation.

About Guess & Co. Corporation

Guess & Co. Corporation is a diversified energy, healthcare, technology and real estate company focused on revitalizing and serving rural America. Our company is positioned to become the undisputed market leader in rural energy, rural health care, rural technology and rural real estate. As a company based in the Midwest, we are at the heart of rural America. Guess & Co. Corporation is also a registered contractor with the US government to provide solutions to federal government agencies and members of our company have active top-secret / SCI authorizations. We are based in Osage Beach, Missouri. Our company operates in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and North Carolina. Guess & Co. Corporation was founded in August 2017. The management team of Guess & Co. Corporation has over 50 years of combined experience.

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/328b1625-43d1-4881-bf20-e35f77bacb2f



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Tiger Global leads $ 31.5 million investment in interactive edtech quiz

Quizizz, an Indian startup that makes learning more interactive so that students find it interesting to spend more hours studying, said on Wednesday it had raised $ 31.5 million in a new round funding.

Tiger Global led the five-and-a-half-year-old startup’s Series B round. Yahoo co-founder Jerry Yang and existing investors Eight Roads Ventures, GSV Ventures, Nexus Venture Partners also participated in the new round.

Quizizz, which concluded its previous funding round in March of this year, has raised $ 47 million to date. The new round puts it at around $ 300 million, I heard earlier this month.

“When we were kids it was so hard to focus on studying. Our thesis is that with children now living in a world with so many distractions, there is a need to make learning more interesting, ”said Ankit Gupta, co-founder and CEO of Quizizz, in an interview with TechCrunch.

With Deepak Cheenath, the other co-founder of Quizizz, Gupta began the startup’s journey at a non-profit school in Bangalore, where they built several prototypes. That same year – 2015 – the duo engaged closely with teachers and students in the United States and turned to Quizizz, Gupta said.

On Quizizz, teachers and the community develop gamified courses for students. (Teachers don’t have to build these lessons. For concepts they want to explain to students, if lessons exist, many use them instead. The platform now offers over 20 million quizzes. )

These lessons made the learning more engaging for students, Gupta said. The platform also allows teachers to identify in real time which students are struggling to grasp a concept and then fill those gaps, he said.

The platform covers a range of topics including IT, English, Math, Science, Social Studies, World Languages, and the Creative Arts.

Over the years, Quizizz has grown organically across the world and many classrooms are now using the platform, Gupta said. The platform is now used by teachers in more than 120 countries, with students answering more than 300 million questions on Quizizz every week. In the United States, which is currently Quizizz’s largest market, more than 80% of K-12 schools use the platform, he said.

“During the pandemic, Quizziz made the transition to online education seamlessly. Now that we’re back in the building, I’ve used it almost exclusively. Creating, finding and modifying courses using Quizizz has become almost a hobby for me, ”said Rory Roberts, math professor at Brigantine Community School, in a prepared statement.

“This week, we ran user tests with teachers in California, saw a video of students cheering on their classmates in an auditorium in Kenya, and received a thank you note from a group of teachers wearing t – Quizizz brand shirts in Indonesia. We are incredibly proud of the role our growing team and community of teachers have played in this movement, ”said Cheenath of Quizizz.

The startup plans to deploy new capital to expand its team in the United States and India to keep up with its growth. It is also seeking to forge partnerships to accelerate its international expansion.

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Nevada pageant winner to become 1st transgender contestant for Miss USA


Kataluna Enriquez, who was crowned Miss Nevada USA on Sunday, will become the first openly transgender woman to enter the Miss USA pageant.

With a platform focused on transgender awareness and mental health, Enriquez, 27, beat 21 other contestants at the South Point Hotel Casino in Las Vegas.

“I haven’t had the easiest trip in life,” she said, according to KVVU-TV. “I have fought against physical and sexual abuse. I have had mental health issues. I haven’t grown much. I had no support. But I’m still able to thrive, and I’m still able to survive and be a trailblazer for many.

After his victory, Enriquez thanked the LGBTQ community on Instagram, writing: “My victory is our victory. We just made history. Good pride.

The Miss Nevada USA organization congratulated Enriquez for his historic victory on social media and shared the hashtag #bevisible.

In March, Enriquez, who had previously entered trans-specific contests, became the first transgender woman to be crowned Miss Silver State USA, the main preliminary for Miss Nevada USA.

During the question-and-answer segment of the contest, Enriquez said that being true to herself is a hurdle she faces on a daily basis.

“Today, I am a proud transgender woman of color. Personally, I have learned that my differences don’t make me less than, it makes me more than, ”she said. Las Vegas Review reported. “I know my uniqueness will take me to all of my destinations and all that I have to go through in life.”

Kataluna Enrique attends the 2nd annual TransNation Festival in Los Angeles on October 21, 2017.Single File Nicole / Getty Images

Enriquez, who is Filipino American, designs her own outfits, including a rainbow sequin dress she wore Sunday night in honor of “Pride Month” and anyone unlucky to ‘flaunt their colors, “she posted. on Instagram.

“The pageantry is so expensive, and I wanted to compete and be able to grow and develop skills and create dresses for myself and for others,” Enriquez said, according to the Journal.

She will represent Nevada at the 2021 Miss USA Pageant, which will be held on November 29 at the Paradise Cove Theater at the River Spirit Casino Resort in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

The Miss Universe pageant system, of which Los Angeles-based Miss USA is a part, began allowing transgender participants in 2012. If she is crowned Miss USA, Enriquez will be the second trans contestant in a Miss Universe pageant, after the Spanish Angela Ponce in 2018..

Miss America, a separate organization headquartered in New Jersey, did not immediately respond to a survey on whether transgender women or non-binary people are allowed to enter its annual competition. In 2018, the competition was only open to “women born naturally”, according to the lawyer.

In February, a federal judge defended the right another organization, Nevada-based Miss United States of America, to ban transgender applicants from its pageant.

To pursue NBC output at Twitter, Facebook & Instagram



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Nutrition researchers saw malnourished children in residential schools as perfect test subjects – Philippine Canadian Inquirer


Two girls lay in bed in the dormitory of All Saints Indian Residential School in Lac La Ronge, Saskatchewan, in 1945. (Boorne & May. Library and Archives Canada, e010962312), CC BY

The discovery of hundreds of children’s remains in Kamloops, Brandon and Cowessess revealed the absolute devastation that settlers inflicted on Indigenous children, families and communities through the residential school system.


Read more: Amid more shocking residential school findings, non-Indigenous people must act


As a nutrition researcher and Canadian settler, I ask my peers to recognize and understand the damage malnutrition and nutritional experiences have on Indigenous peoples and the legacy they have left.

Easier to assimilate

Ian Mosby, historian of food, Indigenous health and the politics of Canadian colonialism, discovered that between 1942 and 1952, Canada’s foremost nutrition scientists carried out highly unethical research on 1 300 Aboriginal people, including 1,000 children, in Cree communities in northern Manitoba and at six residential schools across Canada.

Many were already suffering from malnutrition due to destructive government policies and dire conditions in residential schools.

In the eyes of researchers, this made them ideal test subjects.

Black and white photo: nurse takes blood sample from baby boy
A nurse takes a blood sample from a boy at the Indian Residential School in Port Alberni, British Columbia, during a medical and dental investigation conducted by the Department of National Health and Welfare in 1948 (F. Royal. Canada. National Film Board of Canada. Photo Library, Library and Archives Canada, e002504649), CC BY

Frederick Tisdall – famous for being the co-creator of Pablum infant food at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto – along with Percy Moore and Lionel Bradley Pett were the primary architects of the nutritional experiments.

They proposed that education and dietary interventions would make Indigenous people more profitable for Canada, that if Indigenous people were healthier, the transmission of diseases like tuberculosis to whites would decrease and assimilation would be easier.

They successfully presented their plan of nutrition experiments to the federal government.

Tisdall, Moore and their team based their case on results obtained after subjecting 400 Cree adults and children in northern Manitoba to a series of intrusive assessments, including physical exams, x-rays and blood tests.

Pett and his team’s pitch centered around determining a baseline. They wanted to give the children at Alberni Indian Residential School a small amount of milk for two years, enough to significantly deprive the growing children of the calories and nutrients they needed.

Other experiments involved withholding essential vitamins and minerals from children in control groups, while preventing Indian health services from providing dental care on the grounds that it could impact study results.

And even before these experiences, children in residential schools were hungry – with reports of severe malnutrition and signs of severe vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

Racial motives and foundations of nutritional experiments

Interest in nutrition research increased dramatically in the 1940s after the Canadian Council on Nutrition publicly stated that over 60 percent of the Canadian population suffered from nutritional deficiencies.

Until then, most of the experiments had been done on animals, but researchers like Pett, who was the primary author of what would become Canada’s Food Guide, took the opportunity to use Indigenous peoples as rats of laboratory.

While authors like Pett often operate under the facade of understanding and helping Indigenous peoples, the racial underpinnings of these nutritional experiences are clear.

Investigators sought to unravel the “Indian problem”. Moore, Tisdall and colleagues attributed to malnutrition discriminatory stereotypes such as “lack of speed, indolence, recklessness and inertia”.

AE Caldwell, director of the Alberni Indian Residential School, said malnutrition was caused by traditional diets and lifestyles, which he also called “indolent habits.” The nutritional experiences, along with the deeply inadequate and shoddy foods given to children in residential schools, aligned perfectly with Caldwell’s assimilation mandate.

Denying virtually all children access to adequate traditional foods is another means of colonization and cultural genocide.

Nurse watches boys spit into test tubes
A nurse from the Department of National Health and Welfare supervised the collection of saliva samples from boys at the Indian Residential School in Port Alberni, British Columbia, in 1948. (F. Royal. Canada. National Film Board of Canada. Photo library. Library and Archives Canada, e002504650), CC BY

According to Mosby’s findings, Pett said he aimed to better understand the “inevitable” transition away from country foods, but residential schools were deliberately designed to bring about this.

Their research is unethical by contemporary standards, and it’s hard to believe that it was ever okay to experiment on anyone, let alone children, without consent.

The aftermath of the Holocaust and biomedical experiments in concentration camps led to the development of the Nuremberg Code in 1947, which states that voluntary consent to research is absolutely essential and that experiments must avoid mental suffering and unnecessary physics.

The code came out the same year Pett embarked on his nutritional experiments at six residential schools.

Consequences of malnutrition and experimentation

Childhood malnutrition can be fatal, especially when combined with the risk of disease, which was often the case in residential schools.

The final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission indicates that the leading causes of death among children in residential schools were physical injury, malnutrition, disease and neglect.

For residential school survivors, malnutrition has lasting effects. Starvation in childhood increases the risk of chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes, and research indicates that severe malnutrition can even cause epigenetic changes that can be passed down from generation to generation.

Experimenting with children already in pain was immoral.

Food insecurity and nutrition issues in Indigenous communities are major issues in Canada, resulting from residential schools and colonial policies that continue to this day.

Experiences in residential schools and in communities have made health care settings precarious and traumatic places for many Indigenous peoples and led to some reluctance to be vaccinated during the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, stigma, violence and racism against Indigenous peoples in these contexts persist.

This particular story of experiences of malnutrition and nutrition on indigenous children and adults has already been told. It gained the attention of the mainstream media in 2013 after Mosby’s research and advocacy.

And this is no surprise to indigenous peoples, whose truths we must finally listen to deeply.

If you are a residential school survivor or have been affected by the residential school system and need assistance, you can contact the 24 hour residential school crisis line: 1-866-925-4419

Allison Daniel, PhD Candidate, Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.


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Hydroponics giant Hydrofarm plans new headquarters in Northern California


Becoming a publicly traded company, temporarily moving its headquarters from Petaluma to the east coast, spending $ 343 million to acquire three more companies, preparing to move back to a larger North Bay hub. It’s been a busy seven months for indoor grow equipment manufacturer and distributor Hydrofarm.

On December 14, nearly 10 million shares of Hydrofarm Holding Group began trading on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol “HYFM”, raising proceeds of $ 182.3 million, according to the annual report of the March, 31st. The company made a follow-up offer of 5.5 million shares that ended on May 3, bringing in an additional $ 309.8 million.

After peaking at $ 92 in mid-February, the stock price was $ 56.96 at the close of trading on Friday.

Then, earlier this year, Hydrofarm moved its corporate headquarters to its distribution center in the Philadelphia area. It is one of nine totaling 900,000 square feet that the 4-year-old company operates in the United States, Canada and Spain. Hydrofarm also has offices in China.

This happened because Hydrofarm was preparing a larger location elsewhere in North Bay, which it had been looking for for a few years.

Hydrofarm had planned to move its corporate headquarters from Petaluma to the 250,000 square foot Victory Station warehouse in South Sonoma, but that deal failed to materialize amid the rapidly cooling demand for real estate from the new industry. legal cannabis, according to real estate sources.

Hydrofarm could not be reached for comment on its plans for North Bay.

As cannabis became a key driver of demand for environmentally controlled agricultural products, Hydrofarm made its debut in Marin County during the catastrophic drought of 1977-1978, the Business Journal reported in 2010. Founder Stuart Dvorin has developed a water-efficient hydroponics crop that has gained traction among gardeners.

The product line has expanded to include energy efficient grow lights and germination kits. Then, Hydrofarm embarked on the manufacture and distribution of indoor gardening equipment for professional growers and hobbyists.

Today, the key markets are producers of cannabis, flowers, fruits, plants, vegetables, grains and herbs. The portfolio now includes 26 exclusive brands developed in-house with around 900 product variants under 24 patents and 60 registered trademarks. The company also owns more than 40 exclusive and preferred brands totaling 900 other storage units.

The company’s brands represent around 60% of sales. The total catalog, which contains products from more than 400 suppliers, includes more than 6,000 references.

“Our revenue mix continues to shift towards exclusive brands as we continue to innovate, improving overall margins,” says the annual report. “In addition, our revenue stream is very consistent as, according to our estimate, we believe that approximately two-thirds of our net sales are generated from the sale of recurring consumables, including growing media, nutrients and supplies. . “

Last year’s net sales were $ 342.2 million, up 45.6% from 2019. The company speculated in its annual report that public health home shelter orders in the event of a coronavirus pandemic have contributed to this increase in sales. The net income of the previous year only increased by 11.0% compared to 2018.

First quarter net sales were $ 111.4 million, up 66.5% from the previous year. The company attributed this to a 59.6% increase in the volume of products sold plus a 6.9% increase in the price and mix of these products.

As a sign of its commitment to stay in North Bay, Hydrofarm was awarded a lease earlier this year for a new 175,000 square foot distribution warehouse at 2225 Huntington Drive in Fairfield. Meanwhile, Hydrofarm founder Stuart Dvorin was preparing to sell the 110,000 square foot Petaluma main facility at 2249 S. McDowell Blvd. Extension, a $ 17.5 million deal struck on June 7.

“We also intend to move our existing distribution operations in Northern California from the existing Petaluma building to a larger distribution center nearby,” the company wrote in its annual report.

Started in Marin County in 1977 under the name Applied Hydroponics, Hydrofarm moved its headquarters to Petaluma in 1994, employing 65 people at the time. It gradually expanded to 150,000 square feet with a workforce of over 150 employees in 2010 and then to 195,000 square feet in the city in 2017. The company employed 327 full-time at all sites at the end of February. , he reported.

In 2017, Hydrofarm made a big expansion in Canada with the acquisition of the wholesale of Eddi and Greenstar Plant Products. The deal helped Hydrofarm become one of the leading suppliers of hydroponic equipment in Canada, the company said.

This year, Hydrofarm acquired three other companies. Los Angeles-area high-end nutrient maker Heavy 16 was bought for $ 78.1 million, and Humboldt County’s House & Garden brand portfolio for $ 125 million. A $ 161 million deal was announced this month for Aurora International Inc. and Gotham Properties LLC, manufacturers and suppliers of organic hydroponic products based in Oregon.

“We see mergers and acquisitions as an important driver of potential growth, as the hydroponics industry is fragmented and ready to be consolidated,” Hydrofarm wrote in its annual report.

Hydrofarm has also fertilized its C suite with insight over the past two years. In early 2019, Bill Toler arrived as CEO, bringing with him over 3 decades of senior executive experience at large consumer packaged goods companies, most recently including seven years as CEO and Chairman of Hostess. Brands. B. John Lindeman arrived as CFO in March 2020 with 25 years of experience in agriculture and finance.

Jeff Quackenbush covers wine, construction and real estate. Prior to Business Journal, he wrote for Bay City News Service in San Francisco. He graduated from Walla Walla University. Contact him at [email protected] or 707-521-4256.


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Non profit living

Stimulus Check Live Fourth Update: Can It Be Approved In June? Tax Refund, $ 3,600 Child Tax Credit Portal …

Securities:

Biden reflects on his comments on additional infrastructure spending

– The California legislature prepares to pass the $ 262.2 billion spending plan

– Bipartite bill on infrastructure approved and inclusion of a fourth dunning check (all the details)

– State unemployment data shows signs of a slow recovery in some states

Some non-profit organizations keep pushing for additional stimulus control (full details)

– More than half of the states are end federal unemployment benefits (full story)

Kentucky offers $ 1,500 back-to-work bonus

– Judge orders Indiana to continue paying unemployment benefits amid pandemic, including $ 300 Weekly UI Booster (full story)

Texas workers sue state to continue additional weekly unemployment benefit of $ 300 (full details)

White House answers questions about labor shortages caused by generous federal unemployment benefits (full story)

Fourth dunning check linked to lower retail spending (full story)

IRS threw: Child Tax Credit Update Portal and Child Tax Credit Eligibility Assistant

– The petition for recurring stimulus checks goes beyond 2.4 million signatures. Sign it here

– The IRS has confirmed that the Child tax credit payments will start July 15 (full story)

$ 10 billion fund for homeowner stimulus checks (how to apply)

– Many American taxpayers are still waiting for their tax refund (full story)

Louisiana announces it will end $ 300 unemployment compensation recall end of July, becoming the first state ruled by Democrats

Twenty-six US states, almost all led by the GOP, are early termination of supplementary unemployment insurance (full story)

– You can follow your third raise check using the IRS online Get my payment tool

Read some of our related press articles:

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International headquarters

With the closure of the Hong Kong Apple Daily, the media question the scope of the security law | Voice of America


BANGKOK – With the demise of Hong Kong’s last pro-democracy newspaper, questions remain about the future of press freedom in the city.

Apple DailyThe editor of said that with founder Jimmy Lai in prison, five executives arrested under the National Security Act and his financial assets frozen, it was impossible to continue.

The shutdown was greeted with international condemnation, especially from US President Joe Biden, who said Thursday: “Beijing must stop targeting the independent press.”

But as the final million-copy edition sold out, media analysts said the loss of Hong Kong’s last pro-democracy newspaper could impact the press scene and how journalists approach the report on certain issues.

Latest Edit: Hong Kong’s Apple Daily Ends With Million Copy Mintage

Pro-democracy newspaper prints final midnight edition after national security law case forced it into bankruptcy

On Sunday, the impact appeared to be spreading, with news website Stand News announcing that it would temporarily remove some comments and opinion pieces from its website.

Meanwhile, the South China Morning Post and online media New citizens reported that Apple Daily Columnist Fung Wai-kong, 57, was arrested Sunday evening at the airport on suspicion of foreign collusion aimed at endangering national security.

Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam said it was a journalist’s responsibility not to break national security law and denied that the Apple Daily affair was an attack on the media.

“What we are dealing with is neither a media problem nor a reporting problem. It is a suspicious act endangering national security,” Lam said in a briefing last week.

Hong Kong Managing Director Carrie Lam, right, speaks alongside Chief Secretary John Lee, center, and Police Commissioner Raymond Siu at a press conference in Hong Kong, June 25, 2021 .

EEric Wishart, co-organizer of the press freedom committee at the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents’ Club and professor of journalism at the University of Hong Kong, said: “The big question is when do you cross that line? ?

“Can an opinion piece break the law?” [Can] is quoting someone outside of Hong Kong breaking the law? It’s a big demand for journalists, ”he told VOA.

Andrew Powner, managing partner of Haldanes, a Hong Kong law firm that represents international media, said the foreign press continued to report freely, including criticism of the Hong Kong and Chinese governments.

“It would appear that international media that only quote Western critics or lawyers calling for sanctions should not be breaking (National Security Law); provided that the content of the article does not attempt to induce others to commit offenses under (law), but falls within internationally accepted standards of balanced reporting, ”Powner said via email.

Until the first judicial interpretation of the security law is reached, the “red lines” will not be known in detail, Powner said. He added that the allegations and evidence that led to the Apple Daily the arrests of executives are not yet public.

The lawyer said press freedom is guaranteed by law and that the authorities said the arrests were an “exceptional case”.

An advisor to Apple DailyThe Hong Kong founder said the Hong Kong Security Bureau alleged the newspaper violated the law in 30 articles, but failed to notify editors what they were.

A spokesperson for the Hong Kong Security Bureau told VOA earlier this week that he would not comment on the ongoing legal proceedings, but that “endangering national security is a very serious crime.”

Two Hong Kong lawmakers told VOA the law is important. It was adopted in July last year in reaction to mass anti-government protests in 2019 that often turned violent.

Eunice Yung said there were no exemptions under the legislation, adding that the executives were rightly arrested. “They have to bear the legal consequences if they break the national security law,” she said.

A woman takes a photo from the latest edition of Apple Daily as people line up to buy the newspaper in Hong Kong.
A woman takes a photo from the latest edition of Apple Daily as people line up to buy the newspaper in Hong Kong on June 24, 2021.

Yung said the Apple Daily not about freedom of the press, but acknowledged that it was difficult to draw the line.

“If you are just criticizing the law or commenting on its strength, or what the law should include, or what should be exempted, I think that’s allowed and very reasonable,” she said. But “if you ask a foreign country to sanction Hong Kong officials, that’s another story.”

Lawmaker Holden Chow expressed a similar view, saying Hong Kong would continue to have freedoms “as long as they do not go beyond the law.”

Keith Richburg, professor of journalism at the University of Hong Kong, told VOA in May that it was “disturbing” that media critical of the government were targeted in the city, with “Apple Daily and News from the stand probably on the front line.

News from the stand was founded in 2014 and describes itself as a pro-democracy news site.

During the 2019 protests, several of its reporters were injured, including journalist-turned activist Gwyneth Ho. She was one of 47 people charged with subversion under the law in February.

Ronson Chan, the deputy editor of the website, told VOA last week: “After the close of Apple Daily, half of Hong Kong people say News from the stand will be the next target.

“I haven’t heard a very clear message that we may be searched or our staff will be arrested. From my understanding of the law and the police operation, I don’t think we have a problem with our reporting, “Chan said. He added that News from the stand ” editorial policy sticks to its “state of mind” and “principles”.

The news site made a similar comment on Sunday, when it announced via its website the temporary removal of comments, editorials, blogs and reader contributions. The website said news articles and videos would not be affected.

Staff members design their layout for the latest edition of the newspaper at Apple Daily headquarters in Hong Kong on June 23, 2021.
Staff members design the layout for the latest edition of Apple Daily at the newspaper’s headquarters in Hong Kong on June 23, 2021.

News from the stand said six of its board members have resigned and the website “continues to operate and its policy and editorial work remain unchanged.”

Chan told VOA on Sunday that the website was not under pressure from the government, saying, “All measures are taken by ourselves.”

Hong Kong’s only public broadcaster, Radio Television Hong Kong (RTHK), has also come under scrutiny in recent months, with its new broadcast manager cutting popular shows for alleged bias. Journalists were fired and Lam received his own television segment, a move criticized as propaganda by critics.

Wider impact

Mark Simon, Lai’s assistant at Next Digital – the parent company of Apple Daily – declared that the repression of the media would have a “lasting impact”.

“You can’t have political prisoners, you can’t shut down the media, you can’t grab private property and be an international financial center; that doesn’t happen, ”Simon told VOA last week.

Self-proclaimed “Global City of Asia”, Hong Kong has long had a reputation as a global financial hub.

But with scenes of protesters, tear gas and riot police during protests in 2019, that reputation has taken a hit. Add the National Security Law last year, and international companies are considering their options.

Political analyst Joseph Chen, formerly from Hong Kong and now in Australia, cited a recent investigation into how changes in the region were affecting the city’s international status.

When the Hong Kong American Chamber of Commerce, a leading trade organization, surveyed its members, 42% said they were considering leaving. Of the 300 members who responded, the most widely shared concern was about the National Security Act.

“Apparently, many multinational companies in Hong Kong are planning to scale down their operations and expand their operations to other cities in Asia, such as Singapore and Tokyo,” Chen said. “I think these trends will hurt Hong Kong’s economy for the foreseeable future.”

The security law has certainly affected Apple Daily. The newspaper sold out after 26 years, and two of the five executives were denied bail. A hearing is scheduled for August 13.

Some information for this report is from The Associated Press.


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History organization

InclusionNado continues its work of equity in Coronado


InclusionNado is cfailed to help Coronado schools achieve their goal of provide safe and supportive schools for all students. Buy a lawn sign from their website and publicly show your support for their cause. inclusionado.org

– Publicity –

The local community organization InclusioNado has spent the past year working to build awareness, acceptance and action for greater inclusion in schools in Coronado. After the summer 2020 protests, InclusioNado was formed by a group of students, parents and community members committed to helping schools in Coronado achieve their goal of provide safe and supportive schools for all students. Even if InclusionNado is run by volunteers, the organization became a registered nonprofit in December 2020 to facilitate fundraising.

InclusioNado has partnered with local visual storyteller Brad Willis to produce a series of videos, Uncomfortable conversations with a black mom. These videos provide candid conversations about fairness with members of our Coronado community. Themes include motherhood and immigration which incorporate a unique perspective from Coronado. Uncomfortable conversations can be viewed on https://www.inclusionado.org/conversations/

– Publicity –

Louise Erdrich’s “The Game of Silence” is a book by InclusionNado reviewed and placed in the Small Libraries around Coronado.

As part of its educational initiative, InclusioNado launched a Little Free Library program to donate and distribute books on diversity themes to the Little Free Libraries around Coronado. These book choices (designated by an InclusioNado label on the cover and spine of the book) include Ninth room by Jewel Parker Rhodes, Uncomfortable conversations with a black man by Emmanuel Acho, and The game of silence by Louise Erdich. Reviews of these books along with specific discussion questions are posted on the InclusionNado website at https://www.inclusionado.org/little-library-book-reviews/

InclusionNado has also developed a catalog of book and film resources for people to learn about diversity and inclusion. Recommended books are listed for elementary school through high school, and suggested films are rated for youth and adults. Most of the movies are available at the library or on YouTube. Recommended resources are listed on the InclusionNado website at https://www.inclusionado.org/books-and-films/

Black History Month flyer created by InclusioNado.

To celebrate February’s Black History Month, InclusionNado has created a list of Black History Books and Movies. The leaflet recommended books for elementary, middle and high school students. The recommended films are intended for all age groups, but are aimed specifically at those with children. The Black History Month flyer was distributed to schools in Coronado and the Coronado Public Library.

On their first anniversary, InclusioNado organized a silent march around Coronado schools for supporters to show their continued commitment to advancing inclusion within the Coronado community. Recent events validate the importance of InclusionNado’s ongoing work.

Community members can show their support for InclusioNado and for diversity in Coronado by purchasing a lawn sign from the InclusionNado website: https://www.inclusionado.org/contact-us/


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Canadian army

Change of command ceremony inaugurates new cadet leadership


“These young women and men are our future Canadian leaders,” said the lieutenant-colonel. Shaun O’Leary

A virtual change of command ceremony took place today at Canadian Forces Base Borden with the province’s new chief of cadets at the helm.

The Regional Cadet Support Unit (RCSU-Center), which is responsible for the cadet program in Ontario, welcomed a new commander on Friday, who will assume regional leadership of one of the best youth development programs in Canada. .

Lt.-Col. Shaun O’Leary, a long-time member of the Canadian Forces, who was recently assigned to an adult training role at the Canadian Army Doctrine and Training Center in Kingston, will bring extensive experience to the position, which focuses on the development of leadership, citizenship and community service skills among young Canadians.

“I sincerely believe in the Canadian Cadet Organization and am honored to play a role in this organization focused on developing the qualities of citizenship and leadership in youth, promoting a healthy lifestyle and stimulating an interest in the maritime, military and air activities of the Canadian Armed Forces, ”said Lieutenant-Colonel. O’Leary. “These young women and men are our future Canadian leaders.

O’Leary succeeds Lieutenant Colonel. Barry Leonard, who is leaving after two years to take up a diplomatic post at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC

Leonard has held the position for the past 15 months of the COVID-19 pandemic, a very difficult time that has seen the region’s approximately 280 corps and squadrons, including nearly 17,000 cadets, successfully transitioning from what is traditionally an in-person program towards an almost entirely virtually one-to-one program.

Due to current COVID-19 restrictions, this change of command ceremony went virtually.

As RCSU-Central has nearly 20,000 members (adults and youth / cadets) spread across the vast province of Ontario, the virtual adaptation also allowed more audience members to attend than during the ‘a traditionally in-person event.


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International headquarters

Hydroponics giant Hydrofarm plans new headquarters in Northern California after IPO, 3 acquisitions


Becoming a publicly traded company, temporarily moving its headquarters from Petaluma to the east coast, spending $ 343 million to acquire three more companies, preparing to move back to a larger North Bay hub. It’s been a busy seven months for indoor grow equipment manufacturer and distributor Hydrofarm.

On December 14, nearly 10 million shares of Hydrofarm Holding Group began trading on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol “HYFM”, raising proceeds of $ 182.3 million, according to the annual report of the March, 31st. The company made a follow-up offer of 5.5 million shares that ended on May 3, bringing in an additional $ 309.8 million.

After peaking at $ 92 in mid-February, the stock price was $ 56.96 at the market close on Friday.

Earlier this year, Hydrofarm moved its corporate headquarters to its distribution center in the Philadelphia area. It is one of nine totaling 900,000 square feet that the 4-year-old company operates in the United States, Canada and Spain. Hydrofarm also has offices in China.

This happened because Hydrofarm was preparing a larger location elsewhere in North Bay, which it had been pursuing for a few years.

Hydrofarm had planned to move its headquarters from Petaluma to the 250,000-square-foot warehouse at Victory Station in South Sonoma, but that deal did not materialize amid the rapid cooling of demand for real estate in the New Zealand. legal cannabis industry, according to real estate sources.

Hydrofarm could not be reached for comment on its plans for North Bay.

As cannabis has emerged as a key driver of demand for environmentally controlled agricultural products, Hydrofarm made its debut in Marin County during the catastrophic drought of 1977-1978, the Business Journal reported in 2010. gardeners.

The product line has expanded to include energy efficient grow lights and germination kits. Then Hydrofarm began manufacturing and distributing indoor gardening equipment for professional growers and hobbyists.

Today, the key markets are producers of cannabis, flowers, fruits, plants, vegetables, grains and herbs. The portfolio now includes 26 exclusive brands developed in-house with around 900 product variants under 24 patents and 60 registered trademarks. The company also owns more than 40 exclusive and preferred brands totaling 900 other storage units.

The company’s brands represent around 60% of sales. The total catalog, which contains products from more than 400 suppliers, includes more than 6,000 references.

“Our revenue mix continues to shift towards exclusive brands as we continue to innovate, improving overall margins,” says the annual report. “In addition, our revenue stream is very consistent as, according to our estimate, we believe that approximately two-thirds of our net sales are generated from the sale of recurring consumables, including growing media, nutrients and supplies. . “

Last year’s net sales were $ 342.2 million, up 45.6% from 2019. The company speculated in its annual report that public health home shelter orders in the event of a coronavirus pandemic have contributed to this increase in sales. The net turnover for the previous year only increased by 11.0% compared to 2018.

First quarter net sales were $ 111.4 million, up 66.5% from the previous year. The company attributed this to a 59.6% increase in the volume of products sold and a 6.9% increase in the price and mix of these products.

As a sign of its commitment to stay in North Bay, Hydrofarm was awarded a lease earlier this year for a new 175,000 square foot distribution warehouse at 2225 Huntington Drive in Fairfield. Meanwhile, Hydrofarm founder Stuart Dvorin was preparing to sell the 110,000 square foot Petaluma main facility at 2249 S. McDowell Blvd. Extension, a $ 17.5 million deal struck on June 7.

“We also intend to move our existing distribution operations in Northern California from the existing Petaluma building to a larger distribution center nearby,” the company wrote in its annual report.

Started in Marin County in 1977 as Applied Hydroponics, Hydrofarm moved its headquarters to Petaluma in 1994, employing 65 people at the time. It gradually expanded to 150,000 square feet there with a workforce of over 150 employees in 2010, and then to 195,000 square feet in the city in 2017. The company employed 327 full-time across all sites in at the end of February, he reported.

In 2017, Hydrofarm made a big expansion in Canada with the acquisition of the wholesale of Eddi and Greenstar Plant Products. The deal helped Hydrofarm become one of the leading suppliers of hydroponics equipment in Canada, the company said.

This year, Hydrofarm acquired three other companies. Los Angeles-area high-end nutrient maker Heavy 16 was bought for $ 78.1 million, and Humboldt County’s House & Garden brand portfolio for $ 125 million. A $ 161 million deal was announced this month for Aurora International Inc. and Gotham Properties LLC, manufacturers and suppliers of organic hydroponic products based in Oregon.

“We see mergers and acquisitions as an important driver of potential growth, as the hydroponics industry is fragmented and ready to be consolidated,” Hydrofarm wrote in its annual report.

Hydrofarm has also fertilized its C suite with insight over the past two years. In early 2019, Bill Toler arrived as CEO, bringing with him over 3 decades of senior executive experience at large consumer packaged goods companies, most recently including seven years as CEO and Chairman of Hostess. Brands. B. John Lindeman arrived as CFO in March 2020 with 25 years of experience in agriculture and finance.

Jeff Quackenbush covers wine, construction and real estate. Prior to Business Journal, he wrote for Bay City News Service in San Francisco. He graduated from Walla Walla University. Contact him at [email protected] or 707-521-4256.


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Canadian army

Sajjan’s office drops army reservist suspended by Vancouver police for inappropriate relationship


Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan has separated from an Army reservist who was suspended from the Vancouver Police Department for having an inappropriate relationship with a subordinate.

Major Greg McCullough has been hired at Brigade Headquarters in British Columbia as a Special Ministerial Liaison. He was laid off Thursday and returned to his unit for a new assignment.

“As of June 24, 2021, Major McCullough is no longer employed as military assistant to the Minister of National Defense,” Dan Le Bouthillier, head of media relations at the Department of National Defense, said in a brief statement to media.

“He is currently employed by the Army Reserve in Vancouver for other duties.

A spokesperson for the minister told The Canadian Press earlier this week that neither Sajjan nor his staff were aware of the complaint against McCullough or the disciplinary action taken against him while he was a sergeant in the Vancouver Police Department. .

McCullough was hired in the minister’s office in July 2020.

Sajjan and McCullough share a story. Prior to entering politics, Sajjan commanded the Army Reserve Unit in which McCullough served – the British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own). They were also both members of the Vancouver Police Department.

Asked about the relationship between the two, Sajjan spokesman Daniel Minden said, “The minister did not work with Major McCullough of the Vancouver Police Department. They had met while they were away. reservists in the British Columbia Regiment “.

Until Thursday, Sajjan had six military assistants, all of whom worked closely with the minister’s office to provide a wide variety of support.

Conservatives say they are not giving up

McCullough had been tasked as a liaison officer and flagman to help establish secure communications whenever the minister was in the area.

Opposition Tories – who first asked questions about McCullough on Wednesday, the last day of the House of Commons spring session – have vowed not to let go, despite the sacking.

“Once again, Minister Sajjan is showing Canadians that he only acts when he is caught doing the wrong thing,” said Conservative defense critic James Bezan.

“Not only has Minister Sajjan turned a blind eye to the allegations of sexual misconduct against General Vance, but he has also done so in his own office. There are still a number of questions regarding the hiring of Major McCullough. “

According to the Department of Defense, McCullough was one of two candidates who applied for the liaison post and was considered the most qualified.

Fifteen-day suspension

It has been widely reported in Vancouver in recent years that McCullough was given a 15-day suspension from the police department after an external investigation found he had not disclosed a relationship with the policeman. Nicole Chan.

British Columbia’s Office of the Police Complaints Commissioner did not name McCullough in its 2018-2019 annual report, but requested a five-day suspension for a police officer who was involved in a personal relationship and intimate with a policeman. who was under his direct supervision and that the relationship was not disclosed to his supervisor.

The OPCC report also noted that the same policeman had formed a relationship with another policeman knowing that this policeman was in a vulnerable state; the watchdog recommended a 10-day suspension, to be served simultaneously.

The commissioner noted that the police officer had cooperated with the investigation and had sought professional help.

According to local media, McCullough retired from the police force in 2018.

Chan also had a relationship with another senior officer who was later fired from the Vancouver Police Department. She committed suicide in January 2019.


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History organization

Town of Lacey chooses new police chief


Proposed by Town of Lacey

Lacey City Manager Scott Spence announced today that Robert “Bob” Almada has accepted the city’s offer to become Lacey’s next Chief of Police. The announcement follows a nationwide search and comprehensive selection process carried out with Public Sector Search & Consulting. Almada will be the eighth chef in the department’s 54-year history and will be a key member of the management team. Almada will report directly to Mr. Spence.

“Over the past year, Bob has easily and successfully overcome a number of challenges while serving as Interim Chief of Police for Lacey,” said Spence. “Additionally, during his career in law enforcement, he has held various positions and gained a diverse knowledge base and skills that will benefit this organization and the community. I am extremely confident that he will be an effective police chief, a member of the community and an integral part of the city. “

Almada will assume the role of Police Chief of Lacey effective July 1, 2021. Almada has served as Acting Chief of Police since Chief Semko retired in April 2020. Almada was originally hired in October 2019 to serve as Chief of Lacey’s Deputy Police. Prior to Lacey, Almada spent 28 years with the Santa Monica Police Department (SMPD). He started in 1991 as a patrol officer and reached the rank of captain in 2017. While in SMPD, Almada oversaw special operations as well as general police operations, and was responsible for the planning, community affairs and emergency services unit.

Almada holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from California State University, Long Beach and a Masters of Public Administration in Public Sector Management from California State University, Northridge. Additionally, Almada was a member of the inaugural class of the Executive Leadership Institute (ELI) presented by the California Police Chiefs Association and has a Graduate Certificate in Leadership from the Drucker School of Management at the University of Claremont.

“I am truly touched and excited to be a part of the future of the Lacey Police Department and the Lacey community,” Almada said. “I look forward to continuing to serve in this new capacity. “

Police Chief Lacey oversees a department of 77 employees, including 61 commissioned officers. In addition, this position is responsible for an annual budget of approximately $ 13,600,000. The Chief of Police is responsible for public safety services and active crime prevention programs for the benefit of residents and businesses of Lacey.

Spence expressed his sincere gratitude to community members who participated in the Police Chiefs selection process by providing questions to the Chief Police Finalists Community Forum and to community members who served on the Community Interview Panel. . “I am grateful that, even with the ongoing pandemic, we were able to actively involve the community in this process,” said Spence.


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International headquarters

USA Luge presents new starting facility on Olympic Day | News, Sports, Jobs


USA Luge’s head office is located on Church Street in Lake Placid. (Corporate photos – Andy Flynn)

LAKE PLACID – Officials from America’s Luge and the International Luge Federation (FIL) made two important announcements Thursday as part of the state’s Olympic Regional Development Authority’s one-day tour of the facilities locations where athletes train for the Olympics.

In order to celebrate Olympic Day, which was Wednesday, stops were also made at the American Olympic and Paralympic Center and the Mount Van Hoevenberg Olympic Sports Complex, where VIPs and media met with athletes, coaches and managers in the sports of luge, bobsleigh, skeleton, biathlon and Nordic skiing.

Showcasing the newly renovated USA Luge headquarters on Church Street, Claire DelNegro, FIL vice president of artificial sports track, announced that Lake Placid will host a World Cup on December 4-5. It will be the first time in two years that the combined track of Mount Van Hoevenberg has hosted a World Cup; Luge and bobsleigh / skeleton competitions were canceled last winter due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“We are happy to see all the improvements happening here” said DelNegro, who competed in luge for Great Britain at the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. “I would like to invite you all to come and see the toboggan in person on the track. It’s a very exciting sport, and I think you will all become big, big fans.

It was also announced that luge athletes will use Plattsburgh International Airport this winter for the first time. After competing in the World Cup in Whistler, Canada, the entire circuit will travel to Plattsburgh ahead of the Lake Placid World Cup and depart from the same airport as they will head to Europe for the next leg of the tour.

USA Luge Director of Marketing and Sponsorship Gordy Sheer speaks with a host of personalities and media during their Olympic Day visit to USA Luge’s headquarters in Lake Placid on Thursday. (Corporate photos – Andy Flynn)

Thursday’s visit to USA Luge headquarters comes more than a year after an open house was canceled to unveil improvements due to the pandemic. Although it was not an open house, personalities and the media were invited to visit officials such as Jim Leahy, CEO of USA Luge, Gordy Sheer, Director of Marketing and Sponsorship and Mark Grimmette, director of sports programs.

The state’s $ 5 million upgrade reshaped the corporate headquarters. The original 8,400 square foot building was constructed in 1991 and the renovated 15,000 square foot building was completed in 2020. It now includes more office space, a fabrication shop to build sleds inside (instead of under a tent outside the old building), equipment rooms and a state-of-the-art refrigerated start-up facility.

“There is nothing like this installation in the world, and we are extremely proud” said Léahy. “It’s not just for our current athletes, but it’s for athletes for generations to come. Here we have a world class facility with world class work rooms, world class training at the Olympic Training Center. We have added a weight room. So we have all the resources here to ensure the success of our athletes.

The new starting track features two 230-foot ice ramps with four different angles, two down and two up. It is longer than the previous single start ramp, which only allowed athletes to remove the handles and paddle on the ice; that left no room for them to settle into the sled, which is an important part of training. The new ramps are long enough for athletes to get into their sleds. When they finish at the first ramp, they simply head to the second for another descent onto the ice.

Two-time Olympian Summer Britcher said she didn’t realize what she was missing until the new facility opened.

The new departure facility at USA Luge headquarters in Lake Placid has two ramps. (Corporate photos – Andy Flynn)

“This new facility is phenomenal. We are very grateful ”, Britcher said. “The longer ramps we have allow us to get the most out of our paddle training, and the ability to get into the sled is huge. For me personally, I have a very powerful pulling part at the start, but I was a bit weaker on the paddle aspect.

When state funding for USA Luge upgrades was announced in 2016, Empire State Development officials also said they would include $ 1 million for marketing, especially for television. World Cup events in Lake Placid.

“One of the things we need to do is provide a TV signal to host the World Cup races here in the United States”, Sheer said. “And New York State was kind enough to help us fund this … by putting out this signal for the rest of the world to see.”

USA Luge athletes began training for their next Olympic season on their new starting ramps in early May. The team are expected to train in Whistler and Europe in September, return to Lake Placid to train in October, and spend three weeks training on the Olympic track at the Yanqing Sliding Center outside of Beijing in November before the start of the World Cup season in November. 20-21.

The World Cup tour then heads to North America for two stops, Whistler and Lake Placid, before heading to Altenberg, Germany, and Igls, Austria, in December. After the Christmas holidays, the tour continues at four European stops: Königssee, Germany; Sigulda, Latvia; Oberhof, Germany; and St. Moritz, Switzerland.

USA Luge CEO Jim Leahy, right, chats with former Olympic sports complex manager Tony Carlino on Thursday during a tour of the newly renovated USA Luge headquarters in Lake Placid. (Corporate photos – Andy Flynn)

The 2022 Winter Olympics will be held February 4-20 in Beijing, China.

USA Luge CEO Jim Leahy, far right, greets a crowd of VIPs and media on Thursday at the newly renovated USA Luge headquarters in Lake Placid. (Corporate photos – Andy Flynn)

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Canadian army

US Army Corps plans full review of Enbridge Line 5 tunnel plan


The US Army Corps of Engineers said on Wednesday it would conduct a thorough review of Enbridge Energy’s plan to build an oil pipeline tunnel under a Great Lakes channel in Michigan, which could significantly delay the project.

The tunnel would house the replacement of part of Enbridge’s Line 5 that crosses the bottom of the Straits of Mackinac, a waterway of approximately 6.4 kilometers connecting Lake Huron and Lake Michigan.

The Michigan Department of the Environment, Great Lakes and Energy has issued a permit for the $ 500 million tunnel, but Army Corps approval is also required. The federal agency would examine the potential effects on the straits and adjacent wetlands.

The Corps could have contented itself with a tailor-made examination of the tunnel’s needs and objectives before making its decision. But he opted for an environmental impact study, which involves a more complete study, including the examination of reasonable alternatives.

“Most appropriate level of examination”

“I have concluded that an EIA is the most appropriate level of review due to the potential for impacts significantly affecting the quality of the human environment,” said Jaime A. Pinkham, Acting Deputy Secretary of the army for civil engineering work.

Thousands of comments from the public and native tribes warranted further investigation, Pinkham said, adding that navigating the busy shipping channel was also a consideration.

Enbridge had pledged to complete the tunnel by 2024, but “is evaluating the schedule” in light of the government’s decision, which will delay construction, spokesman Ryan Duffy said.

“Placing a pipeline in a new Great Lakes tunnel will provide additional levels of safety and environmental protection and will make what is currently a safe pipeline even safer, while creating jobs in Michigan and securing the energy needed by consumers in Michigan and the region, ”said Enbridge.

The Canadian company, based in Calgary, Alta., Struck a deal in 2018 with former Republican Gov. Rick Snyder to build the tunnel. He intervened under pressure from area tribes, tourism companies and environmental groups to shut down Line 5, which carries petroleum and natural gas liquids between Superior, Wisconsin and Sarnia, Ontario.

Criticisms of the project “encouraged”

Critics argue that the submarine section – two parallel pipes laid in 1953 – is vulnerable to a spill that could pollute hundreds of kilometers of water and shoreline.

Enbridge, backed by industry and labor groups, says it is in good condition and has never leaked.

Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer ordered Line 5’s submarine lines shut down in mid-May, a deadline the company ignored. Legal action is pending in the Federal Court. Canada, which has called the continued operation of the pipeline “non-negotiable,” is pushing the Biden administration to intervene.

The proposed tunnel is a separate regulatory issue. In addition to the Army Corps, Enbridge is also awaiting approval from the Michigan Public Service Commission.

“We are encouraged to see that the Army Corps of Engineers has responded to our call to undertake a more rigorous analysis” of the project, said Whitney Gravelle, president of the Indian community of Bay Mills. The tribe, which has treaty-guaranteed fishing rights in the straits, “is very concerned that the pipeline threatens our way of life,” she said.

Drilling through bedrock and soils under the straits would violate many environmental protection laws, said David Holtz of Oil and Water Don’t Mix, an anti-Line 5 coalition.

“It’s hard to imagine how the Enbridge tunnel project can survive the kind of in-depth, independent assessment that is now possible with today’s Army Corps decision,” Holtz said.

Enbridge said it would continue to work with the Corps on its review of the company’s claim “and toward a successful conclusion of this process.”


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Non profit living

BizWest honors healthcare professionals with Health Care Heroes awards – Greeley Tribune

BizWest on Thursday recognized the contributions of healthcare workers and organizations to the well-being of the Boulder Valley and northern Colorado areas with the 2021 Health Care Heroes Awards.

The following people and groups represent the winners and finalists in the various Health Care Heroes categories:

Public Service

Honors an individual or organization – inside or outside of healthcare – for their leadership focused on a particular healthcare problem or need. The applications were assessed on criteria such as the impact on health care in the community and how they met a need that might not otherwise have been met.

  • Winner: Sunrise Community Health
  • Finalist: H2 Fabrication
  • Finalist: Noëlle Rodriguez

Distinguished service

Honors a healthcare administrator who has demonstrated leadership excellence within their organization during COVID-19. Candidates were assessed on the leadership provided during the pandemic, ensuring worker safety, quality patient care, and immunizations for the community.

  • Winner: Lauren Shimp, Columbine West Health & Rehab Facility
  • Finalist: Fred Pitzl, Good Samaritan Society Fort Collins Village
  • Finalist: SCL Health Good Samaritan Medical Center

COVID-19 frontline nurse

Honors a nurse who has demonstrated excellence, dedication and perseverance in meeting the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. Candidates were assessed on their performance during the pandemic, going beyond their usual duties and responsibilities.

  • Winner: Joel Bitler, Columbine Health Systems
  • Finalist: Cheryl Baum, New Mercer Commons ALF / Columbine Health Systems
  • Finalist: Amy Provopulos, UCHealth Mountain Crest

Healthcare innovator / researcher

Honors a person or organization for an innovation in medical technology or research. Priority was given to breakthroughs that contributed to testing, treatment, safety gear or vaccines against COVID-19.

  • Winner: Michael Lindsey, Thermal Strike Ranger
  • Finalist: UCHealth
  • Finalist: Banner Innovation Group

COVID-19 frontline health worker

Honors an individual who has demonstrated excellence, dedication and perseverance in meeting the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, including doctors, paramedics, paramedics and emergency service personnel and others. Candidates were assessed on their performance during the pandemic, going beyond their usual duties and responsibilities.

  • Winner: Jennifer Hogestad, UCHealth
  • Finalist: Rebecca Jackson, Columbine Health Systems
  • Finalist: Mo Lyons, Banner Health

Mental Health Provider of the Year

Recognizes a mental health care provider who has positively impacted their organization and / or patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Candidates were assessed on their performance during the pandemic, going beyond their usual duties and responsibilities.

  • Winner: Alicia Milar, SummitStone Health Partners
  • Finalist: Janina Fariñas, La Cocina
  • Finalist: Adena Kling, Longmont United Hospital Centura

COVID-19 Healthcare Allies Award

Honor someone outside of mainstream health care who excelled during the COVID-19 pandemic, including firefighters, law enforcement, and representatives of civic and non-profit organizations. Applicants were assessed on how well the person went beyond their normal duties to support healthcare workers and the community at large.

  • Winner: Foothills Unitar Church
  • Finalist: AMR
  • Finalist: UCHealth Northern Colorado Foundation

Nursing and Assisted Living Facility of the Year

Recognizes the best nursing and assisted living facility or group in the region. Applicants were assessed based on their response to the COVID-19 pandemic and how they prioritized the physical, mental and emotional well-being of patients.

  • Winner: Good Samaritan Society Fort Collins Village
  • Finalist: Garden Square at Westlake Assisted Living
  • Finalist: Tamara Gebhardt, New Mercer Commons ALF / Columbine Health Systems

COVID-19 support worker

Includes non-physician and non-nurse members of the multidisciplinary team, such as physician assistants, CNAs, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, medical imaging, researchers, technicians, etc. beyond their usual tasks and responsibilities.

  • Winner: Gloria Gonzalez-Engle, Boulder Community Health
  • Finalist: Jeremiah Martinez, Boulder Community Health – Sterile Treatment Service
  • Finalist: Marilyn Schaefer, UCHealth Greeley Hospital

Volunteer Award

Recognizes an unpaid volunteer for service in a health care organization. Applicants were assessed on criteria such as seniority, impact on the organization and how well they met a need that might not have been met otherwise.

  • Winner: Mark Meyer, Boulder Community Health
  • Finalist: Emily Kemme, UCHealth
  • Finalist: Fuerza Latina

BizWest has received over 100 nominations for the Health Care Heroes program. The judges included Gene Haffner, Julie Johnson Haffner, Charlie Harms, George Hayes, Joel Montbriand and Ron Secrist, all veterans of the healthcare or nonprofit sectors.

Health Care Heroes was sponsored by Anthem BC / BS, H2 Manufacturing Solutions and The Weld Trust. A healthcare coalition that included Boulder Community Health, Centura Health Avista Adventist Hospital, Columbine Health Systems, Good Samaritan Society Communities of Northern Colorado, and SCL Health Good Samaritan Medical Center also contributed.

© 2021 BizWest Media LLC

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History organization

The AIDS activism of the past still has lessons for us today


As a gay man who grew up after the worst of the AIDS crisis, I was moved by the volume. It allowed me to connect with my queer ancestors – the dead and the survivors – like never before.

The 700-page tome is a strengthening addition to an area of ​​ongoing research and testimony in the history of AIDS, a fix to previous accounts that have elevated some perspectives over others and only clung to to a handful of numbers.

Based on nearly two decades of interviews with nearly 200 members of the AIDS organization ACT UP (the Coalition Against AIDS to Unlock Power), “Let the Record Show” works as a oral history and a brief. Schulman herself was a grassroots member of ACT UP from 1987 to 1992, during which time, as she puts it, “a despised group of people” came together to “force our country to change against their will. “.

The book is also a plan. In fact, its main goal, writes Schulman, “is not to look back with nostalgia, but rather to help contemporary and future activists learn the lessons of the past so that they can organize themselves more effectively in the past. present ”.

ACT UP was successful in part because it used a variety of creative and mind-blowing direct action efforts – like the legendary Stop the Church demonstration – to demand the attention of a society that let down people with AIDS.

To examine ACT UP’s history and enduring legacy, I spoke with Schulman on the racial and social justice movements that shaped ACT UP, the misrepresentations of the group and the lingering trauma of the AIDS crisis.

The following conversation has been edited slightly for length and clarity.

One thing that “Let the Record Show” does is combat the fact that people tend to have a distorted version of the ACT UP story. What is this distorted version?

Americans are trained to believe in the structure of John Wayne – the heroic white individual – where one guy comes in and saves everyone. But it’s not even good in the movies.

In real life, change comes from community, from forming coalitions, some kind of collectivity of people who decide they need change.

Thus, the story of ACT UP has been limited to a handful of individuals, some of whom have done incredible work and are heroic. But to tell activists today that you can transform a whole paradigm with four or five people would be misleading them.

In this book, I speak of 140 of the hundreds of people who created this movement and dedicated their lives to it.

Could you talk about the racial and social justice movements that many ACT UP members have come from and how these movements have influenced the group at large?

ACT UP was a predominantly white gay organization, but it was not a exclusively Organization of white gay men. And that’s a really significant difference. There were so many kinds of influences from so many different communities and individuals. I can break it down into three parts.

The first is that the women and people of color in ACT UP tended to come from earlier political movements. There were older white gay men who came from the gay liberation movement. But many young white homosexuals had never been politically active before. Thus, people from the feminist movement for women’s health, the women’s peace movement, the reproductive rights movement, the Latin American student movement, CORE (the Congress of Racial Equality) and the Black Panthers have had a huge impact on ACT UP.

The second area of ​​influence was that a lot of ACT UP members were born in the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s. I was born in the 50’s. So as gay kids we had no idea what to do with it. ‘a homosexual community or movement. But we’ve seen Black Resistance on TV and in Life and Jet magazines. We watched footage of blacks standing up to police, sitting at lunch counters, and using creative, non-violent civil disobedience. It had a huge impact on us. I think there was an internalization and identification that took place, because when I was researching the book I came back and reread Martin Luther King’s “Letter from Birmingham Prison” Jr., in which he explains what direct action is. And I realized that was exactly what ACT UP was doing, even though we didn’t realize it at the time.

The third area is that the Monday night meetings at the Lesbian and Gay Center, where there are said to be between 300 and 700 people, were predominantly white and male. Yet many of those in attendance, including many white gay men, were also part of other coalitions with more diverse communities. They worked with homeless people, drug addicts, HIV positive women, HIV positive prisoners, HIV positive mothers, with the Haitian community.

And so, by extension, ACT UP was really part of a huge coalition and served a very wide range of people.

People have often seen the late writer and AIDS activist Larry Kramer as a leader of ACT UP. But part of your book aims to move away from the idea that there was never a single definitive leader of the group.

I interviewed 188 surviving ACT UP members over 18 years, and no one thinks Larry Kramer was the leader of ACT UP. It was a media creation, because he was someone who fit that image of John Wayne, albeit the gay version, and the media at the time was all white and male. The private sector was entirely white and male. The government was all white and male. And the homosexuals who were part of this power apparatus were mostly in the closet.

When these structures watched ACT UP, they tended to see men who looked like them: Ivy League graduates and some type of social background. But there were a lot of other white gay men in ACT UP doing all kinds of work that was never historized. For example, the organization for the housing of the homeless with AIDS, or the people who worked to legalize the exchange of needles in New York.

And then there were a lot of unrecognized women, straight women like Karine Timour, who single-handedly organized this five-year campaign to gain access to insurance for more than 500,000 people living with HIV.

There was an Asian Pacific Islander Caucus, and these members would go to Asian gay bars and do safe sex education using red Chinese New Year lucky paper to wrap condoms for a community that doesn was processed by none of the safes. -sexual programs in the city.

The Latino Caucus was really important. There were four Latino-related committees in ACT UP, and I give the names of about 35 Latino activists in the organization. They went to Puerto Rico and started ACT UP Puerto Rico and were part of everything in the group.

There was Patricia Navarro, who was the only parent of a person with AIDS who joined ACT UP. It was a chicana of the working class of California. Her son was Ray navarro. So there was so much heroism and activity and creativity, and I really wanted people to have access to this information.

What prompted you to structure your book as a plan for activists today?

We are in such a crisis right now in the United States – with the suppression of voters, with the rise of this fanatical right-wing ideological cult in government – and there are many movements of people who are desperate for change. And there are some exciting moves. There is the movement against police violence, the Movement for Black Lives, the very important movement for immigration reform, the movement for solidarity with Palestine, the movement to democratize education.

We are in a time when people really want change, and I think the information that can help you achieve change is crucial. This is why this book is not an act of nostalgia. It’s really about looking to the future, creating a big tent policy for the types of movements that we need right now.

In June 2019, I was in New York for the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. I met a gay friend and in my sixties. He spoke of the loss of many friends to AIDS. It made me think about the lingering trauma – how little heed American society about it. How do we start this process?

That’s why I end the book with a conversation with César Carrasco, of the Latino Caucus. He’s a very deep thinker. He’s a social worker in psychiatry. He talks about the myth of resilience. This idea that if you have lived, even if your friends are dead, you are fine, and how false and fragile it is.

Many first generation AIDS survivors had various problems. Many have had lives which, as Caesar says, are meaningless, because they have been abandoned. There is no recognition of what they went through. And I hope trying to tell a bigger story can be part of that recognition.


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International headquarters

UNESCO has always been mired in politics and feuds, but that shouldn’t hurt its work


Australia’s Great Barrier Reef made international headlines this week. This was not good news for the reef, described by David Attenborough as “one of the greatest and most magnificent natural treasures the world possesses”.

A report filed by the UNESCO World Heritage Center recommended adding the reef to the list of 53 other World Heritage sites considered “endangered” – a move the Morrison government suggested was prompted by pressure policies.

The “endangered” classification is important for Australia as the reef is estimated to provide 64,000 jobs and contributes A $ 6.4 billion annually to the economy.

If the World Heritage Committee downgrades the reef as a World Heritage site, it will almost certainly hurt its attractiveness as a tourist destination and therefore Australia’s economic benefits.

But why is such a report from this United Nations agency so important? The reason is that the World Heritage Committee carries considerable weight on the world stage – and politics has indeed been an unfortunate part of its operations since its inception.

The Australian government said it was “blinded” by the UN recommendation to list the Great Barrier Reef as “endangered”.
KYDPL KYODO / AP

“Clearly, there was politics behind that”

UNESCO’s mandate to build peace through international cooperation in the fields of education, science, culture and media freedom derives from its founding principles in 1945 after the Second World War. The preamble to its constitution declares,

… Since wars begin in the minds of men, it is in the minds of men that the defenses of peace must be built.

Nations are elected to the UNESCO World Heritage Committee at a biennial conference of the 193 Member States of UNESCO. This committee has significant power – it is authorized to make decisions on behalf of the world. And while UN member states can complain about its decisions, none can challenge the committee’s independence or authority.

The current chair of the World Heritage Committee is China, which adds to the reason why Australia protested so loudly against his recommendation.

Australian Environment Minister Sussan Ley and Foreign Minister Marise Payne immediately phoned UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay in Paris to express their deep concerns. Ley said,

This decision was flawed and there was clearly politics behind it, and it thwarted the proper process.

The head of the UNESCO World Heritage Marine Program, Dr Fanny Douvere, however, pointed out that the report was a rigorous scientific document with contributions from Australia’s Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and official government reports on water quality – assessed and analyzed by a team of experts from the World Heritage Center.

Moreover, she said, work on the report began years ago and the Chinese government was “unaware” of the recommendations made.

We have yet to see how this altercation plays out, possibly at the next World Heritage Committee meeting in China in July.

How UNESCO is structured

Behind the scenes of UNESCO there is a complex interplay of international politics and UN bureaucratic processes and actions which sometimes influence the work of the agency.

I was appointed to a senior level within UNESCO from 1995 to 2005, working both in a field office and at its headquarters in Paris, and I played a central role in the attempts of the organization to reform and decentralize its operations in the early 2000s. So I have a good knowledge of the beast from within.

The first thing to realize is that there is a gap between the headquarters and the field. Almost all the attention is focused on the UNESCO Headquarters. This is where the ambassadors of the Member States have their offices and where all the important committees are based. Consequently, decisions on international conventions and actions are the responsibility of the Parisian administration.

But this is not where the most effective program action takes place – it is the work of more than 50 field offices around the world. And UNESCO’s field offices are making a real difference.

In my own work in Indonesia, as an example, we reformed the entire basic education system in the country from centralized rote learning to decentralized open classroom exploration. We have also helped the country emerge from total media censorship by helping pass legislation to ensure a free press and have built a radio network of 32 independent stations across the country trained in investigative journalism.

Headquarters provided excellent technical assistance, but the field office put on the show and found the funding.

Much of the criticism leveled at UNESCO focuses on its overly bureaucratic structure and low productivity. This criticism is largely fueled by the attention to what is happening at headquarters in Paris, and not in the field offices in places like New Delhi, Jakarta and Maputo.



Read more: The Australian government has been “blinded” by the UN recommendation to place the Great Barrier Reef in danger. But it’s not a big surprise


Member States withdrawing funding

The second thing to understand about UNESCO is that it is a “technical” agency, not a “funding” organization like, for example, the United Nations Development Program.

Because the funding depends on the Member States, this has real consequences. Sensitive political issues can anger member states, causing them to withdraw from the organization – along with their funding.

For example, after Palestine was added as a full member in 2011, the United States and Israel stopped paying their dues. The United States, which accounted for over 20% of UNESCO’s budget, accumulated some $ 600 million in unpaid dues.

The Trump administration then withdrew the United States completely from the organization after the World Heritage Committee designated the Old City of Hebron in the West Bank as a Palestinian World Heritage Site in 2017. The United States Ambassador to the United States to the West Bank UN representative Nikki Haley called the politicization of UNESCO “chronic embarrassment.”

Israel and the United States opposed the decision to designate Hebron as a Palestinian World Heritage site which was also “in danger”.
Bernat Armangue / AP

It was not the first time that the United States had withdrawn. In 1984, the Reagan administration withdrew from UNESCO amid complaints about the way it was run and what one US official, Gregory Newell, called “foreign politicization.” He decried what he perceived as

… An endemic hostility towards the institutions of a free society – especially those that protect a free press, free markets and, most importantly, individual human rights.

Bearing in mind UNESCO’s mandate

UNESCO’s listing of the Great Barrier Reef as “endangered” is at its heart a moral decision concerned with minimizing the effects of climate change and urging Member States to act.

But because it is played out at the headquarters level, there is a whiff of political commitment. It is, after all, that states play the politics of power with their members, their funding and their influence.



Read more: Is UNESCO World Heritage Status for Cultural Sites Killing What He Loves?


But the organization is so much more when you move away from the sparkle of the world’s capitals to the field. Here, the agency’s business is to build trust and connect with communities to make things happen.

This is in line with UNESCO’s mandate, which is important to remember when attention is diverted to self-serving quarrels among its members.


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History organization

Gordon to leave Fox Sports booth for daily role at Hendrick


CHARLOTTE, North Carolina – Jeff Gordon will be leaving the Fox Sports booth to take on a daily role at Hendrick Motorsports as Vice President and Second Line Manager of Majority Owner Rick Hendrick’s team.

Wednesday’s announcement positions the four-time champion and Hall of Famer to one day succeed Hendrick, 71, atop NASCAR’s most successful organization.

Gordon will officially begin the executive leadership role in early 2022.

“Jeff and I have been talking about this for many years and I think it’s a natural evolution for him and our business,” said Hendrick. “He understands our culture, our values ​​and the importance we place on our people and our partnerships. I couldn’t be more excited to work hand in hand with him and cement together the future of Hendrick Motorsports. “

Gordon joined Hendrick Motorsports for the last Cup race of the 1992 season and launched one of the greatest careers in NASCAR history. He won 93 races – third on the all-time list – and four Cup titles before retiring in 2015.

A d

He joined the Fox Sports booth the following year, but maintained an active role with the team as Hendrick’s only partner in organizing the championship on 13 occasions. Gordon became a shareholder of Hendrick in 1999 and was listed as a part-owner of the No. 48 car when it was created in 2001 for seven-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson.

“I can’t express what Hendrick Motorsports means to me,” Gordon said. “This is my home and the people here are my family. I have never lost my passion for organization, for our sport and for the simple challenge of running and winning at the highest level.

Gordon has also been active in bringing Kyle Larson into the Hendrick organization this year following Larson’s most-season-long NASCAR suspension for uttering a racial slur during a virtual race. Larson has been on the winning streak in four consecutive Cup races and leads the Cup series with four wins on points. The Hendrick drivers have won six consecutive races since the May 16 victory at Dover by Alex Bowman, who took over the No.48 this season after Johnson’s switch to IndyCar.

A d

“I have always been impressed by his commercial instinct. At some level, he’s been involved in every major decision we’ve made over the past two decades, and his influence has grown steadily since he quit driving, ”said Hendrick, who is also CEO of Hendrick Automotive Group, on Gordon.

As Vice President and Co-Owner, Gordon will work with the team on a daily basis, focusing on the organization’s competition and marketing groups. He will report to Rick Hendrick and will work alongside President Marshall Carlson and Chief Executive Officer Jeff Andrews.

Gordon will also join Hendrick on the NASCAR Team Owners Council and serve as Hendrick Motorsports’ seat on the sanctioning body’s diversity, equity and inclusion committee.

“Being a part of the competition is where I’m happiest and I feel I can make the biggest contribution to the team’s continued and long-term success,” said Gordon. “Rick and I have a common vision, which is based on the values ​​he instilled, the culture he built and our desire to be the best in all categories, on and off the track.

A d

Hendrick Motorsports becomes the first NASCAR team to share their long-term succession plan. The group of owners of the best teams in the Cup are not young: Roger Penske is 84, Joe Gibbs is 80, Jack Roush is 79 and Richard Childress is 75.

Hendrick will be 72 in July; Gordon will be 50 in August.

“I love to run and compete, and Jeff is the only person I know who hates losing as much as I do,” said Hendrick. “I am feeling great physically and have no plans to go anywhere anytime soon, which is exactly why now is the right time.”

Last month, Hendrick overtook Petty Enterprises as the most successful team in NASCAR history when Larson claimed the 269th Cup victory for HMS. He has since won two more points races to bring the total to 271 wins.

Gordon will continue to work as a Fox broadcaster until the end of the year.

___

More AP auto races: https://apnews.com/hub/auto-racing and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.



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Canadian army

Harry O’Neill of Ridgetown was the inventor of the “Slider” baseball field


Harry O’Neill in 1924

As you travel through Chatham-Kent’s sporting history, there are many stories that will surprise you.

One of them concerns the “cursor”.

No, not a delicious miniature burger, we’re talking about the hard-to-touch baseball field.

Several pitchers in Major League Baseball history are well known for their slider, including David Cone, CC Sabathia, Zack Greinke, Clayton Kershaw, Rollie Fingers and Steve Carlton.

However, the land is believed to originate from Ridgetown, Ontario, invented by a man named Harry O’Neill.

Now this fact is debated. Some will attribute the pitch to Charles “Chief” Bender, others will credit George Uhle, still others will credit George Blaeholder; but in the middle of that discussion, there’s always Harry O’Neill from Ridgetown.

After high school, Harry O’Neill attended the University of Toronto and soon found himself in the Canadian military. In 1919, O’Neill helped the Canadian Expeditionary Force team win a tag team championship while playing in London, England.

After World War I, O’Neill returned to Canada and traveled to Alberta, where he won another title, this time throwing for the Medicine Hat Monarchs. His big breakthrough, however, came in 1921 when he was spotted playing for the Windsor Chicks.

In 1922, O’Neill was signed by Connie Mack to play for the Philadelphia Athletics. He made his Major League Baseball debut that year and also adapted for track and field in 1923.

It is while launching with Athletics that O’Neill would have discovered the “slider”. Pitching for batting practice, his teammates asked O’Neill to make easy pitches over the plate. Trying to pick up speed on his fastball, O’Neill adjusted his grip and his throws, although slightly slower, began to cut through the plate. When Hall of Fame Director Connie Mack came to investigate, he told O’Neill to “find out what it is and keep doing it.”

However, most of his professional career has been in the minor leagues, where he has presented his patented slider pitch in cities such as Augusta, Salt Lake City, Shreveport, Dallas, Hollywood and Boise. At Augusta, O’Neill threw a non-hitter.

If it hadn’t been for a car crash, where his hip was injured in his second season with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1923, O’Neill and his pioneering land might have had a much longer career. in the Major League.

At the end of his playing days, O’Neill spent two seasons as a minor league manager for the Salt Lake Bees in 1927 and the Boise Senators in 1928. During those years, O’Neill was known for enter training when needed. .

Upon retirement, Harry O’Neill returned to Chatham-Kent, where he worked for the Township of Howard. O’Neill died in 1969 at the age of 76, but his slider still lives in the big leagues.

Harry O’Neill working for Howard Township

By Ian Kennedy


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Non profit living

Moratorium on evictions will expire at the end of June

In Together’s offices, the association is receiving more and more calls, as a federal moratorium on evictions is due to end on June 30. “So we see a lot of fear, a lot of panic,” said Together President and CEO Michael Hornacek. According to Hornacek, the organization has seen an increased need for aid since the start of the pandemic, from food to housing and utilities. “It’s all coming to an end at the same time. And I think we’re trying to do our best to prepare to respond,” he said. Hornacek said that not only are they seeing an increase in the number of people needing help, but the requests themselves are also different. “So instead of seeing a rent request of $ 750 to pay a month’s rent, we could see six to nine months, and the request is going to be $ 6,000 to $ 9,000,” Hornacek said. worried because homeowners may again file evictions, the fallout could happen quickly. “If we evict, you know, hundreds and thousands of homes in our community, where do these people go? Can the shelter system handle this? Are they going to be on the street? Will they live in their car? “Says Hornacek. Rental assistance is available, but requests can take time. Together works with the Metro Area Continuum of Care for the Homeless. MACCH is the administrator of about 20 million dollars in federal rent assistance. Executive Director Randy McCoy said there is still about $ 15 million to be made from this federal money. However, once the landlord and tenant submit the required documents, it may still take two to three weeks for the money to come out. late or if you are not sure how you are going to pay the July rent now, start an application early to avoid any kind of market instability. housing or loss of your housing, “McCoy said. In addition to this federal money, McCoy said, there are dollars available from private philanthropy and other grants. In total, McCoy said MACCH has already provided $ 10 million in aid in 2021. “So the need is still quite strong in the Omaha community. You know, we were hoping 2021 would be less in demand, but I say it’s at least on par with what we’ve seen in 2020, if not slightly better at this point, “McCoy said. The nonprofits are hoping landlords can give tenants some time to get this done. financing and paying the rent, before you evict them. ”You don’t really see it until it’s all over, and then all of a sudden this summer, if you see more homeless people on the streets or in cars, you’ll see it, but then it’s too late, “Hornacek mentioned.

In Together’s offices, the association is receiving more and more calls, as a federal moratorium on evictions is due to end on June 30.

“So we see a lot of fear, a lot of panic,” said Together President and CEO Michael Hornacek.

According to Hornacek, the organization has seen an increased need for assistance since the start of the pandemic, from food to housing and utilities.

“It’s all coming to an end at the same time. And I think we’re trying to do our best to prepare to respond,” he said.

Hornacek said that not only are they seeing an increase in the number of people needing help, but the requests themselves are also different.

“So instead of seeing a rent request of $ 750 to pay a month’s rent, we could see six to nine months, and the request is going to be $ 6,000 to $ 9,000,” Hornacek said.

He worries, as homeowners may again file evictions, the fallout could happen quickly.

“If we evict, you know, hundreds and thousands of homes in our community, where do these people go? Can the shelter system handle this? Are they going to be on the street? Will they live in their car? Hornacek said.

Rental assistance is available, but requests can take time.

Ensemble works with the Metropolitan Area Continuum of Care for the Homeless.

MACCH is the administrator of approximately $ 20 million in federal rent assistance.

Executive Director Randy McCoy said there is still about $ 15 million to be made from that federal money.

However, once the landlord and tenant submit the required documents, it can still take two to three weeks for the money to come out.

“If you’re currently late or don’t know how you’re going to pay July rent now, start an application early to avoid any sort of housing instability or loss of your home,” McCoy said.

In addition to that federal money, McCoy said there were dollars available from private philanthropies and other grants. In total, McCoy said MACCH has already disbursed $ 10 million in aid in 2021.

“So the need is still pretty strong in the Omaha community. You know, we were hoping 2021 would be less in demand, but I’d say it’s at least on par with what we’ve seen in 2020, if not slightly higher. at this point, ”McCoy said.

Nonprofits are hoping landlords can give tenants some time to secure that financing and pay the rent, before they evict them.

“You don’t really see it until it’s all over, and then all of a sudden this summer, if you see more homeless people on the streets or in cars, you will see it, but then it’s is too late, ”Hornacek mentioned.

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History organization

Canadian Bar Association launches Indigenous toolkit for law firms


Section 3, Talent and Student Management, discusses inclusive hiring practices and the engagement of Indigenous students. And section 4 deals with law and legal traditions, explaining, for example, the difference between indigenous law and indigenous law, and providing common expressions, glossaries, dictionaries and editorial resources, as well as references to d ‘other resources.

The term “toolkit” is appropriate because of the abundance of resources it contains, explains Regehr.

“I encourage lawyers and law firms to review it,” he adds, noting that despite the wealth of information in the toolkit, it can be easily accessed depending on what the user wants to know. “Make a commitment to see this as part of your journey to reconciliation,” he says.

“The recent discovery of anonymous burials of Indigenous children in former residential schools is a stark reminder of the need to truly and urgently engage in the process of truth and reconciliation,” said Nikki Gershbain, Director of inclusion of McCarthy Tétrault. Canadian lawyer.

“This should be a priority for all law firms and legal workplaces,” she added. “The CBA Reconciliation Kit is an important step forward for the legal profession and should be a starting point for any organization wishing to embark on this important journey.


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Canadian army

Volunteers introduced vaccines to poor India after deadly COVID-19 outbreak


BENGALURU – Volunteer groups are spreading the word about sending COVID-19 vaccines to the poor and elderly in India, and transporting some to vaccination centers in rickshaws and taxis following an outbreak of infections that has killed hundreds of thousands of people.

SEEDS, an organization that provides relief from natural disasters, has focused its efforts on the poorest communities, where, it says, many lack even basic information about vaccines.

“We found that a lot of people over the age of 60 didn’t even know they could get vaccinated and protect themselves,” said co-founder Dr Manu Gupta.

SEEDS members go door-to-door in Delhi’s poorest neighborhoods and villages in North and West India, helping citizens register their details on the government vaccination portal and by transporting some of them free of charge to vaccination centers.

About 170,000 people died in April and May when a second wave of infections ravaged densely populated cities and rural India’s hinterlands, and health experts say mass vaccination is the only way to avoid further loss of life if another wave occurs.

A second NGO, Robin Hood Army, has partnered with Uber Technologies Inc to provide free rides to vaccination centers in Delhi and Mumbai.

Its co-founder, Neel Ghose, urged the government to speed up the process by carrying out its vaccination campaign among people.

“For this to be truly effective it has to be like the way we thought about polio 20 years ago, where we reached the doors of the vaccinated and not the other way around.”

The government said a door-to-door vaccination campaign against COVID-19 was not possible due to the risk of contamination and waste.

Uday Sampath report in Bangalore; Editing by Sanjeev Miglani and John Stonestreet


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International headquarters

Protecting detainees during COVID-19: Isolation centers inaugurated in Bangladesh prisons – Bangladesh


A COVID-19 outbreak in a prison can be devastating both for the prison population and prison staff. This is especially true for overcrowded facilities where the health care system is overloaded. The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) continues to support the Bangladesh Prisons Directorate to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in prison facilities.

Three COVID-19 isolation centers (a 70-bed center in Keraniganj Central Prison, a 41-bed center in Feni District 2 Prison, and a 28-bed center in Kishoreganj District 2 Prison) have recently inaugurated by His Excellency Asaduzzaman Khan, the Minister of the Interior.

These centers are the result of close cooperation between the Ministry of the Interior (MoHA), the Directorate of Prisons, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW) and the ICRC.

Elaborating on the ICRC’s support to help set up COVID-19 isolation centers in three prisons, Katja Lorenz, head of the ICRC delegation in Bangladesh, said: “Prisoners are among the most vulnerable populations facing to the coronavirus pandemic. is essential so that prisons can separate those who have caught the virus from the rest of the prison population. “

“Our support included the design and establishment of the centers and the provision of technical support to establish guidelines and implement infection prevention and control measures. We also provided basic medical and sanitary equipment as well as furniture.

Brigadier General Md Mominur Rahman Mamun, Inspector General of Prisons, said: “The Prisons Directorate has been working constantly since the start of the pandemic to develop an effective and comprehensive system to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in prisons. These constant efforts involve all staff in the Prisons Directorate, from headquarters to prison guards. “

“This work was supported by different partners (including MoHA, MoHFW and ICRC) present from the start and actively involved in various projects such as training sessions on precautionary measures against COVID-19 for prison staff , the regular distribution of personal protective equipment (PPE) in the 68 prisons and the renovation and establishment of three isolation centers for inmates with COVID-19. “

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in Bangladesh in 2020, the ICRC has worked with the Prisons Directorate to identify the most important needs in the response to the pandemic in prisons.

We have provided continued support to the Directorate of Prisons to assist both detainees and prison staff, including, in 2021, providing PPE to some prisons and at the Headquarters of the Directorate of Prisons. We are currently setting up additional assistance for the 68 prisons in Bangladesh (as requested by the Prisons Directorate) in response to the latest wave of the pandemic.


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History organization

Local schools can teach race and fight racism, no politician needed


As educators wrap up the 2020-21 school year and prepare for a “new normal” this fall, one of the tasks on the bridge is curriculum planning. Speaking with principals across the country, I have heard many concerns about state legislatures deciding how individual schools teach students about race and racism in American history and train educators on diversity. , equity and inclusion. The National Association of Heads of Secondary Schools believes that school members – educators and principals – should make decisions about curriculum and professional development, not those of state or federal Capitol buildings.

Local control is at the heart of the American education system at the primary and secondary levels. Communities within a single state vary widely, as do their needs and priorities. that’s whyour education system prioritizes school decision-making at the local level. Of course, there are standards and benchmarks that apply to all schools when it comes to the curriculum. Significant and specific commonalities, such as the subjects taught and the concepts covered, exist for good reason.

Advancing racial justice and equity

Based on my years of education experience, districts that focus on improving student outcomes and academic performance have one thing in common: they actively engage and engage their educators in in-depth conversations. on educational standards, programs and strategies. The specific content and teaching methods must be decided by and with the experts: teachers and school leaders.

Teachers know the make-up of students in a given class, and principals know the make-up of students in each grade, as well as the larger context, challenges, strengths and demographics of the school as a whole. Principals know intimately the inner workings of their buildings, the myriad personalities, strengths and weaknesses of students and staff, which children and teachers are soaring and who need more support.

Principals develop and maintain relationships with families and community members, ensure that students’ cultural backgrounds and languages ​​spoken at home are recognized and respected, and create schedules and structures that allow families to genuinely engage in school activities and decision making. What to teach and how to teach it in a way that advances students and their learning is a nuanced decision best left to those who work most closely with our students.

Critical breed theory: My Texas public school sanitized history, facilitated injustice

Creating schools that support student success goes beyond lessons. School leaders play a pivotal role in creating school cultures that honor, celebrate, affirm and defend the rich diversity of identity, culture, race, language and community that students and staff bring to the classroom. building. Principals have the power to identify racism, implement anti-racist strategies, uplift students and staff of color, and ultimately make our schools and society more inclusive and fair. .

Students during a basketball game in Goodyear, Ariz. On February 6, 2020.

The NASSP has long condemned the structural, institutional, and systemic racism that permeates all dimensions of American life, including education. As a national organization, we call on school leaders to embrace and promote racial justice and equity in education.

Fundamentally, equity is a commitment to social justice, civil rights, and human connection. This is why, in our Position Statement on Racial Justice and Equity in Education, NASSP emphasizes the essential role principals and vice-principals play in creating culturally appropriate and equitable learning environments for all students.

Politicians are not education experts

The NASSP encourages school leaders to: implement various recruitment and hiring practices; hire educators experienced in teaching about race and inequality; provide professional development that prepares teachers to deal with incidents and facilitate discussions of racism, prejudice and identity; and ensure that the program includes stories and portrayals of diverse people – including the unjust systems under which they have been oppressed and the ongoing struggles for justice.

School leaders have a responsibility to ensure that history, social studies and civic education curricula and teaching materials include accurate representations of the central role of race in history and governance. Americans, as well as the traumatic and lasting impact of slavery on our society.

Ronn Nozoe, CEO of the National Association of High School Principals

They are responsible for exploring how an anti-racist lens can be applied to the teaching of all subjects, including math and science. They have a responsibility to review disaggregated data and policies on grading, discipline and access to advanced courses with the aim of eliminating inequalities. And they have a responsibility to familiarize themselves with culturally appropriate pedagogy and to support teachers in their efforts to examine their own implicit biases and make their teaching practices more equitable and inclusive.

Bad teaching: Banning Critical Race Theory in Schools Reduces Reality and Sells Children

State and federal legislatures are not education experts, and they cannot know the individuals and communities that make up a school’s ecosystem. But educators and school leaders are doing it. They are experienced and knowledgeable professionals who should make curriculum decisions based on their in-depth expertise in what children need to know, how they actually learn, and who they really are.

Ronn Nozoe is the CEO of the National Association of Heads of Secondary Schools. In his home state of Hawaii, Ronn served as Deputy State Superintendent, District Superintendent, Principal, Deputy Principal, and Teacher. Follow him on Twitter: @RonnNozoe



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International headquarters

NATO leaders say China is a global security challenge – The North State Journal


President Joe Biden, center, walks with European Council President Charles Michel, right, and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, during the US-EU summit at the Brussels European Council on Tuesday June 15, 2021 (AP Photo / Patrick Semansky)

BRUSSELS – NATO leaders said last Monday that China is a constant security challenge and said the Chinese are working to undermine world order.

In a summit statement, the leaders said that China’s objectives and “assertive behavior presented systemic challenges to the rules-based international order and areas relevant to the security of the alliance.”

While the 30 heads of state and government have avoided branding China as a rival, they have expressed concern over what they have termed “coercive policies,” the opaque ways in which it is modernizing its armed forces and its nation. use of disinformation.

They called on Beijing to respect its international commitments and act responsibly in the international system.

President Joe Biden, who arrived at the summit after three days of consultations with the Group of Seven allies in England, pushed for the G-7 statement denouncing what he says are forced labor practices and d other human rights violations affecting Uyghur Muslims and ethnic minorities in Western Xinjiang Province. The president said he was satisfied with the statement, although differences remain between the allies on the force to criticize Beijing.

The new press release from Brussels indicates that NATO countries “will engage with China in order to defend the security interests of the alliance”.

But some allies bristled at NATO’s efforts to speak out on China.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said NATO’s decision to designate China as a threat “should not be overstated” because Beijing, like Russia, is also a partner in some areas. China is Germany’s largest trading partner and relies heavily on Russia to meet the country’s energy needs.

Merkel noted that “when you look at the cyber threats, the hybrid threats, when you look at the cooperation between Russia and China, you can’t just ignore China.”

But she added that it was important to “strike the right balance” because China is also a partner on many issues.

“I think it is very important, just as we do in Russia, to always offer political discussions, a political speech, in order to find solutions,” said Merkel. “But where there are threats, and I said they are also in the hybrid realm, then as NATO you have to be prepared.”

French President Emmanuel Macron urged the alliance not to let China distract it from what he saw as more pressing issues facing NATO, including the fight against terrorism and security concerns related to the Russia.

“I think it is very important not to disperse our efforts and not to be prejudiced in our relationship with China,” Macron said.

The Chinese Embassy in the UK issued a statement saying that the G-7 statement “deliberately defamed China and arbitrarily interfered with China’s internal affairs,” and exposed the “sinister intentions of a few countries, such as the United States “.

Biden arrived at his first NATO summit as president as key members said it was a pivotal moment for an alliance. Under the presidency of Donald Trump, who questioned the relevance of the multilateral organization and took steps to ensure that nations bear their share of the costs.

Shortly after arriving at alliance headquarters, Biden spoke with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg and underscored the United States’ commitment to Article 5 of the charter of the alliance, which states that an attack on one member is an attack on all and must be fought. a collective response.

“Section 5 which we regard as a sacred obligation,” Biden said. “I want NATO to know America is here.”

Belgian Prime Minister Alexander de Croo said Biden’s presence “underlines the renewal of the transatlantic partnership”. De Croo said NATO allies were looking to get past four difficult years under the Trump administration and the infighting among member countries.

“I think we are now ready to move on,” said de Croo.

Trump has regularly berated other NATO nations for not spending enough on defense and even threatened to pull the United States out of the world’s largest security organization.

The alliance has also updated Article 5 to provide more clarity on how the alliance should respond to major cyber attacks – a growing concern amid hacks targeting the US government and businesses around the world by hackers based in Russia.

Beyond extending the potential use of Article 5’s mutual defense clause to space, leaders also broadened the definition of what could constitute such an attack in cyberspace, in a warning to any opponent who might use constant low level attacks as a tactic.

The organization said in 2014 that a cyber attack could be countered by a collective response from the 30 member countries, but on Monday they said that “the impact of significant cumulative malicious cyber activity could, under certain circumstances, be considered equivalent to an armed attack. attack. “

The President started his day by meeting with leaders of the Baltic states on NATO’s eastern flank as well as with separate meetings with Polish and Romanian leaders to discuss the threat posed by Russia and the recent air piracy in Belarus, according to the White House.

Biden’s route to Europe was designed to meet first with G-7 leaders and then with NATO allies in Brussels ahead of his much-anticipated meeting with Putin in Geneva on Wednesday. .

Biden met Turkish President Erdogan on the sidelines of the summit on Monday evening.

Biden, during his campaign, angered Turkish officials after he described Erdogan as an “autocrat.” In April, Biden infuriated Ankara by declaring that the Ottoman-era massacres and deportations of Armenians were “genocide” – a term US presidents have avoided using.

In a brief exchange with reporters, Biden described it as a “very good meeting.” He and Erdogan met in private before being joined by other officials.


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Non profit living

Collaboration Expands Quality Addiction Treatment Services at University of Miami and Across Ohio

DOWNTOWN, Minn .– (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – The nonprofit Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation provides addiction care, as well as recovery, family and educational services to Ohio residents, including students at the University of Miami, with its RecoveryGo ™ telehealth solutions, which are now available to anyone living in the state. A long-standing collaboration with The Haven at College, which has been providing services to the University of Miami since 2018, has helped facilitate Hazelden Betty Ford’s expansion in Buckeye State.

“Our virtual ambulatory care and other telehealth resources and services are proving to be effective and convenient, and have allowed us to expand access and reach more people as addiction problems skyrocket amid the crisis. pandemic, ”said Hazelden Betty Ford, President and CEO Mark Mishek. “Ohio has been at the center of the drug addiction epidemic, and we are grateful for the opportunity to collaborate with the University of Miami and other partners to help bring healing and hope to more. individuals, families and communities. ”

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is the nation’s largest nonprofit provider of addiction treatment, mental health care, recovery resources, and related prevention and education services, with sites across the country , extensive telehealth solutions and a growing network of collaborators across healthcare.

The Haven at College is a member of the Hazelden Betty Ford Patient Care Network and has provided outpatient drug treatment and recovery support services to students at the University of Miami in Oxford, Ohio, for over two years. Now refocusing resources in her home state of California, The Haven at College worked with officials at the University of Miami to ease the transition to Hazelden Betty Ford’s clinical services and ensure that students encountered no lack of access to professional help.

“It was really important for us to have a smooth transition with a quality treatment provider, and no one is better at substance abuse treatment than Hazelden Betty Ford, so we’re thrilled,” said Sharon Weber, co-founder of The Haven at University. In addition to her high-quality, evidence-based treatment services, Hazelden Betty Ford also provides extensive recovery, family and educational services, meaning Miami students and student service professionals will have access to even more resources than before. ”

Hazelden Betty Ford’s Intensive Outpatient and Insurance-Eligible Virtual Drug Treatment Services are now available for the first time not only to University of Miami students, but also to people from all corners of the world. Ohio, including rural underserved areas.

“No matter where you live in Ohio, if you have commercial health insurance and a computer, you and your family are now eligible to participate in therapy without traveling,” said Laura Adams , Hazelden Betty Ford’s Senior Director of Outreach for Ohio.

Designed to replicate her on-site patient care experience, Hazelden Betty Ford’s Virtual Substance Use Disorder Treatment Services combine group therapy and one-on-one counseling sessions via encrypted law-compliant video technology for more of security. To access Hazelden Betty Ford’s treatment previously, Ohio residents had to go to a facility in another state. Now they can access it directly from their homes.

Other RecoveryGo ™ resources and services now available in Ohio and nationwide include a free one-day virtual family program, available in English and Spanish; a virtual program for children; and many digital recovery support tools, such as mobile apps, podcasts, and an online peer community. In addition, Hazelden Betty Ford prevention experts seek to increase their support for Ohio’s school systems by expanding their services to graduate students; and its professional training consultants, already active in Ohio, are available to collaborate with more treatment centers, hospitals, health systems and recovery organizations, as well as public health leaders. from Ohio who want to implement virtual care and other evidence-based behavioral health solutions.

“By providing more opportunities for quality treatment and ongoing support, and working with others in Ohio who are also committed to reducing the negative impact of addiction, we can bring hope and healing to people.” underserved rural areas and others statewide, ”said James Ahlman, executive director of the East Hazelden Betty Ford region.

An industry leader and long-time provider of telehealth solutions, Hazelden Betty Ford moved all of its “outpatients” nationwide at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, to a robust virtual platform that includes a effective virtual drug testing system and other best practices to ensure the highest levels of confidentiality, security and quality. A year later, Hazelden Betty Ford has now provided virtual ambulatory care to thousands of people across the United States.

First results from the Butler Research Center show that Hazelden Betty Ford’s Virtual Intensive Outpatient (IOP) treatment is working well, with patients discharged “against medical advice” at a significantly lower rate than previous IOP patients on site – a good indicator of positive results in the field. long term results. Based on preliminary results at 1 and 3 months, Hazelden Betty Ford also observed little or no difference between on-site and virtual IOP patients with respect to: reported cravings, mental health symptoms, sobriety, confidence in sobriety, attendance and quality of life support group.

“Virtual drug addiction care is here to stay,” Ahlman said. “More than a stopgap solution during the pandemic, telehealth fills important gaps in the behavioral health care system, allowing many patients to take a first step that they would otherwise have delayed and dramatically expanding access. If these preliminary results hold up for the long term, virtual care is expected to create new transformative opportunities for the thousands of people in Ohio and millions across the country struggling with substance use.

See www.RecoveryGo.org or call 1-800-I-DO-CARE for more details and resources.

About the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation is a force of healing and hope for individuals, families and communities affected by addiction to alcohol and other drugs. As the nation’s leading nonprofit provider of comprehensive inpatient and outpatient drug treatment and concomitant mental health care for adults and youth, the Foundation has 17 locations across the country, with extensive solutions. on-site and telehealth and a network of collaborators across health care. With a legacy that began in 1949 and included the founding in 1982 of the Betty Ford Center, the Foundation today also includes a Graduate School of Addiction Studies, a Publishing Division, a Center for Addiction Research, recovery advocacy and thought leadership, professional and medical training programs. , school-based prevention resources and a specialized program for children growing up in families struggling with addictions. Learn more about www.HazeldenBettyFord.org and on Twitter.

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History organization

Fayetteville Group Celebrates Juneteenth with March at Market House


A local community group honored black American slaves who were sold to the Market House in downtown Fayetteville with a demonstration in the building.

The actors dressed in old clothes and had ankle and wrist chains, while others held signs reading “Slaves Sold Here,” silently marched down Hay Street on Sunday afternoon to perform a slavery reenactment.

Onlookers at restaurants and shops along the street observed that the silent group was led by a white actor with a whip and overalls and another on horseback.

The event, hosted by local nonprofit Let’s Make It Happen Together, was one of many celebrations on June 10 this weekend in Fayetteville and Cumberland County.

Juneteenth is now considered a national holiday to commemorate enslaved black Americans and the end of slavery in the United States.

The Fayetteville Market House:Accounts of slave auctions under the arcades

A controversial historical monument

“I said, if we really want to celebrate Juneteenth, we really have to tell the whole story and tell the truth about it,” said Swan Davis, a community activist. “For us not to do it that way, it means we were afraid of what our ancestors went through.”

Davis, the founder of the organization, said he wanted to tell the story of the Market House and the slaves who were sold there with the show.

The Fayetteville Market House was built in 1832 to replace the old State House, which was destroyed in a fire. It was not built as a slave market, but as a town hall and a market. But records show slaves were sold there at auction.

Let’s Make It Happen Together put on the show in two weeks, and local actors and volunteers performed songs, poems and a play on a stage in front of the building. A large crowd of people attended the event.

Built in 1831, the Market House has been the center of controversy in the city.

Davis has been told by some people that he shouldn’t do this.

“It was just like at the end of the day our ancestors went through this, and it was right that we did it right and tell as much truth as possible about what happened,” said Davis said. “We are just thankful that we were able to do this and we had a lot of volunteers to support as well as our community. “

The re-enactment of slavery, performed by local actors in Fayetteville, told the story of black American slaves who were sold to the Market House between 1820 and 1860.

Davis wanted to challenge claims that the Market House was not a place where slaves were sold and that the conversation about this part of its history should be discussed.

Other speakers at the event included Reverend Christopher Stackhouse, pastor of Lewis Chapel Baptist Missionary Church in Fayetteville.

In his speech, he referred to the bell inside the Market House that rang every night at 9 p.m. signifying a curfew put in place before slavery ended in the city.

“They rang that bell to remind people, black people of Fayetteville, NC, ‘remember your place,’” Stackhouse said. “If you were outside after 9 am, you could be severely beaten if not killed. Even though the Emancipation Proclamation was passed, they still rang that bell. “

Stackhouse, whose ancestor was a runaway slave from the city, said the Market House always serves as a reminder that black people in the city have a “place.”

Christopher D. Stack:Fayetteville Market House, where slaves were sold, not as “historic” as its defenders claim

“They always try to act like all of this stuff has been around for so many generations that we don’t need to mention it anymore,” Stackhouse said. “It is not a distant and distant story that no living person has a connection to. It is still relevant today.”

Some people from Hay Street joined the crowd to watch the show. Others verbally expressed their contempt.

“We’re not painting with a pretty brush what happened here,” Stackhouse said. “It is important for all of us to know that souls, people, men, women, boys, girls and babies have been sold in this building here. Market House which is so historic it cannot be out of place, but so historic that you can’t tell its story.

Storytelling and celebration

Raqi Barnett, 49, was one of the actors in the play outside Market House.

Dressed in a long white skirt and a tattered green top, Barnett passionately recited “The Negro Mother” by poet Langston Hughes in which he describes the life and slavery of a black woman.

Actress Raqi Barnett, a resident of Fayetteville, played "The negro mother," a poem by Langston Hughes.

“When I got ready to do the poem, I really wanted them to feel the power of words on how they could make a difference,” Barnett said. “See how you can take what she’s been through and use it to push yourself to do better, think about the story, treat others well. “

Barnett, a theatrical arts teacher at EE Smith High School, said she wanted to be in the mindset of a enslaved person and what she may have been thinking or what she experienced in the moments before. to be sold in the building.

At the end of the event, the crowd danced to a rendition of Frankie Beverly and Maze’s 1981 hit “Before I Let Go” outside the Market House to celebrate June 19, honor the past and look to the future.

“We’ve been through too much,” Davis said. “And we still have walls to tear down. “

Regional corporate reporter Kristen Johnson can be reached at [email protected] or 910-486-3570.

Support local journalism with a subscription to The Fayetteville Observer. Click the “subscribe” link at the top of this article.


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International headquarters

Libyan Business Council discusses the results of the Djerba International Business Forum with the Tunisian delegation |


By Sami Zaptia.

LBC meets with a delegation of Tunisian companies to discuss the results of the DIBF (Photo: LBC).

London, June 21, 2021:

The president of the Libyan Business Council, Abdalla Al-Fellah, on Sunday met a delegation of Tunisian companies led by the president of the Tunisian Association for International Development and Investment, Lazhar Ben Younes, at the LBC headquarters in Tripoli .

The delegation included a number of Tunisian businessmen, the president of the Federation of Chambers of Commerce and Industry of Medenine and the Director of the Spaces of Economic Activities in Zarzis.

The Tunisian Association for International Development and Investment organized the Djerba International Business Forum (DIBF) in which the LBC and a large Libyan delegation participated in Djerba from May 27 to 28.

LBC reported that the meeting, which included some of the Libyan participants in the DIBF, discussed:

  • The results of the DIBF.
  • The foundations on which bilateral cooperation should take place.
  • How to deal with the obstacles and problems faced by businessmen in both countries.
  • Seeking to activate the economic agreements concluded between the two countries.
  • Monitoring of the issue of Libyan money seized in Tunisian banks.
  • Reject and condemn illegal organizations claiming to represent Libyan and Tunisian entrepreneurs.

The two sides also agreed to put in place a cooperation agreement which includes:

  • Exchange information on investment and employment opportunities and investors from both sides.
  • Work on opening a special corridor for business leaders at border crossings.
  • Study the establishment of a free zone at the Ras Ajdir border post.

Several results of the Djerba International Business Forum unveiled | (libyaherald.com)

Zliten Chamber of Commerce President Summarizes Solutions to Improve Libyan-Tunisian Trade at Djerba Forum | (libyaherald.com)

Djerba International Business Forum May 27-28 – kick-off with large Libyan participation | (libyaherald.com)

Zliten Chamber of Commerce meets South African Ambassador to discuss increased economic cooperation | (libyaherald.com)


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